Discussion:
Debussy's Nocturnes (esp., Nuages) - Favorite recordings
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aesthete8
2003-11-24 03:37:32 UTC
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I like Monteux's RCA stereo recording with the BSO.

It has had several reincarnations; the one I like best is the one that
came out on the CRITICS CHOICE record label. Very clear, esp. the
sound of the harp in Nuages.
David Wake
2003-11-24 05:44:42 UTC
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Post by aesthete8
I like Monteux's RCA stereo recording with the BSO.
It has had several reincarnations; the one I like best is the one that
came out on the CRITICS CHOICE record label. Very clear, esp. the
sound of the harp in Nuages.
Stokowski/LSO/EMI is excellent in all three nocturnes, especially
"Sirenes".

David
David7Gable
2003-11-24 07:16:34 UTC
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Given how much I like the Nocturnes, it's surprising how few recordings I've
heard. (Actually, I like Nuages better than Fêtes and Fêtes better than
Sirènes.)

I have and like these three:

Munch/BSO (Nuages & Fêtes only; RCA)
Monteux/LSO (Philips)
Boulez/Cleveland (Sony)

Boulez is not uninvolved but reticent, as mysterious as the sphinx, and his
Nuages may be too reticent for some listeners, but not for me: temperamentally,
Debussy's art of suggestion with its nuances, subtle shifts, and dependence on
understatement suits him very well. Nevertheless, he may be at his best in
Fêtes, where the technical control he exerts over the monolithic crescendo
depicting the crowd of revelers moving in from a distance is not to be
believed.

Boulez has actually "reorchestrated" Sirènes: composing the specific vowel
sounds that the sirens sing. Nevertheless, as decent as Boulez's performance
is, this is the movement that benefits most from a more "shameless" approach.
Like Monteux's.

I haven't listened to the Monteux in a while, but it's on a disc that is an
absolute favorite of mine: it includes a distinctive and sensationally
atmospheric performance of the symphonic fragments from Le martyre de Saint
Sébastien. As much as I hate to admit it, Monteux shapes both Nuages and
Sirènes more distinctively than Boulez, and it's only in the Fêtes that Boulez
strikes me as clearly superior. (Good as Boulez's first recording of the
Nocturnes is, it's not quite the triumph that his savage Philharmonia La mer
is.)

-david gable
David7Gable
2003-11-29 02:42:07 UTC
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To correct misstatements in my first post in this thread:

1. Boulez's first recording of the Nocturnes is with the New Philharmonia, not
the Cleveland.

2. Monteux's Nocturnes are coupled with a recording of Images on RCA, not with
the Symphonic fragments from Martyre on Philips. The orchestra is the Boston
Symphony.

3. Monteux's Symphonic fragments from Martyre on Philips is coupled with
another recording of the Images. The orchestra is the London Symphony.

-david gable
g***@gmail.com
2015-08-27 08:41:22 UTC
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Post by David7Gable
Given how much I like the Nocturnes, it's surprising how few recordings I've
heard. (Actually, I like Nuages better than Fêtes and Fêtes better than
Sirènes.)
Munch/BSO (Nuages & Fêtes only; RCA)
Monteux/LSO (Philips)
Boulez/Cleveland (Sony)
Boulez is not uninvolved but reticent, as mysterious as the sphinx, and his
Nuages may be too reticent for some listeners, but not for me: temperamentally,
Debussy's art of suggestion with its nuances, subtle shifts, and dependence on
understatement suits him very well. Nevertheless, he may be at his best in
Fêtes, where the technical control he exerts over the monolithic crescendo
depicting the crowd of revelers moving in from a distance is not to be
believed.
Boulez has actually "reorchestrated" Sirènes: composing the specific vowel
sounds that the sirens sing. Nevertheless, as decent as Boulez's performance
is, this is the movement that benefits most from a more "shameless" approach.
Like Monteux's.
I haven't listened to the Monteux in a while, but it's on a disc that is an
absolute favorite of mine: it includes a distinctive and sensationally
atmospheric performance of the symphonic fragments from Le martyre de Saint
Sébastien. As much as I hate to admit it, Monteux shapes both Nuages and
Sirènes more distinctively than Boulez, and it's only in the Fêtes that Boulez
strikes me as clearly superior...
If you haven't yet heard Monteux's LSO Nuages" and "Fetes", it was recently uploaded on Youtube.
g***@gmail.com
2015-08-27 08:44:08 UTC
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Post by David7Gable
Given how much I like the Nocturnes, it's surprising how few recordings I've
heard. (Actually, I like Nuages better than Fêtes and Fêtes better than
Sirènes.)
Munch/BSO (Nuages & Fêtes only; RCA)
Monteux/LSO (Philips)
Boulez/Cleveland (Sony)
Boulez is not uninvolved but reticent, as mysterious as the sphinx, and his
Nuages may be too reticent for some listeners, but not for me: temperamentally,
Debussy's art of suggestion with its nuances, subtle shifts, and dependence on
understatement suits him very well. Nevertheless, he may be at his best in
Fêtes, where the technical control he exerts over the monolithic crescendo
depicting the crowd of revelers moving in from a distance is not to be
believed.
Boulez has actually "reorchestrated" Sirènes: composing the specific vowel
sounds that the sirens sing. Nevertheless, as decent as Boulez's performance
is, this is the movement that benefits most from a more "shameless" approach.
Like Monteux's.
I haven't listened to the Monteux in a while, but it's on a disc that is an
absolute favorite of mine: it includes a distinctive and sensationally
atmospheric performance of the symphonic fragments from Le martyre de Saint
Sébastien. As much as I hate to admit it, Monteux shapes both Nuages and
Sirènes more distinctively than Boulez, and it's only in the Fêtes that Boulez
strikes me as clearly superior...
For those who still haven't heard Monteux's LSO "Nuages" and "Fetes", they were recently uploaded on Youtube.
Terry Simmons
2003-11-24 13:33:34 UTC
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Post by aesthete8
I like Monteux's RCA stereo recording with the BSO.
It has had several reincarnations; the one I like best is the one that
came out on the CRITICS CHOICE record label. Very clear, esp. the
sound of the harp in Nuages.
von Karajan is excellent in this music, in my opinion.
--
Cheers!
Terry
David Wake
2003-11-24 16:02:55 UTC
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Post by Terry Simmons
Post by aesthete8
I like Monteux's RCA stereo recording with the BSO.
It has had several reincarnations; the one I like best is the one that
came out on the CRITICS CHOICE record label. Very clear, esp. the
sound of the harp in Nuages.
von Karajan is excellent in this music, in my opinion.
Wow - I wasn't even aware that he's recorded it. Do you have the details?

