Discussion:
HOLST: What is favorite recording of "Neptune"?
(too old to reply)
g***@gmail.com
2014-04-10 23:56:35 UTC
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Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Kerrison
2014-04-11 09:01:37 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Interestingly, the score indicates that the female voices at the end are to be divided into Chorus I and Chorus II, with the second choir providing a kind of "echo" effect to the first. I wonder how many recordings have separated them left and right stereophonically? I believe Sargent and the BBCSO did it that way on their 1957 HMV LP, but has anyone else done so since?
g***@gmail.com
2014-04-13 09:14:22 UTC
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Post by Kerrison
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Interestingly, the score indicates that the female voices at the end are to be divided into Chorus I and Chorus II, with the second choir providing a kind of "echo" effect to the first. I wonder how many recordings have separated them left and right stereophonically? I believe Sargent and the BBCSO did it that way on their 1957 HMV LP, but has anyone else done so since?
If you can believe it, Sargent's NEPTUNE was included in a cd entitled CLASSICAL MUSIC FOR STUDYING:

http://www.shazam.com/music/web/album?id=52508804
g***@gmail.com
2014-04-16 05:09:16 UTC
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Post by Kerrison
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Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Interestingly, the score indicates that the female voices at the end are to be divided into Chorus I and Chorus II, with the second choir providing a kind of "echo" effect to the first. I wonder how many recordings have separated them left and right stereophonically? I believe Sargent and the BBCSO did it that way on their 1957 HMV LP, but has anyone else done so since?
On Youtube, aren't the two posting of his recording of NEPTUNE in mono?
Kerrison
2014-04-24 08:58:34 UTC
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Post by Kerrison
Interestingly, the score indicates that the female voices at the end are to be divided into Chorus I and Chorus II, with the second choir providing a kind of "echo" effect to the first. I wonder how many recordings have separated them left and right stereophonically? I believe Sargent and the BBCSO did it that way on their 1957 HMV LP, but has anyone else done so since?
On Youtube, aren't the two posting of his recording of NEPTUNE in mono?
As far as I can discover, it's Sargent's mono Decca 1953 LSO recording that is on You Tube, not his 1957 HMV stereo remake with the BBC Symphony. There was also a live performance from the Royal Albert Hall in 1965, again with the BBC SO, on BBC Radio Classics, but with the choir so distantly placed up in the gallery it's not clear whether Sargent had the two choruses divided or not.
g***@gmail.com
2015-01-01 21:52:32 UTC
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Post by Kerrison
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Post by Kerrison
Interestingly, the score indicates that the female voices at the end are to be divided into Chorus I and Chorus II, with the second choir providing a kind of "echo" effect to the first. I wonder how many recordings have separated them left and right stereophonically? I believe Sargent and the BBCSO did it that way on their 1957 HMV LP, but has anyone else done so since?
On Youtube, aren't the two posting of his recording of NEPTUNE in mono?
As far as I can discover, it's Sargent's mono Decca 1953 LSO recording that is on You Tube, not his 1957 HMV stereo remake with the BBC Symphony. There was also a live performance from the Royal Albert Hall in 1965, again with the BBC SO, on BBC Radio Classics, but with the choir so distantly placed up in the gallery it's not clear whether Sargent had the two choruses divided or not.
Is this the 1957 HMV stereo recording with the BBC Symphony? Does this recently upload Youtube clip sound like stereo?:


dk
2015-01-02 00:45:30 UTC
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Post by Kerrison
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Post by Kerrison
Interestingly, the score indicates that the female voices at
the end are to be divided into Chorus I and Chorus II, with
the second choir providing a kind of "echo" effect to the first.
I wonder how many recordings have separated them left and right
stereophonically? I believe Sargent and the BBCSO did it that
way on their 1957 HMV LP, but has anyone else done so since?
On Youtube, aren't the two posting of his recording of NEPTUNE in mono?
As far as I can discover, it's Sargent's mono Decca 1953 LSO
recording that is on You Tube, not his 1957 HMV stereo remake
with the BBC Symphony. There was also a live performance from
the Royal Albert Hall in 1965, again with the BBC SO, on BBC
Radio Classics, but with the choir so distantly placed up in
the gallery it's not clear whether Sargent had the two choruses
divided or not.
Is this the 1957 HMV stereo recording with the BBC Symphony?
http://youtu.be/tVuB1bAm-6Q
(note: mono recording)

dk
g***@gmail.com
2015-02-04 10:17:39 UTC
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Post by Kerrison
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Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Interestingly, the score indicates that the female voices at the end are to be divided into Chorus I and Chorus II, with the second choir providing a kind of "echo" effect to the first. I wonder how many recordings have separated them left and right stereophonically? I believe Sargent and the BBCSO did it that way on their 1957 HMV LP, but has anyone else done so since?
Is this it? It was posted last week on Youtube:


g***@gmail.com
2015-02-27 00:02:51 UTC
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Post by Kerrison
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Interestingly, the score indicates that the female voices at the end are to be divided into Chorus I and Chorus II, with the second choir providing a kind of "echo" effect to the first. I wonder how many recordings have separated them left and right stereophonically? I believe Sargent and the BBCSO did it that way on their 1957 HMV LP, but has anyone else done so since?
You can listen to Sargent's Neptune w/the BBCSO here. But is it stereo or mono?:

http://darkmp3.ru/album-classical-music-for-studying-8410717.html
g***@gmail.com
2016-09-27 09:30:28 UTC
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Post by Kerrison
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Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Interestingly, the score indicates that the female voices at the end are to be divided into Chorus I and Chorus II, with the second choir providing a kind of "echo" effect to the first. I wonder how many recordings have separated them left and right stereophonically? I believe Sargent and the BBCSO did it that way on their 1957 HMV LP, but has anyone else done so since?
http://darkmp3.ru/album-classical-music-for-studying-8410717.html
g***@gmail.com
2016-09-25 08:19:28 UTC
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Post by Kerrison
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Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Interestingly, the score indicates that the female voices at the end are to be divided into Chorus I and Chorus II, with the second choir providing a kind of "echo" effect to the first. I wonder how many recordings have separated them left and right stereophonically? I believe Sargent and the BBCSO did it that way on their 1957 HMV LP, but has anyone else done so since?
Concerning the recording w/Sargent conducting the BBCSO, I have a question concerning Youtube posts of that.

