Discussion:
WAYLTL - October , 2019
(too old to reply)
Bozo
2019-10-02 21:10:27 UTC
Permalink
Samuil Feinberg playing and compositions:


Fantasy No.1, Op.5 , the composer, piano,audio,score:



Fantasy No.2,Op.9 (1919),Svetlana Elina, piano, audio, score :



Suite for Piano,Op.11 (1923), the composer, piano,audio,score:



Three Preludes,Op.15 (1923),Christophe Sirodeau,piano,audio,score:



Piano Sonata No.9,Op.29, (1939),composer ,piano, audio only:





Feinberg plays Scriabin’s Piano Sonata No.5 , live, in Moscow,1948:



Feinberg plays “Appassionata” , recording late 1930’s :




Feinberg plays Rachmaninoff Etude Tableaux, Op.39,# 9, recording 1950’s :


Oscar
2019-10-02 21:24:59 UTC
Permalink
New album from Patricia Kopatchinskaja and Camerata Bern on alpha, Time & Eternity. Two main pieces are Concerto funebre for violin and string orchestra by Hartmann, and Polyptyque for violin and two small string orchestras by Frank Martin (1973, composed in last year of his life).
number_six
2019-10-04 01:47:48 UTC
Permalink
Ruders - Handmaid's Tale(da capo)
fine score, more drama here than in Atwood's dystopian narrative

Zemlinsky - SQ 1-1 - La Salle Qt (DGG)
had never heard these before - more romantic than I expected
bonus item is a qt by HE Apostel - never heard anything by him before

Newport Folk Festival 1963 (Vanguard)
I had forgotten the quality of the backing vocals on Blowin' in the Wind
Was taken by surprise and its impact was powerful
Frank Berger
2019-10-04 05:25:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by number_six
Ruders - Handmaid's Tale(da capo)
fine score, more drama here than in Atwood's dystopian narrative
Zemlinsky - SQ 1-1 - La Salle Qt (DGG)
had never heard these before - more romantic than I expected
bonus item is a qt by HE Apostel - never heard anything by him before
Newport Folk Festival 1963 (Vanguard)
I had forgotten the quality of the backing vocals on Blowin' in the Wind
Was taken by surprise and its impact was powerful
The backup singers included Peter, Paul and Mary, Joan Baez and Pete Seeger!
number_six
2019-10-05 18:02:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Frank Berger
Post by number_six
Ruders - Handmaid's Tale(da capo)
fine score, more drama here than in Atwood's dystopian narrative
Zemlinsky - SQ 1-1 - La Salle Qt (DGG)
had never heard these before - more romantic than I expected
bonus item is a qt by HE Apostel - never heard anything by him before
Newport Folk Festival 1963 (Vanguard)
I had forgotten the quality of the backing vocals on Blowin' in the Wind
Was taken by surprise and its impact was powerful
The backup singers included Peter, Paul and Mary, Joan Baez and Pete Seeger!
Baez soars, especially on Te Ador, Ate Amanha.

This says it's Volume 1 of the 1963 evening concerts. Volumes 2-3 don't appear to have been released on CD, though there are some Newport folk CDs for other years as well.
Lawrence Chalmers
2019-10-03 14:44:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bozo
http://youtu.be/SvJWNtzl_hA
http://youtu.be/bDTyuMDi9Zc
http://youtu.be/9frVGuhuwZo
http://youtu.be/5nVM0Bt4er8
http://youtu.be/w-2yxPUpnxw
http://youtu.be/e845OpSr8Ww
http://youtu.be/OF6NVcOwrME
http://youtu.be/hq2QR2HCt4o
http://youtu.be/u68pliZxn84
Shostakovich Symphonies from the set of complete by Michael Sanderling and the Dresden Orchestra. Mostly very good with a standout No. 8. The sound is quite
good. The packaging is my only gripe. A slip case packed tight. But the price is really attractive.
Bozo
2019-10-03 22:05:15 UTC
Permalink
Elgar:

Piano Quintet , its first recording with Ethel Hobday with the Spencer Dyke Quartet for the National Gramophonic Society in December , 1925, not sure from whence my download.

Violin Sonata, Lorraine McAslan,violin, John Blakely,piano,ASW cd.
c***@gmail.com
2019-10-04 01:54:34 UTC
Permalink
A new recording of Francisco de Peñalosa’s "Lamentations" by New York Polyphony on Bis. Gorgeous performance and recording of a rare work by an underappreciated composer.

AC
Bill Anderson
2019-10-04 03:24:02 UTC
Permalink
The NGS Elgar is likely from Bryan Bishop. It was one of several NGS transfers he offered here years ago, prior to his "Shellackophile" web blog.

- Bill A.
Al Eisner
2019-10-05 01:59:33 UTC
Permalink
I've had Barnabás Kelemen's fine performance of the Bartók's solo
sonata (as recommended here by Messrs Emerson and Cooper for a while),
but until today I had not listened to the couplingL: the 44 duos,
played with Katalin Kokas. Oddly, these don't seem to have been
mentioned along with the recommendations.

I had previously heard the set in the Hungaroton Bartok edition's
chamber volume - I believe Wilkomirska and ? - but that was a long
time ago, and it didn't make a great impression (quite possibly my
fault). The Kelemen version does. The relatively simple pieces of
the first half are mostly based on songs, and the performances were,
sell, songlike. The more complicated second half had many based
on dances, which were played with energy and flexibility. The works
are in numerical order. I don't know if I "should have" (whatever
that means) listened straight through, but I did, and found it
most rewarding. The recording is from BMC.
--
Al Eisner
c***@gmail.com
2019-10-05 19:36:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Al Eisner
I've had Barnabás Kelemen's fine performance of the Bartók's solo
sonata (as recommended here by Messrs Emerson and Cooper for a while),
but until today I had not listened to the couplingL: the 44 duos,
played with Katalin Kokas. Oddly, these don't seem to have been
mentioned along with the recommendations.
I had previously heard the set in the Hungaroton Bartok edition's
chamber volume - I believe Wilkomirska and ? - but that was a long
time ago, and it didn't make a great impression (quite possibly my
fault). The Kelemen version does. The relatively simple pieces of
the first half are mostly based on songs, and the performances were,
sell, songlike. The more complicated second half had many based
on dances, which were played with energy and flexibility. The works
are in numerical order. I don't know if I "should have" (whatever
that means) listened straight through, but I did, and found it
most rewarding. The recording is from BMC.
--
Al Eisner
I'm a big fan of this recording. A couple of weeks ago my wife and I attended a wonderful concert that included selections from the 44 duos: https://www.kaufmanmusiccenter.org/mch/event/israeli-chamber-project-folk-rhapsody/. The ingenious notion of the group was to intersperse the duos among the other works on the program in groups of three, with the two violinists off to one side of the stage or the other. The performances were superb; do not miss this group if they're ever in your neighborhood! They have two more concerts scheduled in NYC during 2019/20. We already have tickets for this one: https://www.baruch.cuny.edu/calendar/EventList.aspx?&eventidn=70627&view=EventDetails&information_id=937616&AspxAutoDetectCookieSupport=1. (The Webern arrangement of Schoenberg's op. 9 is more fun than any of the composer's originals, imo.)