David
Stephen North
2003-11-24 22:09:47 UTC
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Post by David Wake
Post by Terry Simmons
Post by aesthete8
I like Monteux's RCA stereo recording with the BSO.
It has had several reincarnations; the one I like best is the one that
came out on the CRITICS CHOICE record label. Very clear, esp. the
sound of the harp in Nuages.
von Karajan is excellent in this music, in my opinion.
Wow - I wasn't even aware that he's recorded it. Do you have the details?
David
He didn't

S
Terry Simmons
2003-11-26 00:37:57 UTC
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Post by David Wake
Post by Terry Simmons
Post by aesthete8
I like Monteux's RCA stereo recording with the BSO.
It has had several reincarnations; the one I like best is the one that
came out on the CRITICS CHOICE record label. Very clear, esp. the
sound of the harp in Nuages.
von Karajan is excellent in this music, in my opinion.
Wow - I wasn't even aware that he's recorded it. Do you have the details?
David
Oops, sorry! I was thinking of La Mer. (I have these moments...)
--
Cheers!
Terry
aesthete8
2003-12-06 20:00:44 UTC
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Stokowski's "Nuages" reminds me of Streisand's "Verschwiegen Liebe"
where the tempo was slowed down sooooooooo much that something eerie
and mysterious began overcome the music.
Post by Terry Simmons
Post by David Wake
Post by Terry Simmons
Post by aesthete8
I like Monteux's RCA stereo recording with the BSO.
It has had several reincarnations; the one I like best is the one that
came out on the CRITICS CHOICE record label. Very clear, esp. the
sound of the harp in Nuages.
von Karajan is excellent in this music, in my opinion.
Wow - I wasn't even aware that he's recorded it. Do you have the details?
David
Oops, sorry! I was thinking of La Mer. (I have these moments...)
Richard Bernas
2003-11-24 21:10:29 UTC
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Post by Terry Simmons
Post by aesthete8
I like Monteux's RCA stereo recording with the BSO.
It has had several reincarnations; the one I like best is the one that
came out on the CRITICS CHOICE record label. Very clear, esp. the
sound of the harp in Nuages.
von Karajan is excellent in this music, in my opinion.
I thought he only recorded - and re-recorded - La Mer.
Where can you find his Nocturnes?

Richard
Alan Cooper
2003-11-24 14:22:54 UTC
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Post by aesthete8
I like Monteux's RCA stereo recording with the BSO.
It has had several reincarnations; the one I like best is the one that
came out on the CRITICS CHOICE record label. Very clear, esp. the
sound of the harp in Nuages.
I imprinted on Cantelli's Nuages and Fetes, and they remain my
favorites. There is a wonderful recording of all three by Van Beinum
that is available on Australian Eloquence.

AC
Diaz Philipp
2003-11-27 15:37:38 UTC
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Post by Alan Cooper
Post by aesthete8
I like Monteux's RCA stereo recording with the BSO.
It has had several reincarnations; the one I like best is the one that
came out on the CRITICS CHOICE record label. Very clear, esp. the
sound of the harp in Nuages.
I imprinted on Cantelli's Nuages and Fetes, and they remain my
favorites.
I agree with that.
Kai-Uwe
Matthew B. Tepper
2003-11-27 18:43:01 UTC
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Post by Diaz Philipp
Post by Alan Cooper
Post by aesthete8
I like Monteux's RCA stereo recording with the BSO.
It has had several reincarnations; the one I like best is the one that
came out on the CRITICS CHOICE record label. Very clear, esp. the
sound of the harp in Nuages.
I imprinted on Cantelli's Nuages and Fetes, and they remain my
favorites.
I agree with that.
I like Cantelli's Debussy recordings too.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
War is Peace. ** Freedom is Slavery. ** It's all Napster's fault!
David7Gable
2003-11-24 17:07:00 UTC
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My post in this thread is a mine of misinformation. To be repaired later.

-david gable
Joshua Kaufman
2003-11-24 17:44:21 UTC
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Post by aesthete8
I like Monteux's RCA stereo recording with the BSO.
It has had several reincarnations; the one I like best is the one that
came out on the CRITICS CHOICE record label. Very clear, esp. the
sound of the harp in Nuages.
My favorite Nocturens, especially in Fetes, is Abaddo on DG.

-Joshua
--
AOL-IM: TerraEpon
David M. Cook
2003-11-24 18:19:47 UTC
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Post by aesthete8
It has had several reincarnations; the one I like best is the one that
came out on the CRITICS CHOICE record label. Very clear, esp. the
sound of the harp in Nuages.
Another vote for the Stokie on EMI:

http://tinyurl.com/wcoy

And also Martinon in that Debussy/Ravel box set, if you don't mind buying
your Debussy in one big lump.

It looks like BRO has a lot of potential Debussy gems:

http://tinyurl.com/wco4

Dave Cook
Stephen North
2003-11-24 22:12:08 UTC
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Post by aesthete8
I like Monteux's RCA stereo recording with the BSO.
It has had several reincarnations; the one I like best is the one that
came out on the CRITICS CHOICE record label. Very clear, esp. the
sound of the harp in Nuages.
Monteux press all the right buttons

In its first CD incarnation (or on LP) top Nocturnes in this house - Haitink.

S
Raymond Hall
2003-11-24 22:49:03 UTC
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"Stephen North" <***@compuserve.com> wrote in message news:***@posting.google.com...
| ***@hotmail.com (aesthete8) wrote in message news:<***@posting.google.com>...
| > I like Monteux's RCA stereo recording with the BSO.
| >
| > It has had several reincarnations; the one I like best is the one that
| > came out on the CRITICS CHOICE record label. Very clear, esp. the
| > sound of the harp in Nuages.
|
| Monteux press all the right buttons
|
| In its first CD incarnation (or on LP) top Nocturnes in this house -
Haitink.

I'll endorse the Haitink Debussy. On an excellent Philips Duo. Although I am
about to wander out and see if I can pick up the van Beinum La Mer, Images,
and Nocturnes on Eloquence, already mentioned in this thread.

Regards,

# http://www.users.bigpond.com/hallraylily/index.html
See You Tamara (Ozzy Osbourne)

Ray, Taree, NSW
David Wake
2003-11-24 23:06:27 UTC
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Post by Raymond Hall
| > I like Monteux's RCA stereo recording with the BSO.
| >
| > It has had several reincarnations; the one I like best is the one that
| > came out on the CRITICS CHOICE record label. Very clear, esp. the
| > sound of the harp in Nuages.
|
| Monteux press all the right buttons
|
| In its first CD incarnation (or on LP) top Nocturnes in this house -
Haitink.
Don't you find that Haitink is too driven in "Fetes"?

David
aesthete8
2003-11-25 04:19:26 UTC
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To find out about a new Monteux bio:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/mybigfatsymposium
Post by David Wake
Post by Raymond Hall
| > I like Monteux's RCA stereo recording with the BSO.
| >
| > It has had several reincarnations; the one I like best is the one that
| > came out on the CRITICS CHOICE record label. Very clear, esp. the
| > sound of the harp in Nuages.
|
| Monteux press all the right buttons
|
| In its first CD incarnation (or on LP) top Nocturnes in this house -
Haitink.
Don't you find that Haitink is too driven in "Fetes"?
David
Matthew B. Tepper
2003-11-25 20:23:53 UTC
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Post by David Wake
Don't you find that Haitink is too driven in "Fetes"?
And this is wrong because...?
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
War is Peace. ** Freedom is Slavery. ** It's all Napster's Fault!
Curtis Croulet
2003-11-25 01:35:13 UTC
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Post by Raymond Hall
I'll endorse the Haitink Debussy.
I like this too, but the trumpets are too close at the start of the procession
in Fêtes.
--
Curtis Croulet
Temecula, California
33° 27' 59" N, 117° 05' 53" W
Richard Bernas
2003-11-25 09:29:25 UTC
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Post by Curtis Croulet
Post by Raymond Hall
I'll endorse the Haitink Debussy.
I like this too, but the trumpets are too close at the start of the procession
in Fêtes.
They also mis-read the upbeat to the fanfare figure, playing it too
fast.
But overall, it is a great performance. A lot of Nocturnes depends on
first rate individual and collective woodwind playing and this is
where the Concertgebouw and Boston SO recordings excel.