Some of them identify the chorus as the "bbc symphony chorus" while others identify the chorus as "bbc women's chorus".

Are we talking about 2 different recordings with the same orchestra but different choruses?
g***@gmail.com
2016-09-25 08:43:35 UTC
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Post by Kerrison
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Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Interestingly, the score indicates that the female voices at the end are to be divided into Chorus I and Chorus II, with the second choir providing a kind of "echo" effect to the first. I wonder how many recordings have separated them left and right stereophonically? I believe Sargent and the BBCSO did it that way on their 1957 HMV LP, but has anyone else done so since?
That echo effect can also be heard on Boult's 1960's recording with the New Philharmonia.
g***@gmail.com
2016-11-07 09:25:31 UTC
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Post by Kerrison
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Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Interestingly, the score indicates that the female voices at the end are to be divided into Chorus I and Chorus II, with the second choir providing a kind of "echo" effect to the first. I wonder how many recordings have separated them left and right stereophonically? I believe Sargent and the BBCSO did it that way on their 1957 HMV LP, but has anyone else done so since?
According to this review:

- In ‘Neptune’ no-one has quite achieved that other-worldly quality that Sargent evinces from his wordless chorus.

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2014/Jul14/Sargent_icon_2564634121.htm
g***@gmail.com
2017-12-26 08:32:44 UTC
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Post by Kerrison
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Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Interestingly, the score indicates that the female voices at the end are to be divided into Chorus I and Chorus II, with the second choir providing a kind of "echo" effect to the first. I wonder how many recordings have separated them left and right stereophonically? I believe Sargent and the BBCSO did it that way on their 1957 HMV LP, but has anyone else done so since?
- In ‘Neptune’ no-one has quite achieved that other-worldly quality that Sargent evinces from his wordless chorus.
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2014/Jul14/Sargent_icon_2564634121.htm
If there is a stereo Neptune on Youtube from Sargent's studio recording, please let me know. They all seem to be mono.
Charles Milton Ling
2014-04-11 09:18:08 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
I like Steinberg very much (perhaps more than I like "The Planets" per se).
--
Charles Milton Ling
Vienna, Austria
Gpg4win encryption available
g***@gmail.com
2014-04-15 09:13:40 UTC
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Post by Charles Milton Ling
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Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
I like Steinberg very much (perhaps more than I like "The Planets" per se).
--
Charles Milton Ling
Vienna, Austria
Gpg4win encryption available
The following review of Steinberg's recording may be of interest:

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2012/May12/Strauss_Holst_UNI016.htm
g***@gmail.com
2014-04-15 18:33:03 UTC
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Post by Charles Milton Ling
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Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
I like Steinberg very much (perhaps more than I like "The Planets" per se).
--
Charles Milton Ling
Vienna, Austria
Gpg4win encryption available
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2012/May12/Strauss_Holst_UNI016.htm
It says:

- ...The strange sonorities of Neptune. Once again the level of detail in this 40-year-old recording is astonishing making this otherworldly music as haunting as one could wish. Unusually the wordless choir - normally so genteel - conjures up images of keening winds in that distant, frigid place.
g***@gmail.com
2014-06-22 09:18:48 UTC
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Post by Charles Milton Ling
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Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
I like Steinberg very much (perhaps more than I like "The Planets" per se).
The following review of Steinberg's recording may be of interest:

- Indeed, if there's one recording that delivers all the complexity--and skill--of Holst's great score it must be this one. As good as he is, none of Boult's celebrated versions offers this level of insight or involvement...the strange sonorities of Neptune. Once again the level of detail in this 40-year-old recording is astonishing making this otherworldly music as haunting as one could wish. Unusually the wordless choir - normally so genteel - conjures up images of keening winds in that distant, frigid place.

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2012/May12/Strauss_Holst_UNI016.htm
g***@gmail.com
2014-04-13 19:42:25 UTC
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Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
The following has been said about NEPTUNE:

- ...[Holst] finishes with the mystic Neptune, where the music hints at a realm beyond form and melody -- the dark world of "uncreated reality".

http://vidoz.com.ua/video/_l8LTDs1Hh5.html
g***@gmail.com
2014-04-13 19:49:01 UTC
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Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
- ...[Holst] finishes with the mystic Neptune, where the music hints at a realm beyond form and melody -- the dark world of "uncreated reality".
http://vidoz.com.ua/video/_l8LTDs1Hh5.html
In 2011, someone here said:

- My most recent concert experience
(Mackerras at the 2009 Proms, and at the top of the gallery too) was
overwhelming. There was a quietude throughout that huge hall at the end
of Neptune which was intensely moving. I don't suppose my friends and I
were alone in feeling that we'd just experienced something communally
unforgettable: something to do with a sense of place in the cosmos ....
something to do with how to live life in the knowledge of our own
transience ... hard to put into words, but very deep.
whiskynsplash
2014-04-14 01:37:59 UTC
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Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
- ...[Holst] finishes with the mystic Neptune, where the music hints at a realm beyond form and melody -- the dark world of "uncreated reality".
http://vidoz.com.ua/video/_l8LTDs1Hh5.html
- My most recent concert experience
(Mackerras at the 2009 Proms, and at the top of the gallery too) was
overwhelming. There was a quietude throughout that huge hall at the end
of Neptune which was intensely moving. I don't suppose my friends and I
were alone in feeling that we'd just experienced something communally
unforgettable: something to do with a sense of place in the cosmos ....
something to do with how to live life in the knowledge of our own
transience ... hard to put into words, but very deep.
The BBC schedules The Planets practically every year at the Proms. I was not at the 2009 performance, but I do remember a hushed silence in that enormous hall after Neptune either in 2008 or 2010. I believe it is because they put the womens chorus offstage and rather high up and they may have even separated the chorus into Chorus I and Chorus II offstage on either side of the stage as is called for in the score.

It's an effect that must be heard live and simply cannot be reproduced on a recording no matter how good the equipment. Another remarkable aural experience was 2013's Parsifal where they essentially treated the domed Albert Hall as the Grail Temple and placed the childrens chorus high up in the Gallery. I think old Wagner, who once conducted in the hall, would have been pleased. All it needed was for one of London's fat pigeons (flying rats) to be dropped in from a skylight to stand in for the dove.
Kerrison
2014-04-14 07:01:13 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
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Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
- ...[Holst] finishes with the mystic Neptune, where the music hints at a realm beyond form and melody -- the dark world of "uncreated reality".
http://vidoz.com.ua/video/_l8LTDs1Hh5.html
- My most recent concert experience
(Mackerras at the 2009 Proms, and at the top of the gallery too) was
overwhelming. There was a quietude throughout that huge hall at the end
of Neptune which was intensely moving. I don't suppose my friends and I
were alone in feeling that we'd just experienced something communally
unforgettable: something to do with a sense of place in the cosmos ....
something to do with how to live life in the knowledge of our own
transience ... hard to put into words, but very deep.
And as with so much else these days, Mackerras's performance can be readily seen on You Tube ...


Kerrison
2014-04-14 07:34:32 UTC
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Whilst on You Tube, I heartily recommend a viewing of a Russian performance conducted by Valeriy Platonov. There's a hilarious comment under the video, where someone says he "can't imagine how long it took to get all of Tomita's music onto sheets ... even though its kinda missing the beauty of the two aliens talking with each other." Surely he can't be serious in thinking this is an orchestral arrangement of a synthesiser recording?! ...


g***@gmail.com
2015-06-02 07:20:03 UTC
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Post by Kerrison
Post by g***@gmail.com
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Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
- ...[Holst] finishes with the mystic Neptune, where the music hints at a realm beyond form and melody -- the dark world of "uncreated reality".
http://vidoz.com.ua/video/_l8LTDs1Hh5.html
- My most recent concert experience
(Mackerras at the 2009 Proms, and at the top of the gallery too) was
overwhelming. There was a quietude throughout that huge hall at the end
of Neptune which was intensely moving. I don't suppose my friends and I
were alone in feeling that we'd just experienced something communally
unforgettable: something to do with a sense of place in the cosmos ....
something to do with how to live life in the knowledge of our own
transience ... hard to put into words, but very deep.
And as with so much else these days, Mackerras's performance can be readily seen on You Tube ...
http://youtu.be/ZQQGi4gN6gI
Mackerras' studio recording of Neptune is also on Youtube. It's been viewed close to 220,000 times and has almost 300 comments.
Randy Lane
2014-04-15 15:36:02 UTC
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Credit for the Dutoit Planets, as well as the equally praised Ravel orchestral cycle, should probably all go to the Decca recordng team and not the conductor. Dutoit will always be Dutoit. Some good stuff (I like some of his Berlioz), but most of the time smoothed over to sound nice but not very provacative or masterful.
g***@gmail.com
2014-04-13 19:43:07 UTC
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Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Considering that Dutoit's recording received 36 5-star reviews at Amazon, is it really THAT good?
Randy Lane
2014-04-16 00:43:33 UTC
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Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Previn/EMI (oh for an affordable quad SACD!)

Thought today about some conductors I don't think recorded The Planets but might have left us very good renditions had they done so. Perhaps they exist somewhere in a broadcast archive.

Silvestri
Barbiroli
Berglund
g***@gmail.com
2015-11-10 11:35:08 UTC
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Post by Randy Lane
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Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Previn/EMI (oh for an affordable quad SACD!)
Previn's LSO recording became available on Youtube last month.

I found the NEPTUNE to be unremarkable.
g***@gmail.com
2014-04-24 03:48:45 UTC
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Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Concerning Mehta's recording with the L.A. Philharmonic, I found the tempi too fast--almost rushed--especially at the beginning.
Terry
2014-04-24 15:41:55 UTC
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Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Concerning Mehta's recording with the L.A. Philharmonic, I found the tempi
too fast--almost rushed--especially at the beginning.
Whilst at present the only recording I have is that by Dutoit and the
Montrealers, I have very pleasant memories of HvK and the VPO on Decca.
I must see if that recording has made its way onto CD.
Gerard
2014-04-24 17:12:08 UTC
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"Terry" wrote in message news:250420140141556870%***@tpgi.com.au...

I have very pleasant memories of HvK and the VPO on Decca.
I must see if that recording has made its way onto CD.

