Discussion:
WAYLTL - March 2020
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Oscar
2020-03-01 06:45:53 UTC
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Strauss (R): Selected Works

Lucerne Festival Orchestra / Riccardo Chailly

Decca 483 3080 ℗ © 2019. CD.
DDD.
Recorded at KKL Luzern, Switzerland, August 11 & 12, 2017.
Executive producer: Dominic Fyfe.
Recording producer: John Fraser.
Recording engineer: Philip Siney.
Recording editor: Julia Thomas.
Production co-ordinator: Joanne Baines.
Publishers: Peters Edition (Also sprach Zarathustra, Tod und Verklärung, Till Eulenspiegel); Boosey & Hawkes (Dance of the Seventh Veils).

Booklet note: James Jolly.
Booklet editing: WLP Ltd.
Art direction: Darren Rumney.
Artist photography © Peter Fischli/Lucerne Festival.

COMMENT: Excellent performances, in particular a very fine Death and Transfiguration. But the entire disc is quality. And it is Chailly's _first_ disc of Strauss. Difficult to imagine he has gone this far into a decades-long career, aged 67, and had not committed the music of Germany's greatest 20th C. composer to disc.

-Also sprach Zarathustra, Op.30 TrV 176
-Tod und Verklärung, Op.24 TrV 158 (Death and Transfiguration)
-Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks, Op.28 TrV 171
-Salomes Tanz der sieben Schleier ("Salome"), Op.54 (Dance of the Seventh Veils)
Bozo
2020-03-01 14:57:02 UTC
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Piano Concerto # 3 of Ernst Krenek, and PC # 1 of Hans Werner Henze, cd-r's I have, but provenance unclear:

(Henze)

(Krenek)

Surprisingly accessible ,although not a frequent listen.
number_six
2020-03-02 18:31:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Oscar
Strauss (R): Selected Works
snip <
...the music of Germany's greatest 20th C. composer...
Reading this, I wanted to say no, but it must have been pure contrarianism. On reflection, this characterization seems well-founded, far more so than I first wanted to admit.
Bozo
2020-03-02 21:48:20 UTC
Permalink
Hummel's Piano Sonatas Nos.5,6, the two best of his nine (IMHO), mine the late Constance Keene,pianist,Newport Classics cd's :

(5)

(6)
Frank Berger
2020-03-02 23:09:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bozo
http://youtu.be/fdbLs-Zqsno (5)
http://youtu.be/XRB_u_a-zZo (6)
Anyone know when these were recorded?
Oscar
2020-03-03 00:28:03 UTC
Permalink
Reading this, I wanted to say no, but it must have been pure contrarianism. On reflection, this > characterization seems well-founded, far more so than I first wanted to admit.
I wanted to say 'no' when composing it! But, I cannot think of another more worthy candidate for such an accolade. Strauss famously called himself a 'first-rate second-rate composer', but he has so many excellent compositions. Gets a lot of spins in Chez Oscar. I love Rosenkavalier. Four Last Songs. Elektra. Death and Transfiguration. Arabella. The list goes on.
Frank Berger
2020-03-03 00:37:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Oscar
Reading this, I wanted to say no, but it must have been pure contrarianism. On reflection, this > characterization seems well-founded, far more so than I first wanted to admit.
I wanted to say 'no' when composing it! But, I cannot think of another more worthy candidate for such an accolade. Strauss famously called himself a 'first-rate second-rate composer', but he has so many excellent compositions. Gets a lot of spins in Chez Oscar. I love Rosenkavalier. Four Last Songs. Elektra. Death and Transfiguration. Arabella. The list goes on.
Almost all of he greatest works were written quite early in his career.
He had written little or nothing at that level for years and then came
Four Last Songs in 1948, IMO his greatest work, or at least my favorite.
Oscar
2020-03-03 00:43:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Frank Berger
Almost all of he greatest works were written quite early in his career.
He had written little or nothing at that level for years and then came
Four Last Songs in 1948, IMO his greatest work, or at least my favorite.
I should have written "first-class second-rate composer". I concur with yr appraisal. He had some halcyon years, for sure. Listening to the Chailly disc again. The Lucerne Festival Orchestra is simply marvelous. What a band.
c***@gmail.com
2020-03-03 13:39:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Frank Berger
Post by Oscar
Reading this, I wanted to say no, but it must have been pure contrarianism. On reflection, this > characterization seems well-founded, far more so than I first wanted to admit.
I wanted to say 'no' when composing it! But, I cannot think of another more worthy candidate for such an accolade. Strauss famously called himself a 'first-rate second-rate composer', but he has so many excellent compositions. Gets a lot of spins in Chez Oscar. I love Rosenkavalier. Four Last Songs. Elektra. Death and Transfiguration. Arabella. The list goes on.
Almost all of he greatest works were written quite early in his career.
He had written little or nothing at that level for years and then came
Four Last Songs in 1948, IMO his greatest work, or at least my favorite.
While agreeing with respect to the Four Last Songs, I have a different view of Strauss overall. Except for Rosenkavalier, Bourgeois gentilhomme, and many of the early Lieder (1880s-90s), all of my favorite pieces date from 1942 (Capriccio) or later (Oboe Concerto, Sonatinas for Wind Instruments, Horn Concerto #2, Metamorphosen). Filled with nostalgia for the earlier works, but pared down, more reflective than bombastic.