I wish Abbado's BSO/DG version was better transfered. Nuages esp.
sounds unfocused, as if the tape EQ was misjudged. I didn't think the
Berlin re-make was as good.

Richard
Curtis Croulet
2003-11-25 16:16:13 UTC
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I played this after this little exchange of messages, and I was reminded why
I've always liked this recording. The sound is great, too. Yeah, I wish the
trumpets were further away, but it's not fatal.
--
Curtis Croulet
Temecula, California
33° 27' 59" N, 117° 05' 53" W
aesthete8
2003-11-26 00:32:16 UTC
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Concerning Haitink's recording, nothing happened to me when I listened
to it.

And with regard to Stokowski, I felt that he was too
mystical/spiritual and as a result, did not capture the flow which I
feel is crucial to this music.

Concerning Cantelli, I liked his version which was very different from
his mentor Toscanini's 1940 live broadcast. Cantelli captured the
flow, but Toscanini's sounded like puffy white clouds w/a rose blush
sailing like QE2's across an azure sky. Too monumental and
picturesque for me.
Post by Curtis Croulet
I played this after this little exchange of messages, and I was reminded why
I've always liked this recording. The sound is great, too. Yeah, I wish the
trumpets were further away, but it's not fatal.
David7Gable
2003-11-29 02:29:49 UTC
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Who would be playing cor anglais in the New Philharmonia Orchestra when Boulez
recorded the Nocturnes for Columbia in December 1968? I love the playing.

-david
J. R. Robinson
2003-11-26 06:55:08 UTC
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Post by aesthete8
I like Monteux's RCA stereo recording with the BSO.
It has had several reincarnations; the one I like best is the
one that came out on the CRITICS CHOICE record label. Very
clear, esp. the sound of the harp in Nuages.
Of the recordings I'm well acquainted with -- those directed by
Cantelli, Beinum, Stokowski, Fournet, and Haitink -- I favor the
Fournet [Supraphon]. The Czech PO under Fournet produce a more
earthy and detailed, less suave and homogenized sound than do the
Concertgebouw under Haitink, with Fournet allowing individual
voices, particularly those of the woodwinds, to stand out a bit
more from the orchestral fabric. Fournet adopts slightly slower
tempos than Haitink in "Nuages" and "Fêtes," significantly slower
in "Sirènes," but he generates and expertly maintains inner
tension throughout, and the music flows unimpeded with a natural
sense of ebb and flow. "Fêtes" is treated to a uniquely buoyant
performance, with rhythms being less trenchant but more "well
sprung" and balletic than usual and with woodwinds bouncing
around like a bunch of Mendelssohn's faeries; the stately
procession that runs through the middle of the festivities has
just a hint of a swagger to it that I really like, as well.
Fournet's account of this movement provides a fascinating
contrast to Cantelli's, which is notable for its tremendous sweep
and momentum.

Beinum directs a taut and bracing account with excellent clarity
-- in other words, pretty much what you'd expect from Beinum and
his orchestra. I like it well enough, but it generally strikes
me as a touch too fast and forthright, and tension could be
greater. Stokowski stretches "Nuages" further than he can
sustain it, and tension goes slack. His "Sirènes" goes better,
and his "Fêtes" is quite imaginative, but his performance doesn't
do much for me on the whole. I like Haitink's "Nuages" and
"Sirènes" quite a lot, but his "Fêtes" is too rhythmically square
and inflexible for my liking; even at the moderate pace he
adopts, the movement strikes me as a bit mechanical and
relentless.

I've not heard the Monteux/BSO recording but strongly suspect
that I would like it, as I like Monteux's other Debussy
recordings a great deal. His 1963 account of <Images> with the
LSO is my favorite of that work.

J. R. Robinson
Denver, Colorado
aesthete8
2003-11-27 00:17:45 UTC
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Concerning Monteux's BSO recording, I think you'll like it.

Keep in mind that M. knew Debussy; he conducted the ballet premiere of
L'APRES MIDI...
Post by J. R. Robinson
Post by aesthete8
I like Monteux's RCA stereo recording with the BSO.
It has had several reincarnations; the one I like best is the
one that came out on the CRITICS CHOICE record label. Very
clear, esp. the sound of the harp in Nuages.
Of the recordings I'm well acquainted with -- those directed by
Cantelli, Beinum, Stokowski, Fournet, and Haitink -- I favor the
Fournet [Supraphon]. The Czech PO under Fournet produce a more
earthy and detailed, less suave and homogenized sound than do the
Concertgebouw under Haitink, with Fournet allowing individual
voices, particularly those of the woodwinds, to stand out a bit
more from the orchestral fabric. Fournet adopts slightly slower
tempos than Haitink in "Nuages" and "Fêtes," significantly slower
in "Sirènes," but he generates and expertly maintains inner
tension throughout, and the music flows unimpeded with a natural
sense of ebb and flow. "Fêtes" is treated to a uniquely buoyant
performance, with rhythms being less trenchant but more "well
sprung" and balletic than usual and with woodwinds bouncing
around like a bunch of Mendelssohn's faeries; the stately
procession that runs through the middle of the festivities has
just a hint of a swagger to it that I really like, as well.
Fournet's account of this movement provides a fascinating
contrast to Cantelli's, which is notable for its tremendous sweep
and momentum.
Beinum directs a taut and bracing account with excellent clarity
-- in other words, pretty much what you'd expect from Beinum and
his orchestra. I like it well enough, but it generally strikes
me as a touch too fast and forthright, and tension could be
greater. Stokowski stretches "Nuages" further than he can
sustain it, and tension goes slack. His "Sirènes" goes better,
and his "Fêtes" is quite imaginative, but his performance doesn't
do much for me on the whole. I like Haitink's "Nuages" and
"Sirènes" quite a lot, but his "Fêtes" is too rhythmically square
and inflexible for my liking; even at the moderate pace he
adopts, the movement strikes me as a bit mechanical and
relentless.
I've not heard the Monteux/BSO recording but strongly suspect
that I would like it, as I like Monteux's other Debussy
recordings a great deal. His 1963 account of <Images> with the
LSO is my favorite of that work.
J. R. Robinson
Denver, Colorado
n***@yahoo.com
2003-11-26 18:48:02 UTC
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Post by aesthete8
I like Monteux's RCA stereo recording with the BSO.
It has had several reincarnations; the one I like best is the one that
came out on the CRITICS CHOICE record label. Very clear, esp. the
sound of the harp in Nuages.
My two cents:

Favorite versions:
1.) Stokowski, Philadelphia Orchestra (recorded 1937-1939); on
Biddulph WHL 013 CD: "Leopold Stokowski Conducts Music From France
(Vol.III)" Sumptuous, yet distant and spare. Lovely.

