Discussion:
Suggested recordings by English composers
(too old to reply)
GIAM
2010-04-13 10:26:11 UTC
Permalink
Hi,

I'm looking for recordings of English composers, but I don't really
know where to start. I'm particularly interested in Mauice Greene,
William Boyce, Ralph Vaughn Williams and Gustav Holst. Can anyone
suggest pointers to recordings for these composers?

Thanks,

GIAM
Terry
2010-04-13 16:29:10 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 13 Apr 2010 20:26:11 +1000, GIAM wrote
(in article
Post by GIAM
Hi,
I'm looking for recordings of English composers, but I don't really
know where to start. I'm particularly interested in Mauice Greene,
William Boyce, Ralph Vaughn Williams and Gustav Holst. Can anyone
suggest pointers to recordings for these composers?
Thanks,
GIAM
For Vaughan Williams, it will be the symphonies. Reliable conductors are Sir
Andrew Davis, Vernon Handley, Sir Adrian Boult, Andre Previn and Bernard
Haitink. Look out for the Fantasia on a Theme of Thomas Tallis, The Lark
Ascending, Flos Campi and Sancta Civitas. I would strongly recommend looking
out for the 30-CD set ³Vaughan Williams, the Collector's Edition² put out by
EMI -- an astonishing bargain.

For Holst it will be ³The Planets². There are many good recordings, but that
by Dutoit and the Montreal Symphony Orchestra on Decca is as good as any.
Then there will be the Suites for Military Band, and the Mercury recording
conducted by Frederick Fennell is good. There's a nice Naxos CD containing
³Bena Mori², ³Somerset Rhapsody² and ³Egdon Heath². You might like his choral
music (I do), so I strongly recommend ³This Have I Done for my True Love², a
Hyperion CD by Stephen Layton and the Holst Singers.

Can't help you with Maurice Greene. I have only one item by him, on a disc
called (appropriately enough) ³Musica Oscura², by Anthony Rooley and the
Consort of Musicke. You could do a search at, say, Arkiv Music's website to
see what's available, but I'm not in a position to comment.

I think of William Boyce as a fairly minor composer compared with Vaughan
Williams and Gustav Holst, but there are some nice recordings of his
overtures on Chandos, where Adrian Shepherd conducts Cantilena. I've only
heard one or two of these on the radio, and find them attractive.
--
Cheers!

Terry
El Klauso
2010-04-13 17:09:01 UTC
Permalink
Terry's list is quite good, but I'd add the following:

Vaughan-Williams: Music from "The Wasps," Variants on "Dives and
Lazarus," String Quartets, Phantasy Quintet, English Folk-Song Suite,
Studies in English Folk Song, and the Chandos 3-CD survey of Film
Music.

Holst: St. Paul's Suite, Brook Green Suite, Songs w/o Words, Ballet
Music from "The Perfect Fool," Somerset Rhapsody, Egdon Heath, Choral
Hymns from the Rig Veda, Savitri, Hymn of Jesus.
Terry
2010-04-13 23:28:09 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 14 Apr 2010 03:09:01 +1000, El Klauso wrote
(in article
Post by El Klauso
Vaughan-Williams: Music from "The Wasps," Variants on "Dives and
Lazarus," String Quartets, Phantasy Quintet, English Folk-Song Suite,
Studies in English Folk Song, and the Chandos 3-CD survey of Film
Music.
Holst: St. Paul's Suite, Brook Green Suite, Songs w/o Words, Ballet
Music from "The Perfect Fool," Somerset Rhapsody, Egdon Heath, Choral
Hymns from the Rig Veda, Savitri, Hymn of Jesus.
The OP was looking for recommendations for *recordings*, not just works. As
it happens, apart from the film music, you'll find all the RVW works you
mentioned in the big EMI box. Last time I saw that box, it was very cheap.
--
Cheers!

Terry
OW
2010-04-14 01:13:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Terry
(in article
Post by El Klauso
Vaughan-Williams: Music from "The Wasps," Variants on "Dives and
Lazarus," String Quartets, Phantasy Quintet, English Folk-Song Suite,
Studies in English Folk Song, and the Chandos 3-CD survey of Film
Music.
Holst: St. Paul's Suite, Brook Green Suite, Songs w/o Words, Ballet
Music from "The Perfect Fool," Somerset Rhapsody, Egdon Heath, Choral
Hymns from the Rig Veda, Savitri, Hymn of Jesus.
The OP was looking for recommendations for *recordings*, not just works. As
it happens, apart from the film music, you'll find all the RVW works you
mentioned in the big EMI box. Last time I saw that box, it was very cheap.
--
Cheers!
Terry
I second the recommendation of RVW's Suite from THE WASPS, one of my
favorite British pieces. The recording by Sir Adrian Boult and the LSO
is about as wonderful as you can possibly get.

Then of course, there's Holst's THE PLANETS, probably the greatest
orchestral piece ever written by a Brit. There are many fine
recordings of it, but two of my favorites are Von Karajan/Berlin and
Mehta/Los Angeles. I also once heard on the radio a very interesting
recording of it from the 1920's, with Holst himself conducting. Don't
know whether that is on CD, though.
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-04-14 03:13:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by OW
Then of course, there's Holst's THE PLANETS, probably the greatest
orchestral piece ever written by a Brit. There are many fine
recordings of it, but two of my favorites are Von Karajan/Berlin and
Mehta/Los Angeles. I also once heard on the radio a very interesting
recording of it from the 1920's, with Holst himself conducting. Don't
know whether that is on CD, though.
Acoustic and electric recordings, both with the LSO. The first was made in
scattered sessions from 1922-24, the remake in 1926. Pearl for the acoustic
and Naxos (available from MDT in the UK, for example) for the electric.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
OW
2010-04-14 12:59:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by OW
Then of course, there's Holst's THE PLANETS, probably the greatest
orchestral piece ever written by a Brit. There are many fine
recordings of it, but two of my favorites are Von Karajan/Berlin and
Mehta/Los Angeles. I also once heard on the radio a very interesting
recording of it from the 1920's, with Holst himself conducting. Don't
know whether that is on CD, though.
Acoustic and electric recordings, both with the LSO.  The first was made in
scattered sessions from 1922-24, the remake in 1926.  Pearl for the acoustic
and Naxos (available from MDT in the UK, for example) for the electric.
--
Matthew B. Tepper:  WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here:http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
Thanks for the info, Mathew. That's tempting to order.

Another CD of British music I should mention is Vernon Handley's
conducting of Granville Bantock's gorgeous Hebridean and Celtic
symphonies. Definitely one of my desert island discs.
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-04-14 14:05:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by OW
Post by OW
Then of course, there's Holst's THE PLANETS, probably the greatest
orchestral piece ever written by a Brit. There are many fine recordings
of it, but two of my favorites are Von Karajan/Berlin and Mehta/Los
Angeles. I also once heard on the radio a very interesting recording of
it from the 1920's, with Holst himself conducting. Don't know whether
that is on CD, though.
Acoustic and electric recordings, both with the LSO.  The first was made
in scattered sessions from 1922-24, the remake in 1926.  Pearl for the
acoustic and Naxos (available from MDT in the UK, for example) for the
electric.
Thanks for the info, Mathew. That's tempting to order.
If you're having only one, get the electrical recording.

I neglected to note that my own pick for "the greatest orchestral piece ever
written by a Brit" would be Elgar's "Enigma" Variations.
Post by OW
Another CD of British music I should mention is Vernon Handley's
conducting of Granville Bantock's gorgeous Hebridean and Celtic
symphonies. Definitely one of my desert island discs.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
bpnjensen
2010-04-14 15:05:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by OW
Post by OW
Then of course, there's Holst's THE PLANETS, probably the greatest
orchestral piece ever written by a Brit. There are many fine recordings
of it, but two of my favorites are Von Karajan/Berlin and Mehta/Los
Angeles. I also once heard on the radio a very interesting recording of
it from the 1920's, with Holst himself conducting. Don't know whether
that is on CD, though.
Acoustic and electric recordings, both with the LSO.  The first was made
in scattered sessions from 1922-24, the remake in 1926.  Pearl for the
acoustic and Naxos (available from MDT in the UK, for example) for the
electric.
Thanks for the info, Mathew. That's tempting to order.
If you're having only one, get the electrical recording.
I neglected to note that my own pick for "the greatest orchestral piece ever
written by a Brit" would be Elgar's "Enigma" Variations.
Post by OW
Another CD of British music I should mention is Vernon Handley's
conducting of Granville Bantock's gorgeous Hebridean and Celtic
symphonies. Definitely one of my desert island discs.
--
Matthew B. Tepper:  WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here:http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
So Matthew, whose Enigma do you like best? I enjoy Boult's EMI, but
I'm wide open...