AC
Frank Berger
2020-03-03 16:35:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Frank Berger
Post by Oscar
Reading this, I wanted to say no, but it must have been pure contrarianism. On reflection, this > characterization seems well-founded, far more so than I first wanted to admit.
I wanted to say 'no' when composing it! But, I cannot think of another more worthy candidate for such an accolade. Strauss famously called himself a 'first-rate second-rate composer', but he has so many excellent compositions. Gets a lot of spins in Chez Oscar. I love Rosenkavalier. Four Last Songs. Elektra. Death and Transfiguration. Arabella. The list goes on.
Almost all of he greatest works were written quite early in his career.
He had written little or nothing at that level for years and then came
Four Last Songs in 1948, IMO his greatest work, or at least my favorite.
While agreeing with respect to the Four Last Songs, I have a different view of Strauss overall. Except for Rosenkavalier, Bourgeois gentilhomme, and many of the early Lieder (1880s-90s), all of my favorite pieces date from 1942 (Capriccio) or later (Oboe Concerto, Sonatinas for Wind Instruments, Horn Concerto #2, Metamorphosen). Filled with nostalgia for the earlier works, but pared down, more reflective than bombastic.
AC
Will give these a listen.
Frank Berger
2020-03-03 18:05:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Frank Berger
Post by Oscar
Reading this, I wanted to say no, but it must have been pure contrarianism. On reflection, this > characterization seems well-founded, far more so than I first wanted to admit.
I wanted to say 'no' when composing it! But, I cannot think of another more worthy candidate for such an accolade. Strauss famously called himself a 'first-rate second-rate composer', but he has so many excellent compositions. Gets a lot of spins in Chez Oscar. I love Rosenkavalier. Four Last Songs. Elektra. Death and Transfiguration. Arabella. The list goes on.
Almost all of he greatest works were written quite early in his career.
He had written little or nothing at that level for years and then came
Four Last Songs in 1948, IMO his greatest work, or at least my favorite.
While agreeing with respect to the Four Last Songs, I have a different view of Strauss overall. Except for Rosenkavalier, Bourgeois gentilhomme, and many of the early Lieder (1880s-90s), all of my favorite pieces date from 1942 (Capriccio) or later (Oboe Concerto, Sonatinas for Wind Instruments, Horn Concerto #2, Metamorphosen). Filled with nostalgia for the earlier works, but pared down, more reflective than bombastic.
AC
I ordered the Philips set, described as Strauss' "complete" music for
wind ensemble, then noticed it doesn't include the 2nd sonatina.
Frank Berger
2020-03-03 18:48:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Frank Berger
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Frank Berger
Post by Oscar
Post by number_six
Reading this, I wanted to say no, but it must have been pure
contrarianism.  On reflection, this > characterization seems
well-founded, far more so than I first wanted to admit.
I wanted to say 'no' when composing it! But, I cannot think of
another more worthy candidate for such an accolade. Strauss famously
called himself a 'first-rate second-rate composer', but he has so
many excellent compositions. Gets a lot of spins in Chez Oscar. I
love Rosenkavalier. Four Last Songs. Elektra. Death and
Transfiguration. Arabella. The list goes on.
Almost all of he greatest works were written quite early in his career.
He had written little or nothing at that level for years and then came
Four Last Songs in 1948, IMO his greatest work, or at least my favorite.
While agreeing with respect to the Four Last Songs, I have a different
view of Strauss overall.  Except for Rosenkavalier, Bourgeois
gentilhomme, and many of the early Lieder (1880s-90s), all of my
favorite pieces date from 1942 (Capriccio) or later (Oboe Concerto,
Sonatinas for Wind Instruments, Horn Concerto #2, Metamorphosen).
Filled with nostalgia for the earlier works, but pared down, more
reflective than bombastic.
AC
I ordered the Philips set, described as Strauss' "complete" music for
wind ensemble, then noticed it doesn't include the 2nd sonatina.
I based the above on the Discogs listing which includes the Symphony for
Wind Instruments but not the 2nd Sonatina. Arkivmusic shows the
Sonatina. That must be right.
Gerard
2020-03-04 11:53:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Frank Berger
Post by Frank Berger
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Frank Berger
Post by Oscar
Post by number_six
Reading this, I wanted to say no, but it must have been pure
contrarianism.  On reflection, this > characterization seems
well-founded, far more so than I first wanted to admit.
I wanted to say 'no' when composing it! But, I cannot think of
another more worthy candidate for such an accolade. Strauss famously
called himself a 'first-rate second-rate composer', but he has so
many excellent compositions. Gets a lot of spins in Chez Oscar. I
love Rosenkavalier. Four Last Songs. Elektra. Death and
Transfiguration. Arabella. The list goes on.
Almost all of he greatest works were written quite early in his career.
He had written little or nothing at that level for years and then came
Four Last Songs in 1948, IMO his greatest work, or at least my favorite.
While agreeing with respect to the Four Last Songs, I have a different
view of Strauss overall.  Except for Rosenkavalier, Bourgeois
gentilhomme, and many of the early Lieder (1880s-90s), all of my
favorite pieces date from 1942 (Capriccio) or later (Oboe Concerto,
Sonatinas for Wind Instruments, Horn Concerto #2, Metamorphosen).
Filled with nostalgia for the earlier works, but pared down, more
reflective than bombastic.
AC
I ordered the Philips set, described as Strauss' "complete" music for
wind ensemble, then noticed it doesn't include the 2nd sonatina.
I based the above on the Discogs listing which includes the Symphony for
Wind Instruments but not the 2nd Sonatina. Arkivmusic shows the
Sonatina. That must be right.
ArkivMusic indeed shows the 2nd sonatina "Fröhliche Werkstatt".
I have the same recording on the label newton classics, where that sonatina is called "Symphony for Wind Instruments "The Happy Workshop"".
Frank Berger
2020-03-04 13:16:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gerard
Post by Frank Berger
Post by Frank Berger
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Frank Berger
Post by Oscar
Post by number_six
Reading this, I wanted to say no, but it must have been pure
contrarianism.  On reflection, this > characterization seems
well-founded, far more so than I first wanted to admit.
I wanted to say 'no' when composing it! But, I cannot think of
another more worthy candidate for such an accolade. Strauss famously
called himself a 'first-rate second-rate composer', but he has so
many excellent compositions. Gets a lot of spins in Chez Oscar. I
love Rosenkavalier. Four Last Songs. Elektra. Death and
Transfiguration. Arabella. The list goes on.
Almost all of he greatest works were written quite early in his career.
He had written little or nothing at that level for years and then came
Four Last Songs in 1948, IMO his greatest work, or at least my favorite.
While agreeing with respect to the Four Last Songs, I have a different
view of Strauss overall.  Except for Rosenkavalier, Bourgeois
gentilhomme, and many of the early Lieder (1880s-90s), all of my
favorite pieces date from 1942 (Capriccio) or later (Oboe Concerto,
Sonatinas for Wind Instruments, Horn Concerto #2, Metamorphosen).
Filled with nostalgia for the earlier works, but pared down, more
reflective than bombastic.
AC
I ordered the Philips set, described as Strauss' "complete" music for
wind ensemble, then noticed it doesn't include the 2nd sonatina.
I based the above on the Discogs listing which includes the Symphony for
Wind Instruments but not the 2nd Sonatina. Arkivmusic shows the
Sonatina. That must be right.
ArkivMusic indeed shows the 2nd sonatina "Fröhliche Werkstatt".
I have the same recording on the label newton classics, where that sonatina is called "Symphony for Wind Instruments "The Happy Workshop"".
It never occurred to me that it was an alternative title. Thanks.
Bozo
2020-03-03 19:57:45 UTC
Permalink
Agreed, the Oboe Concerto well worth hearing.
Bozo
2020-03-04 16:14:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bozo
Agreed, the Oboe Concerto well worth hearing.
As is "Ein Heldenleben" , my fav of his tone poems.
Tatonik
2020-03-04 16:45:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bozo
Post by Bozo
Agreed, the Oboe Concerto well worth hearing.
As is "Ein Heldenleben" , my fav of his tone poems.
I'm fond of the two Strauss horn concerti, but I realize that I no
longer have a recording of them. Maybe it's time to address the
situation. I used to have access to Radovan Vlatkovic on EMI.

Any favored versions?
c***@gmail.com
2020-03-04 17:55:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tatonik
Post by Bozo
Post by Bozo
Agreed, the Oboe Concerto well worth hearing.
As is "Ein Heldenleben" , my fav of his tone poems.
I'm fond of the two Strauss horn concerti, but I realize that I no
longer have a recording of them. Maybe it's time to address the
situation. I used to have access to Radovan Vlatkovic on EMI.
Any favored versions?
Peter Damm with Kempe or his earlier less-well-known recording with Rögner. Sleeper: Andrew Joy/WDR, beautifully coupled on Capriccio with Schoeck's Horn Concerto. You can't go far wrong in Strauss with the usual suspects--Brain, Tuckwell, Baumann, Neunecker--except that Brain strikes me as consistently too fast in contrast to the others. The Joy recordings also are available in a terrific Brilliant box devoted to horn music (https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/products/8271226--horn-concertos).

