Discussion:
Hough's Rachmaninov
(too old to reply)
Springer
2004-10-08 03:31:24 UTC
Permalink
"HOUGH" good is it? Anyone in addition to DH hear it and care to comment?

TIA

SERGEI RACHMANINOV
Piano Concertos Nos. 1-4; Paganini Rhapsody

Stephen Hough (piano)

Dallas Symphony Orchestra

Andrew Litton

Hyperion- CDA67501/2(CD)
Reference Recording - This One; Kocsis (Philips); Rachmaninov (RCA or Naxos)
Dan Koren
2004-10-08 04:29:12 UTC
Permalink
Hough's Rachmaninov is a little on the dry side.

Not recommended as the first or only set.



dk
Post by Springer
"HOUGH" good is it? Anyone in addition to DH hear it and care to comment?
TIA
SERGEI RACHMANINOV
Piano Concertos Nos. 1-4; Paganini Rhapsody
Stephen Hough (piano)
Dallas Symphony Orchestra
Andrew Litton
Hyperion- CDA67501/2(CD)
Reference Recording - This One; Kocsis (Philips); Rachmaninov (RCA or Naxos)
Derek Lim
2004-10-08 12:32:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Springer
"HOUGH" good is it? Anyone in addition to DH hear it and care to comment?
TIA
Isn't Hough pronounced "Huff"?

Derek
Tom Deacon
2004-10-08 14:34:02 UTC
Permalink
On 10/8/04 8:32 AM, in article
Post by Derek Lim
Post by Springer
"HOUGH" good is it? Anyone in addition to DH hear it and care to comment?
TIA
Isn't Hough pronounced "Huff"?
Correct.

TD
Simon Smith
2004-10-08 07:35:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Springer
"HOUGH" good is it? Anyone in addition to DH hear it and care to comment?
The playing is incredible. But it's very fast, all of it. I started with the
Fourth (my favourite) and was disappointed by the first movement, unsure
about the second (Hough is fond of a "rubato-of-individual-lines" thing which
I find mannered and irritating, sometimes), but the third movement was
extremely exciting. I felt there were the same problems in the Third, but
technically it is breathtaking and, at times, almost unbelievable. The First
maybe comes off best from this treatment, and the Rhapsody a close second.

The orchestra is excellent. Litton does some fabulous things with phrasing,
for example in the opening of the middle movement of the Third and the
orchestra is never just a meaningless background to the piano.

Overall I think I like this set. It's a different approach, and I'm not
always convinced by Hough's tempi, however impressive his playing might be -
though I don't want performances which wallow either. Unless it's just a tiny
bit. I suspect a few more listens will convert me, mostly.

Simon
--
Simon Smith "I am myself only in music. Music is enough
http://www.ingemisco.com for a whole lifetime - but a lifetime is not
enough for music." (Sergei Rachmaninov)
Van Eyes
2004-10-08 16:20:25 UTC
Permalink
The playing is incredible. But it's very fast, all of it....It's a different approach, and I'm not
always convinced by Hough's tempi, however impressive his playing might be -
though I don't want performances which wallow either. Unless it's just a tiny
bit. I suspect a few more listens will convert me, mostly.
The tempo choices and applause are too intrusive for me. I'll be passing
on it.

