Discussion:
WAYLTL - October , 2019
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Bozo
2019-10-02 21:10:27 UTC
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Samuil Feinberg playing and compositions:


Fantasy No.1, Op.5 , the composer, piano,audio,score:



Fantasy No.2,Op.9 (1919),Svetlana Elina, piano, audio, score :



Suite for Piano,Op.11 (1923), the composer, piano,audio,score:



Three Preludes,Op.15 (1923),Christophe Sirodeau,piano,audio,score:



Piano Sonata No.9,Op.29, (1939),composer ,piano, audio only:





Feinberg plays Scriabin’s Piano Sonata No.5 , live, in Moscow,1948:



Feinberg plays “Appassionata” , recording late 1930’s :




Feinberg plays Rachmaninoff Etude Tableaux, Op.39,# 9, recording 1950’s :


Oscar
2019-10-02 21:24:59 UTC
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New album from Patricia Kopatchinskaja and Camerata Bern on alpha, Time & Eternity. Two main pieces are Concerto funebre for violin and string orchestra by Hartmann, and Polyptyque for violin and two small string orchestras by Frank Martin (1973, composed in last year of his life).
number_six
2019-10-04 01:47:48 UTC
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Ruders - Handmaid's Tale(da capo)
fine score, more drama here than in Atwood's dystopian narrative

Zemlinsky - SQ 1-1 - La Salle Qt (DGG)
had never heard these before - more romantic than I expected
bonus item is a qt by HE Apostel - never heard anything by him before

Newport Folk Festival 1963 (Vanguard)
I had forgotten the quality of the backing vocals on Blowin' in the Wind
Was taken by surprise and its impact was powerful
Frank Berger
2019-10-04 05:25:14 UTC
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Post by number_six
Ruders - Handmaid's Tale(da capo)
fine score, more drama here than in Atwood's dystopian narrative
Zemlinsky - SQ 1-1 - La Salle Qt (DGG)
had never heard these before - more romantic than I expected
bonus item is a qt by HE Apostel - never heard anything by him before
Newport Folk Festival 1963 (Vanguard)
I had forgotten the quality of the backing vocals on Blowin' in the Wind
Was taken by surprise and its impact was powerful
The backup singers included Peter, Paul and Mary, Joan Baez and Pete Seeger!
number_six
2019-10-05 18:02:55 UTC
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Post by Frank Berger
Post by number_six
Ruders - Handmaid's Tale(da capo)
fine score, more drama here than in Atwood's dystopian narrative
Zemlinsky - SQ 1-1 - La Salle Qt (DGG)
had never heard these before - more romantic than I expected
bonus item is a qt by HE Apostel - never heard anything by him before
Newport Folk Festival 1963 (Vanguard)
I had forgotten the quality of the backing vocals on Blowin' in the Wind
Was taken by surprise and its impact was powerful
The backup singers included Peter, Paul and Mary, Joan Baez and Pete Seeger!
Baez soars, especially on Te Ador, Ate Amanha.

This says it's Volume 1 of the 1963 evening concerts. Volumes 2-3 don't appear to have been released on CD, though there are some Newport folk CDs for other years as well.
Lawrence Chalmers
2019-10-03 14:44:25 UTC
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Post by Bozo
http://youtu.be/SvJWNtzl_hA
http://youtu.be/bDTyuMDi9Zc
http://youtu.be/9frVGuhuwZo
http://youtu.be/5nVM0Bt4er8
http://youtu.be/w-2yxPUpnxw
http://youtu.be/e845OpSr8Ww
http://youtu.be/OF6NVcOwrME
http://youtu.be/hq2QR2HCt4o
http://youtu.be/u68pliZxn84
Shostakovich Symphonies from the set of complete by Michael Sanderling and the Dresden Orchestra. Mostly very good with a standout No. 8. The sound is quite
good. The packaging is my only gripe. A slip case packed tight. But the price is really attractive.
Bozo
2019-10-03 22:05:15 UTC
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Elgar:

Piano Quintet , its first recording with Ethel Hobday with the Spencer Dyke Quartet for the National Gramophonic Society in December , 1925, not sure from whence my download.

