Discussion:
Who has made the most recordings of one work?
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Kerrison
2018-06-27 17:38:20 UTC
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I'll kick this off with Stokowski and Stravinsky's "Firebird Suite" ...

1) Philadelphia (1924) RCA first US acoustics
2) Philadelphia (1927) RCA first US electrics
3) Philadelphia (1935) RCA
4) All-American Youth (1941) Columbia
5) NBC Symphony (1942) RCA
6) His Symphony (1950) RCA
7) Berlin Philharmonic (1957) Capitol stereo
8) London Symphony (1967) Decca Phase-4 stereo

Does any other performer (conductor, instrumentalist, singer) match that total for one work?
wkasimer
2018-06-27 19:43:06 UTC
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Post by Kerrison
Does any other performer (conductor, instrumentalist, singer) match that total for one work?
If we're only to consider commercial recordings, probably not. Fischer-Dieskau made "only" seven commercial recordings of Winterreise, although there are also a couple of early broadcast performances, issued by Audite.
Al Eisner
2018-06-27 19:44:42 UTC
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Post by Kerrison
I'll kick this off with Stokowski and Stravinsky's "Firebird Suite" ...
1) Philadelphia (1924) RCA first US acoustics
2) Philadelphia (1927) RCA first US electrics
3) Philadelphia (1935) RCA
4) All-American Youth (1941) Columbia
5) NBC Symphony (1942) RCA
6) His Symphony (1950) RCA
7) Berlin Philharmonic (1957) Capitol stereo
8) London Symphony (1967) Decca Phase-4 stereo
Does any other performer (conductor, instrumentalist, singer) match that total for one work?
Do you mean studio recordings? If you allow for live recordings, a
great number of Horowitz's live recordings have been commercially
released in recent years. Check out the list at klangrede.de. It
looks like (as perhaps expected) Schumann's TrÀumerei has by far
the most, but many other works also exceed 8 (including more
substantial works, like a Chopin Ballade, etc.).
--
Al Eisner
Andy Evans
2018-06-27 20:03:48 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
Do you mean studio recordings? If you allow for live recordings, a
great number of Horowitz's live recordings have been commercially
released in recent years.
If we're talking live then Richter surely - there are so many live recordings of him and quite a few pieces are repeated.
Kerrison
2018-06-27 20:05:20 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
Post by Kerrison
I'll kick this off with Stokowski and Stravinsky's "Firebird Suite" ...
1) Philadelphia (1924) RCA first US acoustics
2) Philadelphia (1927) RCA first US electrics
3) Philadelphia (1935) RCA
4) All-American Youth (1941) Columbia
5) NBC Symphony (1942) RCA
6) His Symphony (1950) RCA
7) Berlin Philharmonic (1957) Capitol stereo
8) London Symphony (1967) Decca Phase-4 stereo
Does any other performer (conductor, instrumentalist, singer) match that total for one work?
Do you mean studio recordings? If you allow for live recordings, a
great number of Horowitz's live recordings have been commercially
released in recent years. Check out the list at klangrede.de. It
looks like (as perhaps expected) Schumann's Träumerei has by far
the most, but many other works also exceed 8 (including more
substantial works, like a Chopin Ballade, etc.).
--
Al Eisner
Yes, I was really thinking of commercial studio recordings and not taking into account any 'live' performances issued from radio or TV broadcasts, for example.
Bozo
2018-06-27 21:27:25 UTC
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Looks like Arrau recorded ( not live ) "Emperor" at least 5 times ?