===================

A few times.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Holst-Planets-Wiener-Philharmoniker/dp/B000KQGOA4/

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Planets-Vienna-Philharmonic-Orchestra/dp/B009IK4U9U/

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Holst-Planets-op-32-Karajan/dp/B00000E3BF/

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Planets-Vpo-Karajan-Gustav-Holst/dp/B0000042EN/

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Karajan-Great-Decca-Recordings-1959-1963/dp/B000025WIP/

On SACD:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/HOLST-PLANET-SACD-SHM-ltd/dp/B006GHC25M/
Terry
2014-04-25 08:05:33 UTC
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Post by Terry
I have very pleasant memories of HvK and the VPO on Decca.
I must see if that recording has made its way onto CD.
===================
A few times.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Holst-Planets-Wiener-Philharmoniker/dp/B000KQGOA4/
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Planets-Vienna-Philharmonic-Orchestra/dp/B009IK4U9U/
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Holst-Planets-op-32-Karajan/dp/B00000E3BF/
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Planets-Vpo-Karajan-Gustav-Holst/dp/B0000042EN/
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Karajan-Great-Decca-Recordings-1959-1963/dp/B000025WIP
/
http://www.amazon.co.uk/HOLST-PLANET-SACD-SHM-ltd/dp/B006GHC25M/
That's good! The SACD is tempting, as I just bought a SACD-capable
player a couple of weeks ago.
g***@gmail.com
2014-05-25 07:59:57 UTC
Permalink
In article <>,
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Concerning Mehta's recording with the L.A. Philharmonic, I found the tempi
too fast--almost rushed--especially at the beginning.
Whilst at present the only recording I have is that by Dutoit and the
Montrealers, I have very pleasant memories of HvK and the VPO on Decca.
I must see if that recording has made its way onto CD.
Concerning the HvK and the VPO on Decca, CLASSICA TODAY loved that recording:

http://www.classicstoday.com/review/radar-karajans-stellar-vienna-planets/
g***@gmail.com
2014-06-23 10:45:11 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
In article <>,
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Concerning Mehta's recording with the L.A. Philharmonic, I found the tempi
too fast--almost rushed--especially at the beginning.
Whilst at present the only recording I have is that by Dutoit and the
Montrealers, I have very pleasant memories of HvK and the VPO on Decca.
I must see if that recording has made its way onto CD.
http://www.classicstoday.com/review/radar-karajans-stellar-vienna-planets/
With regard to his later BPO recording, an Amazon customer said:

- In Neptune, Karajan finds pure, searching mystery that is simply more unreal than Rattle.
g***@gmail.com
2014-08-11 09:36:50 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by g***@gmail.com
In article <>,
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Concerning Mehta's recording with the L.A. Philharmonic, I found the tempi
too fast--almost rushed--especially at the beginning.
Whilst at present the only recording I have is that by Dutoit and the
Montrealers, I have very pleasant memories of HvK and the VPO on Decca.
I must see if that recording has made its way onto CD.
http://www.classicstoday.com/review/radar-karajans-stellar-vienna-planets/
- In Neptune, Karajan finds pure, searching mystery that is simply more unreal than Rattle.
Concerning Rattle's recording, an Amazon customer said:

- I've never heard a Neptune that leaves me so stunned as this one. The female voices from the Rundfunkchor Berlin leave me feeling like I've left this world. EMI might get some of the credit, but the female voices sound so entirely "out there" that it's hard to fathom the fact that this was actually recorded by regular people. I'm left wanting to cry, it's so unbearably touching.
g***@gmail.com
2016-09-04 09:22:00 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by g***@gmail.com
In article <>,
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Concerning Mehta's recording with the L.A. Philharmonic, I found the tempi
too fast--almost rushed--especially at the beginning.
Whilst at present the only recording I have is that by Dutoit and the
Montrealers, I have very pleasant memories of HvK and the VPO on Decca.
I must see if that recording has made its way onto CD.
http://www.classicstoday.com/review/radar-karajans-stellar-vienna-planets/
- In Neptune, Karajan finds pure, searching mystery that is simply more unreal than Rattle.
- I've never heard a Neptune that leaves me so stunned as this one. The female voices from the Rundfunkchor Berlin leave me feeling like I've left this world. EMI might get some of the credit, but the female voices sound so entirely "out there" that it's hard to fathom the fact that this was actually recorded by regular people. I'm left wanting to cry, it's so unbearably touching.
According to this review of Rattle's recording:

- The ''Neptune'' singers are ideally balanced and the recording gives a real sense of remoteness throughout this movement.

http://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/holst-the-planets-9
g***@gmail.com
2014-06-24 08:37:11 UTC
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In article <>,
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Concerning Mehta's recording with the L.A. Philharmonic, I found the tempi
too fast--almost rushed--especially at the beginning.
Whilst at present the only recording I have is that by Dutoit and the
Montrealers, I have very pleasant memories of HvK and the VPO on Decca.
I must see if that recording has made its way onto CD.
According to this review:

- ..."Neptune" has carefully calculated gradations of dynamics but altogether lacks any sense of blissful departure into infinite space.

http://www.allmusic.com/album/holst-the-planets-mw0001853935
g***@gmail.com
2014-05-01 10:00:10 UTC
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Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Concerning Bernstein's NEPTUNE, an Amazon customer said:

- Dark and mysterious as is the blue gas planet at the edge of the solar system, its ominous lower chords are lifted by a wordless chorus halfway through and ends with the voices getting fainter and fainter until you cannot distinguish the sound you're hearing from your own imagination.
g***@gmail.com
2014-12-31 09:18:37 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
- Dark and mysterious as is the blue gas planet at the edge of the solar system, its ominous lower chords are lifted by a wordless chorus halfway through and ends with the voices getting fainter and fainter until you cannot distinguish the sound you're hearing from your own imagination.
Bernstein's NEPTUNE is on Youtube and has generated over 100 comments.
g***@gmail.com
2014-05-01 10:13:08 UTC
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Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Concerning Sir Charles Groves' NEPTUNE, an Amazon customer said:

- And Neptune is just gorgeous. It is the sound of quiet rapture, rather than infinite space. The choir sounds suitably disembodied and ethereal.
g***@gmail.com
2014-05-01 10:32:37 UTC
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Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Concerning Yoel Levi's NEPTUNE, an Amazon customer said:

- Neptune, the Mystic, a musical painting of the infinite. Here, as in all the planets on this recording allows the listener to get inside the music. Turn this movement up in volume, the darkness and mystery is tangible, but yet again, even here, a sense of urgency, perhaps the urgency of the unanswered question of time and space as the wordless female chorus fades into the nothingness of silence.
g***@gmail.com
2014-05-02 00:33:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Concerning Stokowski's 1956 stereo recording, someone at Youtube said:

- I don't know of a lovelier "Neptune." Stokowski insisted that ten seconds of silence be added before the needle ran into the end groove. The sound is warmly analog.
g***@gmail.com
2014-08-11 10:07:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
- I don't know of a lovelier "Neptune." Stokowski insisted that ten seconds of silence be added before the needle ran into the end groove. The sound is warmly analog.
An Amazon customer said:

- Neptune may be the loveliest, most ethereal version of all, with vague premonitions of minimalism Stokowski seems to sense (& Holst toyed with in several other compositions); the ending takes us out of the world of myth & the gods & leaves us in the silence of outer space. Not the best Planets all around (maybe the best Neptune)...
g***@gmail.com
2014-05-23 04:45:06 UTC
Permalink
Is the conclusion of NEPTUNE a rare classical music example of a repetitive fade-out?
Ray Hall
2014-05-23 06:14:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
Is the conclusion of NEPTUNE a rare classical music example of a repetitive fade-out?
There are other examples, two of which spring to mind, namely
Tchaikovsky's 6th, and Mahler's Das Lied von der Erde. I am sure there
are others too .... Shosty's 15th ebbs away with the ticking of a clock.

Ray Hall, Taree
John Wiser
2014-05-23 12:00:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ray Hall
Post by g***@gmail.com
Is the conclusion of NEPTUNE a rare classical music example of a repetitive fade-out?
There are other examples, two of which spring to mind, namely
Tchaikovsky's 6th, and Mahler's Das Lied von der Erde. I am sure there
are others too .... Shosty's 15th ebbs away with the ticking of a clock.
Several of Vaughan Williams's, notably the Pastoral Symphony.
and the otherwise so very different 6th. Schulhoff's 1st String Quartet,
after being quite rowdy.

jdw
d***@att.net
2014-05-31 21:50:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Holst, 1923 (acoustic) and 1925 (electric).
Mark Obert-Thorn
2014-06-01 13:24:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by d***@att.net
Holst, 1923 (acoustic) and 1925 (electric).
Both just reissued together, here, along with the rest of Holst's recordings:

http://www.cherryred.co.uk/shopexd.asp?id=4593

Mark O-T
Mark Zimmer
2014-06-04 16:51:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark Obert-Thorn
Post by d***@att.net
Holst, 1923 (acoustic) and 1925 (electric).
http://www.cherryred.co.uk/shopexd.asp?id=4593
Mark O-T
Thanks for the tip! Order placed.
g***@gmail.com
2014-06-03 20:31:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by d***@att.net
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Holst, 1923 (acoustic) and 1925 (electric).
There is something on Youtube that says that its a 1926 Holst recording of Neptune.
Sacqueboutier
2014-06-01 10:40:30 UTC
Permalink
Regardless of what one may of Dutoit as an interpreter (or noninterpreter), his Planets is a complete success. The Decca team may be responsible, but the results are the same. This isn't terribly deep music, but the character and colors are truly spectacular. That said, it's pretty hard to misinterpret as long as you have a great orchestra sitting in front of you. Combination of great orchestra, near perfect recording venue, best recording team in the digital age, and a conductor willing to stay out of the way yields a recording of this work that I turn to more often than any other.

Steinberg was my second recording of the piece, back in the day. One of the all time greatest LP covers. You should get the L p just for that. Again, great orchestra, venue, recording team, and a conductor who kept things moving at an unforced natural pace. Great recording. If I were to live with only two, these two would probably take to to honors.