Bruce Jensen
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-04-14 15:48:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by bpnjensen
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by OW
Post by OW
Then of course, there's Holst's THE PLANETS, probably the greatest
orchestral piece ever written by a Brit. There are many fine
recordings of it, but two of my favorites are Von Karajan/Berlin
and Mehta/Los Angeles. I also once heard on the radio a very
interesting recording of it from the 1920's, with Holst himself
conducting. Don't know whether that is on CD, though.
Acoustic and electric recordings, both with the LSO.  The first was
made in scattered sessions from 1922-24, the remake in 1926.  Pearl
for the acoustic and Naxos (available from MDT in the UK, for
example) for the electric.
Thanks for the info, Mathew. That's tempting to order.
If you're having only one, get the electrical recording.
I neglected to note that my own pick for "the greatest orchestral piece
ever written by a Brit" would be Elgar's "Enigma" Variations.
Post by OW
Another CD of British music I should mention is Vernon Handley's
conducting of Granville Bantock's gorgeous Hebridean and Celtic
symphonies. Definitely one of my desert island discs.
So Matthew, whose Enigma do you like best? I enjoy Boult's EMI, but
I'm wide open...
That's a good one, for sure. One should have the composer's own recording
("Royal Albert Hall Orchestra," 1926, EMI or Naxos) and Harty (1930, Hallé
Tradition, zu viel filtered, but listenable). For stereo, Monteux/LSO
(1958, "wiped off the map" Decca) or Stokowski/Czech Philharmonic (1972
Decca, latterly on Cala). For personal pleasure, I sometimes listen to a
c. 1974 broadcast by Ozawa/San Francisco Symphony from my days there.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
Terry
2010-04-15 02:15:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by bpnjensen
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by OW
Post by OW
Then of course, there's Holst's THE PLANETS, probably the greatest
orchestral piece ever written by a Brit. There are many fine
recordings of it, but two of my favorites are Von Karajan/Berlin
and Mehta/Los Angeles. I also once heard on the radio a very
interesting recording of it from the 1920's, with Holst himself
conducting. Don't know whether that is on CD, though.
Acoustic and electric recordings, both with the LSO.  The first was
made in scattered sessions from 1922-24, the remake in 1926.  Pearl
for the acoustic and Naxos (available from MDT in the UK, for
example) for the electric.
Thanks for the info, Mathew. That's tempting to order.
If you're having only one, get the electrical recording.
I neglected to note that my own pick for "the greatest orchestral piece
ever written by a Brit" would be Elgar's "Enigma" Variations.
Post by OW
Another CD of British music I should mention is Vernon Handley's
conducting of Granville Bantock's gorgeous Hebridean and Celtic
symphonies. Definitely one of my desert island discs.
So Matthew, whose Enigma do you like best? I enjoy Boult's EMI, but
I'm wide open...
That's a good one, for sure. One should have the composer's own recording
("Royal Albert Hall Orchestra," 1926, EMI or Naxos) and Harty (1930, Hallé
Tradition, zu viel filtered, but listenable). For stereo, Monteux/LSO
(1958, "wiped off the map" Decca) or Stokowski/Czech Philharmonic (1972
Decca, latterly on Cala). For personal pleasure, I sometimes listen to a
c. 1974 broadcast by Ozawa/San Francisco Symphony from my days there.
For me, it's Andrew Davis (on Apex, so cheap); or Mackerras/London
Philharmonic Orchestra on EMI; also the Monteux already mentioned.
Zinman/Baltimor on Telarc is very fine indeed, and I am impressed also with
Oramo and the CBSO, a filler to their superb recording of The Dream of
Gerontius. So many excellent recordings!
--
Cheers!

Terry
D***@aol.com
2010-04-15 20:10:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by OW
Post by OW
Then of course, there's Holst's THE PLANETS, probably the greatest
orchestral piece ever written by a Brit. There are many fine
recordings of it, but two of my favorites are Von Karajan/Berlin
and Mehta/Los Angeles. I also once heard on the radio a very
interesting recording of it from the 1920's, with Holst himself
conducting. Don't know whether that is on CD, though.
Acoustic and electric recordings, both with the LSO. �The first was
made in scattered sessions from 1922-24, the remake in 1926. �Pearl
for the acoustic and Naxos (available from MDT in the UK, for
example) for the electric.
Thanks for the info, Mathew. That's tempting to order.
If you're having only one, get the electrical recording.
I neglected to note that my own pick for "the greatest orchestral piece
ever written by a Brit" would be Elgar's "Enigma" Variations.
Post by OW
Another CD of British music I should mention is Vernon Handley's
conducting of Granville Bantock's gorgeous Hebridean and Celtic
symphonies. Definitely one of my desert island discs.
So Matthew, whose Enigma do you like best? �I enjoy Boult's EMI, but
I'm wide open...
That's a good one, for sure. �One should have the composer's own recording
("Royal Albert Hall Orchestra," 1926, EMI or Naxos) and Harty (1930, Hall�
Tradition, zu viel filtered, but listenable). �For stereo, Monteux/LSO
(1958, "wiped off the map" Decca) or Stokowski/Czech Philharmonic (1972
Decca, latterly on Cala). �For personal pleasure, I sometimes listen to a
c. 1974 broadcast by Ozawa/San Francisco Symphony from my days there.
Plus Toscanini. The 1951/2 NBC SO recording is a stupendous
performance. As are the live performances by him that have survived.

Don Tait
bpnjensen
2010-04-15 20:13:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by OW
Post by OW
Then of course, there's Holst's THE PLANETS, probably the greatest
orchestral piece ever written by a Brit. There are many fine
recordings of it, but two of my favorites are Von Karajan/Berlin
and Mehta/Los Angeles. I also once heard on the radio a very
interesting recording of it from the 1920's, with Holst himself
conducting. Don't know whether that is on CD, though.
Acoustic and electric recordings, both with the LSO. The first was
made in scattered sessions from 1922-24, the remake in 1926. Pearl
for the acoustic and Naxos (available from MDT in the UK, for
example) for the electric.
Thanks for the info, Mathew. That's tempting to order.
If you're having only one, get the electrical recording.
I neglected to note that my own pick for "the greatest orchestral piece
ever written by a Brit" would be Elgar's "Enigma" Variations.
Post by OW
Another CD of British music I should mention is Vernon Handley's
conducting of Granville Bantock's gorgeous Hebridean and Celtic
symphonies. Definitely one of my desert island discs.
So Matthew, whose Enigma do you like best? I enjoy Boult's EMI, but
I'm wide open...
That's a good one, for sure. One should have the composer's own recording
("Royal Albert Hall Orchestra," 1926, EMI or Naxos) and Harty (1930, Hall
Tradition, zu viel filtered, but listenable). For stereo, Monteux/LSO
(1958, "wiped off the map" Decca) or Stokowski/Czech Philharmonic (1972
Decca, latterly on Cala). For personal pleasure, I sometimes listen to a
c. 1974 broadcast by Ozawa/San Francisco Symphony from my days there.
  Plus Toscanini. The 1951/2 NBC SO recording is a stupendous
performance. As are the live performances by him that have survived.
  Don Tait- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Thanks, Don - how is the recorded sound on that one? (or do I need
even ask?). I love Toscanini in general, but the Studio sonics are
often left wanting...

Bruce Jensen
D***@aol.com
2010-04-15 21:27:00 UTC
Permalink
[Elgar's Enigma Variations]
Post by bpnjensen
� Plus Toscanini. The 1951/2 NBC SO recording is a stupendous
performance. As are the live performances by him that have survived.
� Don Tait- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Thanks, Don - how is the recorded sound on that one? (or do I need
even ask?). �I love Toscanini in general, but the Studio sonics are
often left wanting...
Bruce Jensen
Hello Bruce --

The sound of the commercial recording is very good. It was made in
Carnegie Hall, and the RCA Victor engineers captured a fair amount of
the hall's resonance. Which they often didn't.

I well know what you mean about the frequently-wanting sonics on
Toscanini recordings.

Don Tait
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-04-16 06:51:00 UTC
Permalink
***@aol.com appears to have caused the following letters to be
typed in news:e18c5998-2e86-45e8-a3ac-d80576c40849
Post by D***@aol.com
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
That's a good one, for sure. One should have the composer's own
recording ("Royal Albert Hall Orchestra," 1926, EMI or Naxos) and Harty
(1930, Hallé Tradition, zu viel filtered, but listenable). For stereo,
Monteux/LSO (1958, "wiped off the map" Decca) or Stokowski/Czech
Philharmonic (1972 Decca, latterly on Cala). For personal pleasure, I
sometimes listen to a c. 1974 broadcast by Ozawa/San Francisco Symphony
from my days there.
Plus Toscanini. The 1951/2 NBC SO recording is a stupendous
performance. As are the live performances by him that have survived.
Don Tait
It is, although I somewhat prefer his live 1935 BBC Symphony broadcast,
even with the dimmer sound.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
D***@aol.com
2010-04-16 22:04:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
� Plus Toscanini. The 1951/2 NBC SO recording is a stupendous
performance. As are the live performances by him that have survived.
� Don Tait
It is, although I somewhat prefer his live 1935 BBC Symphony broadcast,
even with the dimmer sound.
Total agreement. The 1935 performance is staggering. The finest
Toscanini version we have, I think.

Don Tait
Beaver Lad
2010-04-15 06:41:58 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@216.168.3.70>, Matthew B.
Tepper <oyþ@earthlink.net> wrote:

[snip]
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
I neglected to note that my own pick for "the greatest orchestral piece ever
written by a Brit" would be Elgar's "Enigma" Variations.
==========================

Agreed!

Although I'm starting to feel that the Second Symphony is just as
worthy of that designation.