Violin Sonata, Lorraine McAslan,violin, John Blakely,piano,ASW cd.
c***@gmail.com
2019-10-04 01:54:34 UTC
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A new recording of Francisco de Peñalosa’s "Lamentations" by New York Polyphony on Bis. Gorgeous performance and recording of a rare work by an underappreciated composer.

AC
Bill Anderson
2019-10-04 03:24:02 UTC
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The NGS Elgar is likely from Bryan Bishop. It was one of several NGS transfers he offered here years ago, prior to his "Shellackophile" web blog.

- Bill A.
Al Eisner
2019-10-05 01:59:33 UTC
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I've had Barnabás Kelemen's fine performance of the Bartók's solo
sonata (as recommended here by Messrs Emerson and Cooper for a while),
but until today I had not listened to the couplingL: the 44 duos,
played with Katalin Kokas. Oddly, these don't seem to have been
mentioned along with the recommendations.

I had previously heard the set in the Hungaroton Bartok edition's
chamber volume - I believe Wilkomirska and ? - but that was a long
time ago, and it didn't make a great impression (quite possibly my
fault). The Kelemen version does. The relatively simple pieces of
the first half are mostly based on songs, and the performances were,
sell, songlike. The more complicated second half had many based
on dances, which were played with energy and flexibility. The works
are in numerical order. I don't know if I "should have" (whatever
that means) listened straight through, but I did, and found it
most rewarding. The recording is from BMC.
--
Al Eisner
c***@gmail.com
2019-10-05 19:36:30 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
I've had Barnabás Kelemen's fine performance of the Bartók's solo
sonata (as recommended here by Messrs Emerson and Cooper for a while),
but until today I had not listened to the couplingL: the 44 duos,
played with Katalin Kokas. Oddly, these don't seem to have been
mentioned along with the recommendations.
I had previously heard the set in the Hungaroton Bartok edition's
chamber volume - I believe Wilkomirska and ? - but that was a long
time ago, and it didn't make a great impression (quite possibly my
fault). The Kelemen version does. The relatively simple pieces of
the first half are mostly based on songs, and the performances were,
sell, songlike. The more complicated second half had many based
on dances, which were played with energy and flexibility. The works
are in numerical order. I don't know if I "should have" (whatever
that means) listened straight through, but I did, and found it
most rewarding. The recording is from BMC.
--
Al Eisner
I'm a big fan of this recording. A couple of weeks ago my wife and I attended a wonderful concert that included selections from the 44 duos: https://www.kaufmanmusiccenter.org/mch/event/israeli-chamber-project-folk-rhapsody/. The ingenious notion of the group was to intersperse the duos among the other works on the program in groups of three, with the two violinists off to one side of the stage or the other. The performances were superb; do not miss this group if they're ever in your neighborhood! They have two more concerts scheduled in NYC during 2019/20. We already have tickets for this one: https://www.baruch.cuny.edu/calendar/EventList.aspx?&eventidn=70627&view=EventDetails&information_id=937616&AspxAutoDetectCookieSupport=1. (The Webern arrangement of Schoenberg's op. 9 is more fun than any of the composer's originals, imo.)

