Discussion:
Recommend me some Chopin recordings please.
(too old to reply)
h***@btinternet.com
2015-06-20 20:40:50 UTC
Permalink
This past couple of weeks I've really enjoyed a couple of Chopin recordings. One was the third sonata played by Samson François, the standard EMI one made in the studio. The sound is not so great, hard, but the performance is passionate and seems to me psychological - like it touches on strange almost psychedelic mental states. There's another live recording by François of the first three movements sonata, with much more truthful and beautiful sound, it's in that massive box released a few years ago. But, quite frankly, I thought it was relatively uninteresting poetically.

The other was Vlado Perlemuter's mazurkas. The music doesn't dance in a lively foot tapping way, on the contrary, but I liked it because of the way he separates the voices, sometimes producung unexpected dissonances.

Both these recordings are clearly not recommendable without reservations, either because of tempo or sound. Nevertheless I think they both get at something special in the music which makes them great fun to hear.

Anyway, I'm starting to get interested in Chopin again, and I'm in the mood to hear some more. And so I just wondered here if anyone has come across any interesting Chopin recordings recently.
Oscar
2015-06-20 23:08:30 UTC
Permalink
Lately, I've been listening to Katsaris's Polonaises on Sony 2CD (1994) http://tinyurl.com/p24u25q
AG
2015-06-21 00:13:11 UTC
Permalink
I know you've heard essentially everything, Howie...how about the Zhukov Op28 preludes? Horszowski Op58 on BBC Legends?

AG
h***@btinternet.com
2015-06-21 08:21:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by AG
I know you've heard essentially everything, Howie...how about the Zhukov Op28 preludes? Horszowski Op58 on BBC Legends?
AG
Well I hadn't heard the Horszowski sonata, so thanks for pointing that out for me.
Bozo
2015-06-21 13:19:07 UTC
Permalink
On Sunday, June 21, 2015 at 3:21:44 AM UTC-5, howie..
Well I hadn't heard the Horszowski sonata, so thanks for pointing that out for >me.
Nelson Goerner's all-Chopin debut cd, 1994 I believe, now on EMI Classics released again in 2007.

Arbiter has a 2-fer of Horszowski playing all-Chopin at various stages of his career.A mixed - bag for me, very unsentimental playing , technique not always willing , but interesting.Liner notes report Horszowski's mother studied some with Mikuli.
Bozo
2015-06-21 13:20:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bozo
.Liner notes report Horszowski's mother studied some with Mikuli.
Sorry,forgot :

http://arbiterrecords.org/catalog/chopin-by-horszowski-through-text-and-sound/
h***@btinternet.com
2015-06-21 13:38:47 UTC
Permalink
I thought the Horzowski sonata was wonderful. It seems to move from death to life in the first movement, and the largo is very fresh, as if it's being created there and then, with an attractive nocturnal feel. The complete opposite of Samson Francois. It's on youtube, but I managed to get a download of the CD, which is recorded closely but rather well.
dk
2015-06-21 00:21:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@btinternet.com
Anyway, I'm starting to get interested in Chopin again, and I'm in the mood to
hear some more. And so I just wondered here if anyone has come across any
interesting Chopin recordings recently.
Pletnev's Barcarolle:


Cheers,

dk
Steve Emerson
2015-06-22 00:11:37 UTC
Permalink
I've probably mentioned these here before, but a few out-of-the-way
things:

Sonata Op 58 with Malcuzynski from about 1950, in mono. I'm not aware of
a transfer. Much more successful performance than the one he did later
in stereo.

Etudes, Preludes, and Waltzes with Milosz Magin. These are my favorite
out of the 60% or so of his Chopin that I know. The Waltzes appeared on
a fairly common CD, the rest on a series of 2-disc sets that are scarce;
I imagine they're still available via download from Qobuz and probably
others.

Sonata Op 58 with Firkusny on what's probably Orfeo, I can't find the
disc at present. The coupling is the Moussourgsky Pictures in a
performance that doesn't do much for me. The sonata is fairly
matter-of-fact, but it has charm.

Ballades 3 and 4, live by Magaloff, who is fiery and unrecognizable.
These have appeared on Ades CD and on a variety of iffy-looking LPs.

I agree with Dan about Pletnev's Barcarolle, assuming it's the one on
Virgin, which I've been praising forever. I also love the Stefan
Askenase Barcarolle. The work can hold up to a little bit of dryness (or
more) if the musicianship is intelligent.

SE.
dk
2015-06-22 08:18:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Emerson
I've probably mentioned these here before, but a few out-of-the-way
Sonata Op 58 with Malcuzynski from about 1950, in mono. I'm not aware of
a transfer. Much more successful performance than the one he did later
in stereo.
Etudes, Preludes, and Waltzes with Milosz Magin. These are my favorite
out of the 60% or so of his Chopin that I know. The Waltzes appeared on
a fairly common CD, the rest on a series of 2-disc sets that are scarce;
I imagine they're still available via download from Qobuz and probably
others.
Sonata Op 58 with Firkusny on what's probably Orfeo, I can't find the
disc at present. The coupling is the Moussourgsky Pictures in a
performance that doesn't do much for me. The sonata is fairly
matter-of-fact, but it has charm.
Ballades 3 and 4, live by Magaloff, who is fiery and unrecognizable.
These have appeared on Ades CD and on a variety of iffy-looking LPs.
I agree with Dan about Pletnev's Barcarolle, assuming it's the one on
Virgin, which I've been praising forever. I also love the Stefan
Askenase Barcarolle. The work can hold up to a little bit of dryness (or
more) if the musicianship is intelligent.
SE.
Thanks!

As always my perennial recommendation for Maryla Jonas'
unsurpassed Mazurkas -- quite possibly unmatched as well.

dk
O
2015-06-22 16:10:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by dk
Post by Steve Emerson
I've probably mentioned these here before, but a few out-of-the-way
Sonata Op 58 with Malcuzynski from about 1950, in mono. I'm not aware of
a transfer. Much more successful performance than the one he did later
in stereo.
Etudes, Preludes, and Waltzes with Milosz Magin. These are my favorite
out of the 60% or so of his Chopin that I know. The Waltzes appeared on
a fairly common CD, the rest on a series of 2-disc sets that are scarce;
I imagine they're still available via download from Qobuz and probably
others.
Sonata Op 58 with Firkusny on what's probably Orfeo, I can't find the
disc at present. The coupling is the Moussourgsky Pictures in a
performance that doesn't do much for me. The sonata is fairly
matter-of-fact, but it has charm.
Ballades 3 and 4, live by Magaloff, who is fiery and unrecognizable.
These have appeared on Ades CD and on a variety of iffy-looking LPs.
I agree with Dan about Pletnev's Barcarolle, assuming it's the one on
Virgin, which I've been praising forever. I also love the Stefan
Askenase Barcarolle. The work can hold up to a little bit of dryness (or
more) if the musicianship is intelligent.
SE.
Thanks!
As always my perennial recommendation for Maryla Jonas'
unsurpassed Mazurkas -- quite possibly unmatched as well.
Some of these are on Spotify, but sound like they were recorded with a
washing machine in the background. They performances, as you note, are
first rate though.

-Owen
h***@btinternet.com
2015-06-23 18:58:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by dk
Post by Steve Emerson
I've probably mentioned these here before, but a few out-of-the-way
Sonata Op 58 with Malcuzynski from about 1950, in mono. I'm not aware of
a transfer. Much more successful performance than the one he did later
in stereo.
Etudes, Preludes, and Waltzes with Milosz Magin. These are my favorite
out of the 60% or so of his Chopin that I know. The Waltzes appeared on
a fairly common CD, the rest on a series of 2-disc sets that are scarce;
I imagine they're still available via download from Qobuz and probably
others.
Sonata Op 58 with Firkusny on what's probably Orfeo, I can't find the
disc at present. The coupling is the Moussourgsky Pictures in a
performance that doesn't do much for me. The sonata is fairly
matter-of-fact, but it has charm.
Ballades 3 and 4, live by Magaloff, who is fiery and unrecognizable.
These have appeared on Ades CD and on a variety of iffy-looking LPs.
I agree with Dan about Pletnev's Barcarolle, assuming it's the one on
Virgin, which I've been praising forever. I also love the Stefan
Askenase Barcarolle. The work can hold up to a little bit of dryness (or
more) if the musicianship is intelligent.
SE.
Thanks!
As always my perennial recommendation for Maryla Jonas'
unsurpassed Mazurkas -- quite possibly unmatched as well.
dk
What do you think of Andrzej Wasowski's Mazurkas?
dk
2015-07-12 01:14:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@btinternet.com
Post by dk
Post by Steve Emerson
I've probably mentioned these here before, but a few out-of-the-way
Sonata Op 58 with Malcuzynski from about 1950, in mono. I'm not aware of
a transfer. Much more successful performance than the one he did later
in stereo.
Etudes, Preludes, and Waltzes with Milosz Magin. These are my favorite
out of the 60% or so of his Chopin that I know. The Waltzes appeared on
a fairly common CD, the rest on a series of 2-disc sets that are scarce;
I imagine they're still available via download from Qobuz and probably
others.
Sonata Op 58 with Firkusny on what's probably Orfeo, I can't find the
disc at present. The coupling is the Moussourgsky Pictures in a
performance that doesn't do much for me. The sonata is fairly
matter-of-fact, but it has charm.
Ballades 3 and 4, live by Magaloff, who is fiery and unrecognizable.
These have appeared on Ades CD and on a variety of iffy-looking LPs.
I agree with Dan about Pletnev's Barcarolle, assuming it's the one on
Virgin, which I've been praising forever. I also love the Stefan
Askenase Barcarolle. The work can hold up to a little bit of dryness (or
more) if the musicianship is intelligent.
SE.
Thanks!
As always my perennial recommendation for Maryla Jonas'
unsurpassed Mazurkas -- quite possibly unmatched as well.
What do you think of Andrzej Wasowski's Mazurkas?
Sloppy. Among a very small set of recordings I felt sorry I bought.