(And can you believe it was a post by Tom Deacon that spurred my
interest in the Second?)
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-04-15 07:10:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Beaver Lad
[snip]
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
I neglected to note that my own pick for "the greatest orchestral piece
ever written by a Brit" would be Elgar's "Enigma" Variations.
==========================
Agreed!
Although I'm starting to feel that the Second Symphony is just as
worthy of that designation.
(And can you believe it was a post by Tom Deacon that spurred my
interest in the Second?)
Well, Fleming discovered penicillin in a dish of mold....
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
Allen
2010-04-15 15:03:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Beaver Lad
[snip]
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
I neglected to note that my own pick for "the greatest orchestral piece
ever written by a Brit" would be Elgar's "Enigma" Variations.
==========================
Agreed!
Although I'm starting to feel that the Second Symphony is just as
worthy of that designation.
(And can you believe it was a post by Tom Deacon that spurred my
interest in the Second?)
Well, Fleming discovered penicillin in a dish of mold....
That's Alexander, not Renee.
Allen
Allen
2010-04-15 16:53:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Beaver Lad
[snip]
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
I neglected to note that my own pick for "the greatest orchestral piece
ever written by a Brit" would be Elgar's "Enigma" Variations.
==========================
Agreed!
Although I'm starting to feel that the Second Symphony is just as
worthy of that designation.
(And can you believe it was a post by Tom Deacon that spurred my
interest in the Second?)
Well, Fleming discovered penicillin in a dish of mold....
And Goodyear discovered vulcanization of rubber by accidentally spilling
s mixture of latex and sulfur on a hot stove; a 3M employee whose name I
don't know created a very profitable product (PostIt Notes) when an
adhesive he was working on failed as a general adhesive. Having the
vision to recognize "failure" as perhaps a different kind of success
shows the value of creativity and imagination. Fleming might well have
thrown that petri dish away and therefore cost millions of lives. I've
often wondered if other scientists had the exact same experience as
Fleming and just headed for the nearest wastebasket. I've also often
wondered how many other advances were discovered in the same way but had
the origins hidden by "look how smart I am" statements.
Allen
Gerard
2010-04-15 16:58:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Allen
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Beaver Lad
[snip]
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
I neglected to note that my own pick for "the greatest
orchestral piece ever written by a Brit" would be Elgar's
"Enigma" Variations. ==========================
Agreed!
Although I'm starting to feel that the Second Symphony is just as
worthy of that designation.
(And can you believe it was a post by Tom Deacon that spurred my
interest in the Second?)
Well, Fleming discovered penicillin in a dish of mold....
And Goodyear discovered vulcanization of rubber by accidentally
spilling s mixture of latex and sulfur on a hot stove; a 3M employee
whose name I don't know created a very profitable product (PostIt
Notes) when an adhesive he was working on failed as a general
adhesive. Having the vision to recognize "failure" as perhaps a
different kind of success shows the value of creativity and
imagination. Fleming might well have thrown that petri dish away and
therefore cost millions of lives. I've often wondered if other
scientists had the exact same experience as Fleming and just headed
for the nearest wastebasket. I've also often wondered how many other
advances were discovered in the same way but had the origins hidden
by "look how smart I am" statements.
Allen
What other recordings of works by English composers do you recommend?
Sol L. Siegel
2010-04-17 03:23:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gerard
What other recordings of works by English composers do you recommend?
Finzi's Cello Concerto, with Ma on Lyrita, but Hugh on Naxos will do.

Frank Bridge's The Sea, Enter Spring and Summer. I have Charles Groves on
EMI; there's a Naxos here as well, with James Judd.

Britten's Les Illuminations, Serenade for Tenor, Horn and Strings and
Nocturne are more "difficult" and quite rewarding. You can get them on
one CD, led by the composer. There's also a fine alternative, an OOP EMI
Eminence disc led by Nicholas Cleobury which includes the texts, available
cheap from Amazon marketplace (assuming that it's the same release!):

http://www.amazon.com/Britten-Serenade-Strings-Illuminations-
Nocturne/dp/B000002S71/

or: http://tiny.cc/nsusx
--
- Sol L. Siegel, Philadelphia, PA USA
Terry
2010-04-17 08:15:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sol L. Siegel
Post by Gerard
What other recordings of works by English composers do you recommend?
Finzi's Cello Concerto, with Ma on Lyrita, but Hugh on Naxos will do.
Frank Bridge's The Sea, Enter Spring and Summer. I have Charles Groves on
EMI; there's a Naxos here as well, with James Judd.
Britten's Les Illuminations, Serenade for Tenor, Horn and Strings and
Nocturne are more "difficult" and quite rewarding. You can get them on
one CD, led by the composer. There's also a fine alternative, an OOP EMI
Eminence disc led by Nicholas Cleobury which includes the texts, available
http://www.amazon.com/Britten-Serenade-Strings-Illuminations-
Nocturne/dp/B000002S71/
or: http://tiny.cc/nsusx
Finzi deserves to be better known. I'm pleased to see the recommendation for
his 'cello concerto. His clarinet concerto and the Five Bagatelles for
clarinet and (piano or strings) are excellent, as are his song cycles and
choral music. I like ³Eclogue² too.
--
Cheers!

Terry
David Oberman
2010-04-17 17:20:23 UTC
Permalink
I was hoping this thread would incorporate, or even lead to, a dense
comparison of bafflingly fine points in the recordings of "Spem in
alium."


_______

Integrity & honesty are at the heart of our business.

-- Goldman Sachs Web site
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-04-15 19:01:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Allen
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Beaver Lad
[snip]
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
I neglected to note that my own pick for "the greatest orchestral
piece ever written by a Brit" would be Elgar's "Enigma" Variations.
==========================
Agreed!
Although I'm starting to feel that the Second Symphony is just as
worthy of that designation.
(And can you believe it was a post by Tom Deacon that spurred my
interest in the Second?)
Well, Fleming discovered penicillin in a dish of mold....
And Goodyear discovered vulcanization of rubber by accidentally spilling
s mixture of latex and sulfur on a hot stove; a 3M employee whose name I
don't know created a very profitable product (PostIt Notes) when an
adhesive he was working on failed as a general adhesive. Having the
vision to recognize "failure" as perhaps a different kind of success
shows the value of creativity and imagination. Fleming might well have
thrown that petri dish away and therefore cost millions of lives. I've
often wondered if other scientists had the exact same experience as
Fleming and just headed for the nearest wastebasket. I've also often
wondered how many other advances were discovered in the same way but had
the origins hidden by "look how smart I am" statements.
Very true, but my only point was that good discoveries can follow from
repugnant origins.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
Allen
2010-04-15 19:18:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Allen
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Beaver Lad
[snip]
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
I neglected to note that my own pick for "the greatest orchestral
piece ever written by a Brit" would be Elgar's "Enigma" Variations.
==========================
Agreed!
Although I'm starting to feel that the Second Symphony is just as
worthy of that designation.
(And can you believe it was a post by Tom Deacon that spurred my
interest in the Second?)
Well, Fleming discovered penicillin in a dish of mold....
And Goodyear discovered vulcanization of rubber by accidentally spilling
s mixture of latex and sulfur on a hot stove; a 3M employee whose name I
don't know created a very profitable product (PostIt Notes) when an
adhesive he was working on failed as a general adhesive. Having the
vision to recognize "failure" as perhaps a different kind of success
shows the value of creativity and imagination. Fleming might well have
thrown that petri dish away and therefore cost millions of lives. I've
often wondered if other scientists had the exact same experience as
Fleming and just headed for the nearest wastebasket. I've also often
wondered how many other advances were discovered in the same way but had
the origins hidden by "look how smart I am" statements.
Very true, but my only point was that good discoveries can follow from
repugnant origins.
Mold on a petri dish and the smell of burning sulfur and latex are
repugnant to me.
Allen
O
2010-04-15 19:32:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Allen
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Very true, but my only point was that good discoveries can follow from
repugnant origins.
Mold on a petri dish and the smell of burning sulfur and latex are
repugnant to me.
"These are a few of my favorite things!"

-Owen
Beaver Lad
2010-04-15 20:31:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Beaver Lad
[snip]
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
I neglected to note that my own pick for "the greatest orchestral piece
ever written by a Brit" would be Elgar's "Enigma" Variations.
==========================
Agreed!
Although I'm starting to feel that the Second Symphony is just as
worthy of that designation.
(And can you believe it was a post by Tom Deacon that spurred my
interest in the Second?)
Well, Fleming discovered penicillin in a dish of mold....
===================

Beauty! (as The McKenzie Brothers might have said).

And whilst on the subject of Great Canadians, it's an honour to be
associated with the name of Fleming.
Neil
2010-04-17 09:47:32 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 14 Apr 2010 09:05:56 -0500, "Matthew B. Tepper"
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
I neglected to note that my own pick for "the greatest orchestral piece ever
written by a Brit" would be Elgar's "Enigma" Variations.
You cannot be serious!
Beaver Lad
2010-04-17 10:13:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Neil
On Wed, 14 Apr 2010 09:05:56 -0500, "Matthew B. Tepper"
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
I neglected to note that my own pick for "the greatest orchestral piece ever
written by a Brit" would be Elgar's "Enigma" Variations.
You cannot be serious!
=================

He can.

Can you?
Neil
2010-04-17 16:11:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Beaver Lad
He can.
Can you?
ok well I think the violin concerto is a better work than the
variations for a start. And then there's 9 symphonies by RWV
I would add.
Beaver Lad
2010-04-17 20:01:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Neil
Post by Beaver Lad
He can.
Can you?
ok well I think the violin concerto is a better work than the
variations for a start. And then there's 9 symphonies by RWV
I would add.
=================

I see. Your taste is better than his taste. Right.

bpnjensen
2010-04-14 05:20:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by El Klauso
Vaughan-Williams: Music from "The Wasps," Variants on "Dives and
Lazarus," String Quartets, Phantasy Quintet, English Folk-Song Suite,
Studies in English Folk Song, and the Chandos 3-CD survey of Film
Music.
Holst: St. Paul's Suite, Brook Green Suite, Songs w/o Words, Ballet
Music from "The Perfect Fool," Somerset Rhapsody, Egdon Heath, Choral
Hymns from the Rig Veda, Savitri, Hymn of Jesus.
For Holst's "St Paul's Suite", the EMI Marriner / ASMF recording
(possibly OOP but often available used) coupled with other popular
Brit works including Britten's delightful "Simple Symphony" is first-
class, and my favorite recording of this Holst - beautifully evocative
and spirited.