AC
Not a Dentist
2020-03-04 19:37:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Tatonik
Post by Bozo
Post by Bozo
Agreed, the Oboe Concerto well worth hearing.
As is "Ein Heldenleben" , my fav of his tone poems.
I'm fond of the two Strauss horn concerti, but I realize that I no
longer have a recording of them. Maybe it's time to address the
situation. I used to have access to Radovan Vlatkovic on EMI.
Any favored versions?
Peter Damm with Kempe or his earlier less-well-known recording with Rögner. Sleeper: Andrew Joy/WDR, beautifully coupled on Capriccio with Schoeck's Horn Concerto. You can't go far wrong in Strauss with the usual suspects--Brain, Tuckwell, Baumann, Neunecker--except that Brain strikes me as consistently too fast in contrast to the others. The Joy recordings also are available in a terrific Brilliant box devoted to horn music (https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/products/8271226--horn-concertos).
AC
The second recordings by Tuckwell (Ashkenazy conducting the RPO) are included in a comprehensive Strauss Tone Poems and Concertos box. This also includes the Netherlands Wind Ensemble performances of the Suite, Serenade, Symphony, and Sonatina. The earlier set (with Kertesz and the LSO) can be had in the Kertesz LSO Years box.
Frank Berger
2020-03-04 17:55:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tatonik
Post by Bozo
Post by Bozo
Agreed, the Oboe Concerto well worth hearing.
As is "Ein Heldenleben" , my fav of his tone poems.
I'm fond of the two Strauss horn concerti, but I realize that I no
longer have a recording of them.  Maybe it's time to address the
situation.  I used to have access to Radovan Vlatkovic on EMI.
Any favored versions?
It should hardly be necessary to mention Dennis Brain. Anyone who has
one of the obligatory Strauss/Kempe boxes will have Peter Damm and his
vibrato.
r***@gmail.com
2020-03-30 00:40:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tatonik
Post by Bozo
Post by Bozo
Agreed, the Oboe Concerto well worth hearing.
As is "Ein Heldenleben" , my fav of his tone poems.
I'm fond of the two Strauss horn concerti, but I realize that I no
longer have a recording of them. Maybe it's time to address the
situation. I used to have access to Radovan Vlatkovic on EMI.
Any favored versions?
Under no circumstances miss 'Flanders and Swann's version, for voice and piano. It's a masterpiece.
Not a Dentist
2020-03-30 04:54:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by r***@gmail.com
Post by Tatonik
Post by Bozo
Post by Bozo
Agreed, the Oboe Concerto well worth hearing.
As is "Ein Heldenleben" , my fav of his tone poems.
I'm fond of the two Strauss horn concerti, but I realize that I no
longer have a recording of them. Maybe it's time to address the
situation. I used to have access to Radovan Vlatkovic on EMI.
Any favored versions?
Under no circumstances miss 'Flanders and Swann's version, for voice and piano. It's a masterpiece.
The Flanders & Swann is Mozart, of course, but absolutely wonderful, no debate about that!
Bozo
2020-03-04 17:19:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bozo
Post by Bozo
Agreed, the Oboe Concerto well worth hearing.
As is "Ein Heldenleben" , my fav of his tone poems.
And the "Burlesque " for piano and orchestra, a guilty pleasure since my very young years, almost wore out my parents' Columbia lp of Serkin/Ormandy/PO.
JohnGavin
2020-03-08 18:56:16 UTC
Permalink
The Burlesque and the Violin Sonata are 2 favorites.
Bozo
2020-03-08 22:48:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by JohnGavin
The Burlesque and the Violin Sonata are 2 favorites.
Agreed,and as you know Heifetz recorded the Violin Sonata.
Bozo
2020-03-09 17:14:27 UTC
Permalink
Alicia de Larrocha playing Albeniz’ “Corpus Christi en Sevilla” , from "Iberia", audio with score , a new respect for any pianist who plays this well , or at all !


JohnGavin
2020-03-09 23:22:58 UTC
Permalink
Alicia de Larrocha playing Albeniz’ “Corpus Christi en Sevilla” , from "Iberia", audio with score , a new respect for any pianist who plays this well , or at all !


She has always been among my top 3 or 4 favorite pianists.
Raymond Hall
2020-03-10 00:52:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bozo
Alicia de Larrocha playing Albeniz’ “Corpus Christi en Sevilla” , from "Iberia", audio with score , a new respect for any pianist who plays this well , or at all !
She has always been among my top 3 or 4 favorite pianists.
I am not the most avid pianophile, but de Larrocha never fails in most music. Something I am unable to put my finger on as to why, but she ranks very high for me also. Unobtrusively highly musical, maybe.

Ray Hall, Taree
Raymond Hall
2020-03-10 00:59:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bozo
Alicia de Larrocha playing Albeniz’ “Corpus Christi en Sevilla” , from "Iberia", audio with score , a new respect for any pianist who plays this well , or at all !
She has always been among my top 3 or 4 favorite pianists.
https://www.amazon.com.au/Alicia-Larrocha-Mozart-ALICIA-LARROCHA/dp/B082BWZJ8J/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=de+larrocha&qid=1583801763&s=music&sr=1-1

About to be released. This looks excellent. Can anyone comment further on Larrocha's Mozart. Thx.

Ray Hall, Taree
c***@gmail.com
2020-03-10 14:40:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Raymond Hall
Post by Bozo
Alicia de Larrocha playing Albeniz’ “Corpus Christi en Sevilla” , from "Iberia", audio with score , a new respect for any pianist who plays this well , or at all !
She has always been among my top 3 or 4 favorite pianists.
https://www.amazon.com.au/Alicia-Larrocha-Mozart-ALICIA-LARROCHA/dp/B082BWZJ8J/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=de+larrocha&qid=1583801763&s=music&sr=1-1
About to be released. This looks excellent. Can anyone comment further on Larrocha's Mozart. Thx.
Ray Hall, Taree
It's hard to go wrong with Alicia in anything. She was a great Mozartean--the star of the Lincoln Center Mostly Mozart Festival in its early years--and these recordings are fine. I intend only mild criticism in saying that I prefer her earlier Deccas to the RCAs for both performance and recorded sound.

AC
AB
2020-03-09 23:47:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bozo
Post by JohnGavin
The Burlesque and the Violin Sonata are 2 favorites.
Agreed,and as you know Heifetz recorded the Violin Sonata.
I believe he recorded it twice

AB
Frank Berger
2020-03-10 01:46:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by AB
Post by Bozo
Post by JohnGavin
The Burlesque and the Violin Sonata are 2 favorites.
Agreed,and as you know Heifetz recorded the Violin Sonata.
I believe he recorded it twice
AB
Three times:

1934 with Árpád Sándor
1954 and 1972 with Brooks Smith.

Surprisingly hard to find.
JohnGavin
2020-03-10 10:17:56 UTC
Permalink
The 1972 Strauss Sonata is from Heifetz’ last recital at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. Although his playing was not technically at its best at this stage in his career, there is a real depth to his playing that makes this the recommended version.
Frank Berger
2020-03-10 13:14:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by JohnGavin
The 1972 Strauss Sonata is from Heifetz’ last recital at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. Although his playing was not technically at its best at this stage in his career, there is a real depth to his playing that makes this the recommended version.
And yet each of the others have received votes for the "best" of the
three. I've read the '54 is similar in approach to the '72. Both
driven, aggressive or some such descriptor. The 1934 being more laid
back, lyrical. Though the timings of all 3 are similar.
Raymond Hall
2020-03-04 07:27:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@gmail.com
While agreeing with respect to the Four Last Songs, I have a different view of Strauss overall. Except for Rosenkavalier, Bourgeois gentilhomme, and many of the early Lieder (1880s-90s), all of my favorite pieces date from 1942 (Capriccio) or later (Oboe Concerto, Sonatinas for Wind Instruments, Horn Concerto #2, Metamorphosen). Filled with nostalgia for the earlier works, but pared down, more reflective than bombastic.
AC
Agree fully with all of the above, and will add Till Eulenspiegel (his best tone poem by a mile), Don Quixote, Alpine, and Elektra, Salome, and Die Frau Ohne Schatten as his best operas. Rosenkavalier never floated my boat.