Regards
--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG
Matthew B. Tepper
2004-10-08 19:28:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Van Eyes
The playing is incredible. But it's very fast, all of it....It's a
different approach, and I'm not always convinced by Hough's tempi,
however impressive his playing might be - though I don't want
performances which wallow either. Unless it's just a tiny bit. I
suspect a few more listens will convert me, mostly.
The tempo choices and applause are too intrusive for me. I'll be passing
on it.
I'm going to try to listen to parts of it first.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Take THAT, Daniel Lin, Mark Sadek, James Lin & Christopher Chung!
Wayne Reimer
2004-10-09 04:09:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Simon Smith
Post by Springer
"HOUGH" good is it? Anyone in addition to DH hear it and care to comment?
The playing is incredible. But it's very fast, all of it. I started with the
Fourth (my favourite) and was disappointed by the first movement, unsure
about the second (Hough is fond of a "rubato-of-individual-lines" thing which
I find mannered and irritating, sometimes), but the third movement was
extremely exciting. I felt there were the same problems in the Third, but
technically it is breathtaking and, at times, almost unbelievable. The First
maybe comes off best from this treatment, and the Rhapsody a close second.
The orchestra is excellent. Litton does some fabulous things with phrasing,
for example in the opening of the middle movement of the Third and the
orchestra is never just a meaningless background to the piano.
Overall I think I like this set. It's a different approach, and I'm not
always convinced by Hough's tempi, however impressive his playing might be -
though I don't want performances which wallow either. Unless it's just a tiny
bit. I suspect a few more listens will convert me, mostly.
Simon
Sounds interesting. I wasn't going to buy this set, based on the hype about
Hough going back to R's own recordings of this music, which I don't
particularly like. But, now I might.

There is, I might add, something particularly disconcerting about the idea that
a composer will be, without question, the best performer of his/her own
compositions. It's disconcerting because it reflects a very shallow
understanding of what composers and performers go through to accomplish what
they do. I think it's actually relatively rare for composers to do really
great auto-performances; mostly they seem to aim for a certain dry effeciency.

wr
Matthew B. Tepper
2004-10-08 07:42:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Springer
"HOUGH" good is it? Anyone in addition to DH hear it and care to comment?
FWIW, this also got good reviews in Fanfare and ARG.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Take THAT, Daniel Lin, Mark Sadek, James Lin & Christopher Chung!
Dan Koren
2004-10-08 08:21:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
FWIW, this also got good reviews in Fanfare and ARG.
That is very damning.



dk
arri bachrach
2004-10-08 16:29:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan Koren
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
FWIW, this also got good reviews in Fanfare and ARG.
That is very damning.
dk
for sure, it is damning..... (aslo demeaning)

heard Hough in recital in NYC awhile back and was not at all
impressed.... but his recordings sound somewhat better but his tone is
a bit shallow

AB
Philip
2004-10-08 09:56:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Springer
"HOUGH" good is it? Anyone in addition to DH hear it and care to comment?
I suspect his name rhymes with "cough" not with "bough".
Bob Lombard
2004-10-08 12:29:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Philip
Post by Springer
"HOUGH" good is it? Anyone in addition to DH hear it and care to comment?
I suspect his name rhymes with "cough" not with "bough".
'Tough' and 'rough'.

bl
Paul Ilechko
2004-10-08 12:29:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Philip
Post by Springer
"HOUGH" good is it? Anyone in addition to DH hear it and care to comment?
I suspect his name rhymes with "cough" not with "bough".
More likely Huff than Hoff, I would expect ...
Thomas Wood
2004-10-09 04:32:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Ilechko
Post by Philip
Post by Springer
"HOUGH" good is it? Anyone in addition to DH hear it and care to comment?
I suspect his name rhymes with "cough" not with "bough".
More likely Huff than Hoff, I would expect ...
Several years ago I heard an interview on the radio with Mr Hough and he
confirmed that his name was pronounced "Huff."

And I've thought for a few years now that's he's one of the very best
pianists performing today.

Tom Wood
Allen
2004-10-08 13:04:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Philip
Post by Springer
"HOUGH" good is it? Anyone in addition to DH hear it and care to comment?
I suspect his name rhymes with "cough" not with "bough".
I have no idea how (no pun intended) Stephen pronounces his name, but I
had an instrucor in college who pronounced it to rhyme with "enough". I
hate words with "ough" in them--too damn many ways to pronounce them.
Allen
Ed Presson
2004-10-08 22:02:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Springer
"HOUGH" good is it? Anyone in addition to DH hear it and care to comment?
I heard an interview with the piantist on CBC Radio. The announcer
pronounced it "Huff" and the piantist did not correct him.

