Discussion:
WAYLTL - June, 2020
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Bozo
2020-06-02 18:21:11 UTC
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Decided to extend a bit further my dive into my old lp's :

Faure's complete Barcarolles, Collard, EMI ca.1974.Great playing, but I am more partial to the composer's Nocturnes ( also have Collard's EMI ).

Brahms' Piano Quartet # 3,Op.60, the gem of the set for me and one of the composer's greatest works (IMHO), Guarneri Quartet with Rubinstein, RCA box of all 4 plus the Schumann Op.44 Piano Quintet.
c***@gmail.com
2020-06-02 19:19:33 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Faure's complete Barcarolles, Collard, EMI ca.1974.Great playing, but I am more partial to the composer's Nocturnes ( also have Collard's EMI ).
Brahms' Piano Quartet # 3,Op.60, the gem of the set for me and one of the composer's greatest works (IMHO), Guarneri Quartet with Rubinstein, RCA box of all 4 plus the Schumann Op.44 Piano Quintet.
Nice stuff! We've been on a Haydn kick for the past couple of weeks: all of the symphonies that Derek Solomons recorded with L'estro armonico for Saga & CBS, and Dorati's recording of "Il mondo della luna" one act at a time. It doesn't get any better than that: what a cast!

Riding my exercise bike to Kondrashin's 7/9 of a Mahler symphony cycle as collected by Melodiya. Reached his brisk and dramatic 9th this morning, and it was just what I was in the mood for.

AC
Al Eisner
2020-06-02 22:34:37 UTC
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Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Bozo
Faure's complete Barcarolles, Collard, EMI ca.1974.Great playing, but I am more partial to the composer's Nocturnes ( also have Collard's EMI ).
Brahms' Piano Quartet # 3,Op.60, the gem of the set for me and one of the composer's greatest works (IMHO), Guarneri Quartet with Rubinstein, RCA box of all 4 plus the Schumann Op.44 Piano Quintet.
Nice stuff! We've been on a Haydn kick for the past couple of weeks: all of the symphonies that Derek Solomons recorded with L'estro armonico for Saga & CBS, and Dorati's recording of "Il mondo della luna" one act at a time. It doesn't get any better than that: what a cast!
Riding my exercise bike to Kondrashin's 7/9 of a Mahler symphony cycle as collected by Melodiya. Reached his brisk and dramatic 9th this morning, and it was just what I was in the mood for.
AC
That sounds like a quite incredible amount of exercise.
--
Al Eisner
c***@gmail.com
2020-06-05 14:00:00 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
Post by c***@gmail.com
Riding my exercise bike to Kondrashin's 7/9 of a Mahler symphony cycle as collected by Melodiya. Reached his brisk and dramatic 9th this morning, and it was just what I was in the mood for.
AC
That sounds like a quite incredible amount of exercise.
Al Eisner
:-) Well, yeah, but figure 45-60 minutes per day and it doesn't take too long to get through the cycle. Some symphonies get spread over two days. Accompanied by catch-up reading of New Yorker (now at November 2019), New York Times Magazine (December), and New York Review of Books (almost caught up!). Staying in shape while confined to quarters ;-) Also, my wife doesn't like Mahler symphonies and she's out of earshot while I'm exercising. So you see, it's all perfectly rational.

More seriously, I enjoyed revisiting Kondrashin's Mahler.

Alan
Bozo
2020-06-05 16:21:54 UTC
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Pianist Emanuele Arciuli’s “Walk in Beauty” solo piano Innova 2017 2- cd set I have. Also here if interested :


JohnGavin
2020-06-02 22:40:09 UTC
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2 recordings recommended by D. Hurwitz. The Mendelssohn Piano Quartets with the Bartholdy on Naxos. I can’t agree with him when he asserts they are great. Not even in the vicinity of the great Piano Trios or the Octet.

On the other hand his high praise of Petrenko’s Rachmaninov Symphonic Dances is spot on IMO. One of the best I’ve heard. Also, this work and the Vespers are the composers greatest IMO.
Oscar
2020-06-02 23:36:11 UTC
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Post by JohnGavin
2 recordings recommended by D. Hurwitz. The Mendelssohn Piano Quartets with the Bartholdy on Naxos.
I can’t agree with him when he asserts they are great. Not even in the vicinity of the great Piano Trios or
the Octet.
What does the article "the" refer to, the recordings or the compositions?
Post by JohnGavin
On the other hand his high praise of Petrenko’s Rachmaninov Symphonic Dances is spot on IMO. One of
the best I’ve heard. Also, this work and the Vespers are the composers greatest IMO.
I really like Petrenko's Rachmaninoff's Symphonic Dances, too, and the entirety of his orchestral works cycle on Warners. I was less impressed by the Piano Concertos set from 2010-11, maybe it was my high expectations. Two great musicians and creative thinkers there. I should go revisit those.