dk
Steve Emerson
2015-06-23 22:02:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by dk
As always my perennial recommendation for Maryla Jonas'
unsurpassed Mazurkas -- quite possibly unmatched as well.
And in case anyone isn't aware, she recorded at least 18 of the mazurkas, meaning there are some in addition to what Pearl used (which amounted to 13). Worth a hunt.

SE.
h***@btinternet.com
2015-06-24 04:57:07 UTC
Permalink
The 13 mazurkas by Jonas which aren't on Pearl that Steve talks about are very close to Leonhardt-Froberger/Teldec style that I mentioned re. op 58. Very very accurate and controled, and also very expressive. The ones on Pearl are marred by poor sound.

Wasowski, who I think is also interesting in the mazurkas, seems to turn them into recitatives, dramatic recitatives. And he's so aware of the meloncholy in the music that the drama seems like an internal, psychological, one.
Al Eisner
2015-06-24 21:50:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@btinternet.com
The 13 mazurkas by Jonas which aren't on Pearl that Steve talks about are very close to Leonhardt-Froberger/Teldec style that I mentioned re. op 58. Very very accurate and controled, and also very expressive. The ones on Pearl are marred by poor sound.
I'm a bit confused by the above. According to Steve's count, only 18-5 = 13
are not on Pearl. At amazon.com, the Pearl CD is very expensive. Also
on offer is a single copy of volume 2 of a Columbia set, which contains
9 mazurkas on a 10" LP. (Unfortunately, I cannot read which ones in
the image.) Amazon's cover page says the set contains 19 mazurkas,
but maybe they mean 18.
--
Al Eisner
m***@gmail.com
2015-06-25 03:21:17 UTC
Permalink
And Al, I think you may have even compounded things a little yourself. Anyway, there are 13 on Pearl. There's an 18-mazurka LP floating around. And it turns out that the total count is 22. In addition to the 18 on the LP, there are 4 others found elsewhere that appear in a large, multi-pianist Andante set. Those happen to be on Pearl too; i.e., not everything on Pearl is on the 18-Mazurka record. The Andante is, of course, O/P.

I happen to have a 10" LP with nine mazurkas, FWIW, ML 2036 on Columbia. All of them are on the Pearl set.

The sound on Pearl is not that bad, IMO. It could well be much worse as presented on Youtube. Variables in play for that are of almost unlimited quantity.


SE.
Post by Al Eisner
I'm a bit confused by the above. According to Steve's count, only 18-5 = 13
are not on Pearl. At amazon.com, the Pearl CD is very expensive. Also
on offer is a single copy of volume 2 of a Columbia set, which contains
9 mazurkas on a 10" LP. (Unfortunately, I cannot read which ones in
the image.) Amazon's cover page says the set contains 19 mazurkas,
but maybe they mean 18.
--
Al Eisner
Al Eisner
2015-06-25 18:29:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by m***@gmail.com
And Al, I think you may have even compounded things a little
yourself. Anyway, there are 13 on Pearl. There's an 18-mazurka LP
floating around. And it turns out that the total count is 22. In
addition to the 18 on the LP, there are 4 others found elsewhere that
appear in a large, multi-pianist Andante set. Those happen to be on
Pearl too; i.e., not everything on Pearl is on the 18-Mazurka
record. The Andante is, of course, O/P.
Sorry about that; I misinterpreted your "at least 18" (under your
Emersonian personna) to mean "exactly 18". That 4-CD Andante set is
on offer at Amazon Marketplace, for $109 ("used, like new"), which is
not outrageous for an OOP issue. However, I could not find either
there or anywhere else on the web who plays what works (in particular
how many of the Mazurkas are played by Jonas). Any comments on that
set in general?
Post by m***@gmail.com
I happen to have a 10" LP with nine mazurkas, FWIW, ML 2036 on
Columbia. All of them are on the Pearl set.
If so, then the LP I mentioned below, called "volume 2", Columbia
ML-2101, includes 9 mazurkas, of which 5 may well be not on Pearl
(but as I noted I cannot resolve the words in the blow-up of the
image).
Post by m***@gmail.com
The sound on Pearl is not that bad, IMO. It could well be much worse
as presented on Youtube. Variables in play for that are of almost
unlimited quantity.
The Pearl, unfortunately, is at a truly outrageous price on Amazon.
(That's what I originally looked for, when I encountered the other
stuff.)
Post by m***@gmail.com
SE.
Thanks, "Mr. F".
Post by m***@gmail.com
Post by Al Eisner
I'm a bit confused by the above. According to Steve's count, only 18-5 = 13
are not on Pearl. At amazon.com, the Pearl CD is very expensive. Also
on offer is a single copy of volume 2 of a Columbia set, which contains
9 mazurkas on a 10" LP. (Unfortunately, I cannot read which ones in
the image.) Amazon's cover page says the set contains 19 mazurkas,
but maybe they mean 18.
Al
Steve Emerson
2015-06-26 02:40:14 UTC
Permalink
The Andante Chopin sets are a curious hodgepodge that would be useful if they happened to have something you wanted. Courtesy of Alan Cooper, here's a Jonas discography that lays everything out as to where the Mazurkas can be found:

http://nettheim.com/jonas/jonas-discography.html

I will send you an e-mail.

SE.
Herman
2015-06-28 09:41:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@btinternet.com
The 13 mazurkas by Jonas which aren't on Pearl that Steve talks about are very close to Leonhardt-Froberger/Teldec style that I mentioned re. op 58. Very very accurate and controled, and also very expressive. The ones on Pearl are marred by poor sound.
Wasowski, who I think is also interesting in the mazurkas, seems to turn them into recitatives, dramatic recitatives. And he's so aware of the meloncholy in the music that the drama seems like an internal, psychological, one.
Different strokes... I should listen to Wasowski again. However, one of my favorite Mazurka collections is the one Adam Harasiewiscz recorded over a long period of time for the Chopin Institute.
h***@btinternet.com
2015-06-28 16:25:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Herman
Post by h***@btinternet.com
The 13 mazurkas by Jonas which aren't on Pearl that Steve talks about are very close to Leonhardt-Froberger/Teldec style that I mentioned re. op 58. Very very accurate and controled, and also very expressive. The ones on Pearl are marred by poor sound.
Wasowski, who I think is also interesting in the mazurkas, seems to turn them into recitatives, dramatic recitatives. And he's so aware of the meloncholy in the music that the drama seems like an internal, psychological, one.
Different strokes... I should listen to Wasowski again. However, one of my favorite Mazurka collections is the one Adam Harasiewiscz recorded over a long period of time for the Chopin Institute.
I'll try to get that set from Adam Harasiewicz, I have his mazurkas for Philips but not the later ones.

I've been listening again to Janina Fialkowska -- really just the second CD in the set, the later mazurkas. One thing I've noticed is that there's a lot of repetition in the music, and Fialkowska is really good at making the repeats sound emotionally different from each other. What she hasn't got is fire and energy and dance, and that may be a deal breaker for some, but I enjoy it.

The reason I mentioned Wasowski is that it's so dramatic -- one moment internal and reflective, the next all extrovert. That, combined with his articulation, made me thing of Anner Bylsma's second recording of Bach cello suites, and maybe Wispelwey's 3rd. If you're not so interested in making that connection, which is a bit bizarre I guess, then Wasowski's way may just sound intrusive and pointless.