2.) Yan Pascal Tortelier, Ulster Orchestra (Chandos); 1990s; my
favorite recording of the "Sirenes," sharply and cleanly done by a
chorus of high-school girls! Excellent sound. This is currently a
$2.99 steal from Berkshire with a superb La Mer, etc.

3.) Stokowski/London SO (EMI) 1957; Voluptuous, famous stereo
recording.

Other good ones:
-Monteux/LSO and Monteux/BSO
-Celibidache/Berlin; 1946
-Giulini/Philharmonia Orch (EMI); 1963?
-Martinon/French Radio Orch. (EMI); 1974?
-Haitink/Concertgebouw (Philips) Overrated, but oft-recommended and
very good in any case. There's a certain tension and hurridness and
maybe even a slight lack of "atmosphere" in this account that is not
my cup of tea in this music. I haven't listened to it in a long time,
even though I admire the clean orchestral playing.


Other interesting versions:
-Furtwangler/Berlin PO (Nuages & Fetes only) (rec. 1951); Yes, WF ! A
very different view, atmospheric but maybe too "heavy;" an interesting
alternative.
-Munch/BSO (RCA) (Nuages & Fetes only)
-Paray/Detroit Sy. Orch (Mercury)

Versions I thought were banal and dull and were culled from my
collection:
-Davis/Boston SO (Philips)
-Thomas/Philharmonia Orch (CBS/Sony)

Some versions I have that I don't remember anything about:

-Reiner/Philharmonic SO of NY (rec. 1938) (Nuages, Fetes only)
-Mravinsky/Leningrad PO (1960)

Other than Tortelier, I have not heard any recent versions, though the
DG Boulez sounds intriguing.

-kev rayburn
(who used to make fun of cats but now has two of them!)
Matthew B. Tepper
2003-11-26 20:41:18 UTC
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Post by n***@yahoo.com
2.) Yan Pascal Tortelier, Ulster Orchestra (Chandos); 1990s; my
favorite recording of the "Sirenes," sharply and cleanly done by a
chorus of high-school girls! Excellent sound. This is currently a
$2.99 steal from Berkshire with a superb La Mer, etc.
Ka-Ching! You just made a sale to a patent attorney in Houston. ;--)
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
War is Peace. ** Freedom is Slavery. ** It's all Napster's Fault!
Andy Evans
2003-11-26 20:50:42 UTC
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Yan Pascal Tortelier is a bloody good conductor - he should get a major
orchestra.

=== Andy Evans ===
Visit our Website:- http://www.artsandmedia.com
Audio, music and health pages and interesting links.
Matthew B. Tepper
2003-11-26 20:57:41 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
Yan Pascal Tortelier is a bloody good conductor - he should get a major
orchestra.
Didn't the Hallé consider him, or have him as principal guest, years ago?
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
War is Peace. ** Freedom is Slavery. ** It's all Napster's Fault!
Andy Evans
2003-11-26 21:24:50 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
Yan Pascal Tortelier is a bloody good conductor - he should get a major
orchestra.
Didn't the Hallé consider him, or have him as principal guest, years ago?>>

He hangs around the BBC orchestras. OK, but there are worse conductors with
better orchestras. He's really good in Debussy, Ravel, Falla etc.

=== Andy Evans ===
Visit our Website:- http://www.artsandmedia.com
Audio, music and health pages and interesting links.
Mazzolata
2003-11-26 21:54:56 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
Post by Andy Evans
Yan Pascal Tortelier is a bloody good conductor - he should get a major
orchestra.
Didn't the Hallé consider him, or have him as principal guest, years ago?>>
He hangs around the BBC orchestras. OK, but there are worse conductors with
better orchestras. He's really good in Debussy, Ravel, Falla etc.
I like his Poulenc Gloria and Stabat Mater with the BBC.
--
------------------------------------------------------------------

Got to get behind the mule
in the morning and plow
David M. Cook
2003-11-26 21:07:21 UTC
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Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by n***@yahoo.com
2.) Yan Pascal Tortelier, Ulster Orchestra (Chandos); 1990s; my
favorite recording of the "Sirenes," sharply and cleanly done by a
chorus of high-school girls! Excellent sound. This is currently a
$2.99 steal from Berkshire with a superb La Mer, etc.
Ka-Ching! You just made a sale to a patent attorney in Houston. ;--)
I'm afraid that one sailed right over my head.

Dave Cook
Matthew B. Tepper
2003-11-27 03:54:58 UTC
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Post by David M. Cook
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by n***@yahoo.com
2.) Yan Pascal Tortelier, Ulster Orchestra (Chandos); 1990s; my
favorite recording of the "Sirenes," sharply and cleanly done by a
chorus of high-school girls! Excellent sound. This is currently a
$2.99 steal from Berkshire with a superb La Mer, etc.
Ka-Ching! You just made a sale to a patent attorney in Houston. ;--)
I'm afraid that one sailed right over my head.
I'd have answered you privately if I had a proper email address for you.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
War is Peace. ** Freedom is Slavery. ** It's all Napster's fault!
David M. Cook
2003-11-27 18:28:18 UTC
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Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by David M. Cook
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by n***@yahoo.com
2.) Yan Pascal Tortelier, Ulster Orchestra (Chandos); 1990s; my
favorite recording of the "Sirenes," sharply and cleanly done by a
chorus of high-school girls! Excellent sound. This is currently a
$2.99 steal from Berkshire with a superb La Mer, etc.
Ka-Ching! You just made a sale to a patent attorney in Houston. ;--)
I'm afraid that one sailed right over my head.
I'd have answered you privately if I had a proper email address for you.
d a v e a t d a v i d c o o k d o t o r g

Dave Cook
Matthew B. Tepper
2003-11-27 18:43:02 UTC
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Post by David M. Cook
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by David M. Cook
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by n***@yahoo.com
2.) Yan Pascal Tortelier, Ulster Orchestra (Chandos); 1990s; my
favorite recording of the "Sirenes," sharply and cleanly done by a
chorus of high-school girls! Excellent sound. This is currently a
$2.99 steal from Berkshire with a superb La Mer, etc.
Ka-Ching! You just made a sale to a patent attorney in Houston.
;--)
I'm afraid that one sailed right over my head.
I'd have answered you privately if I had a proper email address for you.
d a v e a t d a v i d c o o k d o t o r g
Watch your mail.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
War is Peace. ** Freedom is Slavery. ** It's all Napster's fault!
aesthete8
2003-11-27 00:16:01 UTC
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I have heard the Paray recording of Nuages and his rendition is the
fastest with Monteux coming in 2nd.