That said, I also like the final Boult recording.
Willem Orange
2014-06-01 13:23:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sacqueboutier
Regardless of what one may of Dutoit as an interpreter (or noninterpreter), his Planets is a complete success. The Decca team may be responsible, but the results are the same. This isn't terribly deep music, but the character and colors are truly spectacular. That said, it's pretty hard to misinterpret as long as you have a great orchestra sitting in front of you. Combination of great orchestra, near perfect recording venue, best recording team in the digital age, and a conductor willing to stay out of the way yields a recording of this work that I turn to more often than any other.
Steinberg was my second recording of the piece, back in the day. One of the all time greatest LP covers. You should get the L p just for that. Again, great orchestra, venue, recording team, and a conductor who kept things moving at an unforced natural pace. Great recording. If I were to live with only two, these two would probably take to to honors.
That said, I also like the final Boult recording.
Just ordered the Steinberg on DG originals = right it is a great cover!!!!
g***@gmail.com
2014-06-03 20:30:37 UTC
Permalink
Regardless of what one may of Dutoit as an interpreter (or noninterpreter), his Planets is a complete success. The Decca team may be responsible, but the results are the same. This isn't terribly deep music, but the character and colors are truly spectacular. That said, it's pretty hard to misinterpret as long as you have a great orchestra sitting in front of you. Combination of great orchestra, near perfect recording venue, best recording team in the digital age, and a conductor willing to stay out of the way yields a recording of this work that I turn to more often than any other...
There is something on Youtube that says that its a live 2009 Dresden Dutoit performance of "The Planets".
g***@gmail.com
2014-06-05 23:30:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sacqueboutier
Regardless of what one may of Dutoit as an interpreter (or noninterpreter), his Planets is a complete success. The Decca team may be responsible, but the results are the same. This isn't terribly deep music, but the character and colors are truly spectacular. That said, it's pretty hard to misinterpret as long as you have a great orchestra sitting in front of you. Combination of great orchestra, near perfect recording venue, best recording team in the digital age, and a conductor willing to stay out of the way yields a recording of this work that I turn to more often than any other.
Concerning Dutoit's NEPTUNE, it reminded me of his recording of DAPHNIS...-- sonically, it was too languid and too luxurious and musically I felt that the performance was not terribly inspired.
Gerald Martin
2014-06-01 17:15:02 UTC
Permalink
Andrew Davis/Toronto on EMI uses a children's chorus.
g***@gmail.com
2016-09-25 08:53:56 UTC
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Post by Gerald Martin
Andrew Davis/Toronto on EMI uses a children's chorus.
According to the following, so does Maazel's recording:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Planets_discography
g***@gmail.com
2014-08-22 08:41:59 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
At 9'31" (according to Youtube), isn't Stokowski's live 1943 performance the longest Neptune on record?
Joe Morris
2014-09-29 05:27:07 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
At 9'31" (according to Youtube), isn't Stokowski's live 1943 performance the longest Neptune on record?
I'm excited by Bell's Neptune that should be released next summer
http://bellsbeer.com/planets/neptune/

We got to try their Mars recently and it was very tasty!
--
Joe Morris Atlanta history blog
***@gmail.com http://atlhistory.com
g***@gmail.com
2014-09-18 09:08:45 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Comments from GRAMOPHONE above various recordings:

http://www.gramophone.co.uk/forum/recordings/historic-planets
Matthew B. Tepper
2014-09-18 19:39:39 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
http://www.gramophone.co.uk/forum/recordings/historic-planets
Speaking of historical "Planets" recordings, has anybody here heard this yet?

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00IOAY1VW/

The obvious question would be about the quality of the transfers.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers.
Mark Obert-Thorn
2014-09-18 20:23:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Speaking of historical "Planets" recordings, has anybody here heard this yet?
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00IOAY1VW/
The obvious question would be about the quality of the transfers.
Well, FWIW, they were done by me. Capstan was used to steady the notoriously wandering pitch of the 1926 early electrical "Planets" and its filler for the first time, as an additional bonus. (The acoustics didn't need it.)

Mark Obert-Thorn
Matthew B. Tepper
2014-09-19 19:52:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark Obert-Thorn
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Speaking of historical "Planets" recordings, has anybody here heard this yet?
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00IOAY1VW/
The obvious question would be about the quality of the transfers.
Well, FWIW, they were done by me. Capstan was used to steady the
notoriously wandering pitch of the 1926 early electrical "Planets" and
its filler for the first time, as an additional bonus. (The acoustics
didn't need it.)
Mark Obert-Thorn
In that case, I'm buying it!

Do you think Capstan could do anything for the wibbly-wobbly timey-wimey 1935
Metropolitan Opera "Don Giovanni" excerpts with Ponselle, Pinza, and Schipa?
The sound makes the Salzburg Selenophones sound like FFRR in comparison, but
fixing those horrid pitch problems would help somewhat.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers.
Mark Obert-Thorn
2014-09-20 02:32:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Do you think Capstan could do anything for the wibbly-wobbly timey-wimey 1935
Metropolitan Opera "Don Giovanni" excerpts with Ponselle, Pinza, and Schipa?
The sound makes the Salzburg Selenophones sound like FFRR in comparison, but
fixing those horrid pitch problems would help somewhat.
Maybe ... Sony used it on the 1935 Ponselle "Traviata" in their "Verdi at the Met" set.

Mark O-T
g***@gmail.com
2014-09-20 08:47:50 UTC
Permalink
Am I the only one who feels that NEPTUNE would be perfect for a future edition of FANTASIA?
g***@gmail.com
2014-09-20 11:45:33 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Concerning Boult's 1966 recording with the New Philharmonia, is this the only cd reissue of that?:

Loading Image...
Kerrison
2014-09-24 08:29:49 UTC
Permalink
The BBC Radio 3's "CD Review" will have a critic on hand next Saturday morning to tell you which is the best recording of "The Planets," so now is your chance to say what you think his No. 1 choice should be ...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b04jj37s

Incidentally, is this Wiki "Planets" Discography complete and up-to-date? ...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Planets_discography
g***@gmail.com
2014-09-24 09:05:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kerrison
The BBC Radio 3's "CD Review" will have a critic on hand next Saturday morning to tell you which is the best recording of "The Planets," so now is your chance to say what you think his No. 1 choice should be ...
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b04jj37s
Thanks a lot.