I've decided I like Chopin and I like the mazurkas as well as any other keyboard anthology I know.
Tony
2015-06-28 16:47:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@btinternet.com
Post by Herman
Post by h***@btinternet.com
The 13 mazurkas by Jonas which aren't on Pearl that Steve talks about are very close to Leonhardt-Froberger/Teldec style that I mentioned re. op 58. Very very accurate and controled, and also very expressive. The ones on Pearl are marred by poor sound.
Wasowski, who I think is also interesting in the mazurkas, seems to turn them into recitatives, dramatic recitatives. And he's so aware of the meloncholy in the music that the drama seems like an internal, psychological, one.
Different strokes... I should listen to Wasowski again. However, one of my favorite Mazurka collections is the one Adam Harasiewiscz recorded over a long period of time for the Chopin Institute.
I'll try to get that set from Adam Harasiewicz, I have his mazurkas for Philips but not the later ones.
I've been listening again to Janina Fialkowska -- really just the second CD in the set, the later mazurkas. One thing I've noticed is that there's a lot of repetition in the music, and Fialkowska is really good at making the repeats sound emotionally different from each other. What she hasn't got is fire and energy and dance, and that may be a deal breaker for some, but I enjoy it.
The reason I mentioned Wasowski is that it's so dramatic -- one moment internal and reflective, the next all extrovert. That, combined with his articulation, made me thing of Anner Bylsma's second recording of Bach cello suites, and maybe Wispelwey's 3rd. If you're not so interested in making that connection, which is a bit bizarre I guess, then Wasowski's way may just sound intrusive and pointless.
I've decided I like Chopin and I like the mazurkas as well as any other keyboard anthology I know.
Are you familiar with Wasowski's Nocturnes as well?

Herman, do you mean these Harasiewicz recordings?

http://en.chopin.nifc.pl/institute/publications/musics2/id/1994
h***@btinternet.com
2015-06-28 17:01:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony
Post by h***@btinternet.com
Post by Herman
Post by h***@btinternet.com
The 13 mazurkas by Jonas which aren't on Pearl that Steve talks about are very close to Leonhardt-Froberger/Teldec style that I mentioned re. op 58. Very very accurate and controled, and also very expressive. The ones on Pearl are marred by poor sound.
Wasowski, who I think is also interesting in the mazurkas, seems to turn them into recitatives, dramatic recitatives. And he's so aware of the meloncholy in the music that the drama seems like an internal, psychological, one.
Different strokes... I should listen to Wasowski again. However, one of my favorite Mazurka collections is the one Adam Harasiewiscz recorded over a long period of time for the Chopin Institute.
I'll try to get that set from Adam Harasiewicz, I have his mazurkas for Philips but not the later ones.
I've been listening again to Janina Fialkowska -- really just the second CD in the set, the later mazurkas. One thing I've noticed is that there's a lot of repetition in the music, and Fialkowska is really good at making the repeats sound emotionally different from each other. What she hasn't got is fire and energy and dance, and that may be a deal breaker for some, but I enjoy it.
The reason I mentioned Wasowski is that it's so dramatic -- one moment internal and reflective, the next all extrovert. That, combined with his articulation, made me thing of Anner Bylsma's second recording of Bach cello suites, and maybe Wispelwey's 3rd. If you're not so interested in making that connection, which is a bit bizarre I guess, then Wasowski's way may just sound intrusive and pointless.
I've decided I like Chopin and I like the mazurkas as well as any other keyboard anthology I know.
Are you familiar with Wasowski's Nocturnes as well?
Herman, do you mean these Harasiewicz recordings?
http://en.chopin.nifc.pl/institute/publications/musics2/id/1994
Yes I have the set, but I've never got into them.
Herman
2015-06-28 18:29:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony
Herman, do you mean these Harasiewicz recordings?
http://en.chopin.nifc.pl/institute/publications/musics2/id/1994
yes, that's the one.
h***@btinternet.com
2015-06-29 11:25:49 UTC
Permalink
I've managed to hear some of that complete set of mazurkas by Harasiewicz now. Words that come to mind are fresh and lively, dancing and playful. My only reservation is to do with the emotional side. Not that there aren't some bittersweet moments of course, despite the energy of it.
Herman
2015-06-29 11:46:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@btinternet.com
I've managed to hear some of that complete set of mazurkas by Harasiewicz now. Words that come to mind are fresh and lively, dancing and playful. My only reservation is to do with the emotional side. Not that there aren't some bittersweet moments of course, despite the energy of it.
he does indeed not sentimentalize 'em.
Andy Evans
2015-07-01 10:25:19 UTC
Permalink
I'm a bit of a sucker for the Golden Age, and I put up with the sound quality as best I can. I wouldn't be without any of these. Most are excerpts, not complete works, and they make up my iTunes playlists:

Mazurkas:
Sofronitsky
Kocalski
Friedman
Rubinstein early mono
Horowitz
There's some Pachmann, Rosenthal and Paderewski in there too

Ballades:
Rachmaninov
Sofronitsky
Hofmann

Preludes:
Cortot
Pogorelich
Sofronitsky

Waltzes:
Hofmann
Rachmaninov
Lipatti

Nocturnes:
Hofmann
Horowitz
Sofronitsky
Koczalski
Early Ashkenazy

Etudes:
Cortot
Rosenthal
Horowitz
Sofronitsky
Early Arrau

Scherzo #4
Richter

Polonaises:
Sofronitsky
Hofmann
Paderewski

Barcarolle:
Sofronitsky 1949

If I had to choose just one it would be all of Sofronitsky in everything he recorded of Chopin.
Bozo
2015-07-01 11:51:32 UTC
Permalink
I'm a bit of a sucker for the Golden Age, and I put up with the sound quality >as best I can.
Suggest, then,you hear the Arbiter Records cd with Leo Sirota's all-Chopin recital from St.Louis,USA, 1950's - '60's radio broadcast tapes Allan Evans " rescued ", some on YT I think.
Bozo
2015-07-01 12:54:07 UTC
Permalink
... Leo Sirota's all-Chopin recital from St.Louis,USA, 1950's - '60's radio broadcast tapes Allan >Evans " rescued ", some on YT I think.

Tony
2015-07-01 14:04:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bozo
I'm a bit of a sucker for the Golden Age, and I put up with the sound quality >as best I can.
Suggest, then,you hear the Arbiter Records cd with Leo Sirota's all-Chopin recital from St.Louis,USA, 1950's - '60's radio broadcast tapes Allan Evans " rescued ", some on YT I think.
That is one of the great Chopin discs IMO.
Frank Berger
2015-07-01 14:32:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony
Post by Bozo
I'm a bit of a sucker for the Golden Age, and I put up with the sound quality >as best I can.
Suggest, then,you hear the Arbiter Records cd with Leo Sirota's all-Chopin recital from St.Louis,USA, 1950's - '60's radio broadcast tapes Allan Evans " rescued ", some on YT I think.
That is one of the great Chopin discs IMO.
Sellers asking $150 on Amazon.
Tony
2015-07-01 14:41:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Frank Berger
Post by Tony
Post by Bozo
I'm a bit of a sucker for the Golden Age, and I put up with the sound quality >as best I can.
Suggest, then,you hear the Arbiter Records cd with Leo Sirota's all-Chopin recital from St.Louis,USA, 1950's - '60's radio broadcast tapes Allan Evans " rescued ", some on YT I think.
That is one of the great Chopin discs IMO.
Sellers asking $150 on Amazon.
Well it's 665 pounds in the UK. Canadian Amazon has it for $44. I've uploaded his Balade no. 4 to YT. Some other pieces are there too.
Bozo
2015-07-01 15:07:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Frank Berger
Sellers asking $150 on Amazon.
$9.99 download at I-Tunes.
Frank Berger
2015-07-01 15:45:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bozo
On Wednesday, July 1, 2015 at 9:41:14 AM UTC-5, Tony
wrote: Sellers asking $150 on Amazon.
$9.99 download at I-Tunes.
HMV has some Sirota. One, a 3disk set on Greendoor has one
reviewer, translated by google:

"As well as Kreutzer, precious assembly of Shirota which
raised a number of disciples and settled in Japan. Farewell
concert is also good to hear a special sentimental without
content of Tokyo. But the original tape of either normal, is
not very good sound. However reprint of the most problem is
SP board. Precious precious SP Yet, once again of Credenza
playback microphone recording, quite wet blanket on what the
real experience there is no sound in the lean,! This plan is
I want you to stop. To meaning there is no, please do not
commercialize reprint of the degree. Recent Green door seems
to have stopped this method, but I want you to newly
re-reprint if that can also this Shirota board."
Tony
2015-07-01 16:18:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Frank Berger
Post by Bozo
On Wednesday, July 1, 2015 at 9:41:14 AM UTC-5, Tony
wrote: Sellers asking $150 on Amazon.
$9.99 download at I-Tunes.
HMV has some Sirota. One, a 3disk set on Greendoor has one
"As well as Kreutzer, precious assembly of Shirota which
raised a number of disciples and settled in Japan. Farewell
concert is also good to hear a special sentimental without
content of Tokyo. But the original tape of either normal, is
not very good sound. However reprint of the most problem is
SP board. Precious precious SP Yet, once again of Credenza
playback microphone recording, quite wet blanket on what the
real experience there is no sound in the lean,! This plan is
I want you to stop. To meaning there is no, please do not
commercialize reprint of the degree. Recent Green door seems
to have stopped this method, but I want you to newly
re-reprint if that can also this Shirota board."
haha Japanese online translations are hilarious. I used to have that Greendoor set and would not recommend it. It's true the sound is poor, and I thought the playing not as impressive as the Arbiter Chopin disc. Greendoor in general has some very strange releases. One of the CDs I bought in Tokyo was a Greendoor release of the almost unheard of Polish pianist Stanislas Niedzielski. It was not the most impressive, but does remind me now that I should upload some of it to YT.
Tony
2015-07-01 21:45:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony
Post by Frank Berger
Post by Bozo
On Wednesday, July 1, 2015 at 9:41:14 AM UTC-5, Tony
wrote: Sellers asking $150 on Amazon.
$9.99 download at I-Tunes.
HMV has some Sirota. One, a 3disk set on Greendoor has one
"As well as Kreutzer, precious assembly of Shirota which
raised a number of disciples and settled in Japan. Farewell
concert is also good to hear a special sentimental without
content of Tokyo. But the original tape of either normal, is
not very good sound. However reprint of the most problem is
SP board. Precious precious SP Yet, once again of Credenza
playback microphone recording, quite wet blanket on what the
real experience there is no sound in the lean,! This plan is
I want you to stop. To meaning there is no, please do not
commercialize reprint of the degree. Recent Green door seems
to have stopped this method, but I want you to newly
re-reprint if that can also this Shirota board."
haha Japanese online translations are hilarious. I used to have that Greendoor set and would not recommend it. It's true the sound is poor, and I thought the playing not as impressive as the Arbiter Chopin disc. Greendoor in general has some very strange releases. One of the CDs I bought in Tokyo was a Greendoor release of the almost unheard of Polish pianist Stanislas Niedzielski. It was not the most impressive, but does remind me now that I should upload some of it to YT.
for Golden Age playing of Chopin, try this Rosenthal nouvelle etude. It must be some of the most beautiful Chopin playing on record.


JohnGavin
2015-07-01 23:42:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony
for Golden Age playing of Chopin, try this Rosenthal nouvelle etude. It must be some of the most beautiful Chopin playing on record.
http://youtu.be/ZItBrjyy0PY
Here's one I consider very special - partially because it is one of Chopin's very greatest short masterpieces, partly because it is played relatively infrequently, and thirdly because this live performance is very special:


Tony
2015-07-02 07:15:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by JohnGavin
Post by Tony
for Golden Age playing of Chopin, try this Rosenthal nouvelle etude. It must be some of the most beautiful Chopin playing on record.
http://youtu.be/ZItBrjyy0PY
http://youtu.be/cNxYr-qU2w4
That Michelangeli performance is wonderful. I uploaded that and several other pieces from that same amazing recital he gave in Prato in '67. The disc of the entire recital is essential IMO. Also I'd like to point out that there's a YT channel which posts rare Michelangeli recitals:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDM1rmvaHHGuY-YUKHYStBQ/videos
h***@btinternet.com
2015-07-02 10:08:48 UTC
Permalink
I've been listening to Sofronitsky play mazurkas, I think I have every mazurka he recorded. The 1949 recital is really in a class of its own, I don't think he came close to that degree of focus either before or after.
Al Eisner
2015-07-02 00:13:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bozo
Post by Frank Berger
Sellers asking $150 on Amazon.
$9.99 download at I-Tunes.
Thanks. The Arbiter site says that the release was "remastered for
downloading" in 2014. (Not quite sure what that means.) I'm sure
that download quality (I-Tunes) should be fine for these (Sirota
Chopin) recordings.
--
Al Eisner
Frank Lekens
2015-07-20 07:59:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Al Eisner
Post by Bozo
Post by Frank Berger
Sellers asking $150 on Amazon.
$9.99 download at I-Tunes.
Thanks. The Arbiter site says that the release was "remastered for
downloading" in 2014. (Not quite sure what that means.) I'm sure
that download quality (I-Tunes) should be fine for these (Sirota
Chopin) recordings.
A pity they sell it only through iTunes, a webshop I'm unwilling to have
dealings with since they won't let you buy anything unless you install
their own software (which I'd very much like to avoid infecting my
computer with).
--
Frank Lekens

http://fmlekens.home.xs4all.nl/
Steve Emerson
2015-07-02 01:13:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony
Post by Bozo
I'm a bit of a sucker for the Golden Age, and I put up with the sound quality >as best I can.
Suggest, then,you hear the Arbiter Records cd with Leo Sirota's all-Chopin recital from St.Louis,USA, 1950's - '60's radio broadcast tapes Allan Evans " rescued ", some on YT I think.
That is one of the great Chopin discs IMO.
Thirded. If it were only for the Ballade #4 (which it isn't)....
h***@btinternet.com
2015-07-01 14:02:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@btinternet.com
Sofronitsky
Kocalski
Friedman
Rubinstein early mono
Horowitz
There's some Pachmann, Rosenthal and Paderewski in there too
Rachmaninov
Sofronitsky
Hofmann
Cortot
Pogorelich
Sofronitsky
Hofmann
Rachmaninov
Lipatti
Hofmann
Horowitz
Sofronitsky
Koczalski
Early Ashkenazy
Cortot
Rosenthal
Horowitz
Sofronitsky
Early Arrau
Scherzo #4
Richter
Sofronitsky
Hofmann
Paderewski
Sofronitsky 1949
If I had to choose just one it would be all of Sofronitsky in everything he recorded of Chopin.
Rachmaninoff recorded Sonata 2; Cortot recorded 2 and 3 (just once?); Tiegerman recorded 3; Sofronitsky recorded 3. What else is interesting from these early pianists with the sonatas. I can't help feeling that these early pianists saw Chopin as a miniaturist really, which is a shame because I think op 58 is his most towering masterpiece.
Steve Emerson
2015-07-21 04:54:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@btinternet.com
Rachmaninoff recorded Sonata 2; Cortot recorded 2 and 3 (just once?);
Cortot recorded #3 twice. 1931 but also 1933. Find the latter on a Naxos Historical release. No. 2 I believe also was done at least twice. See November 2006 RMCR thread called "New Naxos Historicals: Furtwangler, De Sabata, Moiseiwitsch, Cortot" begun by TD with Mark Obert-Thorn, Miguel, me, et al.

SE.
g***@gmail.com
2018-10-07 03:33:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@btinternet.com
Post by Herman
Post by h***@btinternet.com
The 13 mazurkas by Jonas which aren't on Pearl that Steve talks about are very close to Leonhardt-Froberger/Teldec style that I mentioned re. op 58. Very very accurate and controled, and also very expressive. The ones on Pearl are marred by poor sound.
Wasowski, who I think is also interesting in the mazurkas, seems to turn them into recitatives, dramatic recitatives. And he's so aware of the meloncholy in the music that the drama seems like an internal, psychological, one.
Different strokes... I should listen to Wasowski again. However, one of my favorite Mazurka collections is the one Adam Harasiewiscz recorded over a long period of time for the Chopin Institute.
I'll try to get that set from Adam Harasiewicz, I have his mazurkas for Philips but not the later ones.
I've been listening again to Janina Fialkowska -- really just the second CD in the set, the later mazurkas. One thing I've noticed is that there's a lot of repetition in the music, and Fialkowska is really good at making the repeats sound emotionally different from each other. What she hasn't got is fire and energy and dance, and that may be a deal breaker for some, but I enjoy it.
The reason I mentioned Wasowski is that it's so dramatic -- one moment internal and reflective, the next all extrovert. That, combined with his articulation, made me thing of Anner Bylsma's second recording of Bach cello suites, and maybe Wispelwey's 3rd. If you're not so interested in making that connection, which is a bit bizarre I guess, then Wasowski's way may just sound intrusive and pointless.
I've decided I like Chopin and I like the mazurkas as well as any other keyboard anthology I know.
(Recent Youtube upload):

Chopin - 10 Mazurkas - Grinberg
Frank Lekens
2015-06-22 12:14:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Emerson
Etudes, Preludes, and Waltzes with Milosz Magin. These are my favorite
out of the 60% or so of his Chopin that I know. The Waltzes appeared on
a fairly common CD, the rest on a series of 2-disc sets that are scarce;
I imagine they're still available via download from Qobuz and probably
others.
If you like Magin and would like to explore all his Chopin, you might be
pleased to know they've been collected in a not too expensive little 10
cd box.