Ray Hall, Taree
c***@gmail.com
2020-03-04 14:52:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Raymond Hall
Post by c***@gmail.com
While agreeing with respect to the Four Last Songs, I have a different view of Strauss overall. Except for Rosenkavalier, Bourgeois gentilhomme, and many of the early Lieder (1880s-90s), all of my favorite pieces date from 1942 (Capriccio) or later (Oboe Concerto, Sonatinas for Wind Instruments, Horn Concerto #2, Metamorphosen). Filled with nostalgia for the earlier works, but pared down, more reflective than bombastic.
AC
Agree fully with all of the above, and will add Till Eulenspiegel (his best tone poem by a mile), Don Quixote, Alpine, and Elektra, Salome, and Die Frau Ohne Schatten as his best operas. Rosenkavalier never floated my boat.
Ray Hall, Taree
Till has the virtue of relative brevity, but if I had to choose one of the tome poems, it would be Don Quixote. We seem to have opposite tastes in the operas, since the ones you list are my *least* favorites. After Rosenkavalier and Capriccio I'd name Arabella. The first time our daughter heard Frau from the Met (probably 2 or 3 years old), she said, "Why is that lady shouting at me?" Nailed it! :-)

AC
Bob Harper
2020-03-05 06:25:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Frank Berger
Post by Oscar
Reading this, I wanted to say no, but it must have been pure contrarianism. On reflection, this > characterization seems well-founded, far more so than I first wanted to admit.
I wanted to say 'no' when composing it! But, I cannot think of another more worthy candidate for such an accolade. Strauss famously called himself a 'first-rate second-rate composer', but he has so many excellent compositions. Gets a lot of spins in Chez Oscar. I love Rosenkavalier. Four Last Songs. Elektra. Death and Transfiguration. Arabella. The list goes on.
Almost all of he greatest works were written quite early in his career.
He had written little or nothing at that level for years and then came
Four Last Songs in 1948, IMO his greatest work, or at least my favorite.
While agreeing with respect to the Four Last Songs, I have a different view of Strauss overall. Except for Rosenkavalier, Bourgeois gentilhomme, and many of the early Lieder (1880s-90s), all of my favorite pieces date from 1942 (Capriccio) or later (Oboe Concerto, Sonatinas for Wind Instruments, Horn Concerto #2, Metamorphosen). Filled with nostalgia for the earlier works, but pared down, more reflective than bombastic.
AC
Metamorphosen is a particular favorite of mine. I know of no work for
strings that is its superior. Equal, perhaps, but not superior. The
Suitner recording--only available now as a download, alas--is a real
sleeper. If you can find the CD, grab it!

Bob Harper
Oscar
2020-03-05 09:00:55 UTC
Permalink
Stellar new Stabat mater by Pergolesi on the alpha label. Christophe Rousset & Les Talens Lyriques, Sandrine Piau (S) and Christopher Lowery (C). Streaming via AppleMusic. Up there with the finest versions, IMO, on first impression, although I prefer a traditional female alto to countertenor. Still and all, will order this on CD. I’ve long admired Rousset’s direction in 18th C. repertoire. My reference version is Alessandrini & Concerto Italiano on Opus 111 (1998).
Frank Berger
2020-03-05 13:20:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Harper
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Frank Berger
Post by Oscar
Post by number_six
Reading this, I wanted to say no, but it must have been pure
contrarianism.  On reflection, this > characterization seems
well-founded, far more so than I first wanted to admit.
I wanted to say 'no' when composing it! But, I cannot think of
another more worthy candidate for such an accolade. Strauss famously
called himself a 'first-rate second-rate composer', but he has so
many excellent compositions. Gets a lot of spins in Chez Oscar. I
love Rosenkavalier. Four Last Songs. Elektra. Death and
Transfiguration. Arabella. The list goes on.
Almost all of he greatest works were written quite early in his career.
He had written little or nothing at that level for years and then came
Four Last Songs in 1948, IMO his greatest work, or at least my favorite.
While agreeing with respect to the Four Last Songs, I have a different
view of Strauss overall.  Except for Rosenkavalier, Bourgeois
gentilhomme, and many of the early Lieder (1880s-90s), all of my
favorite pieces date from 1942 (Capriccio) or later (Oboe Concerto,
Sonatinas for Wind Instruments, Horn Concerto #2, Metamorphosen).
Filled with nostalgia for the earlier works, but pared down, more
reflective than bombastic.
AC
Metamorphosen is a particular favorite of mine. I know of no work for
strings that is its superior. Equal, perhaps, but not superior. The
Suitner recording--only available now as a download, alas--is a real
sleeper. If you can find the CD, grab it!
Bob Harper
I have Suitner on Edel Classics 882. Recorded 1966 with Staatskapelle
Dresden. OOP, but a there are a couple on Ebay. Curious that I have
seven recordings and four of those are with Staatskapelle Dresden (2 by
Kempe, Suitner and Sinopoli). The other three are Furtwangler (1947,
Berlin), Gielen (1983, Cincinnati) and Karajan (1969, Berlin).
Andrew Clarke
2020-03-05 21:46:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Oscar
Strauss (R): Selected Works
Lucerne Festival Orchestra / Riccardo Chailly
Decca 483 3080 ℗ © 2019. CD.
DDD.
Recorded at KKL Luzern, Switzerland, August 11 & 12, 2017.
Executive producer: Dominic Fyfe.
Recording producer: John Fraser.
Recording engineer: Philip Siney.
Recording editor: Julia Thomas.
Production co-ordinator: Joanne Baines.
Publishers: Peters Edition (Also sprach Zarathustra, Tod und Verklärung, Till Eulenspiegel); Boosey & Hawkes (Dance of the Seventh Veils).
Booklet note: James Jolly.
Booklet editing: WLP Ltd.
Art direction: Darren Rumney.
Artist photography © Peter Fischli/Lucerne Festival.
COMMENT: Excellent performances, in particular a very fine Death and Transfiguration. But the entire disc is quality. And it is Chailly's _first_ disc of Strauss. Difficult to imagine he has gone this far into a decades-long career, aged 67, and had not committed the music of Germany's greatest 20th C. composer to disc.
-Also sprach Zarathustra, Op.30 TrV 176
-Tod und Verklärung, Op.24 TrV 158 (Death and Transfiguration)
-Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks, Op.28 TrV 171
-Salomes Tanz der sieben Schleier ("Salome"), Op.54 (Dance of the Seventh Veils)
Supp'e, from the Hollywood Bowl, with Andres Segovia and Isaac Stern:



Let nobody say I never post about classical music.

Andrew Clarke
Canberra
Bozo
2020-03-06 17:42:31 UTC
Permalink
Pianist Jan Lisiecki's new DGG Beethoven PC # 4 download I just acquired;wonderful. As noted, #2,#4 gems of the set, although #3,#5 worth hearing.I purchased just # 4.

All here :


Bozo
2020-03-07 00:14:25 UTC
Permalink
1995 Naxos cd of the Shostakovich Piano Trios ( Op.8 at age 17 in 1923 and Op.67 1943 ), and Op.127 (1967) Seven Romances for Soprano and Piano Trio ( requested of the composer by Rostropovich ), Stockholm Piano Trio,Anita Soldh,soprano.Cd arrived today, had earlier discovered to my chagrin I had no recordings of the Trios.Sound a bit murky at times, but performances fine, the Romances rather dark than romantic. Amazon seller used , but pristine , with booklet, US $7 included s&h.
number_six
2020-03-08 18:08:54 UTC
Permalink
Decca Ansermet French Music box discs 1 - 2

highlights so far are Debussy Rhapsody for clarinet and orch, and Images
AB
2020-03-10 00:10:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bozo
Pianist Jan Lisiecki's new DGG Beethoven PC # 4 download I just acquired;wonderful. As noted, #2,#4 gems of the set, although #3,#5 worth hearing.I purchased just # 4.
http://youtu.be/d4szJzlhLyA
listening to #4 right now. Great facility, wonderful scales......some interesting ideas. but piano sound a bit thin. very enjoyable
AB
Oscar
2020-03-10 18:15:15 UTC
Permalink
Bach (J.S.): The Four Orchestral Suites, BWV 1066-69

New Philharmonia Orchestra / Otto Klemperer
Gareth Morris (fl) (No.2)

Warner Classics Japan WPCS-13544/45 ℗ © 1971, ℗ 2016. 2SACD (hybrid).
Recorded at Studio No.1, Abbey Road, London, September 19, October 6, 17 & 18, 1969 (No.1); September 17 & October 17, 1969 (Nos.2 & 3); and September 19, 1969 (No.4).
Producer: Suvi Raj Grubb.
Balance engineer: Robert Gooch.