AC
Al Eisner
2019-10-05 20:20:04 UTC
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Post by c***@gmail.com
I've had Barnabás Kelemen's fine performance of the Bartók's solo
sonata (as recommended here by Messrs Emerson and Cooper for a while),
but until today I had not listened to the couplingL: the 44 duos,
played with Katalin Kokas. Oddly, these don't seem to have been
mentioned along with the recommendations.
I had previously heard the set in the Hungaroton Bartok edition's
chamber volume - I believe Wilkomirska and ? - but that was a long
time ago, and it didn't make a great impression (quite possibly my
fault). The Kelemen version does. The relatively simple pieces of
the first half are mostly based on songs, and the performances were,
sell, songlike. The more complicated second half had many based
on dances, which were played with energy and flexibility. The works
are in numerical order. I don't know if I "should have" (whatever
that means) listened straight through, but I did, and found it
most rewarding. The recording is from BMC.
--
Al Eisner
I'm a big fan of this recording. A couple of weeks ago my wife and I attended a wonderful concert that included selections from the 44 duos: https://www.kaufmanmusiccenter.org/mch/event/israeli-chamber-project-folk-rhapsody/. The ingenious notion of the group was to intersperse the duos among the other works on the program in groups of three, with the two violinists off to one side of the stage or the other. The performances were superb; do not miss this group if they're ever in your neighborhood! They have two more concerts scheduled in NYC during 2019/20. We already have tickets for this one: https://www.baruch.cuny.edu/calendar/EventList.aspx?&eventidn=70627&view=EventDetails&information_id=937616&AspxAutoDetectCookieSupport=1. (The Webern arrangement of Schoenberg's op. 9 is more fun than any of the composer's originals, imo.)
AC
The Israeli Chamber Project does put on concerts around my parts.
I heard them a couple of years ago, with a different subset of
players, and quite mixed results. As I recall (I'd have to
dig up the program) they had more winds and a pianist, and much
of the program was arrangements, some successful (as I recall,
some Stravinsky) and some not. The best performance was that
Debussy clarinet work. But the program ended with a rather
undistinguised Schumann piano quintet. So I would have to be
convinced. :)
--
Al Eisner
c***@gmail.com
2019-10-06 14:04:17 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Al Eisner
I've had Barnabás Kelemen's fine performance of the Bartók's solo
sonata (as recommended here by Messrs Emerson and Cooper for a while),
but until today I had not listened to the couplingL: the 44 duos,
played with Katalin Kokas. Oddly, these don't seem to have been
mentioned along with the recommendations.
I had previously heard the set in the Hungaroton Bartok edition's
chamber volume - I believe Wilkomirska and ? - but that was a long
time ago, and it didn't make a great impression (quite possibly my
fault). The Kelemen version does. The relatively simple pieces of
the first half are mostly based on songs, and the performances were,
sell, songlike. The more complicated second half had many based
on dances, which were played with energy and flexibility. The works
are in numerical order. I don't know if I "should have" (whatever
that means) listened straight through, but I did, and found it
most rewarding. The recording is from BMC.
--
Al Eisner
I'm a big fan of this recording. A couple of weeks ago my wife and I attended a wonderful concert that included selections from the 44 duos: https://www.kaufmanmusiccenter.org/mch/event/israeli-chamber-project-folk-rhapsody/. The ingenious notion of the group was to intersperse the duos among the other works on the program in groups of three, with the two violinists off to one side of the stage or the other. The performances were superb; do not miss this group if they're ever in your neighborhood! They have two more concerts scheduled in NYC during 2019/20. We already have tickets for this one: https://www.baruch.cuny.edu/calendar/EventList.aspx?&eventidn=70627&view=EventDetails&information_id=937616&AspxAutoDetectCookieSupport=1. (The Webern arrangement of Schoenberg's op. 9 is more fun than any of the composer's originals, imo.)
AC
The Israeli Chamber Project does put on concerts around my parts.
I heard them a couple of years ago, with a different subset of
players, and quite mixed results. As I recall (I'd have to
dig up the program) they had more winds and a pianist, and much
of the program was arrangements, some successful (as I recall,
some Stravinsky) and some not. The best performance was that
Debussy clarinet work. But the program ended with a rather
undistinguised Schumann piano quintet. So I would have to be
convinced. :)
--
Al Eisner
Well, all I can say is give them another shot, although I agree with what you say about some of their transcriptions (which doesn't apply to Webern's marvelous transcription of Schoenberg op. 9). Also, the concert featured a classic instance of Murphy's Law in operation: a cellphone going off during the ultra-quiet ending of Kurtág's "Hommage a R. Schumann." Even worse, the ringtone sounded like an electronic imitation of a harp arpeggio. I guess Kurtág is fond of "games," but even so <SIGH>.