I have noticed that it is the non-French conductors who linger over
Nuages in attempt to bring out things in the music that I doubt
Debussy had intended.

Another conductor who has not been mentioned yet is Desormiere who had
a 10" lp of the Nocturnes.
Post by n***@yahoo.com
Post by aesthete8
I like Monteux's RCA stereo recording with the BSO.
It has had several reincarnations; the one I like best is the one that
came out on the CRITICS CHOICE record label. Very clear, esp. the
sound of the harp in Nuages.
1.) Stokowski, Philadelphia Orchestra (recorded 1937-1939); on
Biddulph WHL 013 CD: "Leopold Stokowski Conducts Music From France
(Vol.III)" Sumptuous, yet distant and spare. Lovely.
2.) Yan Pascal Tortelier, Ulster Orchestra (Chandos); 1990s; my
favorite recording of the "Sirenes," sharply and cleanly done by a
chorus of high-school girls! Excellent sound. This is currently a
$2.99 steal from Berkshire with a superb La Mer, etc.
3.) Stokowski/London SO (EMI) 1957; Voluptuous, famous stereo
recording.
-Monteux/LSO and Monteux/BSO
-Celibidache/Berlin; 1946
-Giulini/Philharmonia Orch (EMI); 1963?
-Martinon/French Radio Orch. (EMI); 1974?
-Haitink/Concertgebouw (Philips) Overrated, but oft-recommended and
very good in any case. There's a certain tension and hurridness and
maybe even a slight lack of "atmosphere" in this account that is not
my cup of tea in this music. I haven't listened to it in a long time,
even though I admire the clean orchestral playing.
-Furtwangler/Berlin PO (Nuages & Fetes only) (rec. 1951); Yes, WF ! A
very different view, atmospheric but maybe too "heavy;" an interesting
alternative.
-Munch/BSO (RCA) (Nuages & Fetes only)
-Paray/Detroit Sy. Orch (Mercury)
Versions I thought were banal and dull and were culled from my
-Davis/Boston SO (Philips)
-Thomas/Philharmonia Orch (CBS/Sony)
-Reiner/Philharmonic SO of NY (rec. 1938) (Nuages, Fetes only)
-Mravinsky/Leningrad PO (1960)
Other than Tortelier, I have not heard any recent versions, though the
DG Boulez sounds intriguing.
-kev rayburn
(who used to make fun of cats but now has two of them!)
Andy Evans
2003-11-27 12:00:11 UTC
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I have noticed that it is the non-French conductors who linger over Nuages in
attempt to bring out things in the music that I doubt Debussy had intended.>

Same with the piano Preludes - I did a timing of several pianists and French
ones were among the fastest, the best by far to my ears being Cortot. In one
case he was twice as fast as Zimmerman. It's possible that these works have a
'natural speed' in which the ideas hang together, and that lingering does
little to improve matters.

=== Andy Evans ===
Visit our Website:- http://www.artsandmedia.com
Audio, music and health pages and interesting links.
aesthete8
2003-11-27 16:49:45 UTC
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I think that the French are also more concerned with the flow of the
music rather than an analysis/scritinization approach which usually
impedes the flow.
Post by Andy Evans
I have noticed that it is the non-French conductors who linger over Nuages in
attempt to bring out things in the music that I doubt Debussy had intended.>
Same with the piano Preludes - I did a timing of several pianists and French
ones were among the fastest, the best by far to my ears being Cortot. In one
case he was twice as fast as Zimmerman. It's possible that these works have a
'natural speed' in which the ideas hang together, and that lingering does
little to improve matters.
=== Andy Evans ===
Visit our Website:- http://www.artsandmedia.com
Audio, music and health pages and interesting links.
David7Gable
2003-11-29 02:32:27 UTC
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Post by aesthete8
I think that the French are also more concerned with the flow of the
music rather than an analysis/scritinization approach which usually
impedes the flow.
Can you provide clear and unmistakable examples of these opposite approaches?

-david gable
aesthete8
2003-11-30 20:44:10 UTC
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Could an example be the lack of success non-French singers seem to
have performing melodies (French art songs)?

It seems to me that the French concern for creating an atmosphere and
their viewpoint that the performer is supposed to bring a work of art
to life (ala the theme of Sorcerer's A.) by allowing the meaning of
the song (meaning usually derived from analysis/scrutinization) to NOT
dominate the performance.
Post by David7Gable
Post by aesthete8
I think that the French are also more concerned with the flow of the
music rather than an analysis/scritinization approach which usually
impedes the flow.
Can you provide clear and unmistakable examples of these opposite approaches?
-david gable
D***@aol.com
2013-08-20 18:05:56 UTC
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Post by aesthete8
I have heard the Paray recording of Nuages and his rendition is the
fastest with Monteux coming in 2nd.
I have noticed that it is the non-French conductors who linger over
Nuages in attempt to bring out things in the music that I doubt
Debussy had intended.
A very late reply (with some snipping) to this interesting thread, which I guess I missed in 2003. Thanks to its recent resurrector. Regarding Monteux and Debussy, the following is from John Canarina's biography "Pierre Monteux, Maitre" (Amadeus Press, 2003), p. 24. Writing about the Colonne Orchestra's 1908 season and Monteux's participation it, Canarina says that Debussy conducted the orchestra's first performance of La Mer. Monteux was a member of the orchestra. He later conducted a number of rehearsals and performances at which Debussy was present and evidently made his convictions known pretty forcefully. Canarina says the following very interesting and pertinent things;

"Monteux would later recall that Debussy was impatient with conductors and other musicians who performed his works in what he considered to be an excessively delicate and 'perfumed' style. He disliked the term 'impressionism' as applied to his music and insisted that when he wrote *forte* [loud] he wanted *forte*. 'Impressionism' in music implies a subtle depiction of moods and emotions rather than an aurally graphic representation of the subject matter. Debussy would have none of this, though the term continued to be used to describe his music, in spite of his protestations."
Post by aesthete8
Another conductor who has not been mentioned yet is Desormiere who had
a 10" lp of the Nocturnes.
Total agreement! The Supraphon recordings are mono-only, circa 1950 I believe, but the basic sound is very good and the performances magnificent. The same applies to La Mer, recorded by Desormiere with the Czech PO at the same time. Important recordings by a gifted man and conductor whose career was cruelly cut much too short by a disabling stoke circa 1954.

