Discussion:
WAYTL October 2021
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HT
2021-09-30 11:20:27 UTC
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Frédéric CHOPIN (1810-1849)
12 Études, Op 25 (1832-36) [32:42]
4 Scherzi (1831-43) [43:05]
Beatrice Rana (piano)
rec. January 2020 (Études) & February 2021 (Scherzi), Teldex Studio, Berlin
WARNER CLASSICS 9029676424 [75:47]

"There is no prescribed way to play Chopin and I definitely enjoy hearing different approaches, relishing how Rana seems to emphasise the Romantic elements of the writing and creating a broad palette of colour. Rana’s formidable technique is striking throughout, a quality exceeded only by her musical acumen and love for the works." Michael Cookson (Musicweb)

I never was a great fan of Rana's Chopin. This time it's different, and I agree with Cookson. Nevertheless, I sometimes wonder when listening to her: can a performer have too much technique? Should the études and scherzi sound as effortless as she makes them sound?

After Rana it is hard to look forward to 150 or so Chopin recitals by youngsters who try to become one of the finalists in Warsaw this month.

Henk
M. A.
2021-10-02 15:52:03 UTC
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Post by HT
Frédéric CHOPIN (1810-1849)
12 Études, Op 25 (1832-36) [32:42]
4 Scherzi (1831-43) [43:05]
Beatrice Rana (piano)
rec. January 2020 (Études) & February 2021 (Scherzi), Teldex Studio, Berlin
WARNER CLASSICS 9029676424 [75:47]
"There is no prescribed way to play Chopin and I definitely enjoy hearing different approaches, relishing how Rana seems to emphasise the Romantic elements of the writing and creating a broad palette of colour. Rana’s formidable technique is striking throughout, a quality exceeded only by her musical acumen and love for the works." Michael Cookson (Musicweb)
I never was a great fan of Rana's Chopin. This time it's different, and I agree with Cookson. Nevertheless, I sometimes wonder when listening to her: can a performer have too much technique? Should the études and scherzi sound as effortless as she makes them sound?
After Rana it is hard to look forward to 150 or so Chopin recitals by youngsters who try to become one of the finalists in Warsaw this month.
Henk
Thank you for your impressions, Henk.

I have good memories from Rana's Schumann/Ravel disc from her Cliburn competition. On that basis, I heard her live this summer, with a program consisting of a Bach suite, Debussy's etudes I and the complete Chopin scherzi. I very much liked the Bach (I do enjoy romanticized Bach). I then sat through the Debussy etudes (just not my cup of tea) and afterwards wanted to enjoy the Chopin scherzi, but her interpretation that evening just did not work for me. Obviously, the technical challenges of the scherzi were non-existant for her, but the tempi felt all over the place and the pieces lacked structure and coherence. Admittedly, she probably was not helped by the acoustics of the venue (a temporary venue constructed to comply with Corona restrictions), in which her bass octaves sometimes sounded overpowered. The A-flat major etude of op. 25 was the only encore.

I have listened through her new Chopin disc on a car ride a few days ago. Initially, I was a bit put off by what I felt to be a lack of singing line in the aforementioned A-flat major etude and a weird retard in the middle of it, but did like a lot of what followed. I didn't listen to the scherzi yet.

Just my two cents.

M.A.
HT
2021-10-02 16:58:14 UTC
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Post by M. A.
Post by HT
Frédéric CHOPIN (1810-1849)
12 Études, Op 25 (1832-36) [32:42]
4 Scherzi (1831-43) [43:05]
Beatrice Rana (piano)
rec. January 2020 (Études) & February 2021 (Scherzi), Teldex Studio, Berlin
WARNER CLASSICS 9029676424 [75:47]
"There is no prescribed way to play Chopin and I definitely enjoy hearing different approaches, relishing how Rana seems to emphasise the Romantic elements of the writing and creating a broad palette of colour. Rana’s formidable technique is striking throughout, a quality exceeded only by her musical acumen and love for the works." Michael Cookson (Musicweb)
I never was a great fan of Rana's Chopin. This time it's different, and I agree with Cookson. Nevertheless, I sometimes wonder when listening to her: can a performer have too much technique? Should the études and scherzi sound as effortless as she makes them sound?
After Rana it is hard to look forward to 150 or so Chopin recitals by youngsters who try to become one of the finalists in Warsaw this month.
Henk
Thank you for your impressions, Henk.
I have good memories from Rana's Schumann/Ravel disc from her Cliburn competition. On that basis, I heard her live this summer, with a program consisting of a Bach suite, Debussy's etudes I and the complete Chopin scherzi. I very much liked the Bach (I do enjoy romanticized Bach). I then sat through the Debussy etudes (just not my cup of tea) and afterwards wanted to enjoy the Chopin scherzi, but her interpretation that evening just did not work for me. Obviously, the technical challenges of the scherzi were non-existant for her, but the tempi felt all over the place and the pieces lacked structure and coherence. Admittedly, she probably was not helped by the acoustics of the venue (a temporary venue constructed to comply with Corona restrictions), in which her bass octaves sometimes sounded overpowered. The A-flat major etude of op. 25 was the only encore.
I have listened through her new Chopin disc on a car ride a few days ago. Initially, I was a bit put off by what I felt to be a lack of singing line in the aforementioned A-flat major etude and a weird retard in the middle of it, but did like a lot of what followed. I didn't listen to the scherzi yet.
Just my two cents.
M.A.
Thanks for your opinion! If you enjoy romanticized Bach, you'll like her Goldbergs. And I sincerely hope that she'll record the Debussy etudes.