Is that something I have to listen to at that exact time, or will it be posted such that it can be listened to later?
Kerrison
2014-09-24 12:34:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by Kerrison
The BBC Radio 3's "CD Review" will have a critic on hand next Saturday morning to tell you which is the best recording of "The Planets," so now is your chance to say what you think his No. 1 choice should be ...
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b04jj37s
Thanks a lot.
Is that something I have to listen to at that exact time, or will it be posted such that it can be listened to later?
Yes, they have a "Listen Again" page where the broadcast is uploaded not long after its transmission and can be heard worldwide. Here, for example, under "On demand" is last Saturday's broadcast which you can hear by clicking the purple 'player' icon ...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b006tmtz
g***@gmail.com
2014-09-25 12:37:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51bUc%2BFIQ3L._SL500_AA280_.jpg
Here is a review of that cd:

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/march99/holst.htm
g***@gmail.com
2014-09-25 09:20:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Listening to NEPTUNE, am I the only one who is reminded of some of the movements of Beethoven's late string quartets which may also have been marked "sempre piannissimo"?
Herman
2014-09-25 12:52:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Listening to NEPTUNE, am I the only one who is reminded of some of the movements of Beethoven's late string quartets which may also have been marked "sempre piannissimo"?
Beethoven's Quartets were not marked thus.

Plus, only a day ago you said you were reminded of "Fantasia".

Maybe Neptune reminds you of everything you know.
g***@gmail.com
2014-09-26 08:56:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Herman
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Listening to NEPTUNE, am I the only one who is reminded of some of the movements of Beethoven's late string quartets which may also have been marked "sempre piannissimo"?
Beethoven's Quartets were not marked thus.
Plus, only a day ago you said you were reminded of "Fantasia".
Maybe Neptune reminds you of everything you know.
- There is as much difference between us and ourselves as between us and others.

Michel de Montaigne
Kerrison
2014-09-27 09:20:32 UTC
Permalink
The BBC reviewer went for Paavo Jarvi / Cincinnati on Telarc as his top choice.
Alan Dawes
2014-09-27 11:12:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kerrison
The BBC reviewer went for Paavo Jarvi / Cincinnati on Telarc as his top choice.
I did enjoy Own Morris' review, it was "a real hoot". He must have had
great fun putting it together.

Alan
--
***@argonet.co.uk
***@riscos.org
Using an Acorn RiscPC
Christopher Webber
2014-09-27 12:04:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alan Dawes
I did enjoy Own Morris' review, it was "a real hoot". He must have had
great fun putting it together.
David Owen Norris can be too quirky for some, but his acute ear for
small details (such as spotting that telling, uncorrected wrong violin
note in Karajan's sloppy 'Venus') makes for excellent fun, just as you say.
g***@gmail.com
2015-01-26 09:05:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kerrison
The BBC reviewer went for Paavo Jarvi / Cincinnati on Telarc as his top choice.
Here is a review of Jarvi's recording:

http://www.classical.net/music/recs/reviews/t/tlc80743a.php
g***@gmail.com
2014-11-05 09:51:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Herman
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Listening to NEPTUNE, am I the only one who is reminded of some of the movements of Beethoven's late string quartets which may also have been marked "sempre piannissimo"?
Beethoven's Quartets were not marked thus.
Plus, only a day ago you said you were reminded of "Fantasia".
Maybe Neptune reminds you of everything you know.
Concerning my comment about how some of the movements of Beethoven's late string quartets reminded me of Neptune, this is what I meant (recent article):

- Part of [Beethoven's] gift was the raptus, that ability to withdraw into an inner world that took him beyond everything and everybody around him... Especially in the works of his final period, Beethoven achieved a profound depth in music that is possessed of an otherworldly, cosmic beauty. The sense of expanded time and space conveyed in the final piano sonata or the slow movements of the late quartets...The illusion of the limitless in art...

http://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/books/beethoven-solitude-was-composers-freedom--and-his-only-only-peace/2014/08/06/93c533d4-0cde-11e4-b8e5-d0de80767fc2_story.html
g***@gmail.com
2014-11-05 10:13:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Herman
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Listening to NEPTUNE, am I the only one who is reminded of some of the movements of Beethoven's late string quartets which may also have been marked "sempre piannissimo"?
Beethoven's Quartets were not marked thus.
Plus, only a day ago you said you were reminded of "Fantasia".
Maybe Neptune reminds you of everything you know.
When listening to Neptune, am I the only one who feels (from a recent article on Beethoven):

- ...Withdraw[n] into an inner world...beyond everything and everybody around [me]...A profound depth in music that is possessed of an otherworldly, cosmic beauty. The sense of expanded time and space conveyed in the final piano sonata or the slow movements of the late quartets...The illusion of the limitless in art...

http://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/books/beethoven-solitude-was-composers-freedom--and-his-only-only-peace/2014/08/06/93c533d4-0cde-11e4-b8e5-d0de80767fc2_story.html
g***@gmail.com
2014-12-31 09:16:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Did you know that Holst used an organ to compose Neptune?:

- When composing The Planets Holst initially scored the work for piano duet, except for "Neptune", which was scored for a single organ, as Holst believed that the sound of the piano was too percussive for a world as mysterious and distant as Neptune.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Planets
William Sommerwerck
2014-12-31 11:36:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
Did you know that Holst used an organ to compose Neptune?
Two, in fact... His thumb and forefinger.

ba DUM
g***@gmail.com
2015-01-01 21:17:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Recently uploaded NEPTUNEs on Youtube:

- Karajan's VPO (which has been hailed as better than his later BPO recording),

- Mehta's 1st(?) recording,

- Jarvi's recording which BBC proclaimed as the best,

- Stokowski's late fifties studio recording which at 6:43 is among of the fastest.
g***@gmail.com
2015-02-23 10:48:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
- Karajan's VPO (which has been hailed as better than his later BPO recording),
- Mehta's 1st(?) recording,
- Jarvi's recording which BBC proclaimed as the best,
- Stokowski's late fifties studio recording which at 6:43 is among of the fastest.
Review of Mehta's recording:

http://audaud.com/2013/08/holst-the-planets-the-los-angeles-philharmonic-orch-zubin-mehta-london-1971original-recordings-group-45rpm-vinyl-2-discs/
g***@gmail.com
2015-01-02 05:18:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Can anyone identify the conductor of this?:


dk
2015-01-03 07:05:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
http://youtu.be/AkLzTfu7QD0
Mission Control in Houston conducting the NASA.