AC
Al Eisner
2019-10-06 18:26:17 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
Post by c***@gmail.com
I've had Barnabás Kelemen's fine performance of the Bartók's solo
sonata (as recommended here by Messrs Emerson and Cooper for a while),
but until today I had not listened to the couplingL: the 44 duos,
played with Katalin Kokas. Oddly, these don't seem to have been
mentioned along with the recommendations.
I had previously heard the set in the Hungaroton Bartok edition's
chamber volume - I believe Wilkomirska and ? - but that was a long
time ago, and it didn't make a great impression (quite possibly my
fault). The Kelemen version does. The relatively simple pieces of
the first half are mostly based on songs, and the performances were,
sell, songlike. The more complicated second half had many based
on dances, which were played with energy and flexibility. The works
are in numerical order. I don't know if I "should have" (whatever
that means) listened straight through, but I did, and found it
most rewarding. The recording is from BMC.
--
Al Eisner
I'm a big fan of this recording. A couple of weeks ago my wife and I attended a wonderful concert that included selections from the 44 duos: https://www.kaufmanmusiccenter.org/mch/event/israeli-chamber-project-folk-rhapsody/. The ingenious notion of the group was to intersperse the duos among the other works on the program in groups of three, with the two violinists off to one side of the stage or the other. The performances were superb; do not miss this group if they're ever in your neighborhood! They have two more concerts scheduled in NYC during 2019/20. We already have tickets for this one: https://www.baruch.cuny.edu/calendar/EventList.aspx?&eventidn=70627&view=EventDetails&information_id=937616&AspxAutoDetectCookieSupport=1. (The Webern arrangement of Schoenberg's op. 9 is more fun than any of the composer's originals, imo.)
AC
The Israeli Chamber Project does put on concerts around my parts.
I heard them a couple of years ago, with a different subset of
players, and quite mixed results. As I recall (I'd have to
dig up the program) they had more winds and a pianist, and much
of the program was arrangements, some successful (as I recall,
some Stravinsky) and some not. The best performance was that
Debussy clarinet work. But the program ended with a rather
undistinguised Schumann piano quintet. So I would have to be
convinced. :)
--
Al Eisner
Well, all I can say is give them another shot, although I agree with what you say about some of their transcriptions (which doesn't apply to Webern's marvelous transcription of Schoenberg op. 9). Also, the concert featured a classic instance of Murphy's Law in operation: a cellphone going off during the ultra-quiet ending of Kurtág's "Hommage a R. Schumann." Even worse, the ringtone sounded like an electronic imitation of a harp arpeggio. I guess Kurtág is fond of "games," but even so <SIGH>.
AC
I might try again, depending on the program and the lineup. I tend not
to like transcriptions made specifically for a given set of performers
(as you note, those made by first-rate composers excepted), although
I must say those by the group Calefax are very good (I heard them do
the Goldbergs last year, really fun).