COMMENT: I love these performances! Later Klemp at his absolute finest. Bravo. (Not on AppleMusic.)
number_six
2020-03-11 19:07:14 UTC
Permalink
Ansermet French Music box, disk 13 Ravel

L'heure espagnole -- didn't realize Torquemada's French was so good

disk concludes with Bolero and a stupendous La Valse, with crashing dissonance and stunning rhythmic contrasts. it is Paris Conservatoire, not Suisse Romande (their versions are earlier in the set)
JohnGavin
2020-03-11 19:34:28 UTC
Permalink
Rameau - Keyboard Works Complete - Marcelle Meyer

Superb, spectacular playing on 2 CDs. Desert Island recordings.
Frank Berger
2020-03-11 20:43:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by JohnGavin
Rameau - Keyboard Works Complete - Marcelle Meyer
Superb, spectacular playing on 2 CDs. Desert Island recordings.
Agree.
Bozo
2020-03-11 22:37:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by JohnGavin
Rameau - Keyboard Works Complete - Marcelle Meyer
Superb, spectacular playing on 2 CDs. Desert Island recordings.
Thanks, I just have a single Centurion cd with Mordeci Shehori.
Frank Berger
2020-03-11 20:23:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by number_six
Ansermet French Music box, disk 13 Ravel
L'heure espagnole -- didn't realize Torquemada's French was so good
disk concludes with Bolero and a stupendous La Valse, with crashing dissonance and stunning rhythmic contrasts. it is Paris Conservatoire, not Suisse Romande (their versions are earlier in the set)
Unless I've made a mistake in my database, I have 3 recordings of La
Valse with Ansermet and the Conservatoire. 1947 on LYS and Documents,
1953 on Decca and 1963 on Decca.
number_six
2020-03-11 21:04:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Frank Berger
Post by number_six
Ansermet French Music box, disk 13 Ravel
L'heure espagnole -- didn't realize Torquemada's French was so good
disk concludes with Bolero and a stupendous La Valse, with crashing dissonance and stunning rhythmic contrasts. it is Paris Conservatoire, not Suisse Romande (their versions are earlier in the set)
Unless I've made a mistake in my database, I have 3 recordings of La
Valse with Ansermet and the Conservatoire. 1947 on LYS and Documents,
1953 on Decca and 1963 on Decca.
'Tis the 1953 Decca to which my comments relate.
Frank Berger
2020-03-11 21:14:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by number_six
Post by Frank Berger
Post by number_six
Ansermet French Music box, disk 13 Ravel
L'heure espagnole -- didn't realize Torquemada's French was so good
disk concludes with Bolero and a stupendous La Valse, with crashing dissonance and stunning rhythmic contrasts. it is Paris Conservatoire, not Suisse Romande (their versions are earlier in the set)
Unless I've made a mistake in my database, I have 3 recordings of La
Valse with Ansermet and the Conservatoire. 1947 on LYS and Documents,
1953 on Decca and 1963 on Decca.
'Tis the 1953 Decca to which my comments relate.
The 1963 recording turns out to be with the Suisse Romande.
Lawrence Chalmers
2020-03-14 01:23:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Oscar
Strauss (R): Selected Works
Lucerne Festival Orchestra / Riccardo Chailly
Decca 483 3080 ℗ © 2019. CD.
DDD.
Recorded at KKL Luzern, Switzerland, August 11 & 12, 2017.
Executive producer: Dominic Fyfe.
Recording producer: John Fraser.
Recording engineer: Philip Siney.
Recording editor: Julia Thomas.
Production co-ordinator: Joanne Baines.
Publishers: Peters Edition (Also sprach Zarathustra, Tod und Verklärung, Till Eulenspiegel); Boosey & Hawkes (Dance of the Seventh Veils).
Booklet note: James Jolly.
Booklet editing: WLP Ltd.
Art direction: Darren Rumney.
Artist photography © Peter Fischli/Lucerne Festival.
COMMENT: Excellent performances, in particular a very fine Death and Transfiguration. But the entire disc is quality. And it is Chailly's _first_ disc of Strauss. Difficult to imagine he has gone this far into a decades-long career, aged 67, and had not committed the music of Germany's greatest 20th C. composer to disc.
-Also sprach Zarathustra, Op.30 TrV 176
-Tod und Verklärung, Op.24 TrV 158 (Death and Transfiguration)
-Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks, Op.28 TrV 171
-Salomes Tanz der sieben Schleier ("Salome"), Op.54 (Dance of the Seventh Veils)
The ABC Stuart Skelton recording of Tristan und Isolde. Great singing and emotion coming through beautifully IMO. Also the new Elder Halle Sibelius
4th and 6th symphonies. New details emerging in these works aided by marvelous engineering, deliver a deeply satisfying pick of the many other performances out there. I hope numbers 5 and 7 provide the same enjoyment.
Oscar
2020-03-16 19:00:18 UTC
Permalink
The Early Recordings - 1945, Part III

San Francisco Symphony Orchestra / Pierre Monteux
San Francisco Municipal Men's Chorus [7]
Marian Anderson (C) [7]

Pierre Monteux - The Complete RCA Album Collection

RCA Red Seal/Sony Classical 88843073482 ℗ © 2014. 40CD.
Recording: War Memorial Opera House, San Francisco, January 27, 1945 [1]; March 3, 1945 [2]-[7]; March 10, 1945 [8]-[21].
Producer and engineer credits not listed.
[1]-[6] Disk-to-tape transfers: Ward Marston. Mastering: Marian Conaty.
[7] Disk-to-tape transfers: Ward Marston. Digitally remastered by Nathaniel Johnson, supervisor & David Satz, engineer.
[8]-[21] Disk transfers & mastering: Andreas K. Meyer.

Original releases:
[1] M/DM-1113, M (11-9508/9), DM (11-9510/1).
[2]-[6] M/DM-1252, M (12-0501/2), DM (12-0503/4).
[7] SP-13 (11-8983/4), M/DM-1111, M (11-9500/1), DM (11-9502/3).
[8]-[21] M/DM-1052, M (11-9164/7), DM (11-9168/71).

Reissue credits:
Produced by Robert Russ.
Booklet editor: Jochen Rudelt, texthxouse.
Design: [ec:ko] communications.
Biographical research: Michael Gray.
Tape research: Anthony Fountain.
Document research: Michael Panico.
Production manager: Klara Korytowska.
Disk and tape transfers from original analogue sources and mastering by Andreas K. Meyer using 24-bit/96 kHz technology. Mastering CDs 8, 9, 11, 13-17, 19-23, 25-39: b-sharp music and media solutions (Philip Nedel, Martin Kistner, Hansjorg Seiler, Johannes Muller).

For the sake of consistency we feature the original LP cover and label artwork of the first U.S. LP releases in this edition for CDs 11-39. In cases where a stereo version was subsequently issued on a Victrola LP or CD release, we added a note to the referring recording and mastered from the available stereo source.

CDs 1-40 © Sony Music Entertainment.
This compilation ℗ & © 2014 Sony Music Entertainment.
Distributed by Sony Music Entertainment.
Made in the E.U.

COMMENT: A beautifully-rendered D'Indy, the Brahms w/ Anderson is an old sepia-toned chestnut, and wow, some offensive intonation to start the Rite of Spring. It catches wind soon enough, if still scrappy and rough around the edges.