http://arrauhouse.org/content/disc_completediscography.htm
h***@btinternet.com
2018-06-27 21:30:34 UTC
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There are 38 recordings of Horowitz playing Traumerei.
Ricardo Jimenez
2018-06-27 23:36:13 UTC
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Post by h***@btinternet.com
There are 38 recordings of Horowitz playing Traumerei.
How many of him playing the Chopin B minor scherzo?
Bozo
2018-06-27 23:55:26 UTC
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Post by Ricardo Jimenez
How many of him playing the Chopin B minor scherzo?
Or Moszowski's "Etincelles " ?
r***@gmail.com
2018-06-28 01:35:51 UTC
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38 of Traumerei on its own, or including recordings of Kinderszenen?
Al Eisner
2018-06-29 23:03:47 UTC
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Post by r***@gmail.com
38 of Traumerei on its own, or including recordings of Kinderszenen?
The discography I mentioned earlier (which advertises itself as nearly
complete) lists 28 on its own plus 6 Kinderszenen's. Only 17 of
Etincelles. It appears one Chopin waltz may beat it out for
second place, with various other pieces close behind.
--
Al Eisner
Bozo
2018-06-29 23:48:29 UTC
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Only 17 of Etincelles. It appears one Chopin waltz may beat it out for
second place,
Op.34,# 2, A minor, I assume ?
Al Eisner
2018-06-30 00:10:44 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Only 17 of Etincelles. It appears one Chopin waltz may beat it out for
second place,
Op.34,# 2, A minor, I assume ?
Right, with Op. 64 #2 only a few behind.
--
Al Eisner
graham
2018-06-28 01:47:57 UTC
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Post by h***@btinternet.com
There are 38 recordings of Horowitz playing Traumerei.
37 too many!
dk
2018-06-28 02:52:14 UTC
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Post by graham
Post by h***@btinternet.com
There are 38 recordings of Horowitz playing Traumerei.
37 too many!
38 too many!
graham
2018-06-28 04:17:16 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by graham
Post by h***@btinternet.com
There are 38 recordings of Horowitz playing Traumerei.
37 too many!
38 too many!
Well I hadn't heard them all!!
O
2018-06-28 15:04:39 UTC
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Post by graham
Post by dk
Post by graham
Post by h***@btinternet.com
There are 38 recordings of Horowitz playing Traumerei.
37 too many!
38 too many!
Well I hadn't heard them all!!
If you've heard one...

-Owen
piano4tay
2018-06-28 09:02:43 UTC
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Only 38?.....it seems like more.....

Amn
Andy Evans
2018-06-28 09:59:43 UTC
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Post by piano4tay
Only 38?.....it seems like more.....
Amn
It's frightening to think of how many times Horowitz played these pieces in his lifetime. The good thing about jazz is you can play different notes each time.
Bozo
2018-06-28 13:07:22 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
The good thing about jazz is you can play different notes each time.
And you could record Cage's 4'33" 8 times , or 38 times, in one morning !!
piano4tay
2018-06-29 04:41:40 UTC
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To be fair, however many times Horowitz played something he never sounded as though he was bored or phoning in a performance or just going through the motions....That takes something, when you've been playing the same piece for 60 years......I could never understand why he played traumerie so damned often until I started to play it myself.....it can be hypnotically elusive for the performer....not necessarily so for the listener...

AMN
Bozo
2018-06-29 12:44:22 UTC
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Post by piano4tay
...it can be hypnotically elusive for the performer....not necessarily so for the listener...
I heard Horowitz play "Traumeri" live, as his second encore , after "Etincelles ", in 1976 , got a standing ovation , a more than a few tears in the audience.
Ricardo Jimenez
2018-06-29 13:18:14 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Post by piano4tay
...it can be hypnotically elusive for the performer....not necessarily so for the listener...
I heard Horowitz play "Traumeri" live, as his second encore , after "Etincelles ", in 1976 , got a standing ovation , a more than a few tears in the audience.
Correct me if I am wrong, but I am under the impression that he played
it to tell the audience, "This is the last encore, now go home to bed
and do your own träumerei".
Bozo
2018-06-29 18:57:22 UTC
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Post by Ricardo Jimenez
Correct me if I am wrong, but I am under the impression that he played
it to tell the audience, "This is the last encore, now go home to bed
and do your own träumerei".
On the particular recital to which I referred, he played one more encore after " Traumeri" , Rachmaninoff Op.32, # 12 if I recall.
piano4tay
2018-06-30 04:41:52 UTC
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I think that 'traumerie' is generally translated in English as 'day dreaming', not the stuff we do when asleep.....The French translation is 'Reverie', the English usage of which captures this better......I'm not sure how often he did this, but when I saw horowitz he held up three fingers to the audience before beginning his encores to indicate how many we were going to get......Looking at his concertography, there seem to be only a few occasions when he gave more - or less - than three, and in his later years, when it featured, traumerie was often not the last.....