As for Kurtág, I suppose he could have been playing on Schumann's
affliction of hearing unwanted notes in his ears. :) Do you have a
recommendation for an entrée into Kurtág? The limited amount I've
heard I found a bit hard to get into.
--
Al Eisner
Al Eisner
2019-10-07 01:29:56 UTC
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As for Kurtag (whose 2:40 violin duo Ligatura... 31b is heard on the Keller duos disc) -- you might try the Keller Quartet's set of his works; though I should know the range of his oeuvre better than I do. His single opera, derived from Beckett's _Endgame_ and which premiered late last year, will be the rare item that causes a breach in my no-opera rule.
Well, I made a brief start. It seemed natural to start with his String
Quartet Opus 1. I found a performance by the Athena Quartet online.
The work is fanciful, interesting to hear, lots of odd effect, but
difficult to really grasp. Then the Keller's performance of
"12 Miccroludes for String Quartet" on youtube:
- 12 movements in 10
minutes (but nothing like Webern's concision). I found this to be
a much more solid, structured, often intense, work, very effective in this
performance - I'll investigate more later. Thanks.
--
Al Eisner
c***@gmail.com
2019-10-07 14:04:34 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
As for Kurtag (whose 2:40 violin duo Ligatura... 31b is heard on the Keller duos disc) -- you might try the Keller Quartet's set of his works; though I should know the range of his oeuvre better than I do. His single opera, derived from Beckett's _Endgame_ and which premiered late last year, will be the rare item that causes a breach in my no-opera rule.
Well, I made a brief start. It seemed natural to start with his String
Quartet Opus 1. I found a performance by the Athena Quartet online.
The work is fanciful, interesting to hear, lots of odd effect, but
difficult to really grasp. Then the Keller's performance of
http://youtu.be/FzIFHJw9qmo - 12 movements in 10
minutes (but nothing like Webern's concision). I found this to be
a much more solid, structured, often intense, work, very effective in this
performance - I'll investigate more later. Thanks.
--
Al Eisner
Thanks for the initial report, Al. I would have recommended the same Keller ECM CD as Steve. Now try this on for size: https://www.col-legno.com/en/shop/31870-gyoergy-kurtag-portrait-salzburg-1993. (I think you can stream it in its entirety.) And if you're still with me, there's an excellent recording of song cycles on Sony. See https://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/kurtag-song-cycles. And then to Juliane Banse's fabulous recording of the Kafka Fragmente (also ECM). I've read a lot about the opera but haven't heard it yet.

AC
Al Eisner
2019-10-07 21:48:44 UTC
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Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Al Eisner
As for Kurtag (whose 2:40 violin duo Ligatura... 31b is heard on the Keller duos disc) -- you might try the Keller Quartet's set of his works; though I should know the range of his oeuvre better than I do. His single opera, derived from Beckett's _Endgame_ and which premiered late last year, will be the rare item that causes a breach in my no-opera rule.
Well, I made a brief start. It seemed natural to start with his String
Quartet Opus 1. I found a performance by the Athena Quartet online.
The work is fanciful, interesting to hear, lots of odd effect, but
difficult to really grasp. Then the Keller's performance of
http://youtu.be/FzIFHJw9qmo - 12 movements in 10
minutes (but nothing like Webern's concision). I found this to be
a much more solid, structured, often intense, work, very effective in this
performance - I'll investigate more later. Thanks.
--
Al Eisner
Thanks for the initial report, Al. I would have recommended the same Keller ECM CD as Steve. Now try this on for size: https://www.col-legno.com/en/shop/31870-gyoergy-kurtag-portrait-salzburg-1993. (I think you can stream it in its entirety.) And if you're still with me, there's an excellent recording of song cycles on Sony. See https://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/kurtag-song-cycles. And then to Juliane Banse's fabulous recording of the Kafka Fragmente (also ECM). I've read a lot about the opera but haven't heard it yet.
AC
Thanks. I took a quick look at the col-legno link (I'll play it
through later). I can play a track, but it doesn't seem to continue
to the next, nor is there the usual bar showing track progress or
providing some control - am I issing nsomething? (At least the performers
forn each piece can be found at Amazon.)
--
Al Eisner
c***@gmail.com
2019-10-08 13:09:16 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Al Eisner
As for Kurtag (whose 2:40 violin duo Ligatura... 31b is heard on the Keller duos disc) -- you might try the Keller Quartet's set of his works; though I should know the range of his oeuvre better than I do. His single opera, derived from Beckett's _Endgame_ and which premiered late last year, will be the rare item that causes a breach in my no-opera rule.
Well, I made a brief start. It seemed natural to start with his String
Quartet Opus 1. I found a performance by the Athena Quartet online.
The work is fanciful, interesting to hear, lots of odd effect, but
difficult to really grasp. Then the Keller's performance of
http://youtu.be/FzIFHJw9qmo - 12 movements in 10
minutes (but nothing like Webern's concision). I found this to be
a much more solid, structured, often intense, work, very effective in this
performance - I'll investigate more later. Thanks.
--
Al Eisner
Thanks for the initial report, Al. I would have recommended the same Keller ECM CD as Steve. Now try this on for size: https://www.col-legno.com/en/shop/31870-gyoergy-kurtag-portrait-salzburg-1993. (I think you can stream it in its entirety.) And if you're still with me, there's an excellent recording of song cycles on Sony. See https://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/kurtag-song-cycles. And then to Juliane Banse's fabulous recording of the Kafka Fragmente (also ECM). I've read a lot about the opera but haven't heard it yet.
AC
Thanks. I took a quick look at the col-legno link (I'll play it
through later). I can play a track, but it doesn't seem to continue
to the next, nor is there the usual bar showing track progress or
providing some control - am I issing nsomething? (At least the performers
forn each piece can be found at Amazon.)
--
Al Eisner
No, you're not missing anything: the interface is primitive, but it seems that you can listen to the entire album one track at a time. I didn't pay careful attention since I have the CDs.