AC
Al Eisner
2019-10-05 20:20:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@gmail.com
I've had Barnabás Kelemen's fine performance of the Bartók's solo
sonata (as recommended here by Messrs Emerson and Cooper for a while),
but until today I had not listened to the couplingL: the 44 duos,
played with Katalin Kokas. Oddly, these don't seem to have been
mentioned along with the recommendations.
I had previously heard the set in the Hungaroton Bartok edition's
chamber volume - I believe Wilkomirska and ? - but that was a long
time ago, and it didn't make a great impression (quite possibly my
fault). The Kelemen version does. The relatively simple pieces of
the first half are mostly based on songs, and the performances were,
sell, songlike. The more complicated second half had many based
on dances, which were played with energy and flexibility. The works
are in numerical order. I don't know if I "should have" (whatever
that means) listened straight through, but I did, and found it
most rewarding. The recording is from BMC.
--
Al Eisner
I'm a big fan of this recording. A couple of weeks ago my wife and I attended a wonderful concert that included selections from the 44 duos: https://www.kaufmanmusiccenter.org/mch/event/israeli-chamber-project-folk-rhapsody/. The ingenious notion of the group was to intersperse the duos among the other works on the program in groups of three, with the two violinists off to one side of the stage or the other. The performances were superb; do not miss this group if they're ever in your neighborhood! They have two more concerts scheduled in NYC during 2019/20. We already have tickets for this one: https://www.baruch.cuny.edu/calendar/EventList.aspx?&eventidn=70627&view=EventDetails&information_id=937616&AspxAutoDetectCookieSupport=1. (The Webern arrangement of Schoenberg's op. 9 is more fun than any of the composer's originals, imo.)
AC
The Israeli Chamber Project does put on concerts around my parts.
I heard them a couple of years ago, with a different subset of
players, and quite mixed results. As I recall (I'd have to
dig up the program) they had more winds and a pianist, and much
of the program was arrangements, some successful (as I recall,
some Stravinsky) and some not. The best performance was that
Debussy clarinet work. But the program ended with a rather
undistinguised Schumann piano quintet. So I would have to be
convinced. :)
--
Al Eisner
c***@gmail.com
2019-10-06 14:04:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Al Eisner
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Al Eisner
I've had Barnabás Kelemen's fine performance of the Bartók's solo
sonata (as recommended here by Messrs Emerson and Cooper for a while),
but until today I had not listened to the couplingL: the 44 duos,
played with Katalin Kokas. Oddly, these don't seem to have been
mentioned along with the recommendations.
I had previously heard the set in the Hungaroton Bartok edition's
chamber volume - I believe Wilkomirska and ? - but that was a long
time ago, and it didn't make a great impression (quite possibly my
fault). The Kelemen version does. The relatively simple pieces of
the first half are mostly based on songs, and the performances were,
sell, songlike. The more complicated second half had many based
on dances, which were played with energy and flexibility. The works
are in numerical order. I don't know if I "should have" (whatever
that means) listened straight through, but I did, and found it
most rewarding. The recording is from BMC.
--
Al Eisner
I'm a big fan of this recording. A couple of weeks ago my wife and I attended a wonderful concert that included selections from the 44 duos: https://www.kaufmanmusiccenter.org/mch/event/israeli-chamber-project-folk-rhapsody/. The ingenious notion of the group was to intersperse the duos among the other works on the program in groups of three, with the two violinists off to one side of the stage or the other. The performances were superb; do not miss this group if they're ever in your neighborhood! They have two more concerts scheduled in NYC during 2019/20. We already have tickets for this one: https://www.baruch.cuny.edu/calendar/EventList.aspx?&eventidn=70627&view=EventDetails&information_id=937616&AspxAutoDetectCookieSupport=1. (The Webern arrangement of Schoenberg's op. 9 is more fun than any of the composer's originals, imo.)
AC
The Israeli Chamber Project does put on concerts around my parts.
I heard them a couple of years ago, with a different subset of
players, and quite mixed results. As I recall (I'd have to
dig up the program) they had more winds and a pianist, and much
of the program was arrangements, some successful (as I recall,
some Stravinsky) and some not. The best performance was that
Debussy clarinet work. But the program ended with a rather
undistinguised Schumann piano quintet. So I would have to be
convinced. :)
--
Al Eisner
Well, all I can say is give them another shot, although I agree with what you say about some of their transcriptions (which doesn't apply to Webern's marvelous transcription of Schoenberg op. 9). Also, the concert featured a classic instance of Murphy's Law in operation: a cellphone going off during the ultra-quiet ending of Kurtág's "Hommage a R. Schumann." Even worse, the ringtone sounded like an electronic imitation of a harp arpeggio. I guess Kurtág is fond of "games," but even so <SIGH>.

AC
Al Eisner
2019-10-06 18:26:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Al Eisner
Post by c***@gmail.com
I've had Barnabás Kelemen's fine performance of the Bartók's solo
sonata (as recommended here by Messrs Emerson and Cooper for a while),
but until today I had not listened to the couplingL: the 44 duos,
played with Katalin Kokas. Oddly, these don't seem to have been
mentioned along with the recommendations.
I had previously heard the set in the Hungaroton Bartok edition's
chamber volume - I believe Wilkomirska and ? - but that was a long
time ago, and it didn't make a great impression (quite possibly my
fault). The Kelemen version does. The relatively simple pieces of
the first half are mostly based on songs, and the performances were,
sell, songlike. The more complicated second half had many based
on dances, which were played with energy and flexibility. The works
are in numerical order. I don't know if I "should have" (whatever
that means) listened straight through, but I did, and found it
most rewarding. The recording is from BMC.
--
Al Eisner
I'm a big fan of this recording. A couple of weeks ago my wife and I attended a wonderful concert that included selections from the 44 duos: https://www.kaufmanmusiccenter.org/mch/event/israeli-chamber-project-folk-rhapsody/. The ingenious notion of the group was to intersperse the duos among the other works on the program in groups of three, with the two violinists off to one side of the stage or the other. The performances were superb; do not miss this group if they're ever in your neighborhood! They have two more concerts scheduled in NYC during 2019/20. We already have tickets for this one: https://www.baruch.cuny.edu/calendar/EventList.aspx?&eventidn=70627&view=EventDetails&information_id=937616&AspxAutoDetectCookieSupport=1. (The Webern arrangement of Schoenberg's op. 9 is more fun than any of the composer's originals, imo.)
AC
The Israeli Chamber Project does put on concerts around my parts.
I heard them a couple of years ago, with a different subset of
players, and quite mixed results. As I recall (I'd have to
dig up the program) they had more winds and a pianist, and much
of the program was arrangements, some successful (as I recall,
some Stravinsky) and some not. The best performance was that
Debussy clarinet work. But the program ended with a rather
undistinguised Schumann piano quintet. So I would have to be
convinced. :)
--
Al Eisner
Well, all I can say is give them another shot, although I agree with what you say about some of their transcriptions (which doesn't apply to Webern's marvelous transcription of Schoenberg op. 9). Also, the concert featured a classic instance of Murphy's Law in operation: a cellphone going off during the ultra-quiet ending of Kurtág's "Hommage a R. Schumann." Even worse, the ringtone sounded like an electronic imitation of a harp arpeggio. I guess Kurtág is fond of "games," but even so <SIGH>.
AC
I might try again, depending on the program and the lineup. I tend not
to like transcriptions made specifically for a given set of performers
(as you note, those made by first-rate composers excepted), although
I must say those by the group Calefax are very good (I heard them do
the Goldbergs last year, really fun).