Henk
Andy Evans
2021-10-02 19:48:13 UTC
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"Gosh - It's Old Mother Fox!!!"
"Don't think you can humbug me so - come again another day now, go away...."

I do enjoy Stravinsky's Renard once in a while.
raymond....@gmail.com
2021-10-03 01:37:53 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
"Gosh - It's Old Mother Fox!!!"
"Don't think you can humbug me so - come again another day now, go away...."
I do enjoy Stravinsky's Renard once in a while.
Renard is a really fun piece.

Keeping in with the thread title, I acquired Blomstedt's SFSO Sibelius cycle a few days back, and listened to the 3rd/6th disc first off, and for the first time was impressed with the 3rd, always a difficult one for me. In both symphonies, Blomstedt has a very firm grip, and if at times a bit less nuanced than some other readings I have, I have to say I am impressed. The brass in both works is startlingly brash and bold, almost Brucknerian, but I can live with it.

Ray Hall, Taree
Gerard
2021-10-03 10:18:01 UTC
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Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by Andy Evans
"Gosh - It's Old Mother Fox!!!"
"Don't think you can humbug me so - come again another day now, go away...."
I do enjoy Stravinsky's Renard once in a while.
Renard is a really fun piece.
Keeping in with the thread title, I acquired Blomstedt's SFSO Sibelius cycle a few days back, and listened to the 3rd/6th disc first off, and for the first time was impressed with the 3rd, always a difficult one for me. In both symphonies, Blomstedt has a very firm grip, and if at times a bit less nuanced than some other readings I have, I have to say I am impressed. The brass in both works is startlingly brash and bold, almost Brucknerian, but I can live with it.
Ray Hall, Taree
I've always liked the third symphony (by Sibelius) the most. For me it
is the easiest one. Specially the second movement - if it is played
'quasi allegretto' and too slowly.
Regrettably Blomstedt plays it too slowly (albeit not as dreadfully dull
as Barbirolli) ;-(
Frank Berger
2021-10-03 13:27:43 UTC
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Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by Andy Evans
"Gosh - It's Old Mother Fox!!!"
"Don't think you can humbug me so - come again another day now, go away...."
I do enjoy Stravinsky's Renard once in a while.
Renard is a really fun piece.
Keeping in with the thread title, I acquired Blomstedt's SFSO Sibelius cycle a few days back, and listened to the 3rd/6th disc first off, and for the first time was impressed with the 3rd, always a difficult one for me. In both symphonies, Blomstedt has a very firm grip, and if at times a bit less nuanced than some other readings I have, I have to say I am impressed. The brass in both works is startlingly brash and bold, almost Brucknerian, but I can live with it.
Ray Hall, Taree
I've always liked the third symphony (by Sibelius) the most. For me it is the easiest one. Specially the second movement - if it is played 'quasi allegretto' and too slowly.
Regrettably Blomstedt plays it too slowly (albeit not as dreadfully dull as Barbirolli) ;-(
The two 3rds that I have asterisked (positive reaction on my part) are Kondrashin on Globe and Mravinsky on Altus (are rare 2 stars). I don't know about the timings.
Gerard
2021-10-03 13:48:18 UTC
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Post by Frank Berger
Post by Gerard
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by Andy Evans
"Gosh - It's Old Mother Fox!!!"
"Don't think you can humbug me so - come again another day now, go away...."
I do enjoy Stravinsky's Renard once in a while.
Renard is a really fun piece.
Keeping in with the thread title, I acquired Blomstedt's SFSO
Sibelius cycle a few days back, and listened to the 3rd/6th disc
first off, and for the first time was impressed with the 3rd, always
a difficult one for me. In both symphonies, Blomstedt has a very firm
grip, and if at times a bit less nuanced than some other readings I
have, I have to say I am impressed. The brass in both works is
startlingly brash and bold, almost Brucknerian, but I can live with it.
Ray Hall, Taree
I've always liked the third symphony (by Sibelius) the most. For me it
is the easiest one. Specially the second movement - if it is played
'quasi allegretto' and too slowly.
Regrettably Blomstedt plays it too slowly (albeit not as dreadfully
dull as Barbirolli) ;-(
The two 3rds that I have asterisked (positive reaction on my part) are
Kondrashin on Globe and Mravinsky on Altus (are rare 2 stars).  I don't
know about the timings.
Those 2 I don't know.
Two I like a lot: Bernstein (Sony) and Rozhdestvensky.
Gerard
2021-10-03 13:46:39 UTC
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if it is played 'quasi allegretto' and too slowly.
I meant: if it is played 'quasi allegretto' and *NOT* too slowly.
HT
2021-10-03 09:40:33 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
"Gosh - It's Old Mother Fox!!!"
"Don't think you can humbug me so - come again another day now, go away...."
I do enjoy Stravinsky's Renard once in a while.
<g> Just wait, young man, your days will come ...