http://www.amazon.fr/Oeuvre-Coffret-10-Milosz-Magin/dp/B00D93NES0/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1434953088&sr=8-1&keywords=magin+chopin
--
Frank Lekens

http://fmlekens.home.xs4all.nl/
Tony
2015-06-22 15:42:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Frank Lekens
Post by Steve Emerson
Etudes, Preludes, and Waltzes with Milosz Magin. These are my favorite
out of the 60% or so of his Chopin that I know. The Waltzes appeared on
a fairly common CD, the rest on a series of 2-disc sets that are scarce;
I imagine they're still available via download from Qobuz and probably
others.
If you like Magin and would like to explore all his Chopin, you might be
pleased to know they've been collected in a not too expensive little 10
cd box.
http://www.amazon.fr/Oeuvre-Coffret-10-Milosz-Magin/dp/B00D93NES0/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1434953088&sr=8-1&keywords=magin+chopin
--
Frank Lekens
http://fmlekens.home.xs4all.nl/
I had this box-set last decade, though it had a different look. I found the close micing unbearable. The sound quality failed on that one.
m***@gmail.com
2015-06-22 19:00:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony
Post by Frank Lekens
Post by Steve Emerson
Etudes, Preludes, and Waltzes with Milosz Magin. These are my favorite
out of the 60% or so of his Chopin that I know. The Waltzes appeared on
a fairly common CD, the rest on a series of 2-disc sets that are scarce;
I imagine they're still available via download from Qobuz and probably
others.
If you like Magin and would like to explore all his Chopin, you might be
pleased to know they've been collected in a not too expensive little 10
cd box.
http://www.amazon.fr/Oeuvre-Coffret-10-Milosz-Magin/dp/B00D93NES0/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1434953088&sr=8-1&keywords=magin+chopin
--
Frank Lekens
http://fmlekens.home.xs4all.nl/
I had this box-set last decade, though it had a different look. I found the close micing unbearable. The sound quality failed on that one.
I'll have to relisten, Tony, but I doubt that the sound is consistent. These recordings were made over a wide span of time.
HT
2015-06-22 13:00:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Emerson
Ballades 3 and 4, live by Magaloff, who is fiery and unrecognizable.
These have appeared on Ades CD and on a variety of iffy-looking LPs.
And don't forget Tipo's version of all four of them! Surpasses even Malcuzynski's version!

Many thanks for the download, Steve.

Best regards,
Henk
JohnGavin
2015-06-22 14:25:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by HT
Post by Steve Emerson
Ballades 3 and 4, live by Magaloff, who is fiery and unrecognizable.
These have appeared on Ades CD and on a variety of iffy-looking LPs.
And don't forget Tipo's version of all four of them! Surpasses even Malcuzynski's version!
Many thanks for the download, Steve.
Best regards,
Henk
Ballade #1, Fantasy in F Minor - Michelangeli (Live 1957) Testament
Mazurkas - Jonas - and more controversially - Ignaz Friedman
4 Scherzi - Barbosa
Polonaise op. 44 - Horowitz
dk
2015-07-02 06:04:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by HT
Post by Steve Emerson
Ballades 3 and 4, live by Magaloff, who is fiery and unrecognizable.
These have appeared on Ades CD and on a variety of iffy-looking LPs.
And don't forget Tipo's version of all four of them! Surpasses even Malcuzynski's version!
Not even close to Henri Barda:


By far the best I've heard.

dk
George P
2015-07-02 16:32:26 UTC
Permalink
Where can one buy the Barda CD? I only see the mp3s on amazon.fr
dk
2015-07-02 17:21:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by George P
Where can one buy the Barda CD? I only see the mp3s on amazon.fr
Good question. Waiting for your answer! ;-)

dk
Al Eisner
2015-07-03 00:12:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by dk
Post by George P
Where can one buy the Barda CD? I only see the mp3s on amazon.fr
Good question. Waiting for your answer! ;-)
Perhaps not too surprising, the Sisyphe CD "Henri Barda in Japan" is listed
at HMV Japan:

http://www.hmv.co.jp/en/artist_Piano-Concert_000000000230513/item_Henri-Barda-Live-In-Tokyo-2008-brahms-Beethoven-Chopin_4970618

So far as I can tell, the cost is the sale price of 1900 yen plus 1600 yen
shipping to the US, corresponding to about $27 total. (Shipping cost
appears to be the same if you add a second item to your order.)

It is noted as "For Order" and "Arrival Pending", so it's not entirely
clear that they will actually obtain it!

Al Eisner
dk
2015-07-03 00:55:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Al Eisner
Post by dk
Post by George P
Where can one buy the Barda CD? I only see the mp3s on amazon.fr
Good question. Waiting for your answer! ;-)
Perhaps not too surprising, the Sisyphe CD "Henri Barda in Japan" is listed
http://www.hmv.co.jp/en/artist_Piano-Concert_000000000230513/item_Henri-Barda-Live-In-Tokyo-2008-brahms-Beethoven-Chopin_4970618
So far as I can tell, the cost is the sale price of 1900 yen plus 1600 yen
shipping to the US, corresponding to about $27 total. (Shipping cost
appears to be the same if you add a second item to your order.)
It is noted as "For Order" and "Arrival Pending", so it's not entirely
clear that they will actually obtain it!
Al Eisner
Great find!
Thanks a lot.

dk
c***@gmail.com
2015-07-03 11:55:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by dk
Post by Al Eisner
Post by dk
Post by George P
Where can one buy the Barda CD? I only see the mp3s on amazon.fr
Good question. Waiting for your answer! ;-)
Perhaps not too surprising, the Sisyphe CD "Henri Barda in Japan" is listed
http://www.hmv.co.jp/en/artist_Piano-Concert_000000000230513/item_Henri-Barda-Live-In-Tokyo-2008-brahms-Beethoven-Chopin_4970618
So far as I can tell, the cost is the sale price of 1900 yen plus 1600 yen
shipping to the US, corresponding to about $27 total. (Shipping cost
appears to be the same if you add a second item to your order.)
It is noted as "For Order" and "Arrival Pending", so it's not entirely
clear that they will actually obtain it!
Al Eisner
Great find!
Thanks a lot.
dk
As I mentioned when Barda came up in a thread last April, I acquired the superb Tokyo recital as a lossless download from Qobuz (with covers and full documentation) before Qobuz started to prevent users with American IP addresses from ordering. The album is available lossless from Classics Online for $10.99--also with the documentation, which is immediately viewable. I have ordered from Classics Online in the past, but not since the site was redesigned with a clumsy user interface: http://shop.classicsonlinehd.com/albums/53ec53069d29c937100013e1.

AC
Frank Lekens
2015-07-10 16:32:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by dk
Post by Al Eisner
Post by dk
Post by George P
Where can one buy the Barda CD? I only see the mp3s on amazon.fr
Good question. Waiting for your answer! ;-)
Perhaps not too surprising, the Sisyphe CD "Henri Barda in Japan" is listed
http://www.hmv.co.jp/en/artist_Piano-Concert_000000000230513/item_Henri-Barda-Live-In-Tokyo-2008-brahms-Beethoven-Chopin_4970618
So far as I can tell, the cost is the sale price of 1900 yen plus 1600 yen
shipping to the US, corresponding to about $27 total. (Shipping cost
appears to be the same if you add a second item to your order.)
It is noted as "For Order" and "Arrival Pending", so it's not entirely
clear that they will actually obtain it!
Al Eisner
Great find!
Thanks a lot.
dk
As I mentioned when Barda came up in a thread last April, I acquired the superb Tokyo recital as a lossless download from Qobuz (with covers and full documentation) before Qobuz started to prevent users with American IP addresses from ordering. The album is available lossless from Classics Online for $10.99--also with the documentation, which is immediately viewable. I have ordered from Classics Online in the past, but not since the site was redesigned with a clumsy user interface: http://shop.classicsonlinehd.com/albums/53ec53069d29c937100013e1.
AC
Has anyone else tried this yet?
I bought it and downloaded it, but it sounds like they ripped the flacs from cd and didn't check them afterwards, because the last track (the 4th ballade) had a technical glitch near the end (from about 8 minutes onward).