Don Tait
m***@gmail.com
2013-08-20 22:27:31 UTC
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Post by D***@aol.com
Post by aesthete8
Another conductor who has not been mentioned yet is Desormiere who had
a 10" lp of the Nocturnes.
Total agreement! The Supraphon recordings are mono-only, circa 1950 I believe, but the basic sound is very good and the performances magnificent. The same applies to La Mer, recorded by Desormiere with the Czech PO at the same time. Important recordings by a gifted man and conductor whose career was cruelly cut much too short by a disabling stoke circa 1954.
I have the following 12" lp. Does it include the Supraphon NUAGES and FETES?:

Loading Image...
m***@gmail.com
2013-08-20 22:32:56 UTC
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Post by m***@gmail.com
Post by D***@aol.com
Post by aesthete8
Another conductor who has not been mentioned yet is Desormiere who had
a 10" lp of the Nocturnes.
Total agreement! The Supraphon recordings are mono-only, circa 1950 I believe, but the basic sound is very good and the performances magnificent. The same applies to La Mer, recorded by Desormiere with the Czech PO at the same time. Important recordings by a gifted man and conductor whose career was cruelly cut much too short by a disabling stoke circa 1954.
http://classicvinyl.com/files/images/IMG_3797.jpg
Isn't the following the cd for that lp?:

Loading Image...
D***@aol.com
2013-08-22 17:12:02 UTC
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Post by m***@gmail.com
Post by D***@aol.com
Post by aesthete8
Another conductor who has not been mentioned yet is Desormiere who had
a 10" lp of the Nocturnes.
Total agreement! The Supraphon recordings are mono-only, circa 1950 I believe, but the basic sound is very good and the performances magnificent. The same applies to La Mer, recorded by Desormiere with the Czech PO at the same time. Important recordings by a gifted man and conductor whose career was cruelly cut much too short by a disabling stoke circa 1954.
http://classicvinyl.com/files/images/IMG_3797.jpg
Yes, it does. Parliament LPs were budget-priced USA issues of (mostly) Supraphon recordings, although some other East European labels were also represented, such as Electrecord from Romania.

Don Tait
m***@gmail.com
2013-08-24 08:17:06 UTC
Reply
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Post by m***@gmail.com
Post by D***@aol.com
Post by aesthete8
Another conductor who has not been mentioned yet is Desormiere who had
a 10" lp of the Nocturnes.
Total agreement! The Supraphon recordings are mono-only, circa 1950 I believe, but the basic sound is very good and the performances magnificent. The same applies to La Mer, recorded by Desormiere with the Czech PO at the same time. Important recordings by a gifted man and conductor whose career was cruelly cut much too short by a disabling stoke circa 1954.
http://classicvinyl.com/files/images/IMG_3797.jpg
Guess what pianist loved Desormiere's LA MER?:

http://74.6.116.71/search/srpcache?ei=UTF-8&p=%22Richter+said+further%2C+on+listening+to+his+favorite+recording+%28by+Roger+D%C3%A9sormi%C3%A8re%29%2C+%22La+mer+again%3B+shall+I+ever+tire+of+listening+to+it%2C+of+contemplating+it+and+breathing+its+atmosphere%3F+And+each+time+is+like+the+first+time%21+An+enigma%2C+a+miracle+of+natural+reproduction%3B+no%2C+even+more+than+that%2C+sheer+magic%21%22&fr=yfp-t-901&u=http://cc.bingj.com/cache.aspx?q=%22Richter+said+further%2c+on+listening+to+his+favorite+recording+(by+Roger+D%C3%A9sormi%C3%A8re)%2c+%22+La+mer+again%3b+shall+I+ever+tire+of+listening+to+it%2c+of+contemplating+it+and+breathing+its+atmosphere%3f+And+each+time+is+like+the+first+time!+An+enigma%2c+a+miracle+of+natural+reproduction%3b+no%2c+even+more+than+that%2c+sheer+magic!%22&d=4654530199028159&mkt=en-US&setlang=en-US&w=h2DpukwHNDtEopaZto3AWUm2jk4L_AdI&icp=1&.intl=us&sig=7HahGp7x_vqtwdiCC54zXw--
m***@gmail.com
2013-08-24 08:25:58 UTC
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Post by m***@gmail.com
Post by D***@aol.com
Post by aesthete8
Another conductor who has not been mentioned yet is Desormiere who had
a 10" lp of the Nocturnes.
Total agreement! The Supraphon recordings are mono-only, circa 1950 I believe, but the basic sound is very good and the performances magnificent. The same applies to La Mer, recorded by Desormiere with the Czech PO at the same time. Important recordings by a gifted man and conductor whose career was cruelly cut much too short by a disabling stoke circa 1954.
http://classicvinyl.com/files/images/IMG_3797.jpg
Concerning Desormiere's LA MER, guess what pianist said:

- Best recording of any work ever.

http://books.google.com/books?id=mH89AQAAIAAJ&q=richter+desormiere+%22best+recording+of+any+work+ever%22&dq=richter+desormiere+%22best+recording+of+any+work+ever%22&hl=en&sa=X&ei=22wYUvWcGOuvigKSooDQDQ&ved=0CEAQ6AEwAQ
l***@aol.com
2013-08-24 18:44:49 UTC
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Richter
Post by m***@gmail.com
Post by m***@gmail.com
Post by D***@aol.com
Post by aesthete8
Another conductor who has not been mentioned yet is Desormiere who had
a 10" lp of the Nocturnes.
Total agreement! The Supraphon recordings are mono-only, circa 1950 I believe, but the basic sound is very good and the performances magnificent. The same applies to La Mer, recorded by Desormiere with the Czech PO at the same time. Important recordings by a gifted man and conductor whose career was cruelly cut much too short by a disabling stoke circa 1954.
http://classicvinyl.com/files/images/IMG_3797.jpg
- Best recording of any work ever.
http://books.google.com/books?id=mH89AQAAIAAJ&q=richter+desormiere+%22best+recording+of+any+work+ever%22&dq=richter+desormiere+%22best+recording+of+any+work+ever%22&hl=en&sa=X&ei=22wYUvWcGOuvigKSooDQDQ&ved=0CEAQ6AEwAQ
Herman
2013-08-25 10:50:20 UTC
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Humanly it ought to be possible to quit these inane guessing games.
Lionel Tacchini
2013-08-25 11:06:45 UTC
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Post by Herman
Humanly it ought to be possible to quit these inane guessing games.
Technically, filters work fine.
--
Lionel Tacchini
"Ach, Du lieber Augustin, alles ist hin ..."
Al Eisner
2013-08-23 00:20:05 UTC
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Post by D***@aol.com
Post by aesthete8
I have heard the Paray recording of Nuages and his rendition is the
fastest with Monteux coming in 2nd.
I have noticed that it is the non-French conductors who linger over
Nuages in attempt to bring out things in the music that I doubt
Debussy had intended.
A very late reply (with some snipping) to this interesting thread, which I guess I missed in 2003. Thanks to its recent resurrector. Regarding Monteux and Debussy, the following is from John Canarina's biography "Pierre Monteux, Maitre" (Amadeus Press, 2003), p. 24. Writing about the Colonne Orchestra's 1908 season and Monteux's participation it, Canarina says that Debussy conducted the orchestra's first performance of La Mer. Monteux was a member of the orchestra. He later conducted a number of rehearsals and performances at which Debussy was present and evidently made his convictions known pretty forcefully. Canarina says the following very interesting and pertinent things;
"Monteux would later recall that Debussy was impatient with conductors and other musicians who performed his works in what he considered to be an excessively delicate and 'perfumed' style. He disliked the term 'impressionism' as applied to his music and insisted that when he wrote *forte* [loud] he wanted *forte*. 'Impressionism' in music implies a subtle depiction of moods and emotions rather than an aurally graphic representation of the subject matter. Debussy would have none of this, though the term continued to be used to describe his music, in spite of his protestations."
This is quite enlightening. I was wondering if Toscanini was performing
any Debussy during the composer's lifetime. A google search turned up
this interesting book excerpt -- http://tinyurl.com/mxlhgfd --
but it doesn't seem to quite answer the question.
--
Al Eisner
m***@gmail.com
2013-08-23 01:54:41 UTC
Reply
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Post by Al Eisner
Post by D***@aol.com
Post by aesthete8
I have heard the Paray recording of Nuages and his rendition is the
fastest with Monteux coming in 2nd.
I have noticed that it is the non-French conductors who linger over
Nuages in attempt to bring out things in the music that I doubt
Debussy had intended.
A very late reply (with some snipping) to this interesting thread, which I guess I missed in 2003. Thanks to its recent resurrector. Regarding Monteux and Debussy, the following is from John Canarina's biography "Pierre Monteux, Maitre" (Amadeus Press, 2003), p. 24. Writing about the Colonne Orchestra's 1908 season and Monteux's participation it, Canarina says that Debussy conducted the orchestra's first performance of La Mer. Monteux was a member of the orchestra. He later conducted a number of rehearsals and performances at which Debussy was present and evidently made his convictions known pretty forcefully. Canarina says the following very interesting and pertinent things;
"Monteux would later recall that Debussy was impatient with conductors and other musicians who performed his works in what he considered to be an excessively delicate and 'perfumed' style. He disliked the term 'impressionism' as applied to his music and insisted that when he wrote *forte* [loud] he wanted *forte*. 'Impressionism' in music implies a subtle depiction of moods and emotions rather than an aurally graphic representation of the subject matter. Debussy would have none of this, though the term continued to be used to describe his music, in spite of his protestations."
This is quite enlightening. I was wondering if Toscanini was performing
any Debussy during the composer's lifetime. A google search turned up
this interesting book excerpt -- http://tinyurl.com/mxlhgfd --
but it doesn't seem to quite answer the question.
--
Al Eisner
There is a Toscanini YAHOO GROUP and here is a discussion of his re-orchestrations:

http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/arturo_toscanini/message/2375
m***@gmail.com
2013-08-23 02:04:29 UTC
Reply
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Post by Al Eisner
Post by D***@aol.com
Post by aesthete8
I have heard the Paray recording of Nuages and his rendition is the
fastest with Monteux coming in 2nd.
I have noticed that it is the non-French conductors who linger over
Nuages in attempt to bring out things in the music that I doubt
Debussy had intended.
A very late reply (with some snipping) to this interesting thread, which I guess I missed in 2003. Thanks to its recent resurrector. Regarding Monteux and Debussy, the following is from John Canarina's biography "Pierre Monteux, Maitre" (Amadeus Press, 2003), p. 24. Writing about the Colonne Orchestra's 1908 season and Monteux's participation it, Canarina says that Debussy conducted the orchestra's first performance of La Mer. Monteux was a member of the orchestra. He later conducted a number of rehearsals and performances at which Debussy was present and evidently made his convictions known pretty forcefully. Canarina says the following very interesting and pertinent things;
"Monteux would later recall that Debussy was impatient with conductors and other musicians who performed his works in what he considered to be an excessively delicate and 'perfumed' style. He disliked the term 'impressionism' as applied to his music and insisted that when he wrote *forte* [loud] he wanted *forte*. 'Impressionism' in music implies a subtle depiction of moods and emotions rather than an aurally graphic representation of the subject matter. Debussy would have none of this, though the term continued to be used to describe his music, in spite of his protestations."
This is quite enlightening. I was wondering if Toscanini was performing
any Debussy during the composer's lifetime...
Concerning your wondering:

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!searchin/rec.music.classical.recordings/%22My$20understanding$20is$20that$20Toscanini$27s$20occasional$20retouching$20of$20Debussy$27s$20orchestration$20was$20put$20into$20practice$20only$20after$20Toscanini$20had$20asked$20Debussy$20about$20it$20and$20received$20his$20approval.%22/rec.music.classical.recordings/PfAtW7lQHz0/Vof7PmziNgAJ
m***@gmail.com
2013-08-31 10:21:01 UTC
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On Thursday, August 22, 2013 2:20:05 PM UTC-10, Al Eisner wrote:

...I was wondering if Toscanini was performing any Debussy during the composer's lifetime...

Yes he did according to the following:

http://74.6.116.71/search/srpcache?ei=UTF-8&p=%22Debussy+agreed+to+some+refinements+Toscanini+suggested+in+the+scoring+%28including%2C+in+the+first+movement%2C+doubling+the+divided+cello+passage+with+violas+and+adding+trumpets+to+the+final+climax%29%22&fr=yfp-t-900&u=http://cc.bingj.com/cache.aspx?q=%22Debussy+agreed+to+some+refinements+Toscanini+suggested+in+the+scoring+(including%2c+in+the+first+movement%2c+doubling+the+divided+cello+passage+with+violas+and+adding+trumpets+to+the+final+climax)%22&d=4781223153173641&mkt=en-US&setlang=en-US&w=MHHvgqURFJR-P7xLi0uca3WE2qwCbBsR&icp=1&.intl=us&sig=YS8NXdWp49g5Yn.xrfbLMQ--
m***@gmail.com
2013-08-20 11:10:17 UTC
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Post by n***@yahoo.com
Post by aesthete8
I like Monteux's RCA stereo recording with the BSO.
It has had several reincarnations; the one I like best is the one that
came out on the CRITICS CHOICE record label. Very clear, esp. the
sound of the harp in Nuages.
1.) Stokowski, Philadelphia Orchestra (recorded 1937-1939); on
Biddulph WHL 013 CD: "Leopold Stokowski Conducts Music From France
(Vol.III)" Sumptuous, yet distant and spare. Lovely.
To listen to Stokowski's 1937 "Nuages," click on the following link:

http://www.stokowski.org/sitebuilderfiles/371107_Debussy_Nuages_Hc.mp3
Kerrison
2013-08-20 13:28:16 UTC
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If we have any expert Debussy detectives in here with good extension speakers attached to their computers, maybe they could identify the conductor & orchestra in this You Tube upload. Despite several requests in the comments section, the uploader has failed to divulge the performers. The hall acoustic is very airy after a swimming-pool fashion, so that might give a clue, as might the close miking ...