As for Kurtág, I suppose he could have been playing on Schumann's
affliction of hearing unwanted notes in his ears. :) Do you have a
recommendation for an entrée into Kurtág? The limited amount I've
heard I found a bit hard to get into.
--
Al Eisner
Al Eisner
2019-10-07 01:29:56 UTC
Permalink
As for Kurtag (whose 2:40 violin duo Ligatura... 31b is heard on the Keller duos disc) -- you might try the Keller Quartet's set of his works; though I should know the range of his oeuvre better than I do. His single opera, derived from Beckett's _Endgame_ and which premiered late last year, will be the rare item that causes a breach in my no-opera rule.
Well, I made a brief start. It seemed natural to start with his String
Quartet Opus 1. I found a performance by the Athena Quartet online.
The work is fanciful, interesting to hear, lots of odd effect, but
difficult to really grasp. Then the Keller's performance of
"12 Miccroludes for String Quartet" on youtube:
- 12 movements in 10
minutes (but nothing like Webern's concision). I found this to be
a much more solid, structured, often intense, work, very effective in this
performance - I'll investigate more later. Thanks.
--
Al Eisner
c***@gmail.com
2019-10-07 14:04:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Al Eisner
As for Kurtag (whose 2:40 violin duo Ligatura... 31b is heard on the Keller duos disc) -- you might try the Keller Quartet's set of his works; though I should know the range of his oeuvre better than I do. His single opera, derived from Beckett's _Endgame_ and which premiered late last year, will be the rare item that causes a breach in my no-opera rule.
Well, I made a brief start. It seemed natural to start with his String
Quartet Opus 1. I found a performance by the Athena Quartet online.
The work is fanciful, interesting to hear, lots of odd effect, but
difficult to really grasp. Then the Keller's performance of
http://youtu.be/FzIFHJw9qmo - 12 movements in 10
minutes (but nothing like Webern's concision). I found this to be
a much more solid, structured, often intense, work, very effective in this
performance - I'll investigate more later. Thanks.
--
Al Eisner
Thanks for the initial report, Al. I would have recommended the same Keller ECM CD as Steve. Now try this on for size: https://www.col-legno.com/en/shop/31870-gyoergy-kurtag-portrait-salzburg-1993. (I think you can stream it in its entirety.) And if you're still with me, there's an excellent recording of song cycles on Sony. See https://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/kurtag-song-cycles. And then to Juliane Banse's fabulous recording of the Kafka Fragmente (also ECM). I've read a lot about the opera but haven't heard it yet.

AC
Al Eisner
2019-10-07 21:48:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Al Eisner
As for Kurtag (whose 2:40 violin duo Ligatura... 31b is heard on the Keller duos disc) -- you might try the Keller Quartet's set of his works; though I should know the range of his oeuvre better than I do. His single opera, derived from Beckett's _Endgame_ and which premiered late last year, will be the rare item that causes a breach in my no-opera rule.
Well, I made a brief start. It seemed natural to start with his String
Quartet Opus 1. I found a performance by the Athena Quartet online.
The work is fanciful, interesting to hear, lots of odd effect, but
difficult to really grasp. Then the Keller's performance of
http://youtu.be/FzIFHJw9qmo - 12 movements in 10
minutes (but nothing like Webern's concision). I found this to be
a much more solid, structured, often intense, work, very effective in this
performance - I'll investigate more later. Thanks.
--
Al Eisner
Thanks for the initial report, Al. I would have recommended the same Keller ECM CD as Steve. Now try this on for size: https://www.col-legno.com/en/shop/31870-gyoergy-kurtag-portrait-salzburg-1993. (I think you can stream it in its entirety.) And if you're still with me, there's an excellent recording of song cycles on Sony. See https://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/kurtag-song-cycles. And then to Juliane Banse's fabulous recording of the Kafka Fragmente (also ECM). I've read a lot about the opera but haven't heard it yet.
AC
Thanks. I took a quick look at the col-legno link (I'll play it
through later). I can play a track, but it doesn't seem to continue
to the next, nor is there the usual bar showing track progress or
providing some control - am I issing nsomething? (At least the performers
forn each piece can be found at Amazon.)
--
Al Eisner
c***@gmail.com
2019-10-08 13:09:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Al Eisner
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Al Eisner
As for Kurtag (whose 2:40 violin duo Ligatura... 31b is heard on the Keller duos disc) -- you might try the Keller Quartet's set of his works; though I should know the range of his oeuvre better than I do. His single opera, derived from Beckett's _Endgame_ and which premiered late last year, will be the rare item that causes a breach in my no-opera rule.
Well, I made a brief start. It seemed natural to start with his String
Quartet Opus 1. I found a performance by the Athena Quartet online.
The work is fanciful, interesting to hear, lots of odd effect, but
difficult to really grasp. Then the Keller's performance of
http://youtu.be/FzIFHJw9qmo - 12 movements in 10
minutes (but nothing like Webern's concision). I found this to be
a much more solid, structured, often intense, work, very effective in this
performance - I'll investigate more later. Thanks.
--
Al Eisner
Thanks for the initial report, Al. I would have recommended the same Keller ECM CD as Steve. Now try this on for size: https://www.col-legno.com/en/shop/31870-gyoergy-kurtag-portrait-salzburg-1993. (I think you can stream it in its entirety.) And if you're still with me, there's an excellent recording of song cycles on Sony. See https://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/kurtag-song-cycles. And then to Juliane Banse's fabulous recording of the Kafka Fragmente (also ECM). I've read a lot about the opera but haven't heard it yet.
AC
Thanks. I took a quick look at the col-legno link (I'll play it
through later). I can play a track, but it doesn't seem to continue
to the next, nor is there the usual bar showing track progress or
providing some control - am I issing nsomething? (At least the performers
forn each piece can be found at Amazon.)
--
Al Eisner
No, you're not missing anything: the interface is primitive, but it seems that you can listen to the entire album one track at a time. I didn't pay careful attention since I have the CDs.

AC
Al Eisner
2019-10-08 19:25:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Al Eisner
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Al Eisner
As for Kurtag (whose 2:40 violin duo Ligatura... 31b is heard on the Keller duos disc) -- you might try the Keller Quartet's set of his works; though I should know the range of his oeuvre better than I do. His single opera, derived from Beckett's _Endgame_ and which premiered late last year, will be the rare item that causes a breach in my no-opera rule.
Well, I made a brief start. It seemed natural to start with his String
Quartet Opus 1. I found a performance by the Athena Quartet online.
The work is fanciful, interesting to hear, lots of odd effect, but
difficult to really grasp. Then the Keller's performance of
http://youtu.be/FzIFHJw9qmo - 12 movements in 10
minutes (but nothing like Webern's concision). I found this to be
a much more solid, structured, often intense, work, very effective in this
performance - I'll investigate more later. Thanks.
--
Al Eisner
Thanks for the initial report, Al. I would have recommended the same Keller ECM CD as Steve. Now try this on for size: https://www.col-legno.com/en/shop/31870-gyoergy-kurtag-portrait-salzburg-1993. (I think you can stream it in its entirety.) And if you're still with me, there's an excellent recording of song cycles on Sony. See https://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/kurtag-song-cycles. And then to Juliane Banse's fabulous recording of the Kafka Fragmente (also ECM). I've read a lot about the opera but haven't heard it yet.
AC
Thanks. I took a quick look at the col-legno link (I'll play it
through later). I can play a track, but it doesn't seem to continue
to the next, nor is there the usual bar showing track progress or
providing some control - am I issing nsomething? (At least the performers
forn each piece can be found at Amazon.)
--
Al Eisner
No, you're not missing anything: the interface is primitive, but it seems that you can listen to the entire album one track at a time. I didn't pay careful attention since I have the CDs.
AC
... which is what I've done. While my early limited impression of
Kurtág was as rather forbidding, this is a varied program, and I
found most of it rewarding, despite audience noise and some other
sonic issues. Thanks very much for calling attention to it.