The confirmation e-mail about the purchase offers on e-mail address to contact their client service, nor does the website. There's just some community forum where you can post questions, but you can log in. And I can't log in for some reason (it figures). So there's no way to contact them about this, get money back or get a fixed sound file.
What a lousy outfit. Should have investigated that before throwing my money away, I guess.
Frank Lekens
2015-07-10 16:49:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Frank Lekens
As I mentioned when Barda came up in a thread last April, I acquired the superb Tokyo recital as a lossless download from Qobuz (with covers and full documentation) before Qobuz started to prevent users with American IP addresses from ordering. The album is available lossless from Classics Online for $10.99--also with the documentation, which is immediately viewable. I have ordered from Classics Online in the past, but not since the site was redesigned with a clumsy user interface:http://shop.classicsonlinehd.com/albums/53ec53069d29c937100013e1.
AC
Has anyone else tried this yet?
I bought it and downloaded it, but it sounds like they ripped the flacs from cd and didn't check them afterwards, because the last track (the 4th ballade) had a technical glitch near the end (from about 8 minutes onward).
The confirmation e-mail about the purchase offers on e-mail address to contact their client service, nor does the website. There's just some community forum where you can post questions, but you can log in. And I can't log in for some reason (it figures). So there's no way to contact them about this, get money back or get a fixed sound file.
What a lousy outfit. Should have investigated that before throwing my money away, I guess.
Well. Tried contacting them through
https://classicsonline.zendesk.com/hc/en-us/requests/new, but the site
doesn't respond when you click "submit". How bona fide is this site anyway?
--
Frank Lekens

http://fmlekens.home.xs4all.nl/
Frank Lekens
2015-07-10 16:55:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Frank Lekens
Post by Frank Lekens
Post by c***@gmail.com
As I mentioned when Barda came up in a thread last April, I acquired
the superb Tokyo recital as a lossless download from Qobuz (with
covers and full documentation) before Qobuz started to prevent users
with American IP addresses from ordering. The album is available
lossless from Classics Online for $10.99--also with the
documentation, which is immediately viewable. I have ordered from
Classics Online in the past, but not since the site was redesigned
with a clumsy user
interface:http://shop.classicsonlinehd.com/albums/53ec53069d29c937100013e1.
AC
Has anyone else tried this yet?
I bought it and downloaded it, but it sounds like they ripped the
flacs from cd and didn't check them afterwards, because the last track
(the 4th ballade) had a technical glitch near the end (from about 8
minutes onward).
The confirmation e-mail about the purchase offers on e-mail address to
contact their client service, nor does the website. There's just some
community forum where you can post questions, but you can log in. And
I can't log in for some reason (it figures). So there's no way to
contact them about this, get money back or get a fixed sound file.
What a lousy outfit. Should have investigated that before throwing my
money away, I guess.
Well. Tried contacting them through
https://classicsonline.zendesk.com/hc/en-us/requests/new, but the site
doesn't respond when you click "submit". How bona fide is this site anyway?
Okay, there's a customer service address tucked away in the terms of
service. I'll try that.
--
Frank Lekens

http://fmlekens.home.xs4all.nl/
c***@gmail.com
2015-07-10 18:09:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Frank Lekens
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by dk
Post by Al Eisner
Post by dk
Post by George P
Where can one buy the Barda CD? I only see the mp3s on amazon.fr
Good question. Waiting for your answer! ;-)
Perhaps not too surprising, the Sisyphe CD "Henri Barda in Japan" is listed
http://www.hmv.co.jp/en/artist_Piano-Concert_000000000230513/item_Henri-Barda-Live-In-Tokyo-2008-brahms-Beethoven-Chopin_4970618
So far as I can tell, the cost is the sale price of 1900 yen plus 1600 yen
shipping to the US, corresponding to about $27 total. (Shipping cost
appears to be the same if you add a second item to your order.)
It is noted as "For Order" and "Arrival Pending", so it's not entirely
clear that they will actually obtain it!
Al Eisner
Great find!
Thanks a lot.
dk
As I mentioned when Barda came up in a thread last April, I acquired the superb Tokyo recital as a lossless download from Qobuz (with covers and full documentation) before Qobuz started to prevent users with American IP addresses from ordering. The album is available lossless from Classics Online for $10.99--also with the documentation, which is immediately viewable. I have ordered from Classics Online in the past, but not since the site was redesigned with a clumsy user interface: http://shop.classicsonlinehd.com/albums/53ec53069d29c937100013e1.
AC
Has anyone else tried this yet?
I bought it and downloaded it, but it sounds like they ripped the flacs from cd and didn't check them afterwards, because the last track (the 4th ballade) had a technical glitch near the end (from about 8 minutes onward).
The confirmation e-mail about the purchase offers on e-mail address to contact their client service, nor does the website. There's just some community forum where you can post questions, but you can log in. And I can't log in for some reason (it figures). So there's no way to contact them about this, get money back or get a fixed sound file.
What a lousy outfit. Should have investigated that before throwing my money away, I guess.
I feel semi-guilty for having recommended the download. "Semi" because I purchased mine from from Qobuz, so I could not vouch for the Classics Online copy. Anyway, hoping that your only problem is with the op. 52 Ballade, try this: http://www.mediafire.com/download/0c75h7v7i9vs8c6/Chopin_Ballade4_Barda.rar. It's wma, not flac, and I don't hear any glitch. Please contact me privately if you have any more difficulties.

AC
Frank Lekens
2015-07-11 22:50:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Frank Lekens
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by dk
Post by Al Eisner
Post by dk
Post by George P
Where can one buy the Barda CD? I only see the mp3s on amazon.fr
Good question. Waiting for your answer! ;-)
Perhaps not too surprising, the Sisyphe CD "Henri Barda in Japan" is listed
http://www.hmv.co.jp/en/artist_Piano-Concert_000000000230513/item_Henri-Barda-Live-In-Tokyo-2008-brahms-Beethoven-Chopin_4970618
So far as I can tell, the cost is the sale price of 1900 yen plus 1600 yen
shipping to the US, corresponding to about $27 total. (Shipping cost
appears to be the same if you add a second item to your order.)
It is noted as "For Order" and "Arrival Pending", so it's not entirely
clear that they will actually obtain it!
Al Eisner
Great find!
Thanks a lot.
dk
As I mentioned when Barda came up in a thread last April, I acquired the superb Tokyo recital as a lossless download from Qobuz (with covers and full documentation) before Qobuz started to prevent users with American IP addresses from ordering. The album is available lossless from Classics Online for $10.99--also with the documentation, which is immediately viewable. I have ordered from Classics Online in the past, but not since the site was redesigned with a clumsy user interface: http://shop.classicsonlinehd.com/albums/53ec53069d29c937100013e1.
AC
Has anyone else tried this yet?
I bought it and downloaded it, but it sounds like they ripped the flacs from cd and didn't check them afterwards, because the last track (the 4th ballade) had a technical glitch near the end (from about 8 minutes onward).
The confirmation e-mail about the purchase offers on e-mail address to contact their client service, nor does the website. There's just some community forum where you can post questions, but you can log in. And I can't log in for some reason (it figures). So there's no way to contact them about this, get money back or get a fixed sound file.
What a lousy outfit. Should have investigated that before throwing my money away, I guess.
I feel semi-guilty for having recommended the download. "Semi" because I purchased mine from from Qobuz, so I could not vouch for the Classics Online copy. Anyway, hoping that your only problem is with the op. 52 Ballade, try this: http://www.mediafire.com/download/0c75h7v7i9vs8c6/Chopin_Ballade4_Barda.rar. It's wma, not flac, and I don't hear any glitch. Please contact me privately if you have any more difficulties.
AC
No need to feel guilty.
I got some sort of initial reply. I'm hoping an actual human being will
eventually look at my request and deal with it either by giving me an
better download or a refund.

It's not that the ballade is unlistenable, but there is a definite
glitch (like what you hear if there's a hair on your cd, or a small
scratch that makes the cd player almost skip but not quite).

(Definitely more noticeable than nails clicking on keys or Glenn Goulds
humming... :-)

And it was worth it for the rest of the recital anyway.
--
Frank Lekens

http://fmlekens.home.xs4all.nl/
Frank Lekens
2015-07-20 07:51:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Frank Lekens
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Frank Lekens
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by dk
Post by Al Eisner
Post by dk
Post by George P
Where can one buy the Barda CD? I only see the mp3s on amazon.fr
Good question. Waiting for your answer! ;-)
Perhaps not too surprising, the Sisyphe CD "Henri Barda in Japan" is listed
http://www.hmv.co.jp/en/artist_Piano-Concert_000000000230513/item_Henri-Barda-Live-In-Tokyo-2008-brahms-Beethoven-Chopin_4970618
So far as I can tell, the cost is the sale price of 1900 yen plus 1600 yen
shipping to the US, corresponding to about $27 total. (Shipping cost
appears to be the same if you add a second item to your order.)
It is noted as "For Order" and "Arrival Pending", so it's not entirely
clear that they will actually obtain it!
Al Eisner
Great find!
Thanks a lot.
dk
As I mentioned when Barda came up in a thread last April, I acquired
the superb Tokyo recital as a lossless download from Qobuz (with
covers and full documentation) before Qobuz started to prevent users
with American IP addresses from ordering. The album is available
lossless from Classics Online for $10.99--also with the
documentation, which is immediately viewable. I have ordered from
Classics Online in the past, but not since the site was redesigned
http://shop.classicsonlinehd.com/albums/53ec53069d29c937100013e1.
AC
Has anyone else tried this yet?
I bought it and downloaded it, but it sounds like they ripped the
flacs from cd and didn't check them afterwards, because the last
track (the 4th ballade) had a technical glitch near the end (from
about 8 minutes onward).
The confirmation e-mail about the purchase offers on e-mail address
to contact their client service, nor does the website. There's just
some community forum where you can post questions, but you can log
in. And I can't log in for some reason (it figures). So there's no
way to contact them about this, get money back or get a fixed sound
file.
What a lousy outfit. Should have investigated that before throwing my
money away, I guess.
I feel semi-guilty for having recommended the download. "Semi"
because I purchased mine from from Qobuz, so I could not vouch for the
Classics Online copy. Anyway, hoping that your only problem is with
http://www.mediafire.com/download/0c75h7v7i9vs8c6/Chopin_Ballade4_Barda.rar.
It's wma, not flac, and I don't hear any glitch. Please contact me
privately if you have any more difficulties.
AC
No need to feel guilty.
I got some sort of initial reply. I'm hoping an actual human being will
eventually look at my request and deal with it either by giving me an
better download or a refund.
It's not that the ballade is unlistenable, but there is a definite
glitch (like what you hear if there's a hair on your cd, or a small
scratch that makes the cd player almost skip but not quite).
(Definitely more noticeable than nails clicking on keys or Glenn Goulds
humming... :-)
And it was worth it for the rest of the recital anyway.
Small update: my sarcasm about that "outfit" was unwarranted. They've
refunded the purchase. (And incidentally also taken the download offline
due to "licensing issues". So it's no longer available through this
channel. Maybe the glitch was an indication that someone not
representing the label had made -- poor -- rip of the cd and tried to
sell it through their shop?)
--
Frank Lekens