Bruce Jensen
Steve Thompson
2010-04-13 17:09:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Terry
For Vaughan Williams, it will be the symphonies. Reliable conductors are Sir
Andrew Davis, Vernon Handley, Sir Adrian Boult, Andre Previn and Bernard
Haitink. Look out for the Fantasia on a Theme of Thomas Tallis, The Lark
Ascending, Flos Campi and Sancta Civitas.
I'd add Dona Nobis Pacem. The "Reconciliation" movement has got to be
amongst the saddest pieces of music ever written. Personally, I don't get
anything out of Sancta Civitas.

Steve
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Steve Thompson E-mail: smt AT vgersoft DOT com
Voyager Software LLC Web: http://www DOT vgersoft DOT com
39 Smugglers Path VSW Support: support AT vgersoft DOT com
Ithaca, NY 14850
"186,300 miles per second: it's not just a good idea, it's the law"
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Bob Harper
2010-04-13 17:37:40 UTC
Permalink
On Apr 13, 9:29 am, Terry <***@clown.invalid> wrote:
(snip)
Post by Terry
I think of William Boyce as a fairly minor composer compared with Vaughan
Williams and Gustav Holst, but there are some nice recordings of his
overtures on Chandos, where Adrian Shepherd conducts Cantilena. I've only
heard one or two of these on the radio, and find them attractive.
--
Cheers!
Terry
While I wouldn't call Boyce a major composer, his symphonies are
delightful. The recording on Naxos if fine, though if you can find the
(inexplicably OOP) version with the ASMF I'd recommend snapping it up.
I don't know Pinnock's but assume they're decent.

Bob Harper
Gerard
2010-04-13 18:19:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Harper
While I wouldn't call Boyce a major composer, his symphonies are
delightful. The recording on Naxos if fine, though if you can find the
(inexplicably OOP) version with the ASMF I'd recommend snapping it up.
I don't know Pinnock's but assume they're decent.
No, they (Pinnock's) are splendid.
Bob Harper
2010-04-13 18:43:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gerard
Post by Bob Harper
While I wouldn't call Boyce a major composer, his symphonies are
delightful. The recording on Naxos if fine, though if you can find the
(inexplicably OOP) version with the ASMF I'd recommend snapping it up.
I don't know Pinnock's but assume they're decent.
No, they (Pinnock's) are splendid.
Good to know. I'll have to find that disc and buy a copy.

Bob Harper
graham
2010-04-13 18:08:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Terry
(in article
Post by GIAM
Hi,
I'm looking for recordings of English composers, but I don't really
know where to start. I'm particularly interested in Mauice Greene,
William Boyce, Ralph Vaughn Williams and Gustav Holst. Can anyone
suggest pointers to recordings for these composers?
Thanks,
GIAM
For Vaughan Williams, it will be the symphonies. Reliable conductors are Sir
Andrew Davis, Vernon Handley, Sir Adrian Boult, Andre Previn and Bernard
Haitink.
And John Barbirolli
Post by Terry
Look out for the Fantasia on a Theme of Thomas Tallis,
Barbirolli's version is absolutely superb (coupled with Elgar Int. and
allegro).
Graham
Sol L. Siegel
2010-04-14 02:41:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by graham
Post by Terry
For Vaughan Williams, it will be the symphonies. Reliable conductors
are Sir Andrew Davis, Vernon Handley, Sir Adrian Boult, Andre Previn
and Bernard Haitink.
And John Barbirolli
Different conductors are better in different symphonies. Handley's 5th
(and Job) are masterful. Boult's stereo 1 (Sea Symphony) and 2 (London
Symphony) are towering - but so are Previn's. Previn's beautiful 3 is
coupled with a 4 lacking in bite. Handley's 6 is well regarded - as is
Previn's. Paul Daniel on Naxos makes perhaps the strongest statement in
the 4th since Leonard Bernstein (infuriatingly OOP). Both Previn and
Kees Bakels on Naxos offer good pairings of 7 & 8 - but I wouldn't want
to do without Barbirolli's 8. And so forth.
Post by graham
Post by Terry
Look out for the Fantasia on a Theme of Thomas Tallis,
Barbirolli's version is absolutely superb (coupled with Elgar Int. and
allegro).
That would be the oft-reissued EMI disc, with the Sinfonia of London, of
the Tallis Fantasia and Greensleeves Fantasia, with Elgar's Introduction
and Allegro plus the Serenade for Strings. This is an essential item.
Christopher Warren-Green had a disc of this program on Virgin that's
pretty decent, but not in this class.
--
- Sol L. Siegel, Philadelphia, PA USA
TareeDawg
2010-04-14 03:12:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sol L. Siegel
Post by graham
Post by Terry
For Vaughan Williams, it will be the symphonies. Reliable conductors
are Sir Andrew Davis, Vernon Handley, Sir Adrian Boult, Andre Previn
and Bernard Haitink.
And John Barbirolli
Different conductors are better in different symphonies. Handley's 5th
(and Job) are masterful. Boult's stereo 1 (Sea Symphony) and 2 (London
Symphony) are towering - but so are Previn's. Previn's beautiful 3 is
coupled with a 4 lacking in bite. Handley's 6 is well regarded - as is
Previn's. Paul Daniel on Naxos makes perhaps the strongest statement in
the 4th since Leonard Bernstein (infuriatingly OOP). Both Previn and
Kees Bakels on Naxos offer good pairings of 7& 8 - but I wouldn't want
to do without Barbirolli's 8. And so forth.
Post by graham
Post by Terry
Look out for the Fantasia on a Theme of Thomas Tallis,
Barbirolli's version is absolutely superb (coupled with Elgar Int. and
allegro).
That would be the oft-reissued EMI disc, with the Sinfonia of London, of
the Tallis Fantasia and Greensleeves Fantasia, with Elgar's Introduction
and Allegro plus the Serenade for Strings. This is an essential item.
Christopher Warren-Green had a disc of this program on Virgin that's
pretty decent, but not in this class.
Agreed. In fact I got the Warren-ZGreen eons ago, and was so unimpressed
I got rid of it quickly.

Barbirolli's RVW 8 is a classic, virtually unmatchable.

In good sound, I do find Haitink a very strong cycle in RVW, and well
worth getting as a supplement.

Many here have mentioned Holst and The Planets, but his strongest
statement (for me) is Hammersmith, very well done on Naxos. A dark work
but masterful.

Nobody has mentioned Delius yet, but maybe it is best not to go there ...

Then Robert Simpson of course, but maybe only for those of Sibelian/LvB
tendencies.

Ray Hall, Taree
graham
2010-04-14 03:56:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sol L. Siegel
Post by graham
Post by Terry
For Vaughan Williams, it will be the symphonies. Reliable conductors
are Sir Andrew Davis, Vernon Handley, Sir Adrian Boult, Andre Previn
and Bernard Haitink.
And John Barbirolli
Different conductors are better in different symphonies. Handley's 5th
(and Job) are masterful. Boult's stereo 1 (Sea Symphony) and 2 (London
Symphony) are towering - but so are Previn's. Previn's beautiful 3 is
coupled with a 4 lacking in bite. Handley's 6 is well regarded - as is
Previn's. Paul Daniel on Naxos makes perhaps the strongest statement in
the 4th since Leonard Bernstein (infuriatingly OOP). Both Previn and
Kees Bakels on Naxos offer good pairings of 7& 8 - but I wouldn't want
to do without Barbirolli's 8. And so forth.
Post by graham
Post by Terry
Look out for the Fantasia on a Theme of Thomas Tallis,
Barbirolli's version is absolutely superb (coupled with Elgar Int. and
allegro).
That would be the oft-reissued EMI disc, with the Sinfonia of London, of
the Tallis Fantasia and Greensleeves Fantasia, with Elgar's Introduction
and Allegro plus the Serenade for Strings. This is an essential item.
Christopher Warren-Green had a disc of this program on Virgin that's
pretty decent, but not in this class.
Agreed. In fact I got the Warren-ZGreen eons ago, and was so unimpressed I
got rid of it quickly.
Barbirolli's RVW 8 is a classic, virtually unmatchable.
Wasn't it dedicated to him?
Graham
TareeDawg
2010-04-14 04:28:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by graham
Post by Sol L. Siegel
Post by graham
Post by Terry
For Vaughan Williams, it will be the symphonies. Reliable conductors
are Sir Andrew Davis, Vernon Handley, Sir Adrian Boult, Andre Previn
and Bernard Haitink.
And John Barbirolli
Different conductors are better in different symphonies. Handley's 5th
(and Job) are masterful. Boult's stereo 1 (Sea Symphony) and 2 (London
Symphony) are towering - but so are Previn's. Previn's beautiful 3 is
coupled with a 4 lacking in bite. Handley's 6 is well regarded - as is
Previn's. Paul Daniel on Naxos makes perhaps the strongest statement in
the 4th since Leonard Bernstein (infuriatingly OOP). Both Previn and
Kees Bakels on Naxos offer good pairings of 7& 8 - but I wouldn't want
to do without Barbirolli's 8. And so forth.
Post by graham
Post by Terry
Look out for the Fantasia on a Theme of Thomas Tallis,
Barbirolli's version is absolutely superb (coupled with Elgar Int. and
allegro).
That would be the oft-reissued EMI disc, with the Sinfonia of London, of
the Tallis Fantasia and Greensleeves Fantasia, with Elgar's Introduction
and Allegro plus the Serenade for Strings. This is an essential item.
Christopher Warren-Green had a disc of this program on Virgin that's
pretty decent, but not in this class.
Agreed. In fact I got the Warren-ZGreen eons ago, and was so unimpressed I
got rid of it quickly.
Barbirolli's RVW 8 is a classic, virtually unmatchable.
Wasn't it dedicated to him?
Graham
Yes, it was, in 1956. The premiere was given by Barbirolli in Manchester
2nd May 1956.