-D'Indy: Fervaal, Op.40 - Introduction du 1er Acte [1]
-Rimsky-Korsakov: Sadko, Op.5 [2]-[6]
-Brahms: Rhapsody for Contralto, Male Chorus and Orchestra, Op.53 [7]
-Stravinsky: Le sacre du printemps, Scenes of Pagan Russia in 2 Parts [8]-[21]
number_six
2020-03-18 18:51:48 UTC
Permalink
Stravinsky - The Flood, Abraham and Isaac, Variations, Requiem Canticles
Wuorinen - A Reliquary for igor Stravinsky
Knussen, London Sinfonietta, various singers and soloists - DG

In the Flood, even the marmoset gets into the act --but not the pangolin. Canticles was probably the high point of the disk for me. Wuorinen piece is very good, more accessible than I would have found it when it was written in the 70s; recording is from mid-90s
number_six
2020-03-18 19:10:15 UTC
Permalink
DVD 2 from the Julian Bream box concludes with Bream being interviewed by host Kenneth Allsup. Bream's posture in his chair gradually becomes so exaggerated as seeming to defy gravity, and cannot help but command the viewer's attention.
number_six
2020-03-19 23:50:49 UTC
Permalink
Ansermet box disk 31 -- three superb works by Frank Martin
Concerto for 7 Wind instruments, timpani, percussion and string orch
Etudes for String Orchestra
Petite symphonie concertante

Probably familiar to many here; mostly new to me
Bob Harper
2020-03-20 00:08:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by number_six
Ansermet box disk 31 -- three superb works by Frank Martin
Concerto for 7 Wind instruments, timpani, percussion and string orch
Etudes for String Orchestra
Petite symphonie concertante
Probably familiar to many here; mostly new to me
I've loved Martin's music ever since I heard his Cello Concerto on a
Louisville LP 50 years or more ago.

The Concerto may be his orchestral masterpiece.

Bob Harper
number_six
2020-03-20 00:55:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Harper
Post by number_six
Ansermet box disk 31 -- three superb works by Frank Martin
Concerto for 7 Wind instruments, timpani, percussion and string orch
Etudes for String Orchestra
Petite symphonie concertante
Probably familiar to many here; mostly new to me
I've loved Martin's music ever since I heard his Cello Concerto on a
Louisville LP 50 years or more ago.
The Concerto may be his orchestral masterpiece.
Bob Harper
And perhaps In terra pax is his vocal masterpiece?
Bob Harper
2020-03-20 01:02:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by number_six
Post by Bob Harper
Post by number_six
Ansermet box disk 31 -- three superb works by Frank Martin
Concerto for 7 Wind instruments, timpani, percussion and string orch
Etudes for String Orchestra
Petite symphonie concertante
Probably familiar to many here; mostly new to me
I've loved Martin's music ever since I heard his Cello Concerto on a
Louisville LP 50 years or more ago.
The Concerto may be his orchestral masterpiece.
Bob Harper
And perhaps In terra pax is his vocal masterpiece?
The Concerto for 7 Winds, I mean. Don't know In terra pax, so can't
offer an opinion about the vocal music.

Bob Harper
Bozo
2020-03-23 21:56:20 UTC
Permalink
Pianist Tanya Bannister playing short solo piano works of David Del Tredici and Christopher Theofanidis, a 2009 Albany Records cd.

The Violin Sonata (Sergiu Schwartz,Paul Posnak) ,String Quartet (Vega Quartet) ,and Piano Quintet (Vega,Posnak) of John Alden Carpenter, a 2002 Naxos cd.

The Piano Sonata and Diversions for Piano of Carpenter, Denver Oldham,pianist,New World 1999 cd.

Most of these are at YT , hope at your streaming subscription. Mystery to me why the Carpenter's apparently ignored today.

Music providing some solace as we spiral into oblivion behind our Dear Leader.
c***@gmail.com
2020-03-24 13:23:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bozo
Pianist Tanya Bannister playing short solo piano works of David Del Tredici and Christopher Theofanidis, a 2009 Albany Records cd.
The Violin Sonata (Sergiu Schwartz,Paul Posnak) ,String Quartet (Vega Quartet) ,and Piano Quintet (Vega,Posnak) of John Alden Carpenter, a 2002 Naxos cd.
The Piano Sonata and Diversions for Piano of Carpenter, Denver Oldham,pianist,New World 1999 cd.
Most of these are at YT , hope at your streaming subscription. Mystery to me why the Carpenter's apparently ignored today.
Music providing some solace as we spiral into oblivion behind our Dear Leader.
That Carpenter chamber music CD on Naxos is a great favorite of mine. All fine works, especially the Violin Sonata, imo. I've been revisiting with enjoyment some Charles Wuorinen recordings brought to mind by the composer's death, esp. the eclectic batch of works issued by Tzadik under the title "On Alligators." The title piece is at
accompanied by charming illustrations. The Piano Concerto #3 is another work on the CD and it's a riot.

Also obsessing a bit about Romantic/post-Romantic French chamber music: D'Indy String Quartets played by the Joachim Quartet (#3 is a masterpiece, imo, and the other two go down nicely); lovely chamber works for piano and strings by Joseph Jongen performed by the Ensemble Joseph Jongen, which is anchored by the excellent pianist Diane Andersen.

AC
Bozo
2020-03-24 13:38:05 UTC
Permalink
...lovely chamber works for piano and strings by Joseph Jongen performed by the Ensemble Joseph >Jongen, which is anchored by the excellent pianist Diane Andersen.
Thanks for that tip. I enjoy some of Jongen's solo piano music, a 1992 K-Classics cd with pianist Gary Steagal. Diane Andersen is also a Bartok specialist, have one of her cd's of some of his solo works.
number_six
2020-03-24 18:11:52 UTC
Permalink
Diana Doherty - Souvenirs - Sublime music for the oboe (ABC)

It's been awhile, maybe too long, since I listened to an album of sweetly played short works including -- gasp -- movements excerpted from concerti

But at the moment, this sounds fine

Coming up -- 4 cds of Tanzmusik on Archiv
number_six
2020-03-26 00:25:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by number_six
Coming up -- 4 cds of Tanzmusik on Archiv
Dang, there is a printing error in the booklet with the track listings.

pages 5-8 repeat, 9-12 and 25-28 are missing,

The second booklet, with notes, appears complete, so it may help sort out the track listing. Rats.
JohnGavin
2020-03-26 16:12:08 UTC
Permalink
Going through Hyperion‘s Brahms Chamber music box. It’s a great way to spend time in solitude, which I admit I am enjoying very much. Best wishes and prayers for everyone’s good health
Bob Harper
2020-03-26 22:35:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by JohnGavin
Going through Hyperion‘s Brahms Chamber music box. It’s a great way to spend time in solitude, which I admit I am enjoying very much. Best wishes and prayers for everyone’s good health
Are you ill (hope not) or just isolating so you don't take unnecessary
chances?

Bob Harper
JohnGavin
2020-03-26 22:57:09 UTC
Permalink
Are you ill (hope not) or just isolating so you don't take unnecessary
chances?

Bob Harper

Not sick at all, for which I feel very grateful, but following the wise advice of staying relatively isolated. I recommend that if possible everyone avoid going out.
Al Eisner
2020-03-27 04:44:10 UTC
Permalink
Going through Hyperion‘s Brahms Chamber music box. It’s a great way to spend time in solitude, which I admit I am enjoying very much. Best wishes and prayers for everyone’s good health
I've rarely if ever watched complete opera videos, but with the Met
offering free streaming of its HD simulcasts (a different one each day)
I watched Die WalkÃŒre yesterday evening and today. I have to say
I found this absorbing and I really enjoyed it. First time ever
viewing this opera (no, not live either). There can be tedious
spots in audio-only Wagner, but seeing the drama and the closed
captions directly on the screen were a great help.

It't from a May, 2011 performance with Deborah Voigt, Eva-Maria Westbroek,
Stephanie Blythe, Jonas Kaufmann, Bryn Terfel, and Hans-Peter König. The
wonderful first act was (in my not-very-well-informed opinion) by its
three performers (especially Kaufmann), and I really liked Terfel. He
may sometimes overact, but he delivered a fully understandable Wotan,
and afterall the Ring is his story.

Sets were weird/uninteresting, and the stage machinery annoying (were
those horses?), but this was greatly ameliorated by photography which
mostly focused on the performers.

Note (to Oscar?): it was conducted (impressively) by James Levine, and
half of the interviews tacked on the end were done by Placido Domingo.