AMN
graham
2018-06-30 12:42:27 UTC
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Post by piano4tay
I think that 'traumerie' is generally translated in English as 'day dreaming', not the stuff we do when asleep.....The French translation is 'Reverie', the English usage of which captures this better......I'm not sure how often he did this, but when I saw horowitz he held up three fingers to the audience before beginning his encores to indicate how many we were going to get......Looking at his concertography, there seem to be only a few occasions when he gave more - or less - than three, and in his later years, when it featured, traumerie was often not the last.....
AMN
When I was at uni, the music committee booked well-known pianists to
give recitals and the fee paid for two encores.
piano4tay
2018-07-01 05:22:26 UTC
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That could well explain some of the recitals I’ve been to where the artist seemed determined to play encores even as the audience was walking out....

AMN
c***@gmail.com
2018-07-02 05:16:16 UTC
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Post by piano4tay
That could well explain some of the recitals I’ve been to where the artist seemed determined to play encores even as the audience was walking out....
AMN
Yes, you had me wondering. If the fee includes 2 encores and the audience is utterly uninterested, with applause dropping dead ofter the artist's third bow, does the artist loes that part of the fee?
O
2018-07-03 17:40:51 UTC
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Post by c***@gmail.com
That could well explain some of the recitals I¹ve been to where the artist
seemed determined to play encores even as the audience was walking out....
AMN
Yes, you had me wondering. If the fee includes 2 encores and the audience is
utterly uninterested, with applause dropping dead ofter the artist's third
bow, does the artist loes that part of the fee?
Does he get paid more if the audience wants more encores than he's
prepared?

-Owen
Bozo
2018-07-03 21:02:20 UTC
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Post by O
Does he get paid more if the audience wants more encores than he's
prepared?
Or different pay for Mendelssohn " May Breezes " vs. Prokofieff's " Toccata " ?
O
2018-07-04 01:12:40 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Post by O
Does he get paid more if the audience wants more encores than he's
prepared?
Or different pay for Mendelssohn " May Breezes " vs. Prokofieff's " Toccata " ?
"More money? But you played MacDowell's "To a Wild Rose!"

"So that made it four encores! I'd still be out there if they hadn't
all gone home!"

-Owen
g***@gmail.com
2018-06-27 23:52:55 UTC
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Post by Kerrison
I'll kick this off with Stokowski and Stravinsky's "Firebird Suite" ...
1) Philadelphia (1924) RCA first US acoustics
2) Philadelphia (1927) RCA first US electrics
3) Philadelphia (1935) RCA
4) All-American Youth (1941) Columbia
5) NBC Symphony (1942) RCA
6) His Symphony (1950) RCA
7) Berlin Philharmonic (1957) Capitol stereo
8) London Symphony (1967) Decca Phase-4 stereo
Does any other performer (conductor, instrumentalist, singer) match that total for one work?
Didn't Tiana Lemnitz make the most recordings of the Wesendonck Lieder?

I've lost count.
wkasimer
2018-06-28 15:25:33 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
Didn't Tiana Lemnitz make the most recordings of the Wesendonck Lieder?
I doubt it.
JohnGavin
2018-06-28 16:06:51 UTC
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There is a CD of Christian Zacharias playing the same Scarlatti Sonata 16 times. It seems to be out of print.
wkasimer
2018-06-28 17:47:54 UTC
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Post by JohnGavin
There is a CD of Christian Zacharias playing the same Scarlatti Sonata 16 times. It seems to be out of print.
It's included in this set:

https://www.amazon.com/Scarlatti-Sonates-Clavier-Christian-Zacharias/dp/B0040UEI3G
r***@gmail.com
2018-06-30 00:41:47 UTC
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Post by wkasimer
Post by JohnGavin
There is a CD of Christian Zacharias playing the same Scarlatti Sonata 16 times. It seems to be out of print.
https://www.amazon.com/Scarlatti-Sonates-Clavier-Christian-Zacharias/dp/B0040UEI3G
These were live concert performances in different places. They are remarkably different in sound, and the pianist plays differently in different venues. That is its interest.
Sol L. Siegel
2018-07-01 18:09:54 UTC
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Post by Kerrison
I'll kick this off with Stokowski and Stravinsky's "Firebird Suite" ...
1) Philadelphia (1924) RCA first US acoustics
2) Philadelphia (1927) RCA first US electrics
3) Philadelphia (1935) RCA
4) All-American Youth (1941) Columbia
5) NBC Symphony (1942) RCA
6) His Symphony (1950) RCA
7) Berlin Philharmonic (1957) Capitol stereo
8) London Symphony (1967) Decca Phase-4 stereo
Does any other performer (conductor, instrumentalist, singer) match
that total for one work?
That beats HvK's seven Pathetiques. But I wonder if that's the record
(pun intended, I'm afraid) for a symphony.