Ray Hall, Taree
Bob Harper
2010-04-14 05:22:29 UTC
Permalink
On 4/13/10 8:12 PM, TareeDawg wrote:
(snip)
Post by TareeDawg
Nobody has mentioned Delius yet, but maybe it is best not to go there ...
Feel free to, Ray, but I hope you'll pardon me if I don't follow :)

Bob Harper

(snip)
ways
2010-04-14 07:21:44 UTC
Permalink
why what's wrong with delius
TareeDawg
2010-04-14 11:54:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by ways
why what's wrong with delius
For many here, it seems Delius is too perfumed for them, much, but not
quite, like Scriabin and a few others.

Ray Hall, Taree
Bob Harper
2010-04-14 15:38:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by TareeDawg
Post by ways
why what's wrong with delius
For many here, it seems Delius is too perfumed for them, much, but not
quite, like Scriabin and a few others.
Ray Hall, Taree
I think you've hit it exactly for me, and yes, I don't care for
Scriabin either. My loss, no doubt, but I'll live with it (or without
them, as you please).

Bob Harper
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-04-14 15:48:11 UTC
Permalink
Bob Harper <***@comcast.net> appears to have caused the following
letters to be typed in news:4f48f0ae-0ee1-4711-a656-7b1383b305e5
Post by TareeDawg
Post by ways
why what's wrong with delius
For many here, it seems Delius is too perfumed for them, much, but not
quite, like Scriabin and a few others.
Ray Hall, Taree
I think you've hit it exactly for me, and yes, I don't care for Scriabin
either. My loss, no doubt, but I'll live with it (or without them, as you
please).
Bob Harper
On both of those points we can agree, except that I find Delius rather more
flaccid than "perfumed." The latter adjective I reserve for Ketelby.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
Kip Williams
2010-04-14 18:17:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
On both of those points we can agree, except that I find Delius rather more
flaccid than "perfumed." The latter adjective I reserve for Ketelby.
That's not perfume. It's incense!


Kip W
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-04-14 23:59:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kip Williams
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
On both of those points we can agree, except that I find Delius rather
more flaccid than "perfumed." The latter adjective I reserve for
Ketelby.
That's not perfume. It's incense!
Confidentially,....
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
Terry
2010-04-15 02:24:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
letters to be typed in news:4f48f0ae-0ee1-4711-a656-7b1383b305e5
Post by TareeDawg
Post by ways
why what's wrong with delius
For many here, it seems Delius is too perfumed for them, much, but not
quite, like Scriabin and a few others.
Ray Hall, Taree
I think you've hit it exactly for me, and yes, I don't care for Scriabin
either. My loss, no doubt, but I'll live with it (or without them, as you
please).
Bob Harper
On both of those points we can agree, except that I find Delius rather more
flaccid than "perfumed." The latter adjective I reserve for Ketelby.
Still, there's a nice CD on Classics for Pleasure, on which Vernon Handley
conducts:

Fennimore And Gerda - Intermezzo
On Cooking The First Hero In Spring
Summer Night On The River
A Song Before Sunrise
Sleigh Ride
Irmelin - Prelude
The Walk To The Paradise Garden, and
Koanga - La Calinda.

All small, shapely and colourful works. I guess it's ³proceed with caution²
after that. I also rather like ³Paris², and I enjoyed a televised production
of ³A Village Romeo and Juliet² that I saw some years ago, and which is
available on DVD.
--
Cheers!

Terry
TareeDawg
2010-04-15 11:29:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Terry
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
letters to be typed in news:4f48f0ae-0ee1-4711-a656-7b1383b305e5
Post by TareeDawg
Post by ways
why what's wrong with delius
For many here, it seems Delius is too perfumed for them, much, but not
quite, like Scriabin and a few others.
Ray Hall, Taree
I think you've hit it exactly for me, and yes, I don't care for Scriabin
either. My loss, no doubt, but I'll live with it (or without them, as you
please).
Bob Harper
On both of those points we can agree, except that I find Delius rather more
flaccid than "perfumed." The latter adjective I reserve for Ketelby.
Still, there's a nice CD on Classics for Pleasure, on which Vernon Handley
Fennimore And Gerda - Intermezzo
On Cooking The First Hero In Spring
Summer Night On The River
A Song Before Sunrise
Sleigh Ride
Irmelin - Prelude
The Walk To The Paradise Garden, and
Koanga - La Calinda.
All small, shapely and colourful works. I guess it's ³proceed with caution²
after that. I also rather like ³Paris², and I enjoyed a televised production
of ³A Village Romeo and Juliet² that I saw some years ago, and which is
available on DVD.
For those who want a masterpiece, then they should listen to Sea Drift,
with the music set to Walt Whitman. A wonderfully fresh yet poignant
score, and one of Delius' best scores.

Ray Hall, Taree
number_six
2010-04-15 19:20:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by TareeDawg
Post by Terry
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
letters to be typed in news:4f48f0ae-0ee1-4711-a656-7b1383b305e5
Post by TareeDawg
Post by ways
why what's wrong with delius
For many here, it seems Delius is too perfumed for them, much, but not
quite, like Scriabin and a few others.
Ray Hall, Taree
I think you've hit it exactly for me, and yes, I don't care for Scriabin
either. My loss, no doubt, but I'll live with it (or without them, as you
please).
Bob Harper
On both of those points we can agree, except that I find Delius rather more
flaccid than "perfumed."  The latter adjective I reserve for Ketelby.
Still, there's a nice CD on Classics for Pleasure, on which Vernon Handley
Fennimore And Gerda - Intermezzo
On Cooking The First Hero In Spring
Summer Night On The River
A Song Before Sunrise
Sleigh Ride
Irmelin - Prelude
The Walk To The Paradise Garden, and
Koanga - La Calinda.
All small, shapely and colourful works. I guess it's proceed with caution
after that. I also rather like Paris , and I enjoyed a televised production
of A Village Romeo and Juliet that I saw some years ago, and which is
available on DVD.
For those who want a masterpiece, then they should listen to Sea Drift,
with the music set to Walt Whitman. A wonderfully fresh yet poignant
score, and one of Delius' best scores.
Ray Hall, Taree- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
I agree. I love the Hickox recording.
D***@aol.com
2010-04-15 20:28:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Harper
Post by TareeDawg
Post by ways
why what's wrong with delius
For many here, it seems Delius is too perfumed for them, much, but not
quite, like Scriabin and a few others.
Ray Hall, Taree
I think you've hit it exactly for me, and yes, I don't care for
Scriabin either. My loss, no doubt, but I'll live with it (or without
them, as you please).
Bob Harper
First, Scriabin: I recently re-read Michael Kennedy's biography of
Sir Adrian Boult. Kennedy wrote that during his years as head of the
BBC Symphony Orchestra (1932-1949/50), Boult did not choose what he
was to conduct. That was chosen by various BBC types. But, Kennedy
wrote, Boult had his little "black list" of composers whose music he
refused to conduct. Scriabin was one.

Delius: I always enjoyed announcing "The Walk to the Paradise
Garden" on WFMT. I could say that the young lovers were walking away
to "The Paradise Garden." Which was not paradise...but: a pub. A
tavern. A saloon.

Don Tait
Beaver Lad
2010-04-15 06:44:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by ways
why what's wrong with delius
==============

You know the old joke‹those who don't care for his music refer to him
as"Big Delius".
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-04-15 07:10:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Beaver Lad
Post by ways
why what's wrong with delius
==============
You know the old joke‹those who don't care for his music refer to him as
"Big Delius".
Who uses that expression, apart from me?
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
pgaron
2010-04-15 15:24:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Beaver Lad
Post by ways
why what's wrong with delius
==============
You know the old joke‹those who don't care for his music refer to him
as"Big Delius".
Or say "Delius makes me bilious."
boombox
2010-04-15 15:42:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by pgaron
Post by Beaver Lad
Post by ways
why what's wrong with delius
==============
You know the old joke‹those who don't care for his music refer to him
as"Big Delius".
Or say "Delius makes me bilious."
One imagines their sides must ache from the uproarious laughter that
follows such pronouncements.
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-04-15 15:55:33 UTC
Permalink
pgaron <***@my-deja.com> appears to have caused the following letters to
be typed in news:5e94684f-19a8-4243-9c10-0eb63237a5a5
Post by pgaron
Post by Beaver Lad
Post by ways
why what's wrong with delius
=============
You know the old joke‹those who don't care for his music refer to
him as"Big Delius".
Or say "Delius makes me bilious."
"And your Delius? Delirious!"
From "Unfaithfully Yours" (the original, not the dreadful remake)
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
Beaver Lad
2010-04-15 20:32:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
be typed in news:5e94684f-19a8-4243-9c10-0eb63237a5a5
Post by pgaron
Post by Beaver Lad
Post by ways
why what's wrong with delius
=============
You know the old joke‹those who don't care for his music refer to
him as"Big Delius".
Or say "Delius makes me bilious."
"And your Delius? Delirious!"
From "Unfaithfully Yours" (the original, not the dreadful remake)
======================