Ed Presson
Paul Ilechko
2004-10-09 00:56:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Springer
Post by Springer
"HOUGH" good is it? Anyone in addition to DH hear it and care to
comment?
I heard an interview with the piantist on CBC Radio. The announcer
pronounced it "Huff" and the piantist did not correct him.
But did the announcer call him a piantist ?
Joel Warren Lidz
2004-10-08 15:33:12 UTC
Permalink
It rhymes with huff.

Joel Warren Lidz
M. Bartnik
2004-10-08 12:16:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Springer
"HOUGH" good is it? Anyone in addition to DH hear it and care to comment?
TIA
Here's a review from musicweb.co.uk, one Kevin Sutton:

M.B.

--------------------------------------
In an era when performance practice issues, right down to careful research
into the regional dialects used for vocal music, are all the rage, it seems
rather unusual that the nineteenth and twentieth centuries have been left
out of the fray. Andrew Litton and Stephen Hough have taken some steps to
bring more recent music into the discussion with these enlightening
performances of the concertante works by Rachmaninov, who despite his
life-span, stuck firmly with romantic ideals.

It has been the tendency in recent decades to over-sentimentalize
Rachmaninov's music, thus transforming passionate lyricism into syrupy
languor. Not so these performances, available in the UK and due for release
in the US on 14 October 2004. Hough has taken great pains to listen
carefully not only to the composer's own recordings, but also to those of
artists that he most approved, specifically Josef Levhinne and Vladimir
Horowitz. He and Litton have also meticulously corrected errant orchestral
parts that have been so often used as to become canon.


This is playing of the highest order both from soloist and orchestra. So
often, with a new recording of such well-traveled works, it is the tendency
of the cognoscenti to immediately dismiss the living performer as in no way
capable of comparison to some famed corpse. I am here to tell you that
Steven Hough can hold his own against any Horowitz, Richter or Rubinstein.
His fleet playing, clarity of line and phenomenal technique shine like
beacons. There are no studio tricks to cover mistakes; these are live
recordings. Andrew Litton shapes the Dallas Symphony into a taut ensemble,
playing with a unity of sound and an attention to the give and take of
melodic line that would be the envy of any fine choir. This orchestra sings
together with abandon.


Most refreshing are the tempo choices, particularly in the more famous,
often-overwrought second and third concerti. Gone are the layers of overt
varnish. Mr. Hough never stretches a moment for his own sake, rather he
concentrates on the lyricism and forward momentum that were the hallmarks of
the composer's own playing.


I found these readings to be revelatory and refreshing. For the first time
in a long time, I was actually riveted to the speakers, anxiously
anticipating the unfolding story. Too often, a listener can simply take for
granted that he knows what will happen next. What a treat to have a few
surprises.


And, lest one think that there is no romanticism here, start your
exploration of this set with the famous "18th Variation" from the Paganini
Rhapsody, and you will rest at ease. Mr. Hough plays this achingly lyrical
line to absolute perfection.


Program notes are peerless. The detail is meticulous and the writing style
is captivating. The Dallas audiences, notorious for their noisiness and lack
of decorum, (I can say that, I live here) are on their very best behavior,
making for studio quality recording with Hyperion's customary finesse. I
could have lived without the applause at the end of each concerto, but that
is a small complaint given the extremely high quality of everything else
about this set.


A must have. A revelation. Get it.


Kevin Sutton
Dan Koren
2004-10-09 07:55:09 UTC
Permalink
Another bad reviewer who doesn't
know what he is talking about. I
just heard the Paganini Rhapsody
from this set, and it absolutely,
positively *STINKS*. Especially
the 18th variation.



