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Sousa at the Last Night of the Proms
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Kerrison
2019-08-26 23:15:11 UTC
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I just came across on YouTube two Sousa marches played at the Last Night of the Proms in London's Royal Albert Hall and I wonder what American viewers might make of the tempos! ... Here first is Vernon Handley in 1985 with "The Stars and Stripes Forever" ...



And here is Leonard Slatkin in 2004 with "The Liberty Bell" preceded by a joke which had the 6,000-strong audience groaning at its awfulness ...



Still with American music at the Proms, how about Franz Waxman's "Ride of the Cossacks" from 'Taras Bulba' in what I think is a terrific performance from the John Wilson Orchestra. Note the Wagner tubas, to say nothing of the piccolos! ...


Bozo
2019-08-27 00:58:14 UTC
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I just came across on YouTube two Sousa marches played at the Last Night of the Proms in London's Royal >Albert Hall and I wonder what American viewers might make of the tempos!
I have no opinions.For what it's worth, as an American,for me the highlights of Last Night, no matter what preceded that evening , are "Jerusalem" and " Land of Hope and Glory."
wanwan
2019-08-27 06:13:34 UTC
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Post by Kerrison
I just came across on YouTube two Sousa marches played at the Last Night of the Proms in London's Royal Albert Hall and I wonder what American viewers might make of the tempos! ... Here first is Vernon Handley in 1985 with "The Stars and Stripes Forever" ...
http://youtu.be/fJckAn3VMVo
And here is Leonard Slatkin in 2004 with "The Liberty Bell" preceded by a joke which had the 6,000-strong audience groaning at its awfulness ...
http://youtu.be/uoNQUJvbIJM
Well, The Liberty Bell isn't anything unusual in the UK, being the theme for the Monty Python show.

---------------
Eric
Andrew Clarke
2019-08-30 04:04:40 UTC
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Post by wanwan
Post by Kerrison
I just came across on YouTube two Sousa marches played at the Last Night of the Proms in London's Royal Albert Hall and I wonder what American viewers might make of the tempos! ... Here first is Vernon Handley in 1985 with "The Stars and Stripes Forever" ...
http://youtu.be/fJckAn3VMVo
And here is Leonard Slatkin in 2004 with "The Liberty Bell" preceded by a joke which had the 6,000-strong audience groaning at its awfulness ...
http://youtu.be/uoNQUJvbIJM
Well, The Liberty Bell isn't anything unusual in the UK, being the theme for the Monty Python show.
The Stars and Stripes For Ever isn't anything unusual either, more especially the a capella choral arrangement:

"Be kind to your web-footed friends,
For a duck may be somebody's mother ..."

Andrew Clarke
Canberra
O
2019-08-27 14:01:58 UTC
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Post by Kerrison
I just came across on YouTube two Sousa marches played at the Last Night of
the Proms in London's Royal Albert Hall and I wonder what American viewers
might make of the tempos! ... Here first is Vernon Handley in 1985 with "The
Stars and Stripes Forever" ...
http://youtu.be/fJckAn3VMVo
A bit brisk, but still vibrant. Sounds like the same arrangement
Arthur Fiedler used, without the barrel sound of Symphony Hall. I
don't mean that in a bad way.
Post by Kerrison
And here is Leonard Slatkin in 2004 with "The Liberty Bell" preceded by a
joke which had the 6,000-strong audience groaning at its awfulness ...
http://youtu.be/uoNQUJvbIJM
Slatkin having fun, and so did the audience.
Post by Kerrison
Still with American music at the Proms, how about Franz Waxman's "Ride of the
Cossacks" from 'Taras Bulba' in what I think is a terrific performance from
the John Wilson Orchestra. Note the Wagner tubas, to say nothing of the
piccolos! ...
http://youtu.be/asoLIJpvb_w
A great piece to add to my "Road Trip" playlist. Thrilling. It's hard
to find anything classical worthy of a "road trip," because of the
dynamics. The soft parts you can't hear and the loud parts blast your
ears.

-Owen
Kerrison
2019-08-27 18:31:32 UTC
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In article,
Post by Kerrison
I just came across on YouTube two Sousa marches played at the Last Night of
the Proms in London's Royal Albert Hall and I wonder what American viewers
might make of the tempos! ... Here first is Vernon Handley in 1985 with "The
Stars and Stripes Forever" ...
http://youtu.be/fJckAn3VMVo
A bit brisk, but still vibrant. Sounds like the same arrangement
Arthur Fiedler used, without the barrel sound of Symphony Hall. I
don't mean that in a bad way.
Post by Kerrison
And here is Leonard Slatkin in 2004 with "The Liberty Bell" preceded by a
joke which had the 6,000-strong audience groaning at its awfulness ...
http://youtu.be/uoNQUJvbIJM
Slatkin having fun, and so did the audience.
Post by Kerrison
Still with American music at the Proms, how about Franz Waxman's "Ride of the
Cossacks" from 'Taras Bulba' in what I think is a terrific performance from
the John Wilson Orchestra. Note the Wagner tubas, to say nothing of the
piccolos! ...
http://youtu.be/asoLIJpvb_w
A great piece to add to my "Road Trip" playlist. Thrilling. It's hard
to find anything classical worthy of a "road trip," because of the
dynamics. The soft parts you can't hear and the loud parts blast your
ears.
-Owen
Just a little extra bonus from the Proms, still with American music but this time played by a visiting US orchestra. It was in 1997 and the Prommers just loved the Dallas Symphony, both in Gershwin and the theme tune from a certain popular US TV series at the time ...


