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Beethoven piano sonatas recommendations ?
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p***@gmail.com
2016-04-22 14:09:36 UTC
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For those still confused but acquainted with the work of Charles Rosen, it may be worth noting that, asked in a radio interview which of the complete sets of the sonatas he preferred, he put Solomon at the top. Solomon only recorded 18 of the 32, in fact, before a stroke ended his career, but clearly Rosen was intent on this and made his point anyway. As I recall, he put Serkin second, and that was remarkably consistent in a sense, for Serkin and Solomon were great friends, something of a mutual admiration society, and in certain works you can hear kinship in their approach, perhaps particularly the Waldstein and Appassionata. Solomon's final six are great stuff, but his Les Adieux is truly the stuff of legend, just a notch above the two 'name' sonatas mentioned above, the Moonlight, op. 2, no. 1, and a few others more arguably. You may well still want a complete set (not wise, in my view), but I really think those who get Solomon's 18 will bless the day they did.
John Thomas
2016-04-22 22:36:19 UTC
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Post by p***@gmail.com
For those still confused but acquainted with the work of Charles Rosen, it may be worth noting that, asked in a radio interview which of the complete sets of the sonatas he preferred, he put Solomon at the top. Solomon only recorded 18 of the 32, in fact, before a stroke ended his career, but clearly Rosen was intent on this and made his point anyway. As I recall, he put Serkin second, and that was remarkably consistent in a sense, for Serkin and Solomon were great friends, something of a mutual admiration society, and in certain works you can hear kinship in their approach, perhaps particularly the Waldstein and Appassionata. Solomon's final six are great stuff, but his Les Adieux is truly the stuff of legend, just a notch above the two 'name' sonatas mentioned above, the Moonlight, op. 2, no. 1, and a few others more arguably. You may well still want a complete set (not wise, in my view), but I really think those who get Solomon's 18 will bless the day they did.
Well, if we're really going to resurrect this ancient thread and popular topic I'll take the opportunity to after his many years absence agree with Tony Movshon about Rosen's unique Late Sonatas. But I'd also endorse Igor Levit's outstanding set of the same. And if you're willing to spring for a complete set I'd suggest Ronald Brautigam's fortepiano version to hear Beethoven's sonatas played as they were meant to be played, with great sound and masterly performances.
c***@williams.edu
2016-04-22 23:08:49 UTC
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Post by John Thomas
Post by p***@gmail.com
For those still confused but acquainted with the work of Charles Rosen, it may be worth noting that, asked in a radio interview which of the complete sets of the sonatas he preferred, he put Solomon at the top. Solomon only recorded 18 of the 32, in fact, before a stroke ended his career, but clearly Rosen was intent on this and made his point anyway. As I recall, he put Serkin second, and that was remarkably consistent in a sense, for Serkin and Solomon were great friends, something of a mutual admiration society, and in certain works you can hear kinship in their approach, perhaps particularly the Waldstein and Appassionata. Solomon's final six are great stuff, but his Les Adieux is truly the stuff of legend, just a notch above the two 'name' sonatas mentioned above, the Moonlight, op. 2, no. 1, and a few others more arguably. You may well still want a complete set (not wise, in my view), but I really think those who get Solomon's 18 will bless the day they did.
Well, if we're really going to resurrect this ancient thread and popular topic I'll take the opportunity to after his many years absence agree with Tony Movshon about Rosen's unique Late Sonatas. But I'd also endorse Igor Levit's outstanding set of the same. And if you're willing to spring for a complete set I'd suggest Ronald Brautigam's fortepiano version to hear Beethoven's sonatas played as they were meant to be played, with great sound and masterly performances.
I own all of three and agree on all points.
s***@nycap.rr.com
2016-04-23 02:06:19 UTC
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Post by c***@williams.edu
Post by John Thomas
Post by p***@gmail.com
For those still confused but acquainted with the work of Charles Rosen, it may be worth noting that, asked in a radio interview which of the complete sets of the sonatas he preferred, he put Solomon at the top. Solomon only recorded 18 of the 32, in fact, before a stroke ended his career, but clearly Rosen was intent on this and made his point anyway. As I recall, he put Serkin second, and that was remarkably consistent in a sense, for Serkin and Solomon were great friends, something of a mutual admiration society, and in certain works you can hear kinship in their approach, perhaps particularly the Waldstein and Appassionata. Solomon's final six are great stuff, but his Les Adieux is truly the stuff of legend, just a notch above the two 'name' sonatas mentioned above, the Moonlight, op. 2, no. 1, and a few others more arguably. You may well still want a complete set (not wise, in my view), but I really think those who get Solomon's 18 will bless the day they did.
Well, if we're really going to resurrect this ancient thread and popular topic I'll take the opportunity to after his many years absence agree with Tony Movshon about Rosen's unique Late Sonatas. But I'd also endorse Igor Levit's outstanding set of the same. And if you're willing to spring for a complete set I'd suggest Ronald Brautigam's fortepiano version to hear Beethoven's sonatas played as they were meant to be played, with great sound and masterly performances.
I own all of three and agree on all points.
Let me throw in my two cents and suggest Stewart Goodyear for the whole set.