- Sol L. Siegel, Philadelphia, PA USA
g***@gmail.com
2018-07-18 16:17:03 UTC
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Post by Kerrison
I'll kick this off with Stokowski and Stravinsky's "Firebird Suite" ...
1) Philadelphia (1924) RCA first US acoustics
2) Philadelphia (1927) RCA first US electrics
3) Philadelphia (1935) RCA
4) All-American Youth (1941) Columbia
5) NBC Symphony (1942) RCA
6) His Symphony (1950) RCA
7) Berlin Philharmonic (1957) Capitol stereo
8) London Symphony (1967) Decca Phase-4 stereo
Does any other performer (conductor, instrumentalist, singer) match that total for one work?
Concerning THE PLANETS, didn't Boult conduct several studio recordings?
Kerrison
2018-07-18 21:41:21 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by Kerrison
Does any other performer (conductor, instrumentalist, singer) match that total for one work?
Concerning THE PLANETS, didn't Boult conduct several studio recordings?
Yes, five commercial ones:

1) BBC Symphony (1945) HMV 78s
2) London Philharmonic (1953) Nixa / Pye LP
3) Vienna Philharmonic (1959) Westminster
4) New Philharmonia (1966) EMI
5) London Philharmonic (1978) EMI

He also recorded Elgar's 2nd Symphony five times:

1) BBC Symphony (1944) HMV 78s
2) London Philharmonic (1956) Nixa / Pye
3) Scottish National Orchestra (1963) Waverley
4) London Philharmonic (1968) Lyrita
5) London Philharmonic (1975/76) EMI

I should think quite a few conductors have made five recordings of one work over the years, especially when it comes to symphonies by Beethoven or Tchaikovsky.
g***@gmail.com
2018-07-18 23:18:39 UTC
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Post by Kerrison
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by Kerrison
Does any other performer (conductor, instrumentalist, singer) match that total for one work?
Concerning THE PLANETS, didn't Boult conduct several studio recordings?
1) BBC Symphony (1945) HMV 78s
2) London Philharmonic (1953) Nixa / Pye LP
3) Vienna Philharmonic (1959) Westminster
4) New Philharmonia (1966) EMI
5) London Philharmonic (1978) EMI
And then there is this recording of a live 1973 performance:

https://www.google.com/search?tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1366&bih=662&ei=XcpPW6uvGYvh0gLr0augCg&q=boult+planets+live&oq=boult+planets+live&gs_l=img.3...904.6598.0.6733.25.14.3.6.0.0.343.2387.0j8j2j2.12.0....0...1ac.1.64.img..5.13.1913.0..0j35i39k1j0i10i24k1j0i5i30k1j0i8i30k1.0.0o4Q9JAkajI#imgrc=Z7he8TBf64TjkM:
drh8h
2018-07-19 13:31:42 UTC
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Post by Kerrison
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by Kerrison
Does any other performer (conductor, instrumentalist, singer) match that total for one work?
Concerning THE PLANETS, didn't Boult conduct several studio recordings?
1) BBC Symphony (1945) HMV 78s
2) London Philharmonic (1953) Nixa / Pye LP
3) Vienna Philharmonic (1959) Westminster
4) New Philharmonia (1966) EMI
5) London Philharmonic (1978) EMI
I think I would rather hear a Boult Firebird than a Stokowski Elgar 2. This could lead us to another discussion. Is it more valuable to have a performer of genius spread his insights over a large swath of the repertory, or instead concentrate and hone to perfection, a small, or as the case of Carlos Kleiber, tiny number of works to "perfection"?

A Toscanini Symphonie Fantastique or Rach 2?

Furtwangler La Mer?

Koussevitzky Manfred Symphony?

Rubinstein Hammerklavier?

Szigeti and Heifetz switching the Prokofiev concertos they played?