I'll add a few remarks for the benefit of Bozo and others.\, I'll add
a few remarks. Performers for each track are listed at
https://www.amazon.com/Portrait-Concert-1961-1992-Keller-Quartet/dp/B000025BQL/
Note that the pianist on most of it is Kocsis, particularly impressive
in the brief Requiem for soprano and piano. Much of it is typical
miniatures, but there are several longer works. One of the two
longest is an interesting Double Concerto for piano and cello
(Kocsis and Miklos Perenyi), rather percussive, but concluding with
a wonderful lyrical section - well worth hearing this. The other is
the exceedingly strange "Samuel Beckett: What is the Word", which I
would clearly need to hear again if I want to connect.

An interesting suumary of the last work, Quasi una fantasia, is given
by Andsnes here: https://nyphil.org/watch-listen/video/1213/leif-ove-andsnes-on-kurtags-quasi-una-fantasia
While impressive on the recording, this work plainly cries out to be
heard in the concert hall.
--
Al Eisner
Bozo
2019-10-08 20:12:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Al Eisner
One of the two
longest is an interesting Double Concerto for piano and cello
(Kocsis and Miklos Perenyi), rather percussive, but concluding with
a wonderful lyrical section - well worth hearing this.
Thanks ! Enjoyed it, but probably a one-hear for me.

I watched this live YT, Nicholas Altstaedt,cello,Gabor Csalog,piano,Concerto Budapest,Andras Keller,conductor, Palace of Arts,Budapest,Feb.20,2011:

( One percussionist did not get the “black” memo ? )

Try the " Concertante " as well.
Bozo
2019-10-08 23:17:57 UTC
Permalink
After some Kurtag's, and the latest horrors from Trump and his lemmings, cronies, solace in Mozart PC's Nos.11-13, K.413-415, Mozart's own versions for piano and string quartet , on my EMI Classics (now Warner Classics ) cd released 1998,recorded 1997,Patrick Dechorgnat,pianist,Henschel Quartet. The final movement of No.13 amazing, can stand with any mov. of any other PC Mozart wrote, IMHO.


Al Eisner
2019-10-09 01:02:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bozo
Post by Al Eisner
One of the two
longest is an interesting Double Concerto for piano and cello
(Kocsis and Miklos Perenyi), rather percussive, but concluding with
a wonderful lyrical section - well worth hearing this.
Thanks ! Enjoyed it, but probably a one-hear for me.
http://youtu.be/qD52TKTsTcA ( One percussionist did not get the “black” memo ? )
Try the " Concertante " as well.
Thanks - yes, well worth hearing, although a bit static....
--
Al Eisner
number_six
2019-10-12 21:10:33 UTC
Permalink
Wattstax 72 (Stax)

Weill - Kleine Dreigroschenmusik /Violin Concerto /
Mahagonny Songspiel - Atherton, London Sinfonietta (DGG)
Al Eisner
2019-10-15 19:03:32 UTC
Permalink
Recent first CD-hearings:

1) Benjamin Grosvenor, "Dances" (the fourth of his five CD's, a rather
measly output from such a talent):

The opening Bach Partita (#4) really dances; the freedom reminds me
much more of Tipo than of Gould. I equally-well enjoyed the playing
in the following sets of Chopin and Scriabin, but my interest began to
wane after that (not helped by someone's long light-weight takeoff
from the "Blue Danube" waltz), only to be revived at the end by
Morton Gould's terrific "Boogie-Woogie Etude". Largely recommended.

2) The CD in the Hyperion Romantic Piano Concerto series with the
concertos by Massenet and Reynaldo Hahn (Stephen Coombs with
Ossonce/BBC Scotland).

The first movement of the Massenet was overly rambling (with
Lisztian flourishes), the second entirely undistinguied, but the
third was fun - sort of somthing like Saint-Saens might have
written. Still, I doubt if I'd want to hear this again. The Hahn
was altogether more focused and distinguished, a likely winner I
think, performed quite convincingly.
--
Al Eisner
Bozo
2019-10-16 16:29:48 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for mention these. I ,too,think the Grosvenor "Dances" cd is excellent. I do enjoy the Massenet PC much more than you, wish it were played in concerts more often. Dont care much for the Hahn, but respect your opinion.
Al Eisner
2019-10-17 05:55:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bozo
Thanks for mention these. I ,too,think the Grosvenor "Dances" cd is excellent. I do enjoy the Massenet PC much more than you, wish it were played in concerts more often. Dont care much for the Hahn, but respect your opinion.
Any other disk in the Hyperion romantic concerto series which you would
particularly recommend? (Based on the above, I'll of course do the
opposite of whatever you recommend - just kidding.)
--
Al Eisner
HT
2019-10-17 08:30:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Al Eisner
Any other disk in the Hyperion romantic concerto series which you would
particularly recommend? (Based on the above, I'll of course do the
opposite of whatever you recommend - just kidding.)
My personal favorites are Henselt and Rubinstein #4 performed by Hamelin.

Henk
c***@gmail.com
2019-10-17 14:22:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Al Eisner
Post by Bozo
Thanks for mention these. I ,too,think the Grosvenor "Dances" cd is excellent. I do enjoy the Massenet PC much more than you, wish it were played in concerts more often. Dont care much for the Hahn, but respect your opinion.
Any other disk in the Hyperion romantic concerto series which you would
particularly recommend? (Based on the above, I'll of course do the
opposite of whatever you recommend - just kidding.)
--
Al Eisner
OTTOMH I like Roscoe's recording of the two Dohnányi PCs and (surprising even myself) the Glazunov PCs, which provide welcome relief from the usual Russian warhorses. Probably we all know #1 from Richter's famous recording, but Coombs is excellent and has the benefit of good recorded sound. Also Seta Tanyel's Stenhammar and Demidenko's Weber. But OMG, there are so many that I haven't heard at all (looks like 79 volumes to date)!