Henk
AB
2021-10-02 20:07:43 UTC
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Post by HT
Frédéric CHOPIN (1810-1849)
12 Études, Op 25 (1832-36) [32:42]
4 Scherzi (1831-43) [43:05]
Beatrice Rana (piano)
rec. January 2020 (Études) & February 2021 (Scherzi), Teldex Studio, Berlin
WARNER CLASSICS 9029676424 [75:47]
"There is no prescribed way to play Chopin and I definitely enjoy hearing different approaches, relishing how Rana seems to emphasise the Romantic elements of the writing and creating a broad palette of colour. Rana’s formidable technique is striking throughout, a quality exceeded only by her musical acumen and love for the works." Michael Cookson (Musicweb)
I never was a great fan of Rana's Chopin. This time it's different, and I agree with Cookson. Nevertheless, I sometimes wonder when listening to her: can a performer have too much technique? Should the études and scherzi sound as effortless as she makes them sound?
After Rana it is hard to look forward to 150 or so Chopin recitals by youngsters who try to become one of the finalists in Warsaw this month.
Henk
just heard the etudes on YT............... very interesting, at times beautiful, technically OK, but not on the level of the live Sokolov.......perhaps there is some lack of power
Lawrence Kart
2021-10-02 22:20:11 UTC
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perhaps there is some lack of power

What a find!

Mozart Piano Sonatas, Vol. 1, Dezso Ranki (1980, Hungaraton, 3 lps) Sublime performances of these works from the then young Ranki. There doesn't seem to be a Vol. 2 from Ranki. Looks like the ball was picked up by the late Zoltan Kocsis, who certainly wasn't chopped liver. I'll try to investigate. (Amazon says that the Kocsis set is "currently unavailable.")

Here's Ranki in the slow movement of K. 280:
Lawrence Kart
2021-10-02 22:27:38 UTC
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What a find!

Mozart Piano Sonatas, Vol. 1, Dezso Ranki (1980, Hungaraton, 3 lps) Sublime performances of these works from the then young Ranki. There doesn't seem to be a Vol. 2 from Ranki. Looks like the ball was picked up by the late Zoltan Kocsis, who certainly wasn't chopped liver. I'll try to investigate. (Amazon says that the Kocsis set is "currently unavailable.")

Here's Ranki in the slow movement of K. 280: What a find!

Mozart Piano Sonatas, Vol. 1, Dezso Ranki (1980, Hungaraton, 3 lps) Sublime performances of these works from the then young Ranki. There doesn't seem to be a Vol. 2 from Ranki. Looks like the ball was picked up by the late Zoltan Kocsis, who certainly wasn't chopped liver. I'll try to investigate. (Amazon says that the Kocsis set is "currently unavailable.")

Ranki in the slow movement of k. 280 is on You Tube; give it a try.
HT
2021-10-03 09:36:20 UTC
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Post by AB
Post by HT
Frédéric CHOPIN (1810-1849)
12 Études, Op 25 (1832-36) [32:42]
4 Scherzi (1831-43) [43:05]
Beatrice Rana (piano)
rec. January 2020 (Études) & February 2021 (Scherzi), Teldex Studio, Berlin
WARNER CLASSICS 9029676424 [75:47]
"There is no prescribed way to play Chopin and I definitely enjoy hearing different approaches, relishing how Rana seems to emphasise the Romantic elements of the writing and creating a broad palette of colour. Rana’s formidable technique is striking throughout, a quality exceeded only by her musical acumen and love for the works." Michael Cookson (Musicweb)
I never was a great fan of Rana's Chopin. This time it's different, and I agree with Cookson. Nevertheless, I sometimes wonder when listening to her: can a performer have too much technique? Should the études and scherzi sound as effortless as she makes them sound?
After Rana it is hard to look forward to 150 or so Chopin recitals by youngsters who try to become one of the finalists in Warsaw this month.
Henk
just heard the etudes on YT............... very interesting, at times beautiful, technically OK, but not on the level of the live Sokolov.......perhaps there is some lack of power
Good to hear from you, Arri. Rana is certainly not lacking in power, as she shows in her Stravinsky recording. I have the impression that she wants to play Chopin the way she does. In doing so, she makes full use of her extraordinary technical and creative possibilities. This may be the reason why all her solo performances seem so improvisational and provisional - and therefore interesting (in my opinion, of course)

Henk
Andrew Clarke
2021-10-03 22:06:12 UTC
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Goldberg Variations from Pierre Hantai. Schumann Symphonies 1 and 4 from F-X Roth and the Guerzenich Orchester Koeln. Ecstase Melmothienne.

The Schumann uses scores based on the composer's original versions.

Andrew Clarke
Canberra
number_six
2021-10-07 00:24:11 UTC
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Elmer Bernstein - Staccato - EMI /DRG
fine propulsive jazz score paired with his Paris Swings LP

Berio - Thema /Visage /A-Ronne (RCA)

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