AC
Al Eisner
2019-10-08 19:25:19 UTC
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Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Al Eisner
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Al Eisner
As for Kurtag (whose 2:40 violin duo Ligatura... 31b is heard on the Keller duos disc) -- you might try the Keller Quartet's set of his works; though I should know the range of his oeuvre better than I do. His single opera, derived from Beckett's _Endgame_ and which premiered late last year, will be the rare item that causes a breach in my no-opera rule.
Well, I made a brief start. It seemed natural to start with his String
Quartet Opus 1. I found a performance by the Athena Quartet online.
The work is fanciful, interesting to hear, lots of odd effect, but
difficult to really grasp. Then the Keller's performance of
http://youtu.be/FzIFHJw9qmo - 12 movements in 10
minutes (but nothing like Webern's concision). I found this to be
a much more solid, structured, often intense, work, very effective in this
performance - I'll investigate more later. Thanks.
--
Al Eisner
Thanks for the initial report, Al. I would have recommended the same Keller ECM CD as Steve. Now try this on for size: https://www.col-legno.com/en/shop/31870-gyoergy-kurtag-portrait-salzburg-1993. (I think you can stream it in its entirety.) And if you're still with me, there's an excellent recording of song cycles on Sony. See https://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/kurtag-song-cycles. And then to Juliane Banse's fabulous recording of the Kafka Fragmente (also ECM). I've read a lot about the opera but haven't heard it yet.
AC
Thanks. I took a quick look at the col-legno link (I'll play it
through later). I can play a track, but it doesn't seem to continue
to the next, nor is there the usual bar showing track progress or
providing some control - am I issing nsomething? (At least the performers
forn each piece can be found at Amazon.)
--
Al Eisner
No, you're not missing anything: the interface is primitive, but it seems that you can listen to the entire album one track at a time. I didn't pay careful attention since I have the CDs.
AC
... which is what I've done. While my early limited impression of
Kurtág was as rather forbidding, this is a varied program, and I
found most of it rewarding, despite audience noise and some other
sonic issues. Thanks very much for calling attention to it.

I'll add a few remarks for the benefit of Bozo and others.\, I'll add
a few remarks. Performers for each track are listed at
https://www.amazon.com/Portrait-Concert-1961-1992-Keller-Quartet/dp/B000025BQL/
Note that the pianist on most of it is Kocsis, particularly impressive
in the brief Requiem for soprano and piano. Much of it is typical
miniatures, but there are several longer works. One of the two
longest is an interesting Double Concerto for piano and cello
(Kocsis and Miklos Perenyi), rather percussive, but concluding with
a wonderful lyrical section - well worth hearing this. The other is
the exceedingly strange "Samuel Beckett: What is the Word", which I
would clearly need to hear again if I want to connect.