Anyone else partaking of the opportunity?
--
Al Eisner
Bozo
2020-03-26 23:04:21 UTC
Permalink
Isolating to be safe, and today re-discovered some gems had not heard for years:

Richter, The Warsaw Recital, 1972, all-Scriabin, amazing.

Badura-Skoda's 1958 recordings of Schubert sonatas D.959,784. Among my tops.

Bernstein,NYPO,Shostakovich PC # 2 ( Bernstein pianist ), and Poulenc Two-Piano Concerto with Gold and Frizdale,more Poulencian than my LaBeques/Ozawa/BSO.

Solo piano works of Ernest Bloch,Margaret Fingerhut, sui generis but interesting.

Then heard Trump to recommend a " county " approach to virus ??!! Criminal recklessness.All to re-elect Trump.I'll stay inside a long time.
Lawrence Chalmers
2020-03-24 22:11:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Oscar
Strauss (R): Selected Works
Lucerne Festival Orchestra / Riccardo Chailly
Decca 483 3080 ℗ © 2019. CD.
DDD.
Recorded at KKL Luzern, Switzerland, August 11 & 12, 2017.
Executive producer: Dominic Fyfe.
Recording producer: John Fraser.
Recording engineer: Philip Siney.
Recording editor: Julia Thomas.
Production co-ordinator: Joanne Baines.
Publishers: Peters Edition (Also sprach Zarathustra, Tod und Verklärung, Till Eulenspiegel); Boosey & Hawkes (Dance of the Seventh Veils).
Booklet note: James Jolly.
Booklet editing: WLP Ltd.
Art direction: Darren Rumney.
Artist photography © Peter Fischli/Lucerne Festival.
COMMENT: Excellent performances, in particular a very fine Death and Transfiguration. But the entire disc is quality. And it is Chailly's _first_ disc of Strauss. Difficult to imagine he has gone this far into a decades-long career, aged 67, and had not committed the music of Germany's greatest 20th C. composer to disc.
-Also sprach Zarathustra, Op.30 TrV 176
-Tod und Verklärung, Op.24 TrV 158 (Death and Transfiguration)
-Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks, Op.28 TrV 171
-Salomes Tanz der sieben Schleier ("Salome"), Op.54 (Dance of the Seventh Veils)
Traversing the 12cd set of 'Polyphonies' by Pierre Henry. Gasp! But enjoying most of it. I've always been fascinated by musique concrete since I first heard his Veil of Orpheus. What is truly fascinating is the mind and patience
of this man to piece together isolated sounds and transform them into so many ways.

And on YT some Bruckner performances by Hermann Abendroth. Very unique performances that I find quite satisfying.
Ed Presson
2020-03-24 22:47:46 UTC
Permalink
George Antheil: Symphony No. 1, McKonkey's Ferry, Capital of the World
(Ballet Suite), The Golden Bird, Nocturne
in Skyrockets (the last two premiere recordings).
John Storgards/BBC Philharmonic. Chandos 20080

This is the third and most recent of the Chandos series of Antheil
recordings by this group. Storgards gets
better with each CD, but is not yet completely "inside" Antheil.

The First Symphony is a real potpourri of ideas (old, new, borrowed, blue)
that Antheil seeming enjoyed throwing together, but was not
willing to take the time and effort to integrate. I know of only one other
recording, by Hugh Wolff on CPO; it's
a better performance, I think. CPO's sound is not a glamorous as the new
Chandos, but it is very good and sounds more
like a real orchestra in a real space.

The two premieres are 4:22 and 5:30. They are both typical of Antheil: fun
new ideas with references
to other works (usually by Stravinsky). Perhaps for the Antheil collector
if you already have the CPO Antheil CDs.

Ed Presson
Andy Evans
2020-03-25 10:06:13 UTC
Permalink
I haven't listened to any classical music for 2 weeks. In these troubled times I seem drawn to funk and fusion. Herbie hancock, Steely Dan, that kind of thing. Just want a slug of feelgood music. Don't know if any others of you can relate to this.
number_six
2020-03-25 16:40:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andy Evans
I haven't listened to any classical music for 2 weeks. In these troubled times I seem drawn to funk and fusion. Herbie hancock, Steely Dan, that kind of thing. Just want a slug of feelgood music. Don't know if any others of you can relate to this.
My next 6-cd batch will include Street Life by the Crusaders.
Bozo
2020-03-25 16:53:55 UTC
Permalink
I haven't listened to any classical music for 2 weeks. In these troubled times I seem drawn to funk and >fusion. Herbie hancock, Steely Dan, that kind of thing. Just want a slug of feelgood music. Don't know if any >others of you can relate to this.
Each his own, but I still find solace in feelgood Classical. Today,pianist Llyr Williams playing the wonderful Bartok PC # 3 with BBCNOW/Jac van Steen, in Cardiff,May 2019, uplifting that Bartok could write such positive music given his challenges at the time. Encore , “Night in Transylvania” from Bartok’s “Ten Easy Pieces”, Sz.39,which play at myself :

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/m000gmy4
Raymond Hall
2020-03-25 21:21:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andy Evans
I haven't listened to any classical music for 2 weeks. In these troubled times I seem drawn to funk and fusion. Herbie hancock, Steely Dan, that kind of thing. Just want a slug of feelgood music. Don't know if any others of you can relate to this.
Hi Andy, I'm similar, but have been recently hooked by Rammstein on YouTube. Till Lindemann the front singer for the band actually has a good deep voice, amidst all the flashing lights, pyrotechnics, flame throwers attached to the lead and rhythm guitars, and general fooling around. What attracts me about them, is that deep down the members of the band (6) don't take themselves too seriously, unlike some other groups. You get a real show and a blast for your money/time. I first noticed them about 16 years ago.

Two years ago I completed all of Miles Davis output on CD, and love his fusion stuff. Agharta being my favourite 2cd (replete with those delicious water drums) but Miles is too serious for me at the moment in these troubling times.

And then there is classical (including flamenco) ... so much music to cram into our lives.

Stay safe everyone.

Ray Hall, Taree
Andy Evans
2020-03-27 10:14:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Raymond Hall
Post by Andy Evans
I haven't listened to any classical music for 2 weeks. In these troubled times I seem drawn to funk and fusion. Herbie hancock, Steely Dan, that kind of thing. Just want a slug of feelgood music. Don't know if any others of you can relate to this.
Hi Andy, I'm similar, but have been recently hooked by Rammstein on YouTube.
It's healthy, I think, to be able to go directly from Stockhausen to Rammstein. I've always loved their "Mutter", and German is absolutely the right language for their hard rock genre.

I'm pretty sure that if Bach, Beethoven, Mozart and the like were alive at this moment they may well be composing rock, jazz or electronic music. I wouldn't expect innovators to work inside accepted formats.
Oscar
2020-03-27 16:05:14 UTC
Permalink
Till Lindemann of Rammstein has Covid-19. He is in intensive care unit in Berlin.

On March 15, he and his side band, Lindemann, performed a concert in Moscow. Upon returning to Germany, he was hospitalized with an extremely high fever and later tested positive for coronavirus. Immediately sent to intensive care and placed under quarantine.

The 57-year-old singer, who was originally in critical condition, is now said to be feeling better and is no longer in danger of losing his life.
Raymond Hall
2020-03-28 03:08:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andy Evans
Post by Raymond Hall
Post by Andy Evans
I haven't listened to any classical music for 2 weeks. In these troubled times I seem drawn to funk and fusion. Herbie hancock, Steely Dan, that kind of thing. Just want a slug of feelgood music. Don't know if any others of you can relate to this.
Hi Andy, I'm similar, but have been recently hooked by Rammstein on YouTube.
It's healthy, I think, to be able to go directly from Stockhausen to Rammstein. I've always loved their "Mutter", and German is absolutely the right language for their hard rock genre.
I'm pretty sure that if Bach, Beethoven, Mozart and the like were alive at this moment they may well be composing rock, jazz or electronic music. I wouldn't expect innovators to work inside accepted formats.
Very very true. Beethoven would probably be an industrial metal giant. Fortunately, I think it is a very good thing to be able to enjoy many different musical genres. Partly one has to be willing to accept that there is musical enjoyment to be had in different genres, and in finding out other genres that you really enjoy, one's life becomes much enriched.