MIFrost
Willem Orange
2016-04-23 03:21:42 UTC
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Post by John Thomas
Post by p***@gmail.com
For those still confused but acquainted with the work of Charles Rosen, it may be worth noting that, asked in a radio interview which of the complete sets of the sonatas he preferred, he put Solomon at the top. Solomon only recorded 18 of the 32, in fact, before a stroke ended his career, but clearly Rosen was intent on this and made his point anyway. As I recall, he put Serkin second, and that was remarkably consistent in a sense, for Serkin and Solomon were great friends, something of a mutual admiration society, and in certain works you can hear kinship in their approach, perhaps particularly the Waldstein and Appassionata. Solomon's final six are great stuff, but his Les Adieux is truly the stuff of legend, just a notch above the two 'name' sonatas mentioned above, the Moonlight, op. 2, no. 1, and a few others more arguably. You may well still want a complete set (not wise, in my view), but I really think those who get Solomon's 18 will bless the day they did.
Well, if we're really going to resurrect this ancient thread and popular topic I'll take the opportunity to after his many years absence agree with Tony Movshon about Rosen's unique Late Sonatas. But I'd also endorse Igor Levit's outstanding set of the same. And if you're willing to spring for a complete set I'd suggest Ronald Brautigam's fortepiano version to hear Beethoven's sonatas played as they were meant to be played, with great sound and masterly performances.
I just got Claude Franks set from Music and Arts - wonderful
Edward A. Cowan
2016-04-23 04:18:59 UTC
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That's enough for now!!!!
Get that Demus recording of Moonlight first movement!!!!
=
Stay away from the Horowitz recordings- yuck!
Schnabel, Kempff, and Backhaus form the "backbone" of my chosen sets of the Beethoven piano sonatas. I call these three pianists "the grand old men". I also have these sets: Gulda (2 sets), Arrau, Nat, Rosen (late-late sonatas), Kuerti, and Heidsieck. The only sets of which I have heard all 32 sonatas are the Schnabel and Backhaus sets. NOTE: There are separate CD sets of Backhaus' recordings, namely the mono and stereo recordings. The stereo set contains the same mono recording of the "Hammerklavier," but in an electronically synthesized form of stereo. The two Backhaus sets, one identified as "London" and the other as "Decca" I ordered from Japan. Perhaps these sets also exist in European editions. The only USA edition contains the stereo recordings. I find both sets worth hearing. --E.A.C.
Beethoven. How about Schnabel, when he is on form? Wilhelm Kempff, or may=
be =
Backhaus? Or (in hushed, reverent tones) Yves Nat?
-- =
Edward A. Cowan
2016-04-23 04:26:31 UTC
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Hoping that this request will not cause wars between fans of different pianists
I `d like to know some recommended recordings for Beethoven piano sonatas. I
don`t want to buy a complete set, rather the late ones and/or the most famous
ones as I am not really a fan of earlier works of LvB.
Any tips are apreciated.
Thanks
A follow-up: I neglected to add that I also have the very fine Music & Arts set with Claude Frank, a pupil of Artur Schnabel. --E. A. C.
dk
2016-04-23 06:09:14 UTC
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Hoping that this request will not cause wars between fans of
different pianists
?!?
I `d like to know some recommended recordings for Beethoven piano sonatas.
I don`t want to buy a complete set, rather the late ones and/or the most
famous ones as I am not really a fan of earlier works of LvB.
Any tips are appreciated.
So many complete sets are now on YT that the best way to go is to
listen and find out for yourself. Otherwise, the only performances
I recommend nowadays are HJ Lim's.