Schnabel Schumann Sym Etudes? (With benefit of modern splicing. :))

Possiblities endless, but not on this side of the empyrean.
Kerrison
2018-07-20 06:02:02 UTC
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I think I would rather hear a Boult Firebird than a Stokowski Elgar 2. ...
Boult's only recording of any of Stravinsky's music ("Circus Polka") was on a real curiosity of an LP entitled "Bravo" issued by 'Classics for Pleasure' in 1968. It consisted entirely of off-beat casting in which Boult also made his only recordings of any music by Falla ("The Ritual Fire Dance"), Gershwin ("Cuban Overture"), Wolf-Ferrari ("Jewels of the Madonna" Intermezzo), Jeremiah Clarke ("Trumpet Voluntary" orch. Sir Henry Wood) and other short works by Bruch, Saint-Sains and Walton.

He also did a lot of "one-offs" for Readers Digest, including his only recording of any of Mussorgsky's music, a thoroughly splendid version of "Night on Bare Mountain" that suggests he was only too glad to get away from being type-cast in English music ...



Stokowski gave the US Premiere of Elgar's 2nd in Cincinnati in 1911 but it was given the complete thumbs-down by the critics so he never returned to it. He did however conduct the "Enigma Variations" at the age of 90 with the Czech Philharmonic, recorded live in Phase-4, and despite his frailty produced a performance featuring quite the most refulgent "Nimrod" on disc ...


c***@gmail.com
2018-07-21 05:33:54 UTC
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Il giorno venerdì 20 luglio 2018 08:02:04 UTC+2, Kerrison ha scritto:
a thoroughly splendid version of "Night on Bare Mountain" that suggests he was only too glad to get away from being type-cast in English music ...
Another proof of this was his willingness at least up to the 1960s to stand in for indisposed colleagues, maybe half his age, and take on the programme "as is". This resulted in a Petrushka at the RFH in the 60s. If it was broadcast we might yet hear it, probably it wasn't.

Prewar, Boult did this sort of thing quite a lot, on a tour of the BBCSO he did Schoenberg's Variations in Vienna and The Rite of Spring in Paris
Kerrison
2018-07-21 07:36:54 UTC
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Post by Kerrison
a thoroughly splendid version of "Night on Bare Mountain" that suggests he was only too glad to get away from being type-cast in English music ...
Another proof of this was his willingness at least up to the 1960s to stand in for indisposed colleagues, maybe half his age, and take on the programme "as is". This resulted in a Petrushka at the RFH in the 60s. If it was broadcast we might yet hear it, probably it wasn't.
Prewar, Boult did this sort of thing quite a lot, on a tour of the BBCSO he did Schoenberg's Variations in Vienna and The Rite of Spring in Paris
He also made some excellent Tchaikovsky recordings. He used to say the Suite No. 3 deserved to be ranked alongside the last three numbered symphonies and recorded it twice. When the work's recordings were surveyed on the BBC's 'Record Review' programme a few years ago, it was Boult's EMI version that was given the top choice accolade ...


graham
2018-07-21 18:29:47 UTC
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Post by Kerrison
a thoroughly splendid version of "Night on Bare Mountain" that suggests he was only too glad to get away from being type-cast in English music ...
Another proof of this was his willingness at least up to the 1960s to stand in for indisposed colleagues, maybe half his age, and take on the programme "as is". This resulted in a Petrushka at the RFH in the 60s. If it was broadcast we might yet hear it, probably it wasn't.
Prewar, Boult did this sort of thing quite a lot, on a tour of the BBCSO he did Schoenberg's Variations in Vienna and The Rite of Spring in Paris
He also programmed Webern and usually played them twice in a concert. I
was at one when either the 4 or 5 pieces for orchestra were played.
Boult then turned to the audience and said: "We thought that you would
like to hear these again" and repeated the cacophony.
g***@gmail.com
2018-09-03 06:43:37 UTC
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Post by Kerrison
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by Kerrison
Does any other performer (conductor, instrumentalist, singer) match that total for one work?
Concerning THE PLANETS, didn't Boult conduct several studio recordings?
1) BBC Symphony (1945) HMV 78s
2) London Philharmonic (1953) Nixa / Pye LP
3) Vienna Philharmonic (1959) Westminster
4) New Philharmonia (1966) EMI
5) London Philharmonic (1978) EMI
https://rateyourmusic.com/release/album/bbc-symphony-orchestra-adrian-boult-jiri-belohlavek-paul-lewis/the-planets-piano-concerto-no-1.p/
Tassilo
2018-07-19 17:33:52 UTC
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Six recordings of Boulez's Le marteau sans maître with Boulez conducting, three of them recorded live, have been released commercially.