Ray Hall, Taree
Bozo
2020-03-25 12:38:31 UTC
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Post by Ed Presson
George Antheil: Symphony No. 1, McKonkey's Ferry, Capital of the World
(Ballet Suite), The Golden Bird, Nocturne
in Skyrockets (the last two premiere recordings).
John Storgards/BBC Philharmonic. Chandos 20080
Thanks.I certainly dont have your breadth of knowledge of the composer or recordings of his work, have not heard the ones you mention.The one Antheil cd I do have is the CPO of his 2 PC's, the 2nd PC very fine work,Markus Becker, pianist, Eji Oue,NDR Symphony,seemingly fine performances although I have no references.Those with streaming services may wish to his 2nd PC.
Lawrence Kart
2020-03-25 16:55:53 UTC
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Sign that I must be losing it. Recently picked up the Peter Eotvos recording of Stockhausen's "Gruppen for Three Orchestras," a work that I'd certainly heard of but had never listened to. Chose to forestall listening after a while in order not to disturb others in the house, though what I heard was certainly novel and impressive . Later on I was listening to some orchestral works by the prolific Darmstadt-based mid- to late Baroque composer Christoph Graupner (1683-1760) and damned if I couldn't hear a resemblance to the Stockhausen of "Gruppen." Graupner's works tend to go with little sense of transition from one mood or motif to another and, further, and most important, there often are three or more instrumental groups, each with its distinct instrumentation and tone colors, going on at once, while each such grouping typically differs from the others not only in instrumentation but also in tempo and rhythmic framework. Also, these various differences don't amount to/lead to clashes -- rather the feeling is more or less one of fluctuating homogeneity (less so when one focuses on a particular group/thread in the fabric, more so when one steps back and of the whole as a "whole," which in fact it may not be or be intended to be.
Raymond Hall
2020-03-25 21:28:48 UTC
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Post by Lawrence Kart
Sign that I must be losing it. Recently picked up the Peter Eotvos recording of Stockhausen's "Gruppen for Three Orchestras," a work that I'd certainly heard of but had never listened to. Chose to forestall listening after a while in order not to disturb others in the house, though what I heard was certainly novel and impressive . Later on I was listening to some orchestral works by the prolific Darmstadt-based mid- to late Baroque composer Christoph Graupner (1683-1760) and damned if I couldn't hear a resemblance to the Stockhausen of "Gruppen." Graupner's works tend to go with little sense of transition from one mood or motif to another and, further, and most important, there often are three or more instrumental groups, each with its distinct instrumentation and tone colors, going on at once, while each such grouping typically differs from the others not only in instrumentation but also in tempo and rhythmic framework. Also, these various differences don't amount to/lead to clashes -- rather the feeling is more or less one of fluctuating homogeneity (less so when one focuses on a particular group/thread in the fabric, more so when one steps back and of the whole as a "whole," which in fact it may not be or be intended to be.
The Eotvos Gruppen was also a recent addition, but I have yet to listen to it.

Ray Hall, Taree
Lewis Perin
2020-03-27 20:32:57 UTC
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Post by Lawrence Kart
Sign that I must be losing it. Recently picked up the Peter Eotvos
recording of Stockhausen's "Gruppen for Three Orchestras," a work that
I'd certainly heard of but had never listened to. Chose to forestall
listening after a while in order not to disturb others in the house,
though what I heard was certainly novel and impressive . Later on I
was listening to some orchestral works by the prolific Darmstadt-based
mid- to late Baroque composer Christoph Graupner (1683-1760) and
damned if I couldn't hear a resemblance to the Stockhausen of
"Gruppen." Graupner's works tend to go with little sense of transition
from one mood or motif to another and, further, and most important,
there often are three or more instrumental groups, each with its
distinct instrumentation and tone colors, going on at once, while each
such grouping typically differs from the others not only in
instrumentation but also in tempo and rhythmic framework. Also, these
various differences don't amount to/lead to clashes -- rather the
feeling is more or less one of fluctuating homogeneity (less so when
one focuses on a particular group/thread in the fabric, more so when
one steps back and of the whole as a "whole," which in fact it may not
be or be intended to be.
Darmstadt-based? Maybe it’s something in the water.

/Lew
---
Lew Perin / ***@acm.org
https://babelcarp.org
JohnGavin
2020-03-28 00:19:17 UTC
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Elizabeth Chojnacka (harpsichord) plays Scott Joplin. It’s very good!
Bozo
2020-03-28 00:35:29 UTC
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Neglected cd's or cd-r's today :

Constance Lambert's Piano Sonata , really fine, especially last 2 movs.Not sure source of my cd-r, but here as well:
( Part 1 of 3 there )

Piano concertos of Reizenstein (2) and Hindemith, reminded why I have neglected them.The Hyperion cd for Reizenstein, not sure the source of my Hindemith cd-r.

Chopin's complete Polonaises,including Op.61,Pollini's 70's on DGG.I did not care for originally, thus the neglect, but on re-hearing do find his Op.26,# 1 and ( surprisingly) Op.61 are very fine.

Tomorrow, PC's of Pierne,Lalo,Massanet.
Bozo
2020-03-28 18:01:43 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Tomorrow, PC's of Pierne,Lalo,Massanet.
The Pierne no longer impresses me. The Lalo and Massanet are worth hearing, especially the Massanet, a first-rate second-rate PC.Mystery it eems hardly played in comparison to the ubiquitous Saint-Saens # 2 and Ravel G, but perhaps is played in France. Mine the Vox Box here :

(Massanet )
(Lalo )
Bozo
2020-03-28 22:00:46 UTC
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Frederick Lamond , revelatory readings:

From the Pearl cd :

( “Gnomenreigen” )
(“Feux Follets” )

From Marston's set :

( 2 Chopin mazurkas )
Bozo
2020-03-29 21:44:10 UTC
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More Lamond today, at age 71 his noble if spartan Beethoven PC # 3, 1939 live broadcast with RCO,van Beinum,Marston cd :


Per Lamond: " Haydn leads us to Heaven, Mozart is Heaven,Beethoven is God in Heaven." Although here Lamond plays a first mov. cadenza by Clara Schumann, rarely heard per Marston.

A program Lamond played earlier in his career : "Hammerklavier" , Op.110, Op.111 ,Pause,"Waldstein", "Appassionata."

Then, from Uchida's absolutely marvelous 2006 (?) cd of the last 3 Beethoven piano sonatas, Op.109 and 110,perfect pacing in the "second" fugue at end of 110.After many years, I have now come to regard 110,rather than 109,as his sonata I'd take if can have just one.
Bozo
2020-03-29 18:24:53 UTC
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Post by Bozo
http://youtu.be/3LAw3co79_A ( Part 1 of 3 there )
Rather, here for the Lambert :

number_six
2020-03-29 20:41:56 UTC
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Milhaud 2-cd Vox collection
first cd starts with "Six Little Symphonies"
Nos 4 Op 74 and 6 Op79 were my favorites of these
number_six
2020-03-25 16:37:55 UTC
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Post by Lawrence Chalmers
Traversing the 12cd set of 'Polyphonies' by Pierre Henry. Gasp! But enjoying most of it. I've always been fascinated by musique concrete since I first heard his Veil of Orpheus. What is truly fascinating is the mind and patience
of this man to piece together isolated sounds and transform them into so many ways.
Wow, that's a lot more Pierre Henry than I have. No doubt VEIL is a landmark in musique concrete.
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