AC
Al Eisner
2019-10-18 00:45:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Al Eisner
Post by Bozo
Thanks for mention these. I ,too,think the Grosvenor "Dances" cd is excellent. I do enjoy the Massenet PC much more than you, wish it were played in concerts more often. Dont care much for the Hahn, but respect your opinion.
Any other disk in the Hyperion romantic concerto series which you would
particularly recommend? (Based on the above, I'll of course do the
opposite of whatever you recommend - just kidding.)
--
Al Eisner
OTTOMH I like Roscoe's recording of the two Dohnányi PCs and (surprising even myself) the Glazunov PCs, which provide welcome relief from the usual Russian warhorses. Probably we all know #1 from Richter's famous recording, but Coombs is excellent and has the benefit of good recorded sound. Also Seta Tanyel's Stenhammar and Demidenko's Weber. But OMG, there are so many that I haven't heard at all (looks like 79 volumes to date)!
AC
I just listened to the Dohnanyi #2 on youtube - Roscoe not there, but
Shelley/Bamert,
- have
you heard that one, Alan? A terrific work on my first hearing (how
has it escaped me previously?), highly entertaining. [Snap
comments: first movement epic, if a bit bombastic in places; third
consistently effervescent (even when it got fugal); second simply great.]
Thanks for mentioning this.
--
Al Eisner
Al Eisner
2019-10-18 00:50:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Al Eisner
Post by Al Eisner
Post by Bozo
Thanks for mention these. I ,too,think the Grosvenor "Dances" cd is
excellent. I do enjoy the Massenet PC much more than you, wish it were
played in concerts more often. Dont care much for the Hahn, but respect
your opinion.
Any other disk in the Hyperion romantic concerto series which you would
particularly recommend? (Based on the above, I'll of course do the
opposite of whatever you recommend - just kidding.)
--
Al Eisner
OTTOMH I like Roscoe's recording of the two Dohnányi PCs and (surprising
even myself) the Glazunov PCs, which provide welcome relief from the usual
Russian warhorses. Probably we all know #1 from Richter's famous
recording, but Coombs is excellent and has the benefit of good recorded
sound. Also Seta Tanyel's Stenhammar and Demidenko's Weber. But OMG,
there are so many that I haven't heard at all (looks like 79 volumes to
date)!
AC
I just listened to the Dohnanyi #2 on youtube - Roscoe not there, but
Shelley/Bamert, http://youtu.be/T6x3eIVT4iU - have you heard
that one, Alan? A terrific work on my first hearing (how
has it escaped me previously?), highly entertaining. [Snap
comments: first movement epic, if a bit bombastic in places; third
consistently effervescent (even when it got fugal); second simply great.]
Thanks for mentioning this.
The youtube is the Chandos recording, by the way.
--
Al Eisner
c***@gmail.com
2019-10-18 15:33:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Al Eisner
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Al Eisner
Post by Bozo
Thanks for mention these. I ,too,think the Grosvenor "Dances" cd is excellent. I do enjoy the Massenet PC much more than you, wish it were played in concerts more often. Dont care much for the Hahn, but respect your opinion.
Any other disk in the Hyperion romantic concerto series which you would
particularly recommend? (Based on the above, I'll of course do the
opposite of whatever you recommend - just kidding.)
--
Al Eisner
OTTOMH I like Roscoe's recording of the two Dohnányi PCs and (surprising even myself) the Glazunov PCs, which provide welcome relief from the usual Russian warhorses. Probably we all know #1 from Richter's famous recording, but Coombs is excellent and has the benefit of good recorded sound. Also Seta Tanyel's Stenhammar and Demidenko's Weber. But OMG, there are so many that I haven't heard at all (looks like 79 volumes to date)!
AC
I just listened to the Dohnanyi #2 on youtube - Roscoe not there, but
Shelley/Bamert, http://youtu.be/T6x3eIVT4iU - have
you heard that one, Alan? A terrific work on my first hearing (how
has it escaped me previously?), highly entertaining. [Snap
comments: first movement epic, if a bit bombastic in places; third
consistently effervescent (even when it got fugal); second simply great.]
Thanks for mentioning this.
--
Al Eisner
Oh, Shelley is also terrific, but I thought you asked specifically about the Hyperion series. You may know that the composer recorded the piece himself. Available as part of this excellent collection: https://www.pristineclassical.com/collections/composer-dohnanyi/products/pasc381. (There's also an issue on Praga but it's famously bogus.) I refer to the PC#2 as "the last of the Romantic potboilers" because it's such an anachronism given its date of composition. The opening movement is pure bombast with a Big Tune. I love it! And Dohnányi is always at his best in theme-and-variations mode.

Glad you're enjoying it. AC
Al Eisner
2019-10-18 16:11:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Al Eisner
Post by Al Eisner
Any other disk in the Hyperion romantic concerto series which you would
particularly recommend? (Based on the above, I'll of course do the
opposite of whatever you recommend - just kidding.)
OTTOMH I like Roscoe's recording of the two Dohnányi PCs and (surprising even myself) the Glazunov PCs, which provide welcome relief from the usual Russian warhorses. Probably we all know #1 from Richter's famous recording, but Coombs is excellent and has the benefit of good recorded sound. Also Seta Tanyel's Stenhammar and Demidenko's Weber. But OMG, there are so many that I haven't heard at all (looks like 79 volumes to date)!
AC
I just listened to the Dohnanyi #2 on youtube - Roscoe not there, but
Shelley/Bamert, http://youtu.be/T6x3eIVT4iU - have
you heard that one, Alan? A terrific work on my first hearing (how
has it escaped me previously?), highly entertaining. [Snap
comments: first movement epic, if a bit bombastic in places; third
consistently effervescent (even when it got fugal); second simply great.]
Thanks for mentioning this.
Oh, Shelley is also terrific, but I thought you asked specifically about the Hyperion series.
Yes, but I was mainly interested in the works, and that series seemed like
the best place to investigate, not knowing how often they had been
recorded otherwise. And the Hyperion wasn't obviously available on
youtube.
Post by c***@gmail.com
You may know that the composer recorded the piece himself. Available as part of this excellent collection: https://www.pristineclassical.com/collections/composer-dohnanyi/products/pasc381. (There's also an issue on Praga but it's famously bogus.) I refer to the PC#2 as "the last of the Romantic potboilers" because it's such an anachronism given its date of composition. The opening movement is pure bombast with a Big Tune. I love it! And Dohnányi is always at his best in theme-and-variations mode.
Well, mostly bombast. I was intentionally restrained in my
characterization, not wanting to offend anyone. :)
Post by c***@gmail.com
Glad you're enjoying it. AC
Thanks again.
--
Al Eisner
Bozo
2019-10-18 19:32:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Al Eisner
I just listened to the Dohnanyi #2 on youtube -
Thanks AC and Al as reminded me I had the Hyperion cd of the Dohnanyi PC's which I had not listened to in years.In fact , I may have heard only once or twice. Heard again today , but must say I did not connect with either PC. I do have a Naxos cd his solo piano works, Vol.1 of his "Complete Piano Works " on Naxos,Markus Pawlik, pianist, and do enjoy several of the works on that cd, namely the "Six Concert Etudes" ,and "Ruralia Hungarica" suite.
Al Eisner
2019-10-19 00:10:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bozo
Post by Al Eisner
I just listened to the Dohnanyi #2 on youtube -
Thanks AC and Al as reminded me I had the Hyperion cd of the Dohnanyi PC's which I had not listened to in years.In fact , I may have heard only once or twice. Heard again today , but must say I did not connect with either PC.
Of course, based on our previous exchange, not unexpected. :)

I've since listened on youtube to one of your suggestions, Bowen's
Concerto #3 (Dussek/Handley). I enjoyed it, with the last movement
being the highlight for me. It's certainly more pianistic than the
Dohnanyi #2, but the latter is, for me, a richer overall experience.
--
Al Eisner
Bozo
2019-10-19 18:53:04 UTC
Permalink
Fww, two others I forgot to mention in the Hyperion series, although mine are different cd's, would be the Melcer and Brull PC's.Might want to try the 2nd of each if at YT.
Bozo
2019-10-29 02:27:54 UTC
Permalink
Boris Lyatoshynsky, 1895-1968, piano music ( mine an OOP Russian CD ) .