dk
Post by M. Bartnik
Post by Springer
"HOUGH" good is it? Anyone in addition to DH hear it and care to comment?
TIA
M.B.
--------------------------------------
In an era when performance practice issues, right down to careful research
into the regional dialects used for vocal music, are all the rage, it seems
rather unusual that the nineteenth and twentieth centuries have been left
out of the fray. Andrew Litton and Stephen Hough have taken some steps to
bring more recent music into the discussion with these enlightening
performances of the concertante works by Rachmaninov, who despite his
life-span, stuck firmly with romantic ideals.
It has been the tendency in recent decades to over-sentimentalize
Rachmaninov's music, thus transforming passionate lyricism into syrupy
languor. Not so these performances, available in the UK and due for release
in the US on 14 October 2004. Hough has taken great pains to listen
carefully not only to the composer's own recordings, but also to those of
artists that he most approved, specifically Josef Levhinne and Vladimir
Horowitz. He and Litton have also meticulously corrected errant orchestral
parts that have been so often used as to become canon.
This is playing of the highest order both from soloist and orchestra. So
often, with a new recording of such well-traveled works, it is the tendency
of the cognoscenti to immediately dismiss the living performer as in no way
capable of comparison to some famed corpse. I am here to tell you that
Steven Hough can hold his own against any Horowitz, Richter or Rubinstein.
His fleet playing, clarity of line and phenomenal technique shine like
beacons. There are no studio tricks to cover mistakes; these are live
recordings. Andrew Litton shapes the Dallas Symphony into a taut ensemble,
playing with a unity of sound and an attention to the give and take of
melodic line that would be the envy of any fine choir. This orchestra sings
together with abandon.
Most refreshing are the tempo choices, particularly in the more famous,
often-overwrought second and third concerti. Gone are the layers of overt
varnish. Mr. Hough never stretches a moment for his own sake, rather he
concentrates on the lyricism and forward momentum that were the hallmarks of
the composer's own playing.
I found these readings to be revelatory and refreshing. For the first time
in a long time, I was actually riveted to the speakers, anxiously
anticipating the unfolding story. Too often, a listener can simply take for
granted that he knows what will happen next. What a treat to have a few
surprises.
And, lest one think that there is no romanticism here, start your
exploration of this set with the famous "18th Variation" from the Paganini
Rhapsody, and you will rest at ease. Mr. Hough plays this achingly lyrical
line to absolute perfection.
Program notes are peerless. The detail is meticulous and the writing style
is captivating. The Dallas audiences, notorious for their noisiness and lack
of decorum, (I can say that, I live here) are on their very best behavior,
making for studio quality recording with Hyperion's customary finesse. I
could have lived without the applause at the end of each concerto, but that
is a small complaint given the extremely high quality of everything else
about this set.
A must have. A revelation. Get it.
Kevin Sutton
John Oster
2004-10-09 08:16:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan Koren
Another bad reviewer who doesn't
know what he is talking about. I
just heard the Paganini Rhapsody
from this set, and it absolutely,
positively *STINKS*. Especially
the 18th variation.
Plus he plays the easier cadenza in No. 3...PASS!
M. Bartnik
2004-10-09 08:31:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Oster
Post by Dan Koren
Another bad reviewer who doesn't
know what he is talking about. I
just heard the Paganini Rhapsody
from this set, and it absolutely,
positively *STINKS*. Especially
the 18th variation.
Plus he plays the easier cadenza in No. 3...PASS!
There is no "easier" cadenza. Both are fiendishly difficult. The one you're
referring to was actually the one Rachmaninov himself preferred, as he felt
the more heavier version overbalanced the piece in favor of the first
movement.

Many, many excellent pianists prefer the lighter cadenza. And I'm sure they
don't do this because they feel it's easier. Just to give a few examples:
Martha Argerich, Nelson Freire, Nikolai Lugansky. Vladimir Ashkenazy played
(and recorded) both of them.

M.B.
Simon Smith
2004-10-09 08:36:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Oster
Post by Dan Koren
Another bad reviewer who doesn't
know what he is talking about. I
just heard the Paganini Rhapsody
from this set, and it absolutely,
positively *STINKS*. Especially
the 18th variation.
Plus he plays the easier cadenza in No. 3...PASS!
It is not "easier". It's just less gratuitously crashy.
--
Simon Smith "I am myself only in music. Music is enough
http://www.ingemisco.com for a whole lifetime - but a lifetime is not
enough for music." (Sergei Rachmaninov)
Tom Deacon
2004-10-09 13:29:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Oster
Post by Dan Koren
Another bad reviewer who doesn't
know what he is talking about. I
just heard the Paganini Rhapsody
from this set, and it absolutely,
positively *STINKS*. Especially
the 18th variation.
Plus he plays the easier cadenza in No. 3...PASS!
Assuming that Mr. Hough performs the concerto at Rachmaninoff's own tempo,
i.e., very quickly, the shorter cadenza is actually the right choice. In my
opinion the larger cadenza - which the composer actually shunned, too many
notes - only works if the pianist takes broad tempos. E.g. Van Cliburn, who
is just about the only pianist to make me think that this long cadenza is
the right one, and that only while I am listening to him play it.
Afterwards, I revert to the shorter cadenza.