http://fmlekens.home.xs4all.nl/
h***@btinternet.com
2015-06-22 15:35:00 UTC
Permalink
There are some interesting comments around here, and some names which are new to me. I was interested in Steve's comments along the lines of "matter of fact but charming", and "can bear dryness if the musicianship is intelligent."

This is exactly what I found with Froberger's late partitas - Froberger's late music reminds me of Chopin, the so called Death Music, I have no idea whether Chopin knew Froberger, but they were kindred spirits. The trick with late Froberger was to play the music so accurately and cool headedly and in such a controled manner that there isn't any suggestion that the emotions being expresed are actually being suffered by the performer. And yet - to play the music very expressively. This is what Leonhardt's later recordings are like, the one for Teldec especially. Vartolo too.

In Chopin op 58 I'm not sure I've really found the equivalent of Leonhardt. Maybe Sofronitsky (in a Scriabin Museum recording), maybe Demidenko, maybe Kissin.

By the way, this abstract way of playing can work with Romantic music, William Masselos's Davidsbündlertänze is an example, and possibly Kempff's live DBT from Besançon. I'm about to post the Masselos on symphonyshare.
m***@gmail.com
2015-06-22 19:05:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@btinternet.com
There are some interesting comments around here, and some names which are new to me. I was interested in Steve's comments along the lines of "matter of fact but charming", and "can bear dryness if the musicianship is intelligent."
This is exactly what I found with Froberger's late partitas - Froberger's late music reminds me of Chopin, the so called Death Music, I have no idea whether Chopin knew Froberger, but they were kindred spirits. The trick with late Froberger was to play the music so accurately and cool headedly and in such a controled manner that there isn't any suggestion that the emotions being expresed are actually being suffered by the performer. And yet - to play the music very expressively. This is what Leonhardt's later recordings are like, the one for Teldec especially. Vartolo too.
In Chopin op 58 I'm not sure I've really found the equivalent of Leonhardt. Maybe Sofronitsky (in a Scriabin Museum recording), maybe Demidenko, maybe Kissin. [...]
Didn't know about this Sofronitsky. Had no idea he even played it.

I did find the Firkusny. It's this:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B0002K71VO/

SE.
c***@gmail.com
2015-06-23 02:26:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by m***@gmail.com
Post by h***@btinternet.com
There are some interesting comments around here, and some names which are new to me. I was interested in Steve's comments along the lines of "matter of fact but charming", and "can bear dryness if the musicianship is intelligent."
This is exactly what I found with Froberger's late partitas - Froberger's late music reminds me of Chopin, the so called Death Music, I have no idea whether Chopin knew Froberger, but they were kindred spirits. The trick with late Froberger was to play the music so accurately and cool headedly and in such a controled manner that there isn't any suggestion that the emotions being expresed are actually being suffered by the performer. And yet - to play the music very expressively. This is what Leonhardt's later recordings are like, the one for Teldec especially. Vartolo too.
In Chopin op 58 I'm not sure I've really found the equivalent of Leonhardt. Maybe Sofronitsky (in a Scriabin Museum recording), maybe Demidenko, maybe Kissin. [...]
Didn't know about this Sofronitsky. Had no idea he even played it.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B0002K71VO/
SE.
Do you know Marian Filar's impetuous op. 58? Available here: http://randomclassics.blogspot.com/2012/09/the-art-of-marian-filar-and-frieda.html. There's more of Filar's Chopin on Meloclassic derived from radio broadcasts, but I haven't heard it yet: http://www.meloclassic.com/home/marian-filar/. Anna Gourari's op. 58 (http://www.amazon.com/Visions-fugitives-Medtner-Prokoviev-Chopin/dp/B00NSOP9CY, with fascinating couplings; you can see a live performance of the last movement at
A few other things that you may know already, but I don't think they've been mentioned: Gourari's Scherzos ; Arthur Moreira Lima's Waltzes and Preludes; Mazurkas by Halina Czerny-Stefanska (complete) and Youra Guller (selection); Wendy Chen's Ballades; Czerny-Stefanska's Polonaises.

AC
h***@btinternet.com
2015-06-23 07:57:20 UTC
Permalink
I'm glad I heard Goerner's op 58, so thanks Bozo. Impeccable tone, phrasing, etc etc blah blah. My only reservation has to do with creative vision. Does he have one? Horszowski does.
Bozo
2015-06-24 00:16:26 UTC
Permalink
I'm glad I heard Goerner's op 58, so thanks Bozo. Impeccable tone, phrasing, >etc etc blah blah. My only reservation has to do with creative vision. Does he >have one?
Scherzo No.4, 2008 (?) , live video :



On the EMI cd, too, if I recall.
m***@gmail.com
2015-06-25 17:33:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by m***@gmail.com
Post by h***@btinternet.com
There are some interesting comments around here, and some names which are new to me. I was interested in Steve's comments along the lines of "matter of fact but charming", and "can bear dryness if the musicianship is intelligent."
This is exactly what I found with Froberger's late partitas - Froberger's late music reminds me of Chopin, the so called Death Music, I have no idea whether Chopin knew Froberger, but they were kindred spirits. The trick with late Froberger was to play the music so accurately and cool headedly and in such a controled manner that there isn't any suggestion that the emotions being expresed are actually being suffered by the performer. And yet - to play the music very expressively. This is what Leonhardt's later recordings are like, the one for Teldec especially. Vartolo too.
In Chopin op 58 I'm not sure I've really found the equivalent of Leonhardt. Maybe Sofronitsky (in a Scriabin Museum recording), maybe Demidenko, maybe Kissin. [...]
Didn't know about this Sofronitsky. Had no idea he even played it.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B0002K71VO/
SE.
Do you know Marian Filar's impetuous op. 58? Available here: http://randomclassics.blogspot.com/2012/09/the-art-of-marian-filar-and-frieda.html. There's more of Filar's Chopin on Meloclassic derived from radio broadcasts, but I haven't heard it yet: http://www.meloclassic.com/home/marian-filar/. Anna Gourari's op. 58 (http://www.amazon.com/Visions-fugitives-Medtner-Prokoviev-Chopin/dp/B00NSOP9CY, with fascinating couplings; you can see a live performance of the last movement at http://youtu.be/dkK2CvwPAC8 A few other things that you may know already, but I don't think they've been mentioned: Gourari's Scherzos ; Arthur Moreira Lima's Waltzes and Preludes; Mazurkas by Halina Czerny-Stefanska (complete) and Youra Guller (selection); Wendy Chen's Ballades; Czerny-Stefanska's Polonaises.
AC
Thanks, Alan, I will be listening to Filar. I think I've heard the Gourari.

SE.
dk
2015-06-25 04:17:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by m***@gmail.com
Post by h***@btinternet.com
There are some interesting comments around here, and some names which are new to me. I was interested in Steve's comments along the lines of "matter of fact but charming", and "can bear dryness if the musicianship is intelligent."
This is exactly what I found with Froberger's late partitas - Froberger's late music reminds me of Chopin, the so called Death Music, I have no idea whether Chopin knew Froberger, but they were kindred spirits. The trick with late Froberger was to play the music so accurately and cool headedly and in such a controled manner that there isn't any suggestion that the emotions being expresed are actually being suffered by the performer. And yet - to play the music very expressively. This is what Leonhardt's later recordings are like, the one for Teldec especially. Vartolo too.
In Chopin op 58 I'm not sure I've really found the equivalent of Leonhardt. Maybe Sofronitsky (in a Scriabin Museum recording), maybe Demidenko, maybe Kissin. [...]
Didn't know about this Sofronitsky. Had no idea he even played it.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B0002K71VO/
Zhukov, London 1997, live from Wigmore Hall, Denon audio DVD.

dk
h***@btinternet.com
2015-06-25 06:03:46 UTC
Permalink
My Zhukov op 58 got labeled 1998, but I'm sure it must be the same one as DK's. Pletnev's more my cup of tea in that sonata.