dk
g***@gmail.com
2015-01-23 11:08:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Solti's Neptune was recently uploaded on Youtube.
g***@gmail.com
2015-01-23 12:08:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Solti's Neptune was recently uploaded on Youtube.
As well as Davis' and Rattle's.
g***@gmail.com
2015-02-03 09:34:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Solti's Neptune was recently uploaded on Youtube.
Recently uploaded on Youtube:

- Rattle's recording w/the Berlin Philharmonic,

- Stokowski's 1950's studio recording with the LA Philharmonic.
g***@gmail.com
2015-01-26 09:02:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
According to this review of Oudjian's recording:

- Neptune is just splendid, running like water on oil, and capturing that mystical mood that the piece needs. The beautifully polished orchestral playing, coupled with the conductor's refusal to drag, make this the most memorable movement of all. Oh yes, and the wordless chorus is exceptionally done, perfectly matched with Oudjian's vision.

http://www.classical.net/music/recs/reviews/t/tso00005a.php
g***@gmail.com
2015-01-27 21:27:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Upcoming radio program on Holst:

http://tpr.org/post/hubble-space-telescope-skies-beyond-holsts-planets
g***@gmail.com
2015-04-29 22:24:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
When listening to Neptune, does something like this come to mind?:

Loading Image...

http://www.la.com/ci_27783154/new-west-symphony-presents-planets-accompanied-by-artwork
g***@gmail.com
2015-05-24 08:06:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Concerning Colin Davis' studio recording, I just listened to it on Youtube where it was uploaded earlier this year.

It doesn't sound rushed or brisk even though it comes in at 6:46 which is on the fast side for this movement.

Davis is very restrained and I agree with the Amazon customer who said:

- "Neptune"...is a miracle of delicacy, and the offstage women's chorus quite ethereal, impeccable in fact.
g***@gmail.com
2015-06-18 09:03:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
The following on Youtube may be of interest:

- Listening Guide: Holst's The Planets - Neptune, the Mystic
g***@gmail.com
2015-08-01 12:06:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Has anyone heard Ozawa's NEPTUNE?

This recent list ranks his PLANETS recording near the top:

https://petersplanets.wordpress.com/
g***@gmail.com
2016-09-04 09:24:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Has anyone heard Ozawa's NEPTUNE?
https://petersplanets.wordpress.com/
According to this review:

- My chief complaint with this CD is not the interpretation—it is stimulating to encounter a fresh mind at work on the music—but the consistent tendency towards playing that is too loud. Nowhere is this more obvious, of course, than in ''Neptune''. Ozawa (or perhaps the engineers are to blame) never achieves a real pp. The women's voices are too numerous as well as too strong—their first entry is treated as a crescendo, and there is no suggestion of mystical remoteness about them at any point.

http://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/holst-the-planets-9
g***@gmail.com
2016-01-14 09:39:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Richard Hickox's recording of Neptune has over 300,000 hits on Youtube and over 300 comments.
g***@gmail.com
2017-12-27 19:22:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
According to the following:

- [The quiet opening of Neptune] is the intense concentration of a prolonged gaze into infinity.

https://books.google.com/books?id=hGQJAQAAMAAJ&q=%22the+intense+concentration+of+a+prolonged+gaze+into+infinity.%22&dq=%22the+intense+concentration+of+a+prolonged+gaze+into+infinity.%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiFt_Ou9KrYAhUpxlQKHQ2nC_4Q6AEIKTAA
O
2017-12-27 19:53:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
- [The quiet opening of Neptune] is the intense concentration of a prolonged
gaze into infinity.
https://books.google.com/books?id=hGQJAQAAMAAJ&q=%22the+intense+concentration+
of+a+prolonged+gaze+into+infinity.%22&dq=%22the+intense+concentration+of+a+pro
longed+gaze+into+infinity.%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiFt_Ou9KrYAhUpxlQKHQ2nC_4Q6AEIKTAA
How silly. Brings to mind Beecham's yaks or Disney's hippos. I was
gazing into infinity just the other night, then the neighbors closed
the drapes.

To me, it is just 'Allegro con brio.'

-Owen
g***@gmail.com
2018-09-05 00:34:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
- [The quiet opening of Neptune] is the intense concentration of a prolonged
gaze into infinity.
https://books.google.com/books?id=hGQJAQAAMAAJ&q=%22prolonged+gaze+into+infinity%22&dq=%22prolonged+gaze+into+infinity%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi3yeHRzqLdAhXLjFQKHaw2BYYQ6AEILzAB
g***@gmail.com
2018-09-05 00:36:14 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
- [The quiet opening of Neptune] is the intense concentration of a prolonged
gaze into infinity.
https://books.google.com/books?id=hGQJAQAAMAAJ&q=%22prolonged+gaze+into+infinity%22&dq=%22prolonged+gaze+into+infinity%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi3yeHRzqLdAhXLjFQKHaw2BYYQ6AEILzAB
If you want "...a sense of gazing into the infinite universe":

http://www.classical-music.com/article/best-recordings-holsts-planets
g***@gmail.com
2018-09-20 02:07:07 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
Steinberg? Dutoit? Gibson?
Concerning Susskind's recording:

- The light, delicate suggestion of a female choir that ends the final section, Neptune, the Mystic, reveals the ability of this recording to capture the smallest, faintest sonic details.

https://www.stereophile.com/content/2005-records-die-page-4#foeizmBqHCwAip4F.99
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