Frank Berger
2013-08-20 18:01:28 UTC
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Post by m***@gmail.com
Post by n***@yahoo.com
Post by aesthete8
I like Monteux's RCA stereo recording with the BSO.
It has had several reincarnations; the one I like best is the one that
came out on the CRITICS CHOICE record label. Very clear, esp. the
sound of the harp in Nuages.
1.) Stokowski, Philadelphia Orchestra (recorded 1937-1939); on
Biddulph WHL 013 CD: "Leopold Stokowski Conducts Music From France
(Vol.III)" Sumptuous, yet distant and spare. Lovely.
http://www.stokowski.org/sitebuilderfiles/371107_Debussy_Nuages_Hc.mp3
Have you listened to it?
m***@gmail.com
2013-08-24 07:50:23 UTC
Reply
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Post by aesthete8
I like Monteux's RCA stereo recording with the BSO.
It has had several reincarnations; the one I like best is the one that
came out on the CRITICS CHOICE record label. Very clear, esp. the
sound of the harp in Nuages.
According to the CAMBRIDGE COMPANION TO DEBUSSY:

- Inghelbrecht's best recordings include a...studio recording of Nocturnes...Coppola is heard to best advantage in...Nocturnes.

http://books.google.com/books?id=dxfALsh5wgUC&printsec=frontcover&dq=cambridge+debussy&hl=en&sa=X&ei=8mIYUtjtKuTuigKruoHwBA&ved=0CC8Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=%22inghelbrecht's%20best%20recordings%22&f=false
m***@gmail.com
2013-08-25 10:26:59 UTC
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Post by aesthete8
I like Monteux's RCA stereo recording with the BSO.
It has had several reincarnations; the one I like best is the one that
came out on the CRITICS CHOICE record label. Very clear, esp. the
sound of the harp in Nuages.
- Inghelbrecht's best recordings include a...studio recording of Nocturnes...Coppola is heard to best advantage in...Nocturnes.
http://books.google.com/books?id=dxfALsh5wgUC&printsec=frontcover&dq=cambridge+debussy&hl=en&sa=X&ei=8mIYUtjtKuTuigKruoHwBA&ved=0CC8Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=%22inghelbrecht's%20best%20recordings%22&f=false
Concerning Coppola:

http://74.6.116.71/search/srpcache?ei=UTF-8&p=%22His+recordings+of+Debussy+have+been+described+as+%22without+rival+for+the+period%22%2C+with+his+1938+recording+of+Nocturnes+eulogized+as+a+%22masterpiece%22%22&fr=yfp-t-900&u=http://cc.bingj.com/cache.aspx?q=%22His+recordings+of+Debussy+have+been+described+as+%22+without+rival+for+the+period%22%2c+with+his+1938+recording+of+Nocturnes+eulogized+as+a+%22+masterpiece%22%22&d=4949169194273168&mkt=en-US&setlang=en-US&w=XkntacrtpQjKn1g8tA4N44mWJJy6ZC8k&icp=1&.intl=us&sig=A6jIbKJ0FzCX.p24iaMHKw--
m***@gmail.com
2013-08-26 03:33:14 UTC
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Post by m***@gmail.com
Post by m***@gmail.com
Post by aesthete8
I like Monteux's RCA stereo recording with the BSO.
It has had several reincarnations; the one I like best is the one that
came out on the CRITICS CHOICE record label. Very clear, esp. the
sound of the harp in Nuages.
- Inghelbrecht's best recordings include a...studio recording of Nocturnes...Coppola is heard to best advantage in...Nocturnes.
http://books.google.com/books?id=dxfALsh5wgUC&printsec=frontcover&dq=cambridge+debussy&hl=en&sa=X&ei=8mIYUtjtKuTuigKruoHwBA&ved=0CC8Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=%22inghelbrecht's%20best%20recordings%22&f=false
http://74.6.116.71/search/srpcache?ei=UTF-8&p=%22His+recordings+of+Debussy+have+been+described+as+%22without+rival+for+the+period%22%2C+with+his+1938+recording+of+Nocturnes+eulogized+as+a+%22masterpiece%22%22&fr=yfp-t-900&u=http://cc.bingj.com/cache.aspx?q=%22His+recordings+of+Debussy+have+been+described+as+%22+without+rival+for+the+period%22%2c+with+his+1938+recording+of+Nocturnes+eulogized+as+a+%22+masterpiece%22%22&d=4949169194273168&mkt=en-US&setlang=en-US&w=XkntacrtpQjKn1g8tA4N44mWJJy6ZC8k&icp=1&.intl=us&sig=A6jIbKJ0FzCX.p24iaMHKw--
It may be of interest to know that Coppola's 1928 recording of Nocturnes can be heard on Youtube.
c***@ckhowell.com
2013-08-28 06:51:22 UTC
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It may be of interest to know that Coppola's 1928 recording of Nocturnes can be heard on Youtube.

Any thoughts on Silvestri? Surely a prime contender if a voluptuous, hedonistic view is preferred.

Chris Howell
m***@gmail.com
2013-09-07 11:25:09 UTC
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Post by c***@ckhowell.com
Any thoughts on Silvestri? Surely a prime contender if a voluptuous, hedonistic view is preferred.
Chris Howell
According to Morin's book:

http://books.google.com/books?id=ayT5T59ckzIC&pg=PA254&dq=%22silvestri+and+the+Orchestre+de+la+Societe+des+Concerts+du+Conservatoire+are+only%22&hl=en&sa=X&ei=0wwrUq-8K6KWiQKgu4CYCg&ved=0CDEQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=%22silvestri%20and%20the%20Orchestre%20de%20la%20Societe%20des%20Concerts%20du%20Conservatoire%20are%20only%22&f=false
Gerard
2013-08-29 09:23:03 UTC
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Post by aesthete8
I like Monteux's RCA stereo recording with the BSO.
It has had several reincarnations; the one I like best is the one that
came out on the CRITICS CHOICE record label. Very clear, esp. the
sound of the harp in Nuages.
Is there a big difference between Monteux's BSO recording and his LS
recording?:
=========================

Isn't the Decca recording missing Sirènes?
(if so: that is a very big difference)
g***@gmail.com
2014-04-10 22:18:24 UTC
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Post by aesthete8
I like Monteux's RCA stereo recording with the BSO.
It has had several reincarnations; the one I like best is the one that
came out on the CRITICS CHOICE record label. Very clear, esp. the
sound of the harp in Nuages.
According to the following, it's one of Barenboim's best recordings:

http://users.ece.utexas.edu/~perry/fun/music/pgr-comp.html
Terry
2014-04-11 15:06:06 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by aesthete8
I like Monteux's RCA stereo recording with the BSO.
It has had several reincarnations; the one I like best is the one that
came out on the CRITICS CHOICE record label. Very clear, esp. the
sound of the harp in Nuages.
http://users.ece.utexas.edu/~perry/fun/music/pgr-comp.html
It's pretty hard to surpass Abbado in this. Either recording is
top-drawer.
g***@gmail.com
2018-01-17 15:33:09 UTC
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Post by aesthete8
I like Monteux's RCA stereo recording with the BSO.
It has had several reincarnations; the one I like best is the one that
came out on the CRITICS CHOICE record label. Very clear, esp. the
sound of the harp in Nuages.
Recent Youtube upload:

Debussy: Nocturnes "Nuages" & "Fêtes" Stokowski / Philadelphia 1928 / 1929 restored
gggg gggg
2021-01-07 02:12:49 UTC
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Post by aesthete8
I like Monteux's RCA stereo recording with the BSO.
It has had several reincarnations; the one I like best is the one that
came out on the CRITICS CHOICE record label. Very clear, esp. the
sound of the harp in Nuages.
(On Youtube):

Debussy: Nuages from Trois Nocturnes - A Level Music Analysis

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