Probably my fave Preston Sturges film.
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-04-16 06:51:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Beaver Lad
letters to be typed in news:5e94684f-19a8-4243-9c10-0eb63237a5a5
Post by pgaron
Post by Beaver Lad
Post by ways
why what's wrong with delius
You know the old joke‹those who don't care for his music refer to
him as"Big Delius".
Or say "Delius makes me bilious."
"And your Delius? Delirious!"
From "Unfaithfully Yours" (the original, not the dreadful remake)
Probably my fave Preston Sturges film.
I won't argue with you, although I slightly prefer "Sullivan's Travels" and
"The Great McGinty." I'd love to see a Sturges festival in which the
latter film would get introduced by Rod Blagojevich.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
Kip Williams
2010-04-16 13:10:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Beaver Lad
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
From "Unfaithfully Yours" (the original, not the dreadful remake)
Probably my fave Preston Sturges film.
I won't argue with you, although I slightly prefer "Sullivan's Travels" and
"The Great McGinty." I'd love to see a Sturges festival in which the
latter film would get introduced by Rod Blagojevich.
I really like HAIL THE CONQUERING HERO, partly because the humorless
Marine who's concerned about Eddie Bracken's dear mother reminds me of a
former Marine I used to work with in some ways. Also because the movie
really has no dead spots for me.

I will stipulate that I haven't seen as many Preston Sturges movies as
I'd like to. I should see what I have on VHS.


Kip W
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-04-16 14:25:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kip Williams
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Beaver Lad
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
From "Unfaithfully Yours" (the original, not the dreadful remake)
Probably my fave Preston Sturges film.
I won't argue with you, although I slightly prefer "Sullivan's Travels"
and "The Great McGinty." I'd love to see a Sturges festival in which
the latter film would get introduced by Rod Blagojevich.
I really like HAIL THE CONQUERING HERO, partly because the humorless
Marine who's concerned about Eddie Bracken's dear mother reminds me of a
former Marine I used to work with in some ways. Also because the movie
really has no dead spots for me.
I like the family name of "Kockenlocker." Also "Ratskywatsky."
Post by Kip Williams
I will stipulate that I haven't seen as many Preston Sturges movies as
I'd like to. I should see what I have on VHS.
If you have any clue how I could get to see "The French They Are a Funny
Race" (or whichever one of its several titles), please let me know.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
Beaver Lad
2010-04-17 10:29:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Beaver Lad
letters to be typed in news:5e94684f-19a8-4243-9c10-0eb63237a5a5
Post by pgaron
Post by Beaver Lad
Post by ways
why what's wrong with delius
You know the old joke‹those who don't care for his music refer to
him as"Big Delius".
Or say "Delius makes me bilious."
"And your Delius? Delirious!"
From "Unfaithfully Yours" (the original, not the dreadful remake)
Probably my fave Preston Sturges film.
I won't argue with you, although I slightly prefer "Sullivan's Travels" and
"The Great McGinty." I'd love to see a Sturges festival in which the
latter film would get introduced by Rod Blagojevich.
=========================================

For me, SULLIVAN'S TRAVELS is marred by two things: Veronica Lake, who
is just not in the same league as the rest of the cast, and the Disney
cartoon at which the convicts and Sullivan guffaw so uproariously.
There is no such thing as a funny Disney cartoon. Now, if they'd given
us a Fleischer POPEYE (pre-Code), or a Warners DAFFY, the whole thing
would have made way more sense. Those cartoons ARE laugh-out-loud
funny.
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-04-17 13:43:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Beaver Lad
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Beaver Lad
letters to be typed in news:5e94684f-19a8-4243-9c10-0eb63237a5a5
Post by pgaron
Post by Beaver Lad
Post by ways
why what's wrong with delius
You know the old joke‹those who don't care for his music refer
to him as"Big Delius".
Or say "Delius makes me bilious."
"And your Delius? Delirious!"
From "Unfaithfully Yours" (the original, not the dreadful remake)
Probably my fave Preston Sturges film.
I won't argue with you, although I slightly prefer "Sullivan's Travels"
and "The Great McGinty." I'd love to see a Sturges festival in which
the latter film would get introduced by Rod Blagojevich.
=========================================
For me, SULLIVAN'S TRAVELS is marred by two things: Veronica Lake, who is
just not in the same league as the rest of the cast, and the Disney cartoon
at which the convicts and Sullivan guffaw so uproariously. There is no such
thing as a funny Disney cartoon. Now, if they'd given us a Fleischer POPEYE
(pre-Code), or a Warners DAFFY, the whole thing would have made way more
sense. Those cartoons ARE laugh-out-loud funny.
I don't agree with you on either point; Lake is as good as she needs to be,
and unlike most of Sturges' female characters she provides "a little sex."
(The BIG exception for me, of course, is Barbara Stanwyck in "The Lady Eve.")
And while a Pluto cartoon wouldn't be my first choice here, it shows the
convicts responding to the most basic slapstick as their only release, so it
actually fits better than if they had been watching some high comedy.

That said, I have a few problems with other parts of the movie, particularly
the racial stereotype of the cook on the land-yacht. Still, it's a great
movie, despite great flaws.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
number_six
2010-04-15 19:19:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Beaver Lad
Post by ways
why what's wrong with delius
==============
You know the old joke‹those who don't care for his music refer to him
as"Big Delius".
"Biggus Delius"?
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-04-16 06:51:00 UTC
Permalink
number_six <***@hotmail.com> appears to have caused the following
letters to be typed in news:420db340-9c09-48d5-8f88-a1ee3e971ac8
Post by number_six
You know the old joke - those who don't care for his music refer to him
as "Big Delius".
"Biggus Delius"?
I have a vewy gweat fwiend in Fwowida named "Biggus Delius"!
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
Kip Williams
2010-04-16 13:10:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
letters to be typed in news:420db340-9c09-48d5-8f88-a1ee3e971ac8
Post by number_six
You know the old joke - those who don't care for his music refer to him
as "Big Delius".
"Biggus Delius"?
I have a vewy gweat fwiend in Fwowida named "Biggus Delius"!
Wewease Wavel!


Kip W
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-04-16 14:25:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kip Williams
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
letters to be typed in news:420db340-9c09-48d5-8f88-a1ee3e971ac8
Post by number_six
You know the old joke - those who don't care for his music refer to him
as "Big Delius".
"Biggus Delius"?
I have a vewy gweat fwiend in Fwowida named "Biggus Delius"!
Wewease Wavel!
"Havergal Bwian" might have been a shade funnier.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
Kip Williams
2010-04-16 20:33:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Kip Williams
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
letters to be typed in news:420db340-9c09-48d5-8f88-a1ee3e971ac8
Post by number_six
You know the old joke - those who don't care for his music refer to him
as "Big Delius".
"Biggus Delius"?
I have a vewy gweat fwiend in Fwowida named "Biggus Delius"!
Wewease Wavel!
"Havergal Bwian" might have been a shade funnier.
I don't do shady.


Kip W
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-04-14 14:05:58 UTC
Permalink
ways <***@hotmail.com> appears to have caused the following letters
to be typed in news:93001b36-8f40-4265-ab64-
Post by ways
why what's wrong with delius
Don't get me started!
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
boombox
2010-04-14 18:20:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by ways
why what's wrong with delius
Nothing.
Bob Lombard
2010-04-14 18:37:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by boombox
Post by ways
why what's wrong with delius
Nothing.
My personal experience is that his music has an uncanny way of not
connecting.

bl
--
Music, books, a few movies
LombardMusic
http://www.amazon.com/shops/A3NRY9P3TNNXNA
Gerard
2010-04-14 21:37:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Lombard
Post by boombox
Post by ways
why what's wrong with delius
Nothing.
My personal experience is that his music has an uncanny way of not
connecting.
bl
Like loose ends?
Bob Harper
2010-04-14 05:20:53 UTC
Permalink
On 4/13/10 7:41 PM, Sol L. Siegel wrote:
(snip)
Post by Sol L. Siegel
That would be the oft-reissued EMI disc, with the Sinfonia of London, of
the Tallis Fantasia and Greensleeves Fantasia, with Elgar's Introduction
and Allegro plus the Serenade for Strings. This is an essential item.
Yes, indeed. I first owned it on an imported EMI LP 35 or more years
ago. A Desert Island Disc for the ages.

Bob Harper
Thornhill
2010-04-13 17:49:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by GIAM
Hi,
I'm looking for recordings of English composers, but I don't really
know where to start. I'm particularly interested in Mauice Greene,
William Boyce, Ralph Vaughn Williams and Gustav Holst. Can anyone
suggest pointers to recordings for these composers?
Thanks,
GIAM
William Walton is easily my favorite.