Incidentally, there is NOTHING easy about the shorter cadenza.

TD
Bob Lombard
2004-10-09 13:06:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan Koren
Another bad reviewer who doesn't
know what he is talking about. I
just heard the Paganini Rhapsody
from this set, and it absolutely,
positively *STINKS*. Especially
the 18th variation.
Maybe you can help me get a handle on the general tone of Hough's
stench-raising interpretation. Is his approach closer to Rachmaninov's than
to Rubinstein's on a dramatic (<--) versus lyrical (-->) chart?

bl
Dan Koren
2004-10-09 13:34:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Lombard
Post by Dan Koren
Another bad reviewer who doesn't
know what he is talking about. I
just heard the Paganini Rhapsody
from this set, and it absolutely,
positively *STINKS*. Especially
the 18th variation.
Maybe you can help me get a handle
on the general tone of Hough's
stench-raising interpretation. Is
his approach closer to Rachmaninov's
than to Rubinstein's on a dramatic
(<--) versus lyrical (-->) chart?
Neither. It's fast and mechanical.




dk
Tom Deacon
2004-10-09 15:30:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan Koren
Post by Bob Lombard
Post by Dan Koren
Another bad reviewer who doesn't
know what he is talking about. I
just heard the Paganini Rhapsody
from this set, and it absolutely,
positively *STINKS*. Especially
the 18th variation.
Maybe you can help me get a handle
on the general tone of Hough's
stench-raising interpretation. Is
his approach closer to Rachmaninov's
than to Rubinstein's on a dramatic
(<--) versus lyrical (-->) chart?
Neither. It's fast and mechanical.
That would make the playing as musically cynical as the S-S concerti, then?

TD
Dan Koren
2004-10-09 21:05:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Deacon
Post by Dan Koren
Neither. It's fast and mechanical.
That would make the playing as musically
cynical as the S-S concerti, then?
I don't know if I would go as fas as
to use the word "cynical". It does
not sound however that Mr. Hough
gets the music, even though he
does indeed get all the notes.

Personally, being imprinted on
Richter, Rubinstein and Van
Cliburn, I tend not to like
very fast tempi in the Rachy
concerti. However, for those
who like to take their Rachys
on the fast side, there are
plenty of choices to consider
ahead of Mr. Hough, not the
least of which are Earl Wild,
or the composer himself.



dk
M. Bartnik
2004-10-08 12:17:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Springer
"HOUGH" good is it? Anyone in addition to DH hear it and care to comment?
TIA
I also found an article in the New Zealand Herald that talks about the
recording sessions.

M.B.

----------------------

Power-drill trills on the keyboard

15.09.2004 By WILLIAM DART
Stephen Hough has "had a wonderful time in Australia", with reviews
suggesting that audiences enjoyed the pianist's visit as much as he did.

The Sydney Morning Herald's Peter McCallum waxed the deepest shade of purple
after Hough's recital, concluding this was "playing which mesmerised the ear
with rich imaginative worlds and hitherto unknown vistas of colour".

Aucklanders are able to have more than their fair share of the English
pianist over the next week or so, both in person and on disc.

Hough seems genuinely surprised that his new Hyperion CD of Rachmaninov's
works for piano and orchestra is already available in this country.

Recorded with the Dallas Symphony under Andrew Litton, this is Rachmaninov
with a difference. Hough admits that "the fact that it was recorded live
made it unusual enough to consider it for CD. Hyperion is the sort of label
that has to feel that each project has something special about it".