Bozo
2019-08-27 18:48:45 UTC
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Just a little extra bonus from the Proms, still with American music but this time played by a visiting US >orchestra. It was in 1997 and the Prommers just loved the Dallas Symphony,
Thanks , great fun.
m***@gmail.com
2019-08-27 18:48:46 UTC
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Post by Kerrison
In article,
Post by Kerrison
I just came across on YouTube two Sousa marches played at the Last Night of
the Proms in London's Royal Albert Hall and I wonder what American viewers
might make of the tempos! ... Here first is Vernon Handley in 1985 with "The
Stars and Stripes Forever" ...
http://youtu.be/fJckAn3VMVo
A bit brisk, but still vibrant. Sounds like the same arrangement
Arthur Fiedler used, without the barrel sound of Symphony Hall. I
don't mean that in a bad way.
Post by Kerrison
And here is Leonard Slatkin in 2004 with "The Liberty Bell" preceded by a
joke which had the 6,000-strong audience groaning at its awfulness ...
http://youtu.be/uoNQUJvbIJM
Slatkin having fun, and so did the audience.
Post by Kerrison
Still with American music at the Proms, how about Franz Waxman's "Ride of the
Cossacks" from 'Taras Bulba' in what I think is a terrific performance from
the John Wilson Orchestra. Note the Wagner tubas, to say nothing of the
piccolos! ...
http://youtu.be/asoLIJpvb_w
A great piece to add to my "Road Trip" playlist. Thrilling. It's hard
to find anything classical worthy of a "road trip," because of the
dynamics. The soft parts you can't hear and the loud parts blast your
ears.
-Owen
Just a little extra bonus from the Proms, still with American music but this time played by a visiting US orchestra. It was in 1997 and the Prommers just loved the Dallas Symphony, both in Gershwin and the theme tune from a certain popular US TV series at the time ...
http://youtu.be/Yikx8T2zdM0
I remember that Dallas Symphony Proms well. I was VP of Artistic Operations for the Dallas Symphony then, and that Proms concert was the most memorable moment of a 23-day tour in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, England and Ireland. The hall was 90 degrees Fahrenheit that night and the program was long and challenging: Roy Harris' Third Symphony, Barber's Violin Concerto (with Josh Bell) and Tchaikovsky's Fifth. The first encore, which preceded the Gershwin shown here, was "Chester" from William Schuman's "New England Triptych." Some orchestra members did not want to include the theme from "Dallas," but Litton said "trust me - the Brits love that show." The funniest part of the whole evening was Litton's "I told you so" look during the bow immediately after the Dallas theme.

Mark
Kerrison
2019-08-27 22:02:23 UTC
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Post by m***@gmail.com
Post by Kerrison
In article,
Post by Kerrison
I just came across on YouTube two Sousa marches played at the Last Night of
the Proms in London's Royal Albert Hall and I wonder what American viewers
might make of the tempos! ... Here first is Vernon Handley in 1985 with "The
Stars and Stripes Forever" ...
http://youtu.be/fJckAn3VMVo
A bit brisk, but still vibrant. Sounds like the same arrangement
Arthur Fiedler used, without the barrel sound of Symphony Hall. I
don't mean that in a bad way.
Post by Kerrison
And here is Leonard Slatkin in 2004 with "The Liberty Bell" preceded by a
joke which had the 6,000-strong audience groaning at its awfulness ...
http://youtu.be/uoNQUJvbIJM
Slatkin having fun, and so did the audience.
Post by Kerrison
Still with American music at the Proms, how about Franz Waxman's "Ride of the
Cossacks" from 'Taras Bulba' in what I think is a terrific performance from
the John Wilson Orchestra. Note the Wagner tubas, to say nothing of the
piccolos! ...
http://youtu.be/asoLIJpvb_w
A great piece to add to my "Road Trip" playlist. Thrilling. It's hard
to find anything classical worthy of a "road trip," because of the
dynamics. The soft parts you can't hear and the loud parts blast your
ears.
-Owen
Just a little extra bonus from the Proms, still with American music but this time played by a visiting US orchestra. It was in 1997 and the Prommers just loved the Dallas Symphony, both in Gershwin and the theme tune from a certain popular US TV series at the time ...
http://youtu.be/Yikx8T2zdM0
I remember that Dallas Symphony Proms well. I was VP of Artistic Operations for the Dallas Symphony then, and that Proms concert was the most memorable moment of a 23-day tour in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, England and Ireland. The hall was 90 degrees Fahrenheit that night and the program was long and challenging: Roy Harris' Third Symphony, Barber's Violin Concerto (with Josh Bell) and Tchaikovsky's Fifth. The first encore, which preceded the Gershwin shown here, was "Chester" from William Schuman's "New England Triptych." Some orchestra members did not want to include the theme from "Dallas," but Litton said "trust me - the Brits love that show." The funniest part of the whole evening was Litton's "I told you so" look during the bow immediately after the Dallas theme.
Mark
It's interesting that you say the Proms concert was the most memorable of the Dallas SO's tour, doubtless due to the audience's immense roof-raising reception after the Tchaikovsky 5th. Stokowski also performed that same work in the second half of his 1966 Prom. The first half had consisted of the Rimsky-Korsakov 'Russian Easter' Overture, Liszt's 1st PC with Charles Rosen, and the 2nd Suite from Ravel's Daphnis & Chloe.