Symphony No.1 - Previn/LSO (RCA) -- If you buy 1 Walton recording,
this is it.
Symphony No.2 - Szell/Cleveland (Sony)
Symphonies Nos. 1 & 2 - Mackerras/LPO/LSO (EMI)
Violin Concerto - Dong-Suk Kang/Paul Daniel/English Northern
Philharmonia (Naxos)
Cello Concerto - Piatigorsky/Munch/Boston (RCA)
Hindemith Variations - Szell/Cleveland (Sony)
Belshazzar's Feast - Paul Daniel/English Northern Philharmonia (Naxos)

Overall, the whole Naxos survey of Walton is pretty good.
Bob Harper
2010-04-13 18:01:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Thornhill
Post by GIAM
Hi,
I'm looking for recordings of English composers, but I don't really
know where to start. I'm particularly interested in Mauice Greene,
William Boyce, Ralph Vaughn Williams and Gustav Holst. Can anyone
suggest pointers to recordings for these composers?
Thanks,
GIAM
William Walton is easily my favorite.
Symphony No.1 - Previn/LSO (RCA) -- If you buy 1 Walton recording,
this is it.
Symphony No.2 - Szell/Cleveland (Sony)
Symphonies Nos. 1 & 2 - Mackerras/LPO/LSO (EMI)
Violin Concerto -  Dong-Suk Kang/Paul Daniel/English Northern
Philharmonia (Naxos)
Cello Concerto - Piatigorsky/Munch/Boston (RCA)
Hindemith Variations - Szell/Cleveland (Sony)
Belshazzar's Feast - Paul Daniel/English Northern Philharmonia (Naxos)
Overall, the whole Naxos survey of Walton is pretty good.
I agree on all counts. The Previn 1st Symphony is an older recording
(196?), but while it's been approached, it's never been superseded.

Bob Harper
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-04-13 20:00:32 UTC
Permalink
Thornhill <***@gmail.com> appears to have caused the following
letters to be typed in news:83740393-517c-4ccf-8bfd-be6e498baf70
Post by Thornhill
William Walton is easily my favorite.
Symphony No.1 - Previn/LSO (RCA) -- If you buy 1 Walton recording,
this is it.
Symphony No.2 - Szell/Cleveland (Sony)
Symphonies Nos. 1 & 2 - Mackerras/LPO/LSO (EMI)
Violin Concerto - Dong-Suk Kang/Paul Daniel/English Northern
Philharmonia (Naxos)
Cello Concerto - Piatigorsky/Munch/Boston (RCA)
Hindemith Variations - Szell/Cleveland (Sony)
Belshazzar's Feast - Paul Daniel/English Northern Philharmonia (Naxos)
Overall, the whole Naxos survey of Walton is pretty good.
Not the Viola Concerto? Let me suggest Primrose with the composer (1946).
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
TareeDawg
2010-04-13 20:41:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Thornhill
Post by GIAM
Hi,
I'm looking for recordings of English composers, but I don't really
know where to start. I'm particularly interested in Mauice Greene,
William Boyce, Ralph Vaughn Williams and Gustav Holst. Can anyone
suggest pointers to recordings for these composers?
Thanks,
GIAM
William Walton is easily my favorite.
Symphony No.1 - Previn/LSO (RCA) -- If you buy 1 Walton recording,
this is it.
Symphony No.2 - Szell/Cleveland (Sony)
Symphonies Nos. 1& 2 - Mackerras/LPO/LSO (EMI)
Violin Concerto - Dong-Suk Kang/Paul Daniel/English Northern
Philharmonia (Naxos)
Cello Concerto - Piatigorsky/Munch/Boston (RCA)
Hindemith Variations - Szell/Cleveland (Sony)
Belshazzar's Feast - Paul Daniel/English Northern Philharmonia (Naxos)
Overall, the whole Naxos survey of Walton is pretty good.
I also agree on all counts wrt Walton recordings. One 1st that should be
sought out, if obtainable, is Sargeant's with the New Philharmonia as it
then was. It is a more deliberate account than Previn's but has plenty
of bite.

Ray Hall, Taree
Andrew Rose
2010-04-13 20:46:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by TareeDawg
Post by Thornhill
Post by GIAM
Hi,
I'm looking for recordings of English composers, but I don't really
know where to start. I'm particularly interested in Mauice Greene,
William Boyce, Ralph Vaughn Williams and Gustav Holst. Can anyone
suggest pointers to recordings for these composers?
Thanks,
GIAM
William Walton is easily my favorite.
Symphony No.1 - Previn/LSO (RCA) -- If you buy 1 Walton recording,
this is it.
Symphony No.2 - Szell/Cleveland (Sony)
Symphonies Nos. 1& 2 - Mackerras/LPO/LSO (EMI)
Violin Concerto - Dong-Suk Kang/Paul Daniel/English Northern
Philharmonia (Naxos)
Cello Concerto - Piatigorsky/Munch/Boston (RCA)
Hindemith Variations - Szell/Cleveland (Sony)
Belshazzar's Feast - Paul Daniel/English Northern Philharmonia (Naxos)
Overall, the whole Naxos survey of Walton is pretty good.
I also agree on all counts wrt Walton recordings. One 1st that should be
sought out, if obtainable, is Sargeant's with the New Philharmonia as it
then was. It is a more deliberate account than Previn's but has plenty
of bite.
Ray Hall, Taree
I'd also recommend the recordings of E. J. Moeran's music, esp. those on
Lyrita.
--
Andrew Rose

Pristine Classical: "The destination for people interested in historic
recordings..." (Gramophone)

www.pristineclassical.com
number_six
2010-04-14 01:29:24 UTC
Permalink
I'd second many of the foregoing posts -- especially the Vaughan
Williams Tallis Fantasia -- but I'll focus on some stuff that's likely
to garner fewer votes --

Nyman - In re Don Giovanni -- best perf is on Michael Nyman Live

White - Puffin' Billy - on British Light Music Classics 1 (Hyperion)

Dowland - Lute Works - Julian Bream is best

Purcell - Funeral Music for Queen Mary -- and hear what Britten does
with it in the Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra

Elgar - Sea Pictures - Janet Baker
Kip Williams
2010-04-14 01:44:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by number_six
I'd second many of the foregoing posts -- especially the Vaughan
Williams Tallis Fantasia -- but I'll focus on some stuff that's likely
to garner fewer votes --
...
Post by number_six
White - Puffin' Billy - on British Light Music Classics 1 (Hyperion)
I have that on a disk called "Elizabethan Serenade," from Naxos (I
think), and I really enjoy the whole album. Some of the cuts are well
known to UK listeners as themes from radio shows (Puffin' Billy, known
to Americans of a certain age as Captain Kangaroo's music, was a
long-time theme from "Children's Favourites" on the BBC), others are
excerpts from longer works. There are three pieces by Ketelbey, a couple
by Coates, and even one by Billy Mayerl.

The performances seem to be largely Czech orchestras. I got it because I
recognized a couple of the pieces and it was inexpensive, and it became
a favourite right away.


Kip W
number_six
2010-04-15 02:51:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kip Williams
Post by number_six
I'd second many of the foregoing posts -- especially the Vaughan
Williams Tallis Fantasia -- but I'll focus on some stuff that's likely
to garner fewer votes --
...
Post by number_six
White - Puffin' Billy - on British Light Music Classics 1 (Hyperion)
I have that on a disk called "Elizabethan Serenade," from Naxos (I
think), and I really enjoy the whole album. Some of the cuts are well
known to UK listeners as themes from radio shows (Puffin' Billy, known
to Americans of a certain age as Captain Kangaroo's music, was a
long-time theme from "Children's Favourites" on the BBC), others are
excerpts from longer works. There are three pieces by Ketelbey, a couple
by Coates, and even one by Billy Mayerl.
The performances seem to be largely Czech orchestras. I got it because I
recognized a couple of the pieces and it was inexpensive, and it became
a favourite right away.
Kip W
ASV has a nice release of light music by Ronald Binge, composer of
Elizabethan Serenade.

I thought Puffin' Billy deserved a mention in this thread; glad
someone else agrees. We probably have all heard it, and what's not to
like?
Bob Lombard
2010-04-14 01:46:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by number_six
I'd second many of the foregoing posts -- especially the Vaughan
Williams Tallis Fantasia -- but I'll focus on some stuff that's likely
to garner fewer votes --
Dowland - Lute Works - Julian Bream is best
O'Dette has dibs.

bl
--
Music, books, a few movies
LombardMusic
http://www.amazon.com/shops/A3NRY9P3TNNXNA
number_six
2010-04-15 02:54:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Lombard
Post by number_six
I'd second many of the foregoing posts -- especially the Vaughan
Williams Tallis Fantasia -- but I'll focus on some stuff that's likely
to garner fewer votes --
Dowland - Lute Works - Julian Bream is best
O'Dette has dibs.
bl
--
Music, books, a few movies
LombardMusichttp://www.amazon.com/shops/A3NRY9P3TNNXNA
O'Dette's series on Harmonia Mundi is great, and he beats Bream in the
completist department. Somehow, though, the Elizabethan spirit (as I
imagine it to be) seems most alive with Bream. I am not saying the
other fellow is a slouch, though!
Bob Harper
2010-04-15 04:11:27 UTC
Permalink
On 4/14/10 7:54 PM, number_six wrote:
(snip)
Post by number_six
O'Dette's series on Harmonia Mundi is great, and he beats Bream in the
completist department. Somehow, though, the Elizabethan spirit (as I
imagine it to be) seems most alive with Bream. I am not saying the
other fellow is a slouch, though!
My first experience hearing a plucked instrument was a recital by Julian
Bream at William Jewell College in Liberty, MO, in the Spring of 1970.
He played the guitar on the first half of the program (mostly Spanish
music, IIRC) and the lute on the second. Wonderful, though I'm sorry to
say it didn't much impress the girl I took, on whom I had an unrequited
crush :) Your comment about the Elizabethan spirit seems quite apropos
with respect to the lute portion of the program.