Three Preludes, Op.38 :



Prelude,Op.44,# 2 :



Ballade, Op.22 :



Fiorentino plays Brahms Variations,Piano Classics cd :

( Handel )
(Paganini)
Bozo
2019-10-19 00:36:12 UTC
Permalink
... I do have a Naxos cd his solo piano works, Vol.1 of his "Complete Piano Works " on Naxos,Markus Pawlik, >pianist, and do enjoy several of the works on that cd, namely the "Six Concert Etudes" ,and "Ruralia >Hungarica" suite.
Fww,Dohnanyi:

Six Concert Etudes:

(Pawlik)

Ruralia Hungarica :

(2, Pawlk)
(3 , Dohnanyi)
(4 , Pawlik )
(5,Dohnanyi)
(6,Pawlik)
( 7, Dohnanyi )
Bozo
2019-10-17 15:20:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Al Eisner
Any other disk in the Hyperion romantic concerto series which you would
particularly recommend?
The Sauer/Scharwenka with Hough for the Sauer, the Korngold Left-Hand/Marx with Hamelin for the Korngold, the York Bowen Nos. 3,4 with Driver.

Doing the opposite of my recommendations is quite acceptable ,as my wife of 41-years and 2 thirty-something sons would agree.
Al Eisner
2019-10-17 17:04:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bozo
Post by Al Eisner
Any other disk in the Hyperion romantic concerto series which you would
particularly recommend?
The Sauer/Scharwenka with Hough for the Sauer, the Korngold Left-Hand/Marx with Hamelin for the Korngold, the York Bowen Nos. 3,4 with Driver.
Doing the opposite of my recommendations is quite acceptable ,as my wife of 41-years and 2 thirty-something sons would agree.
What, do they drink only Chardonnay? :)

I of course do not expect a comprehensive overview of such a large
series, just a few good suggestions (which I might try on youtube
first, if the works are there even in other performances. Thanks
to you and Alan for the suggestions.
--
Al Eisner

"So convenient a thing it is to be a reasonable Creature, since it
enables one to find or make a Reason for everything one has a mind
to do." >>> Benjamin Franklin (Autobiography)
Bozo
2019-10-17 21:34:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Al Eisner
Post by Al Eisner
I of course do not expect a comprehensive overview of such a large
series, just a few good suggestions (which I might try on youtube
first, if the works are there even in other performances. Thanks
to you and Alan for the suggestions.
You're welcome.By all means hear elsewhere if possible before purchasing as my judgments....
Bozo
2019-10-17 22:29:31 UTC
Permalink
While I have different recordings, the Hyperion Moszkowski/Paderewski and MacDowells would also be considered for sure.Fww. I should have been more clear ( the fog of Shiraz ? ) that I do have the 3 Hyperion cds I mentioned earlier. Right now once again enjoying the quartet version of extraordinary work,extraordinary performance of Mozart K.415,No.13 PC,mentioned earlier this thread.
Bozo
2019-10-08 14:41:49 UTC
Permalink
Agreed on both counts. I think my only exposure to Kurtag to date has been his "Games" for piano , with >which I did not much connect.
This Kurtag "Concertante" ,Op.42 ( 2003) is interesting as well, as is his Op.13 "Officium breve"":


Todd Michel McComb
2019-10-04 06:23:28 UTC
Permalink
https://darktree.bandcamp.com/album/the-hatch
Tatonik
2019-10-05 05:53:00 UTC
Permalink
Listening to Richard Goode playing all the Bach keyboard partitas on
Nonesuch. Just bought the CDs. My overall impression is favorable.
Until now my only complete set was Glenn Gould. I have a 2008 recording
on Onyx of Stephen Kovacevich playing just No. 4 which I find curiously
static. (It fills out an album of the Diabelli Variations, which he
does quite well.)

Tonight I watched "Now Hear This: The Riddle of Bach" on Great
Performances (PBS), hosted by violinist Scott Yoo. It was 3 parts
interesting to 5 parts annoying. Sort of a lightweight Bach travelogue.

I was intrigued to see real dancers dancing a traditional bourée to the
last movement of Violin Partita No. 1. But it annoyed me that the
camera didn't spend enough time on the dancers.
Bozo
2019-10-05 13:14:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tatonik
Tonight I watched "Now Hear This: The Riddle of Bach" on Great
Performances (PBS), hosted by violinist Scott Yoo.
Coincidence, same night I also watched Yoo's "Scarlatti" program in that PBS series.I enjoyed, learned.Have not heard the Bach. Have not checked yet to see if series on YT,too.
Bozo
2019-10-05 13:23:09 UTC
Permalink
Coincidence, same night I also watched Yoo's "Scarlatti" program in that PBS series.I enjoyed, >learned.Have not heard the Bach. Have not checked yet to see if series on YT,too.
Apparently not on YT , just this trailer for the Scarlatti program ( worth watching) :

Tatonik
2019-10-06 05:26:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bozo
Coincidence, same night I also watched Yoo's "Scarlatti" program in that
PBS series.I enjoyed, learned.Have not heard the Bach. Have not checked
yet to see if series on YT,too.
Apparently not on YT , just this trailer for the Scarlatti program
( worth watching) : http://youtu.be/l_dqU2Xn4FU
I haven't watched it yet, but the Scarlatti seems to be available here,
https://www.pbs.org/video/now-hear-this-scarlatti-man-out-of-time-40tfbh/
Just watched the Scarlatti and Vivaldi episodes. They were better than
the one on Bach. The Scarlatti episode was the best - by the end I had
a sense of Scarlatti's influences. In the Vivaldi it was fun to visit
the luthiers and to hear the pianist improvising on a theme of Vivaldi
in the style of various composers (even if this was not particularly
informative).
Tatonik
2019-10-06 05:37:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tatonik
Post by Bozo
Coincidence, same night I also watched Yoo's "Scarlatti" program in that
PBS series.I enjoyed, learned.Have not heard the Bach. Have not checked
yet to see if series on YT,too.
Apparently not on YT , just this trailer for the Scarlatti program
( worth watching) : http://youtu.be/l_dqU2Xn4FU
I haven't watched it yet, but the Scarlatti seems to be available here,
https://www.pbs.org/video/now-hear-this-scarlatti-man-out-of-time-40tfbh/
Just watched the Scarlatti and Vivaldi episodes. They were better than
the one on Bach. The Scarlatti episode was the best - by the end I had
a sense of Scarlatti's influences. In the Vivaldi it was fun to visit
the luthiers and to hear the pianist improvising on a theme of Vivaldi
in the style of various composers (even if this was not particularly
informative).
I do get a little tired of shots of Scott Yoo and his wife smirking at
each other. But I suppose one can't begrudge them the occasional smirk.