(1) Marie-Thérèse Cahn, contralto; ensemble of the Domaine Musical, Pierre Boulez
Disques Véga. Rec. live, 1956. Licensed for release in the States by Westminster.
Reissued as an historic document within Pierre Boulez: Oeuvres complètes (DG)

(2) Jeanne Deroubaix, contralto; ensemble of the Domaine Musical, Pierre Boulez
Joint production, Harmonia Mundi & Adès, rec. 1964. Licensed for release in the States by Turnabout.
Reissued within Pierre Boulez: Le domaine musical 1956…1967 (Adès/Universal Music)
Reissued as an historic document within Pierre Boulez: Oeuvres complètes (DG)

(3.) Yvonne Minton, contralto; Musique Vivante, Pierre Boulez
CBS/Columbia Records, rec. 1972
Reissued within Pierre Boulez: The Complete Columbia Album Collection (Sony)

(4) Elisabeth Laurence, contralto; Ensemble Intercontemporain, Pierre Boulez
CBS, rec. live March 26, 1985
Reissued within Pierre Boulez: The Complete Columbia Album Collection (Sony)

(5) Hilary Summers, contralto; Ensemble Intercontemporain, Pierre Boulez
Deutsche Grammophon, rec. 2002
Reissued within Pierre Boulez: Oeuvres complètes (DG)

(6) Hilary Summers, contralto; West Eastern Divan Orchestra, Pierre Boulez
Rec. live, Berlin, 2010
Included within Hommage à Boulez (DG)
g***@gmail.com
2018-08-25 19:52:25 UTC
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Post by Kerrison
I'll kick this off with Stokowski and Stravinsky's "Firebird Suite" ...
1) Philadelphia (1924) RCA first US acoustics
2) Philadelphia (1927) RCA first US electrics
3) Philadelphia (1935) RCA
4) All-American Youth (1941) Columbia
5) NBC Symphony (1942) RCA
6) His Symphony (1950) RCA
7) Berlin Philharmonic (1957) Capitol stereo
8) London Symphony (1967) Decca Phase-4 stereo
Does any other performer (conductor, instrumentalist, singer) match that total for one work?
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!searchin/rec.music.classical.recordings/ma$20bach$20cello%7Csort:date/rec.music.classical.recordings/Zd1MV7zFwuk/O5KbBAIbCAAJ
g***@gmail.com
2018-09-03 06:22:41 UTC
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Post by Kerrison
I'll kick this off with Stokowski and Stravinsky's "Firebird Suite" ...
1) Philadelphia (1924) RCA first US acoustics
2) Philadelphia (1927) RCA first US electrics
3) Philadelphia (1935) RCA
4) All-American Youth (1941) Columbia
5) NBC Symphony (1942) RCA
6) His Symphony (1950) RCA
7) Berlin Philharmonic (1957) Capitol stereo
8) London Symphony (1967) Decca Phase-4 stereo
Does any other performer (conductor, instrumentalist, singer) match that total for one work?
Didn't Stokowski also record 5 SCHEHERAZADE's?:

http://www.classicalnotes.net/classics2/rimsky.html
g***@gmail.com
2018-11-05 15:56:40 UTC
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Post by Kerrison
I'll kick this off with Stokowski and Stravinsky's "Firebird Suite" ...
1) Philadelphia (1924) RCA first US acoustics
2) Philadelphia (1927) RCA first US electrics
3) Philadelphia (1935) RCA
4) All-American Youth (1941) Columbia
5) NBC Symphony (1942) RCA
6) His Symphony (1950) RCA
7) Berlin Philharmonic (1957) Capitol stereo
8) London Symphony (1967) Decca Phase-4 stereo
Does any other performer (conductor, instrumentalist, singer) match that total for one work?
Concerning LA MER:

- I have seven Toscanini versions to hand (covering the period 1935-53)...

https://www.gramophone.co.uk/feature/debussys-la-mer-a-complete-guide-to-the-best-recordings
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