An interesting suumary of the last work, Quasi una fantasia, is given
by Andsnes here: https://nyphil.org/watch-listen/video/1213/leif-ove-andsnes-on-kurtags-quasi-una-fantasia
While impressive on the recording, this work plainly cries out to be
heard in the concert hall.
--
Al Eisner
Bozo
2019-10-08 20:12:05 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
One of the two
longest is an interesting Double Concerto for piano and cello
(Kocsis and Miklos Perenyi), rather percussive, but concluding with
a wonderful lyrical section - well worth hearing this.
Thanks ! Enjoyed it, but probably a one-hear for me.

I watched this live YT, Nicholas Altstaedt,cello,Gabor Csalog,piano,Concerto Budapest,Andras Keller,conductor, Palace of Arts,Budapest,Feb.20,2011:

( One percussionist did not get the “black” memo ? )

Try the " Concertante " as well.
Bozo
2019-10-08 23:17:57 UTC
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After some Kurtag's, and the latest horrors from Trump and his lemmings, cronies, solace in Mozart PC's Nos.11-13, K.413-415, Mozart's own versions for piano and string quartet , on my EMI Classics (now Warner Classics ) cd released 1998,recorded 1997,Patrick Dechorgnat,pianist,Henschel Quartet. The final movement of No.13 amazing, can stand with any mov. of any other PC Mozart wrote, IMHO.


Al Eisner
2019-10-09 01:02:24 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Post by Al Eisner
One of the two
longest is an interesting Double Concerto for piano and cello
(Kocsis and Miklos Perenyi), rather percussive, but concluding with
a wonderful lyrical section - well worth hearing this.
Thanks ! Enjoyed it, but probably a one-hear for me.
http://youtu.be/qD52TKTsTcA ( One percussionist did not get the “black” memo ? )
Try the " Concertante " as well.
Thanks - yes, well worth hearing, although a bit static....
--
Al Eisner
number_six
2019-10-12 21:10:33 UTC
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Wattstax 72 (Stax)

Weill - Kleine Dreigroschenmusik /Violin Concerto /
Mahagonny Songspiel - Atherton, London Sinfonietta (DGG)
Al Eisner
2019-10-15 19:03:32 UTC
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Recent first CD-hearings:

1) Benjamin Grosvenor, "Dances" (the fourth of his five CD's, a rather
measly output from such a talent):

The opening Bach Partita (#4) really dances; the freedom reminds me
much more of Tipo than of Gould. I equally-well enjoyed the playing
in the following sets of Chopin and Scriabin, but my interest began to
wane after that (not helped by someone's long light-weight takeoff
from the "Blue Danube" waltz), only to be revived at the end by
Morton Gould's terrific "Boogie-Woogie Etude". Largely recommended.

2) The CD in the Hyperion Romantic Piano Concerto series with the
concertos by Massenet and Reynaldo Hahn (Stephen Coombs with
Ossonce/BBC Scotland).

The first movement of the Massenet was overly rambling (with
Lisztian flourishes), the second entirely undistinguied, but the
third was fun - sort of somthing like Saint-Saens might have
written. Still, I doubt if I'd want to hear this again. The Hahn
was altogether more focused and distinguished, a likely winner I
think, performed quite convincingly.
--
Al Eisner
Bozo
2019-10-08 14:41:49 UTC
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Agreed on both counts. I think my only exposure to Kurtag to date has been his "Games" for piano , with >which I did not much connect.
This Kurtag "Concertante" ,Op.42 ( 2003) is interesting as well, as is his Op.13 "Officium breve"":


Todd Michel McComb
2019-10-04 06:23:28 UTC
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https://darktree.bandcamp.com/album/the-hatch
Tatonik
2019-10-05 05:53:00 UTC
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Listening to Richard Goode playing all the Bach keyboard partitas on
Nonesuch. Just bought the CDs. My overall impression is favorable.
Until now my only complete set was Glenn Gould. I have a 2008 recording
on Onyx of Stephen Kovacevich playing just No. 4 which I find curiously
static. (It fills out an album of the Diabelli Variations, which he
does quite well.)

Tonight I watched "Now Hear This: The Riddle of Bach" on Great
Performances (PBS), hosted by violinist Scott Yoo. It was 3 parts
interesting to 5 parts annoying. Sort of a lightweight Bach travelogue.