His wife is either a flutist or a flautist, whichever is correct.
Bozo
2019-10-06 21:21:21 UTC
Permalink
...by the end I had
a sense of Scarlatti's influences..
Same here. And I do not think I'd ever heard K. 213 before, so looked for, found, it :


Tatonik
2019-10-18 18:22:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tatonik
Listening to Richard Goode playing all the Bach keyboard partitas on
Nonesuch. Just bought the CDs. My overall impression is favorable.
I heard Goode live at Ravinia in the Martin Theater in July. He played
two Haydn sonatas, one Mozart rondo, Beethoven Sonata 28, "In the Mists"
by Janácek, and an assortment of Debussy Preludes. The encore was a
Chopin Nocturne. I had never heard the Janácek before. It was lovely.

I was taken with his Haydn. To my knowledge he has never recorded any
Haydn sonatas. Listening to him made me wish he had. He managed to
find their beauty - to make them almost senusal - while retaining the
wit. Now I am even more disappointed with the last Haydn set I bought,
Marc-André Hamlin on Hyperion. Hamlin is brilliant, but there's a
plainness about his approach that is ill-suited to these sonatas, I
think.

Goode has never recorded the Janácek or the Debussy, either. I have his
recording of the Beethoven. This performance of No. 28 was good, though
I detected some insecurity at one juncture.

I'm going to hear Goode again tonight at a small concert hall I've never
been to before - the Galvin Recital Hall at the new Beinen School of
Music at Northwestern University. It's new to me, anyway. The building
wasn't there last time I was on campus. I'm looking forward to
experiencing the hall as much as the performance.

A photo inside Galvin Recital Hall, with windows behind the stage
looking out on Lake Michigan and the Chicago skyline in the distance:

Loading Image...

I hope to arrive before it's dark so I can catch the view.

What's on the program:

https://www.music.northwestern.edu/events/richard-goode-piano

Twice in one year. I'm in danger of becoming a Goode groupie.
Bozo
2019-10-18 19:48:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tatonik
Twice in one year. I'm in danger of becoming a Goode groupie.
I have only one recording, a Nonesuch lp of the Mozart PC's #17 and # 23 he did with Orpheus.One of the Nonesuch that did make it to cd.

Next time you're on North side , and if you like sushi, try Tanoshii on North Clark in Andersonville. http://www.tanoshiisushi.com/
Raymond Hall
2019-10-19 00:10:43 UTC
Permalink
-https://news.wttw.com/sites/default/files/article/image-non-gallery/Mary%20B.jpg

-I hope to arrive before it's dark so I can catch the view.

You could perch (or roost) on those walls ;)

Ray Hall, Taree
Tatonik
2019-10-30 01:58:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tatonik
Post by Tatonik
Listening to Richard Goode playing all the Bach keyboard partitas on
Nonesuch. Just bought the CDs. My overall impression is favorable.
I heard Goode live at Ravinia in the Martin Theater in July. He played
two Haydn sonatas, one Mozart rondo, Beethoven Sonata 28, "In the Mists"
by Janácek, and an assortment of Debussy Preludes. The encore was a
Chopin Nocturne. I had never heard the Janácek before. It was lovely.
I was taken with his Haydn. To my knowledge he has never recorded any
Haydn sonatas. Listening to him made me wish he had. He managed to find
their beauty - to make them almost senusal - while retaining the wit. Now
I am even more disappointed with the last Haydn set I bought, Marc-André
Hamlin on Hyperion. Hamlin is brilliant, but there's a plainness about
his approach that is ill-suited to these sonatas, I think.
Goode has never recorded the Janácek or the Debussy, either. I have his
recording of the Beethoven. This performance of No. 28 was good, though I
detected some insecurity at one juncture.
I'm going to hear Goode again tonight at a small concert hall I've never
been to before - the Galvin Recital Hall at the new Beinen School of Music
at Northwestern University. It's new to me, anyway. The building wasn't
there last time I was on campus. I'm looking forward to experiencing the
hall as much as the performance.
A photo inside Galvin Recital Hall, with windows behind the stage looking
https://news.wttw.com/sites/default/files/article/image-non-gallery/Mary%20B.jpg
Post by Tatonik
I hope to arrive before it's dark so I can catch the view.
It was dark by the time I arrived, and in any case, there was a phalanx
of eager young ushers preventing anyone from entering the auditorium
early. Once inside, while the house lights were still up, what I saw
was the reflection of the audience. From the first row of the balcony,
I waved and saw myself waving back. After the lights went down, the
remaining reflections were the stage and the piano, and the Chicago
skyline becomes visible.

Also visible are the headlights of distant cars. Occasionally one will
turn, the light hits just the right angle and momentarily appears
brighter. It's like being in line with a rotating lighthouse lens.
There is a partially-lit bike path that runs along the lakeshore, too,
and all through the concert you could see cyclists, joggers, and
pedestrians going by. It was a little distracting. To amuse yourself,
you can try to predict in how many seconds a given cyclist will overtake
given jogger. At one point someone walked across the grass and shone a
flashlight into the auditorium.

The acoustics were well-balanced and robustly projected, though there
was a certain register in the treble that sounded a little steely to me.
It was unclear to me whether this was the hall or the piano. I don't
think glass is a very good material for concert halls, acoustically
speaking, but I assume the acoustical firm that designed the hall took
it into account. I came across a review in the Tribune of a concert
here by Stephen Hough a few years ago, and the critic, Alan Artner,
remarked that the room made it impossible to produce a true pianissimo
and that the fortissimos were too loud. In retrospect, I can see what
Artner meant about the pianissimos, but the fortissimos weren't that
bothersome from where I was sitting. I wonder to what extent this is
simply a function of the size of the hall - the smaller the space, the
louder the piano is going to be. Galvin seats 400.

I was most taken with parts of the Partita and the Chopin Mazurkas. The
latter surprised me, because the one recording I have of Goode playing a
few mazurkas didn't impress me. Here, however, they came alive in
rhythm and in Chopin's brand of counterpoint, and they were substantial.
My concert-going companion favored Janacek's "In the Mists." I
preferred Goode's account of this earlier in the year, but I think it
may have been the different hall that made me prefer it.

Before the concert began, Goode announced a change from the printed
program: he would begin with just the Sarabande from the D Major Partita
(No. 4) before launching into the whole of No. 5. One person behind me
grumbled upon hearing this. I'm not sure the grumble was justified - it
was a bonus, not a replacement nor an omission. There was one encore:
No. 3 of Schubert's Moments Musicaux, I believe.

On Goode's tour schedule I saw mention of a scheduled masterclass the
next day in the same hall. Nowhere on Northwestern's website was this
listed, but I took a chance and showed up, somewhat late. Few were
observing - only faculty and other students as far as I could tell. I
don't know if it was officially open to the public, but no one kicked me
out.

The page turner from the night before, a woman with long hair and
spectacles, was in the audience for the master class. She was also
Goode's page turner earlier this summer. I suspect that her relation to
him is more than just page turner - perhaps his wife, violinist Marcia
Weinfeld. She sat in the fourth row, farther up than anyone else. The
noonday sun worked its way 'round the sky and shone through the glass
wall behind the stage, hitting her right in the eyes. She held up a
sheet of paper as a visor, but it wasn't very effective. Translucent
screens had been lowered over the glass, but there were gaps between the
sections from which the sun peeked through. Finally she had had enough
and moved several seats to the left. Within the hour the sun had
shifted and again hit her the in the eyes. I wonder if the architect
considered the wall's orientation to the sun when designing the hall.
During the day joggers and cyclists are still visible through the
screen, and seagulls drift by, but somehow it is all less distracting
than at night.