Bob Harper
number_six
2010-04-15 19:18:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Harper
(snip)
Post by number_six
O'Dette's series on Harmonia Mundi is great, and he beats Bream in the
completist department.  Somehow, though, the Elizabethan spirit (as I
imagine it to be) seems most alive with Bream.  I am not saying the
other fellow is a slouch, though!
My first experience hearing a plucked instrument was a recital by Julian
Bream at William Jewell College in Liberty, MO, in the Spring of 1970.
He played the guitar on the first half of the program (mostly Spanish
music, IIRC) and the lute on the second. Wonderful, though I'm sorry to
say it didn't much impress the girl I took, on whom I had an unrequited
crush :) Your comment about the Elizabethan spirit seems quite apropos
with respect to the lute portion of the program.
Bob Harper
Bob, if she didn't appreciate seeing Bream in person, well...
Bob Lombard
2010-04-15 20:00:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Harper
My first experience hearing a plucked instrument was a recital by Julian
Bream at William Jewell College in Liberty, MO, in the Spring of 1970.
Bob Harper
Well, dang. You spent your 'formative years' in Missouri, and the
first time you heard a 'plucked instrument' was _classical_? Lordy,
Lordy, you had a sheltered upbringing, Bob.

bl
--
Music, books, a few movies
LombardMusic
http://www.amazon.com/shops/A3NRY9P3TNNXNA
Bob Harper
2010-04-15 21:18:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Harper
My first experience hearing a plucked instrument was a recital by Julian
Bream at William Jewell College in Liberty, MO, in the Spring of 1970.
Bob Harper
Well, dang. You spent your 'formative years' in Missouri, and the first
time you heard a 'plucked instrument' was _classical_? Lordy, Lordy, you
had a sheltered upbringing, Bob.
bl
I suppose so. I never was much of one for Country. When I was in sales,
lots of the people I called on were country music fans, some going so
far as to endorse the dictum, "If it ain't country, it ain't music." I
smiled and kept my mouth shut :)

Bob Harper
Bob Harper
2010-04-15 21:08:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by number_six
Post by Bob Harper
(snip)
Post by number_six
O'Dette's series on Harmonia Mundi is great, and he beats Bream in the
completist department. Somehow, though, the Elizabethan spirit (as I
imagine it to be) seems most alive with Bream. I am not saying the
other fellow is a slouch, though!
My first experience hearing a plucked instrument was a recital by Julian
Bream at William Jewell College in Liberty, MO, in the Spring of 1970.
He played the guitar on the first half of the program (mostly Spanish
music, IIRC) and the lute on the second. Wonderful, though I'm sorry to
say it didn't much impress the girl I took, on whom I had an unrequited
crush :) Your comment about the Elizabethan spirit seems quite apropos
with respect to the lute portion of the program.
Bob Harper
Bob, if she didn't appreciate seeing Bream in person, well...
I guess I hadn't thought of it that way, but now that you articulate it...

Bob Harper
OW
2010-04-16 04:42:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by number_six
Post by Bob Harper
(snip)
Post by number_six
O'Dette's series on Harmonia Mundi is great, and he beats Bream in the
completist department.  Somehow, though, the Elizabethan spirit (as I
imagine it to be) seems most alive with Bream.  I am not saying the
other fellow is a slouch, though!
My first experience hearing a plucked instrument was a recital by Julian
Bream at William Jewell College in Liberty, MO, in the Spring of 1970.
He played the guitar on the first half of the program (mostly Spanish
music, IIRC) and the lute on the second. Wonderful, though I'm sorry to
say it didn't much impress the girl I took, on whom I had an unrequited
crush :) Your comment about the Elizabethan spirit seems quite apropos
with respect to the lute portion of the program.
Bob Harper
Bob, if she didn't appreciate seeing Bream in person, well...
Yes, maybe he should have taken her to a David Cassidy concert
instead.
Bob Harper
2010-04-16 06:11:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by OW
Post by number_six
Post by Bob Harper
(snip)
Post by number_six
O'Dette's series on Harmonia Mundi is great, and he beats Bream in the
completist department. Somehow, though, the Elizabethan spirit (as I
imagine it to be) seems most alive with Bream. I am not saying the
other fellow is a slouch, though!
My first experience hearing a plucked instrument was a recital by Julian
Bream at William Jewell College in Liberty, MO, in the Spring of 1970.
He played the guitar on the first half of the program (mostly Spanish
music, IIRC) and the lute on the second. Wonderful, though I'm sorry to
say it didn't much impress the girl I took, on whom I had an unrequited
crush :) Your comment about the Elizabethan spirit seems quite apropos
with respect to the lute portion of the program.
Bob Harper
Bob, if she didn't appreciate seeing Bream in person, well...
Yes, maybe he should have taken her to a David Cassidy concert
instead.
Perhaps. But I don't think that was the problem :)

Bob Harper (who celebrated his 32nd anniversary a couple of weeks ago,
thank you very much)
Kip Williams
2010-04-16 13:18:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Harper
Bob Harper (who celebrated his 32nd anniversary a couple of weeks ago,
thank you very much)
Congratulations, belatedly!
(On a Stoneway)

(Y con Pedro Picapiedra.
)


Kip W
Terry
2010-04-15 02:30:54 UTC
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On Wed, 14 Apr 2010 11:29:24 +1000, number_six wrote
(in article
Post by number_six
I'd second many of the foregoing posts -- especially the Vaughan
Williams Tallis Fantasia -- but I'll focus on some stuff that's likely
to garner fewer votes --
<snip>
Post by number_six
Purcell - Funeral Music for Queen Mary -- and hear what Britten does
with it in the Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra
<snip>

I'm pretty sure he doesn't, actually. The Young Person's Guide is a set of
variations on a piece of incidental music Purcell wrote for the play
³Abdelazar, or The Moor's Revenge². I'm sure there's no trace of Queen Mary's
funeral music in it at all.
--
Cheers!

Terry
number_six
2010-04-15 02:45:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Terry
(in article
Post by number_six
I'd second many of the foregoing posts -- especially the Vaughan
Williams Tallis Fantasia -- but I'll focus on some stuff that's likely
to garner fewer votes --
<snip>
Post by number_six
Purcell - Funeral Music for Queen Mary -- and hear what Britten does
with it in the Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra
<snip>
I'm pretty sure he doesn't, actually. The Young Person's Guide is a set of
variations on a piece of incidental music Purcell wrote for the play
³Abdelazar, or The Moor's Revenge². I'm sure there's no trace of Queen Mary's
funeral music in it at all.
--
Cheers!
Terry
Terry, you're right, it was Purcell's Abdelazar. Though Britten
didn't have a go at the Funeral Music for Queen Mary, Walter Carlos
and Rachel Elkind certainly did...but that's another story!
Kip Williams
2010-04-15 04:15:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Terry
I'm pretty sure he doesn't, actually. The Young Person's Guide is a set of
variations on a piece of incidental music Purcell wrote for the play
³Abdelazar, or The Moor's Revenge². I'm sure there's no trace of Queen Mary's
funeral music in it at all.
It's also a free-standing rondo. I don't know which of the two settings
by Purcell came first.


Kip W
number_six
2010-04-14 01:34:49 UTC
Permalink
For a different side of Holst, Fennell's recordings of the Suites for
Military Band are very good.

Always liked the Hymn to Soma from the Rig Veda, as well.
number_six
2010-04-14 01:37:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by number_six
For a different side of Holst, Fennell's recordings of the Suites for
Military Band are very good.
Always liked the Hymn to Soma from the Rig Veda, as well.
Oops, Terry already mentioned Fennell, so that's a second.

Is Colin McPhee English? There's his Tabu-Tabuhan...
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-04-14 03:13:39 UTC
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number_six <***@hotmail.com> appears to have caused the following
letters to be typed in news:87c9ce4b-e6b8-44c9-8258-
Post by number_six
Post by number_six
For a different side of Holst, Fennell's recordings of the Suites for
Military Band are very good.
Always liked the Hymn to Soma from the Rig Veda, as well.
Oops, Terry already mentioned Fennell, so that's a second.
Is Colin McPhee English? There's his Tabu-Tabuhan...
No, he was Canadian.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
Dave Cook
2010-04-14 02:59:17 UTC
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Post by GIAM
I'm looking for recordings of English composers, but I don't really
know where to start. I'm particularly interested in Mauice Greene,
William Boyce, Ralph Vaughn Williams and Gustav Holst. Can anyone
suggest pointers to recordings for these composers?
For VW there's a 30-CD EMI set:

http://www.amazon.com/Vaughan-Williams-Collectors-Box-Set/dp/B00156ZWV0

For Holst, assuming you mean Holst beyond The Planets, I think the
best place to start is with Boult's Lyrita disc:

http://www.amazon.com/Boult-conducts-Holst-Gustav/dp/B000027QWB

Dave Cook
Greg
2010-04-15 02:11:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by GIAM
Hi,
I'm looking for recordings of English composers, but I don't really
know where to start. I'm particularly interested in Mauice Greene,
William Boyce, Ralph Vaughn Williams and Gustav Holst. Can anyone
suggest pointers to recordings for these composers?
Thanks,
GIAM
In addition to the usual suspects already listed by others, try to
hear some Malcolm Arnold. I like most of what I have heard from him,
but I have an unusual affection for his 5th symphony. Probably my
favorite piece by an English composer. Hickox or Handley.

Greg
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