I was intrigued to see real dancers dancing a traditional bourée to the
last movement of Violin Partita No. 1. But it annoyed me that the
camera didn't spend enough time on the dancers.
Bozo
2019-10-05 13:14:15 UTC
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Post by Tatonik
Tonight I watched "Now Hear This: The Riddle of Bach" on Great
Performances (PBS), hosted by violinist Scott Yoo.
Coincidence, same night I also watched Yoo's "Scarlatti" program in that PBS series.I enjoyed, learned.Have not heard the Bach. Have not checked yet to see if series on YT,too.
Bozo
2019-10-05 13:23:09 UTC
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Coincidence, same night I also watched Yoo's "Scarlatti" program in that PBS series.I enjoyed, >learned.Have not heard the Bach. Have not checked yet to see if series on YT,too.
Apparently not on YT , just this trailer for the Scarlatti program ( worth watching) :

Tatonik
2019-10-06 05:26:48 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Coincidence, same night I also watched Yoo's "Scarlatti" program in that
PBS series.I enjoyed, learned.Have not heard the Bach. Have not checked
yet to see if series on YT,too.
Apparently not on YT , just this trailer for the Scarlatti program
( worth watching) : http://youtu.be/l_dqU2Xn4FU
I haven't watched it yet, but the Scarlatti seems to be available here,
https://www.pbs.org/video/now-hear-this-scarlatti-man-out-of-time-40tfbh/
Just watched the Scarlatti and Vivaldi episodes. They were better than
the one on Bach. The Scarlatti episode was the best - by the end I had
a sense of Scarlatti's influences. In the Vivaldi it was fun to visit
the luthiers and to hear the pianist improvising on a theme of Vivaldi
in the style of various composers (even if this was not particularly
informative).
Tatonik
2019-10-06 05:37:15 UTC
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Post by Tatonik
Post by Bozo
Coincidence, same night I also watched Yoo's "Scarlatti" program in that
PBS series.I enjoyed, learned.Have not heard the Bach. Have not checked
yet to see if series on YT,too.
Apparently not on YT , just this trailer for the Scarlatti program
( worth watching) : http://youtu.be/l_dqU2Xn4FU
I haven't watched it yet, but the Scarlatti seems to be available here,
https://www.pbs.org/video/now-hear-this-scarlatti-man-out-of-time-40tfbh/
Just watched the Scarlatti and Vivaldi episodes. They were better than
the one on Bach. The Scarlatti episode was the best - by the end I had
a sense of Scarlatti's influences. In the Vivaldi it was fun to visit
the luthiers and to hear the pianist improvising on a theme of Vivaldi
in the style of various composers (even if this was not particularly
informative).
I do get a little tired of shots of Scott Yoo and his wife smirking at
each other. But I suppose one can't begrudge them the occasional smirk.

His wife is either a flutist or a flautist, whichever is correct.
Bozo
2019-10-06 21:21:21 UTC
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...by the end I had
a sense of Scarlatti's influences..
Same here. And I do not think I'd ever heard K. 213 before, so looked for, found, it :


HT
2019-10-05 17:24:50 UTC
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Joseph Moog playing the Debussy etudes and Ravel's Gaspard. Stopped listening halfway through Pour les quartes. I don't know how many versions of the etudes I have but Moog's is the least interesting by far. It's like Richter playing Gershwin. Excellent fingers but no idea what he is doing.

Roger Muraro playing the Debussy etudes. Excellent version. The top half of the versions I have.

Henk
Gerard
2019-10-07 21:09:57 UTC
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Edvard Grieg: Complete Symphonic Works, with Eivind Aadland on Audite. 5 hybrid SACDs.
The only "Grieg complete symphonic works" without a complete Peer Gynt (but the 2 suites only).
Also missing: Landkjenning, and a complete Sigurd Jorsalfar.
I received the set today, so I didn't hear much yet. But what I heard, is splendid in every aspect.
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