After the Tchaikovsky 5th, Stokey quieted the cheers and bravos and told the audience that they were the greatest in the world. He then said he looked forward to the following year when, "if the gods permit, we'll be all together again," at which point a Prommer shouted out: "I give them sanction!" After a beautifully timed pause, Stokey looked down into the happy beaming throng of Promenaders and quipped "Mephisto!" He then gave them a dramatic Mussorgsky encore, so click this link and hear it from the original radio broadcast ...


number_six
2019-08-27 22:48:43 UTC
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Post by O
Post by Kerrison
I just came across on YouTube two Sousa marches played at the Last Night of
the Proms in London's Royal Albert Hall and I wonder what American viewers
might make of the tempos! ... Here first is Vernon Handley in 1985 with "The
Stars and Stripes Forever" ...
http://youtu.be/fJckAn3VMVo
A bit brisk, but still vibrant. Sounds like the same arrangement
Arthur Fiedler used, without the barrel sound of Symphony Hall. I
don't mean that in a bad way.
Post by Kerrison
And here is Leonard Slatkin in 2004 with "The Liberty Bell" preceded by a
joke which had the 6,000-strong audience groaning at its awfulness ...
http://youtu.be/uoNQUJvbIJM
Slatkin having fun, and so did the audience.
Post by Kerrison
Still with American music at the Proms, how about Franz Waxman's "Ride of the
Cossacks" from 'Taras Bulba' in what I think is a terrific performance from
the John Wilson Orchestra. Note the Wagner tubas, to say nothing of the
piccolos! ...
http://youtu.be/asoLIJpvb_w
A great piece to add to my "Road Trip" playlist. Thrilling. It's hard
to find anything classical worthy of a "road trip," because of the
dynamics. The soft parts you can't hear and the loud parts blast your
ears.
-Owen
Several times I took Simeon ten Holt on long trips -- Lemniscaat, Canto ostinato, Horizon.

Do NOT play Reich's Music for 18 Musicians behind the wheel. It lulls you, might take away attention to driving...
number_six
2019-08-27 22:58:57 UTC
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Post by Kerrison
I just came across on YouTube two Sousa marches played at the Last Night of the Proms in London's Royal Albert Hall and I wonder what American viewers might make of the tempos! ... Here first is Vernon Handley in 1985 with "The Stars and Stripes Forever" ...
No problem with this tempo. I would not like an effete or tepid reading of this music, not a problem here, plenty of impetus from the trombones.

Audience had a great time in all three of these clips.

Right lads, let's have Jerusalem!
Kerrison
2019-08-29 15:15:54 UTC
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Post by number_six
Post by Kerrison
I just came across on YouTube two Sousa marches played at the Last Night of the Proms in London's Royal Albert Hall and I wonder what American viewers might make of the tempos! ... Here first is Vernon Handley in 1985 with "The Stars and Stripes Forever" ...
No problem with this tempo. I would not like an effete or tepid reading of this music, not a problem here, plenty of impetus from the trombones.
Audience had a great time in all three of these clips.
Right lads, let's have Jerusalem!
OK ... One last speedy American march, "Guadalcanal" by Richard Rodgers, rip-roaringly conducted by, of all people, Sir Adrian Boult. He made a 'World Record Club' LP of 14 Marches in 1967, seven to a side, and to make sure he got them all on, he whipped through the lot at 100 miles an hour. This is a typical example! ...



Phew :)

PS: Incidentally, for those of you who've never seen the length of Boult's baton, here's a nice little treat for you ...


O
2019-08-30 15:27:11 UTC
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Post by Kerrison
Phew :)
PS: Incidentally, for those of you who've never seen the length of Boult's
baton, here's a nice little treat for you ...
http://youtu.be/L1NG7fGX0iA
"You could put your eye out with that!"
-Arturo Toscanini never said that

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