I missed the first performance and part of the second. The second
student was working on the first movement of Beethoven's Piano Sonata
No. 18. Goode frequently demonstrated his points on another piano. He
mentioned that there is more than one first edition of this piece and
that they don't entirely agree. The third student played the first
several movements of Bach's Keyboard Partita No. 5, the same piece Goode
had played in performance the night before. Of one movement, he said to
the student, "I liked some of what you did better than what I did last
night." This elicited a chuckle from a faculty member.

Although he allowed that there are many approaches to Bach that let the
music come through, he advocated bringing out certain voices or lending
emphasis with varying articulation. "We need some help," he said of the
listeners of Bach. As an exercise in the Sarabande, he had the student
play the left hand while he played the right. Not too slow, he said,
and imagine you're playing a cello.

At first there was some confusion over the final student's piece -
Haydn's A-flat piano sonata. There are two A-flat sonatas; student and
master each had the other sonata in mind. The one in question was No.
46 (Hob. XVI). "Haydn was master of the non sequitur and the unexpected
turn," said Haydn. He asked the student if she had written out her own
dynamic markings for the sonata. She hadn't; he suggested that she do
it as an exercise. Bartok did it for several Haydn sonatas, he said:
"It's interesting to see coming from the mind of a composer."

At the end, one faculty member turned to another and said of Goode, "He
lives up to his reputation." This must have been the first time they
had seen him give a masterclass. I did see him give one once before,
probably twenty years ago, in Lutkin Hall on the same campus. One of
his comments I recall from that class was about dynamics in Beethoven
sonatas. Goode said he viewed a piano marking in Beethoven as different
than some other composers - not as soft, but more like a normal speaking
voice.

It was nice at the end of the class to step out of the building, into
the sun, and catch the smell of the lake, then walk for half a mile or
so along the shore. Imagine: I must have been visible from the concert
hall. In that hall, in a manner of speaking, all the world's a stage.
Tatonik
2019-10-30 03:45:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tatonik
Although he allowed that there are many approaches to Bach that let the
music come through, he advocated bringing out certain voices or lending
emphasis with varying articulation. "We need some help," he said of the
listeners of Bach. As an exercise in the Sarabande, he had the student
play the left hand while he played the right. Not too slow, he said,
and imagine you're playing a cello.
Charles Rosen on Bach performance in his book "Piano Notes":

"Playing Bach for oneself or for a friend or pupil looking at the
score (the way the Art of Fugue or the Well-Tempered Keyboard or the
Goldberg Variations would have been played before 1770) raised few
problems; nothing had to be brought out, the harpsichordist (or a
pianist on a Silbermann pianoforte, the instrument manufactured by a
friend of Bach) experienced the different voices through the movement of
the hands, the listener saw the score and followed all the contrapuntal
complexity disentangling the sound visually while listening. Bach's art
did not depend on hearing the different voices and separating them in
the mind, but on appreciating the way what was separate on paper blended
into a wonderful whole.

"In our time, performing Bach in public as if one were alone or with a
friend or two looking on is a self-defeating project; it would be an
exercise in ideology run berserk. Playing in public means publishing
the music, making it available, not simply audible, to the public. An
austere attempt to restrict oneself in a concert hall or on a recording
to those limited means of articulating the music that the composer
himself had at hand will appear equally futile when we reflect that for
the great keyboard works of Bach there was in fact no contemporary
public, and he would never have had to make use of any means to clarify
his work: the music would never have needed that kind of help. In our
time, however, in a concert hall or on a record for a public that is not
expected to look at the score, it is only sensible and rational to try
to make both the separate lines and the extraordinary way they merge
aurally perceptible and understandable for the listeners in a manner
that neither insults their intelligence and the music itself by
dissecting the score with an overtly didactic condescension nor leaves
them in the dark about the wonderful artistry of the work by settling
simply for a generally agreeable impression. I do not know of any
single method to solve this problem. Not all of the details of a work
of Bach can be made intelligible to every listener, and one needs an
individual approach to each piece, an individual decision on what can be
set in relief and how much tact has to be employed to do so."

HT
2019-10-05 17:24:50 UTC
Permalink
Joseph Moog playing the Debussy etudes and Ravel's Gaspard. Stopped listening halfway through Pour les quartes. I don't know how many versions of the etudes I have but Moog's is the least interesting by far. It's like Richter playing Gershwin. Excellent fingers but no idea what he is doing.

Roger Muraro playing the Debussy etudes. Excellent version. The top half of the versions I have.

Henk
Gerard
2019-10-07 21:09:57 UTC
Permalink
Edvard Grieg: Complete Symphonic Works, with Eivind Aadland on Audite. 5 hybrid SACDs.
The only "Grieg complete symphonic works" without a complete Peer Gynt (but the 2 suites only).
Also missing: Landkjenning, and a complete Sigurd Jorsalfar.
I received the set today, so I didn't hear much yet. But what I heard, is splendid in every aspect.
Al Eisner
2019-10-20 00:30:24 UTC
Permalink
The two performances (1955 and 1960) of Brahms Symphony #1 in the
Hans Rosbaud/SWR Baden Badeb Brahms box released last year by SWR.
Neither performance sounds dense or "heavy" (a trap in this work
which I think is avoided by a first-rate and precisely rehearsed
orchestra). The 1960 has consistently longer timings (by about
12% on averae), but it doesn't sound slower, because of the more
incisive playing and (especially in (i)) and a forward pulse. It
might also have better recorded sound (movement (ii) of this
good mono recording is quite gorgeous). Despite somewhat less
urgency in (iii), on most counts I am quite pleased with this
1960. This is my first dip into the Rosbaud Brahms box, which
also contains the other symphonies (two performances of #3), the
two Serenades, and the two piano concertos (Gieseking and Anda).
--
Al Eisner
Lawrence Chalmers
2019-10-16 15:20:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bozo
http://youtu.be/SvJWNtzl_hA
http://youtu.be/bDTyuMDi9Zc
http://youtu.be/9frVGuhuwZo
http://youtu.be/5nVM0Bt4er8
http://youtu.be/w-2yxPUpnxw
http://youtu.be/e845OpSr8Ww
http://youtu.be/OF6NVcOwrME
http://youtu.be/hq2QR2HCt4o
http://youtu.be/u68pliZxn84
A bbc magazine issue of Debussy's Martyrdom of St. Sebastian by BBC Wales Orchestra with soloists. One of the finest of all I have (many!)
Gerard
2019-10-16 15:45:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lawrence Chalmers
A bbc magazine issue of Debussy's Martyrdom of St. Sebastian by BBC Wales Orchestra with soloists. One of the finest of all I have (many!)
Without conductor?
Frank Berger
2019-10-16 15:58:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lawrence Chalmers
Martyrdom of St. Sebastian by BBC Wales Orchestra
Thierry Fischer. Which you could have looked up in the time it took you
to inquire.
Not a Dentist
2019-10-17 01:41:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bozo
http://youtu.be/SvJWNtzl_hA
http://youtu.be/bDTyuMDi9Zc
http://youtu.be/9frVGuhuwZo
http://youtu.be/5nVM0Bt4er8
http://youtu.be/w-2yxPUpnxw
http://youtu.be/e845OpSr8Ww
http://youtu.be/OF6NVcOwrME
http://youtu.be/hq2QR2HCt4o
http://youtu.be/u68pliZxn84
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