I've started to listen to Janina Fialkowska's chopin - mazurkas and op 58. I think what she does is interesting.
Tony
2015-06-25 08:13:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@btinternet.com
My Zhukov op 58 got labeled 1998, but I'm sure it must be the same one as DK's. Pletnev's more my cup of tea in that sonata.
I've started to listen to Janina Fialkowska's chopin - mazurkas and op 58. I think what she does is interesting.
No the '98 Zhukov op. 58 is from Ann Arbor, courtesy of Peter Lemken. I find it has a slightly more intense Largo than the London recital.
Tony
2015-06-25 08:19:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony
Post by h***@btinternet.com
My Zhukov op 58 got labeled 1998, but I'm sure it must be the same one as DK's. Pletnev's more my cup of tea in that sonata.
I've started to listen to Janina Fialkowska's chopin - mazurkas and op 58. I think what she does is interesting.
No the '98 Zhukov op. 58 is from Ann Arbor, courtesy of Peter Lemken. I find it has a slightly more intense Largo than the London recital.
Incidentally you could try Ivo Pogorelich's deconstructive op. 58, with its 18 minute Largo, which I've put on YT. I think it's an amazing experience, in line with Rzewski's Appassionata and Nyiregyhazi's Rach PC 2 slow movement.
m***@gmail.com
2015-06-25 17:37:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony
Post by h***@btinternet.com
My Zhukov op 58 got labeled 1998, but I'm sure it must be the same one as DK's. Pletnev's more my cup of tea in that sonata.
I've started to listen to Janina Fialkowska's chopin - mazurkas and op 58. I think what she does is interesting.
No the '98 Zhukov op. 58 is from Ann Arbor, courtesy of Peter Lemken. I find it has a slightly more intense Largo than the London recital.
The 1980 or so Zhukov Op 58, on Melodiya LP cw the Schumann Fantasy, is the one I like most. It's too bad the MK label didn't do more with their CD series, the one that includes Bunin and one Zhukov release (Tchaikovsky Seasons and Scriabin Preludes, Vers La Flamme, etc.) This would have been good for it.

SE.
dk
2015-07-02 06:26:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony
Post by h***@btinternet.com
My Zhukov op 58 got labeled 1998, but I'm sure it must be the same
one as DK's. Pletnev's more my cup of tea in that sonata.
I've started to listen to Janina Fialkowska's chopin - mazurkas and op
58. I think what she does is interesting.
No the '98 Zhukov op. 58 is from Ann Arbor, courtesy of Peter Lemken.
I find it has a slightly more intense Largo than the London recital.
OTOH the final movement of the London performance is more bone chilling!
No one has ever captured the dark terror of that movement better than Igor.

dk
dk
2015-07-02 06:05:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@btinternet.com
My Zhukov op 58 got labeled 1998, but I'm sure it must be the same one as DK's. Pletnev's more my cup of tea in that sonata.
I've started to listen to Janina Fialkowska's chopin - mazurkas
and op 58. I think what she does is interesting.
Fialkowska sounds pretty heavy handed to my poor ears.

dk
dk
2015-07-02 06:42:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Emerson
I've probably mentioned these here before, but a few out-of-the-way
Sonata Op 58 with Malcuzynski from about 1950, in mono. I'm not aware of
a transfer. Much more successful performance than the one he did later
in stereo.
Etudes, Preludes, and Waltzes with Milosz Magin. These are my favorite
out of the 60% or so of his Chopin that I know. The Waltzes appeared on
a fairly common CD, the rest on a series of 2-disc sets that are scarce;
I imagine they're still available via download from Qobuz and probably
others.
Sonata Op 58 with Firkusny on what's probably Orfeo, I can't find the
disc at present. The coupling is the Moussourgsky Pictures in a
performance that doesn't do much for me. The sonata is fairly
matter-of-fact, but it has charm.
Ballades 3 and 4, live by Magaloff, who is fiery and unrecognizable.
These have appeared on Ades CD and on a variety of iffy-looking LPs.
I agree with Dan about Pletnev's Barcarolle, assuming it's the one on
Virgin, which I've been praising forever. I also love the Stefan
Askenase Barcarolle. The work can hold up to a little bit of dryness (or
more) if the musicianship is intelligent.
Add the Ballades recorded in 2008 in Tokyo by Henri Barda (HJ Lim's
teacher and a Tigermann pupil):
http://youtu.be/4MqMgonWu9E

dk
Oscar
2015-07-28 02:05:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Emerson
I agree with Dan about Pletnev's Barcarolle, assuming it's the one on
Virgin, which I've been praising forever.
I finally got Pletnev's Chopin recital on Virgin. The entire disc is excellent -- the E major Nocturne (Op.62 No.2) is ravishing -- but the Barcarolle stands above the rest. Thanks to you and DK.
dk
2015-07-29 07:28:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Oscar
Post by Steve Emerson
I agree with Dan about Pletnev's Barcarolle, assuming it's the one on
Virgin, which I've been praising forever.
I finally got Pletnev's Chopin recital on Virgin. The entire disc is excellent --
the E major Nocturne (Op.62 No.2) is ravishing -- but the Barcarolle stands
above the rest. Thanks to you and DK.
Zecchi is great too!


dk
t***@gmail.com
2015-06-22 12:18:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@btinternet.com
Anyway, I'm starting to get interested in Chopin again, and I'm in the mood to hear some more. And so I just wondered here if anyone has come across any interesting Chopin recordings recently.
It's not easy to come up with recommendations, since Chopin is one of the most recorded composers, but here are a few interpretations that I find exceptional:

* Ashkenazy's first recording of the Etudes (either on Melodya or Saga), wonderfully poetic playing;
* Ballades by Krystian Zimerman;
* Nocturnes by Claudio Arrau, not everybody's cup of tea because of his slow tempi, but what a glorious sound and cantabile!
* Preludes by Daniil Trifonov, heard them live as well and haven't often heard them played like this;
* 1st Concerto by Argerich/Abbado, very energetic playing
* recital on BBC Legends by Shura Cherkassky, he could be quirky, but he loved music and never produced a harsh tone on the piano!
* Scherzi by Sviatoslav Richter; barnstorming and poetic..
* 2nd Concerto by Ashkenazy/Zinman; one of his early, beautiful recordings from the mid 60's, also because of the coupling (Bach concerto BWV 1052)
* Etudes by Pollini, he may be a "cold water fish" (as Earl Wild called him), but again, I haven't heard these played better than by him..
* Etudes, 2nd/3rd sonatas/nocturnes by Nelson Freire, very natural playing

And unfortunately, there are several performances that haven't been recorded and should have... I will never forget how Radu Lupu played the 3rd sonata (the slow movement was hypnotic, but he started banging in the last movement) and I think it's unforgivable that nobody managed to convince Zimerman to record the 2nd and 3rd sonatas..............

W.
Tony
2015-06-22 15:45:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@btinternet.com
This past couple of weeks I've really enjoyed a couple of Chopin recordings. One was the third sonata played by Samson François, the standard EMI one made in the studio. The sound is not so great, hard, but the performance is passionate and seems to me psychological - like it touches on strange almost psychedelic mental states. There's another live recording by François of the first three movements sonata, with much more truthful and beautiful sound, it's in that massive box released a few years ago. But, quite frankly, I thought it was relatively uninteresting poetically.
The other was Vlado Perlemuter's mazurkas. The music doesn't dance in a lively foot tapping way, on the contrary, but I liked it because of the way he separates the voices, sometimes producung unexpected dissonances.
Both these recordings are clearly not recommendable without reservations, either because of tempo or sound. Nevertheless I think they both get at something special in the music which makes them great fun to hear.
Anyway, I'm starting to get interested in Chopin again, and I'm in the mood to hear some more. And so I just wondered here if anyone has come across any interesting Chopin recordings recently.
If you haven't heard them yet, try Kemal Gekic for the first ballade and first scherzo. I've uploaded them to YT
CSX
2018-10-09 08:06:13 UTC
Permalink
Everything that recorded Vitalij Margulis: it's a couple of CDs with 2nd Sonata, selection of Etudes, Nocturnes.
3rd Sonata and 2nd scherzo (live) from Alexei Sultanov.
Kemal Gekic's Japan recital.
C

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