The set was recorded over three weeks in Dallas' superb Eugene McDermott
Concert Hall, "once the orchestra stopped being embarrassed about all the
portamentos, which are in the very blood of the music", adds Hough.

There was some disapproval, too, of the cover image which shows the composer
at the keyboard, complete with cigarette. "They kicked up a big fuss over
that," laughs Hough, "but I like the way that he has a certain Noel Coward
look instead of always looking like a Russian convict."

Hough confesses that he doesn't like recording, "but today when 95 per cent
of the classical music audience listen to recordings, you can't pursue that
stand. I like the fact that recordings catch what I feel about the pieces at
that moment, and I'm glad that those performances didn't just disappear in
the air".

Saint-Saens' Fourth Piano Concerto is on the bill when Hough appears with
the NZSO in Hamilton on Thursday and in Auckland on Friday. He has already
recorded this composer's complete works for piano and orchestra, and is a
fervent enthusiast. Phrases such as "thrilling journey from darkness to
light" and "power-drill trill" pepper his comments.

He points out that Saint-Saens has a virtual monopoly on the French romantic
piano concerto and, noting the composer's sense of humour, warns me that
"there are quite a few outrageous moments. When Pascal Tortelier and I got
to one jaunty theme, he just dropped the score and roared with laughter".

Next Friday, Aucklanders have another opportunity to hear Hough in that most
privileged of settings, "a solo recital" through the auspices of Chamber
Music New Zealand. For Hough this is his paramount activity as a pianist
because "it's the craft of playing. There are thousands of nuances here that
would have no place in the concerto."

"There's a lot of whispering in this programme," Hough confides, "the
Spanish music is full of half lights and mysterious little implications."

The advertising for the concert offers "Spanish sun and Viennese charm"
although they're not presented in that order. "It's really two contrasting
short recitals," explains Hough. "The first has two sonatas: Schubert at his
most serene, almost without a cloud, preceded by the writhing chromaticism
of the Berg."

Despite the intensity of the Berg, Hough assures me that it won't be "too
angst-ridden. It's almost a waltz, and as much from the Vienna of Johann
Strauss as the Vienna of Freud".

The second half of the programme does make it across the Pyrenees, although
Hough is quick to point out that Granados' Valses Poeticas is a tribute to
Schubert. "There's heavy Southern Spanish, the quaint picture-postcard Spain
of Moskowski's Caprice Espagnol and French composers like Debussy who can be
more Spanish than the real thing."
Tom Deacon
2004-10-08 14:38:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Springer
"HOUGH" good is it? Anyone in addition to DH hear it and care to comment?
TIA
SERGEI RACHMANINOV
Piano Concertos Nos. 1-4; Paganini Rhapsody
Stephen Hough (piano)
Dallas Symphony Orchestra
Andrew Litton
Hyperion- CDA67501/2(CD)
Reference Recording - This One; Kocsis (Philips); Rachmaninov (RCA or Naxos)
If the Saint-Saens Concerti are any measure, I would imagine that these will
be on the superficial side. The S-S concerti album took a very disconcerting
attitude towards the music. Hough is no Jeanne Marie Darre, nor an Artur
Rubinstein or Jean Casadesus. He is also no Rachmaninoff, of course. But
that is self-evident.

Fortunately the Dallas Symphony and Andrew Litton are a distinct cut above
the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra under their current MD.

I would imagine that this one will be all swings and roundabouts. But above
all, you can discount the entirety of British views of the project. Chamber
of commerce boosterism traditionally takes over at moments like this. Alas.

TD
Len of MusicWeb
2004-10-17 19:57:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Deacon
I would imagine that this one will be all swings and roundabouts. But above
all, you can discount the entirety of British views of the project. Chamber
of commerce boosterism traditionally takes over at moments like this. Alas.
TD
This is the most extraordinary assertion. How can anyone take your view on
this recording seriously after that? As it happens the MusicWeb.uk.net
reviewer, Kevin Sutton, lives in Texas.
Len Mullenger

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