dk

dk
g***@gmail.com
2016-04-23 10:11:04 UTC
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Hoping that this request will not cause wars between fans of different pianists
I `d like to know some recommended recordings for Beethoven piano sonatas. I
don`t want to buy a complete set, rather the late ones and/or the most famous
ones as I am not really a fan of earlier works of LvB.
Any tips are apreciated.
Thanks
Johannes
--
===============================================================================
Johannes Roehl "They say that Genius is an infinite capacity
Department of Physics for taking pains."
University of Washington
Email: Sherlock Holmes
==============================================================================
Concerning the APPASSIONATA, the following 2009 review article may be of interest:

http://www.classicalnotes.net/classics3/appassionata.html
dk
2016-04-23 22:21:37 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
Concerning the APPASSIONATA, the following 2009 review
http://www.classicalnotes.net/classics3/appassionata.html
This is as good as it gets:





dk
dk
2016-04-23 22:26:15 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by g***@gmail.com
Concerning the APPASSIONATA, the following 2009 review
http://www.classicalnotes.net/classics3/appassionata.html
http://youtu.be/tpP_OLKksFQ
http://youtu.be/QhGdblmKiBk
http://youtu.be/P0_QWE7cxmg
Honorable mention to


dk
HT
2016-04-24 09:04:56 UTC
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The incomplete Bavouzet set is the one I've listened to more often recently than any other. Uchida's late Beethoven sonatas are also among my favorites.

Henk
Bozo
2016-04-24 14:07:21 UTC
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.... Uchida's late Beethoven sonatas are also among my favorites.
Henk
Agreed, a fine set.
Oscar
2016-05-24 08:40:23 UTC
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Post by HT
The incomplete Bavouzet set is the one I've listened to more often recently than any other.
Henk, on your recommendation I bought the first two multi-disc volumes of this set. Found them used in the bins. The Op.2 Sonatas are simply delightful, though if one must pick nits a few of the tempo selections are too fast, e.g. Op.2 No.1 middle movement ot close to Adagio. Judging from Disc 1, Bavouzet does not disappoint; looking forward to making my acquaintance with the rest of the set. Will make my way through it in chronological order, as sequenced.
HT
2016-05-24 09:38:24 UTC
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Post by Oscar
Henk, on your recommendation I bought the first two multi-disc volumes of this set. Found them used in the bins. The Op.2 Sonatas are simply delightful, though if one must pick nits a few of the tempo selections are too fast, e.g. Op.2 No.1 middle movement ot close to Adagio. Judging from Disc 1, Bavouzet does not disappoint; looking forward to making my acquaintance with the rest of the set. Will make my way through it in chronological order, as sequenced.
Oscar, How kind of you to let me know! It's a pleasure to hear that you like the set.

Henk
John Thomas
2016-05-25 23:20:16 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by g***@gmail.com
Concerning the APPASSIONATA, the following 2009 review
http://www.classicalnotes.net/classics3/appassionata.html
http://youtu.be/tpP_OLKksFQ
http://youtu.be/QhGdblmKiBk
http://youtu.be/P0_QWE7cxmg
Honorable mention to http://youtu.be/4X7woG5vmb4
dk
Ernst Levy doesn't play second fiddle to anyone.
Al Eisner
2016-05-26 22:20:31 UTC
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Post by John Thomas
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by g***@gmail.com
Concerning the APPASSIONATA, the following 2009 review
http://www.classicalnotes.net/classics3/appassionata.html
http://youtu.be/tpP_OLKksFQ
http://youtu.be/QhGdblmKiBk
http://youtu.be/P0_QWE7cxmg
Honorable mention to http://youtu.be/4X7woG5vmb4
dk
Ernst Levy doesn't play second fiddle to anyone.
I have to admit I've never heard the Appassionata played on a fiddle.
--
Al Eisner
dk
2016-05-27 00:20:48 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
Post by John Thomas
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by g***@gmail.com
Concerning the APPASSIONATA, the following 2009 review
http://www.classicalnotes.net/classics3/appassionata.html
http://youtu.be/tpP_OLKksFQ
http://youtu.be/QhGdblmKiBk
http://youtu.be/P0_QWE7cxmg
Honorable mention to http://youtu.be/4X7woG5vmb4
Ernst Levy doesn't play second fiddle to anyone.
I have to admit I've never heard the Appassionata played on a fiddle.
Give Giora Schmidt a few months and he will play it! ;-)



dk

http://youtu.be/6d7K6JRHFr8
dk
2016-05-27 00:15:23 UTC
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Post by John Thomas
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by g***@gmail.com
Concerning the APPASSIONATA, the following 2009 review
http://www.classicalnotes.net/classics3/appassionata.html
http://youtu.be/tpP_OLKksFQ
http://youtu.be/QhGdblmKiBk
http://youtu.be/P0_QWE7cxmg
Honorable mention to http://youtu.be/4X7woG5vmb4
Ernst Levy doesn't play second fiddle to anyone.
Ernst Levy doesn't fiddle -- period! ;-)

dk
Bozo
2016-05-27 01:16:22 UTC
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Post by John Thomas
Ernst Levy doesn't play second fiddle to anyone.
I would want to have been sitting further back than the first row at one of his recitals.
c***@williams.edu
2016-04-23 15:21:35 UTC
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Don't forget the great Yves Nat. Tim Page wrote an article in the Times 31 years ago reviewing complete sets. Here's what he had to say about Nat:

"What a relief to turn to Yves Nat's 30-year-old set on EMI, now available here for the first time (EMI References 1109 213, 11 disks, available from International Book and Record, 40-11 24th St., Long Island City, New York 11101). Here is God's plenty -Beethoven in all his craggy, vital glory. Nat, who lived from 1890 to 1956, was, after Cortot, the most celebrated French pianist of his time; Proust once wrote that Nat's playing ''was that of so great a pianist that one no longer knows if he is a pianist at all; for it becomes so transparent, so filled with what he performs, that he disappears from view and is no more than a window giving on to the masterpiece.'' Nat's playing is quirky, sometimes jangling and not always entirely technically adept. But one never doubts that these are the interpretations of a great musician; Nat's playing goes right to the essence of each measure and movement, yoking them together with consummate mastery."

Here's the entire article: http://tinyurl.com/gnlwvcm
dk
2016-04-23 22:25:46 UTC
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Post by c***@williams.edu
Don't forget the great Yves Nat. Tim Page wrote an article in the
Times 31 years ago reviewing complete sets. Here's what he had to
"What a relief to turn to Yves Nat's 30-year-old set on EMI, now
available here for the first time (EMI References 1109 213, 11 disks,
available from International Book and Record, 40-11 24th St., Long
Island City, New York 11101). Here is God's plenty -Beethoven in all
his craggy, vital glory. Nat, who lived from 1890 to 1956, was, after
Cortot, the most celebrated French pianist of his time;
This is rewriting history. Quite a few French pianists at the time
were far better known and more admired than Nat. IMHO Nat was OK
but rather bland.

dk
George P
2016-05-25 13:29:33 UTC
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Lucchesini's set on Stradivarius is my new favorite (of about 15 sets.) Great balance of beauty and intensity. Sadly, it is OOP. My previous favorites were Annie Fischer and Gulda (Amadeo, Brilliant.)

George
Johannes Roehl
2016-05-27 09:20:43 UTC
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Post by George P
Lucchesini's set on Stradivarius is my new favorite (of about 15 sets.) Great balance of beauty and intensity. Sadly, it is OOP. My previous favorites were Annie Fischer and Gulda (Amadeo, Brilliant.)
I got the Lucchesini years ago after both some people in this group as well as a pianist I am acquainted with praised it. It's quite good although I am not sure I see what is so special about it. It is also a little too reverberant for my taste and Lucchesini is somewhat cavalier with repeats. E.g. he skips them all in the (rather short) first movement of the first sonata which is fairly uncommon and observes others without any apparent system.

Anyway, it is quite funny to see a thread of my own resurrected after 20 years. It is also rather embarassing to have publicly announced not to be fond of "early Beethoven". I have long since revised that opinion.
As far as I recall, the only disc I bought in early 96 was Goode's op.10 (I got rid of it years later). Later I got a few more single discs (maybe Pollini with the late sonatas and Richter in opp.2/3,7 and 90) and in 1997 I bought the almost complete Gilels box. And Gulda's a year or two later.
Oscar
2016-08-30 22:24:12 UTC
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I found myself at the used CD store today. Among other items, I bought an Alpha CD © 2014 of Eric Le Sage's recording of Op.109, 110, 111 (Steinway-D). Recorded à La Salle Philhamonique de Liège Philharmonic, Belgique, January 7-10, 2012.I have all of Le Sage's alpha Schumann, but I don't remember this one coming out. Will report back after I've had opportunity to give it a few auditions. Anyone heard it? Howie? SE?
g***@gmail.com
2019-09-06 04:26:43 UTC
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Hoping that this request will not cause wars between fans of different pianists
I `d like to know some recommended recordings for Beethoven piano sonatas. I
don`t want to buy a complete set, rather the late ones and/or the most famous
ones as I am not really a fan of earlier works of LvB.
Any tips are apreciated.
Thanks
Johannes
--
===============================================================================
Johannes Roehl "They say that Genius is an infinite capacity
Department of Physics for taking pains."
University of Washington
==============================================================================
(Recent article):

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2019/sep/05/beethoven-complete-piano-sonatas-review
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