Stay safe in New York! Keep away from Chiara Di Blasio and the head-cracking N.Y.P.D.!
Bozo
2020-06-03 00:26:19 UTC
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Post by Oscar
Stay safe in New York! Keep away from Chiara Di Blasio and the head-cracking N.Y.P.D.!
Apparently the NYPD were largely absent Monday night ? Even Cuomo was mad.
Bozo
2020-06-03 00:24:51 UTC
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On the other hand his high praise of Petrenko’s Rachmaninov Symphonic Dances is spot on IMO. One of >the best I’ve heard. Also, this work and the Vespers are the composers greatest IMO.
I defer to you on Vespers, but agree on Dances.
Raymond Hall
2020-06-03 02:36:22 UTC
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Post by JohnGavin
2 recordings recommended by D. Hurwitz. The Mendelssohn Piano Quartets with the Bartholdy on Naxos. I can’t agree with him when he asserts they are great. Not even in the vicinity of the great Piano Trios or the Octet.
On the other hand his high praise of Petrenko’s Rachmaninov Symphonic Dances is spot on IMO. One of the best I’ve heard. Also, this work and the Vespers are the composers greatest IMO.
Agree, but I have a soft spot for the 3rd symphony, where the lush quality apparent in the 2nd symphony, for example, is pared down. Apparently Rachmaninov thought it was one of his best works also. A gorgeous work. I have Ashkenazy/RCO in this.

Ray Hall, Taree
Gerard
2020-06-03 08:26:09 UTC
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Post by JohnGavin
2 recordings recommended by D. Hurwitz. The Mendelssohn Piano Quartets with the Bartholdy on Naxos. I can’t agree with him when he asserts they are great. Not even in the vicinity of the great Piano Trios or the Octet.
On the other hand his high praise of Petrenko’s Rachmaninov Symphonic Dances is spot on IMO. One of the best I’ve heard.
I agree about Petrenko. On the other hand Hurwitz forgot and/or skipped a few interesting other recordings.
Like the last recording by Jansons (on BR Klassik), Oue, Sokhiev, Temirkanov, Litton, de Waart, Zinman, Kogan, Pletnev, Polyanski, Neeme Järvi, Paavo Järvi, Kondrashin with the RCO, Jurowski, Gergiev, and other recordings by Svetlanov and Ashkenazy.
Tatonik
2020-06-03 23:19:54 UTC
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I'm listening to Bach's keyboard partitas yet again. Outside, the
robins are providing some extra counterpoint. Not the most learned
counterpoint, perhaps, but not bad, considering.
number_six
2020-06-04 20:23:19 UTC
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Listening to Vaughan Williams - A Cotswold Romance - Hickox - Chnados

apparently s distilled version of Hugh the Drover

The other work on the cd is Death of Tintagiles -- have never heard it before
Lawrence Chalmers
2020-06-05 00:36:56 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Faure's complete Barcarolles, Collard, EMI ca.1974.Great playing, but I am more partial to the composer's Nocturnes ( also have Collard's EMI ).
Brahms' Piano Quartet # 3,Op.60, the gem of the set for me and one of the composer's greatest works (IMHO), Guarneri Quartet with Rubinstein, RCA box of all 4 plus the Schumann Op.44 Piano Quintet.
Sibelius 1,2,5,7 by Bernstein Vienna Phil. Expansive and dramatic versions I enjoyed very much. Must re-listen to the Bernstein/NY Phil set.
Al Eisner
2020-06-05 02:00:48 UTC
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Alina Ibragimova (a fine violinist) and Steven Osborne (one of my
favorite pianists) in Prokofiev's two Violin Sonatas and "Five
Melodies". I'm pretty familiar with #2, but I doubt if I've ever
heard #1 before - I surely would have remembered the work if I
had encountered it in a performance this convincing. (It's also
the first time I can recall a tempo marking of "allegrissimo".)
THe Melodies (not new to me) are at least worth hearing. (The opening
theme and some later moments sound a lot like, I don't know, Gershwin?)
A Hyperion CD - recommended.
--
Al Eisner
Frank Berger
2020-06-05 03:41:17 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
Alina Ibragimova (a fine violinist) and Steven Osborne (one
of my
favorite pianists) in Prokofiev's two Violin Sonatas and "Five
Melodies".  I'm pretty familiar with #2, but I doubt if I've
ever
heard #1 before - I surely would have remembered the work if I
had encountered it in a performance this convincing.  (It's
also
the first time I can recall a tempo marking of
"allegrissimo".) THe Melodies (not new to me) are at least
worth hearing.  (The opening theme and some later moments
sound a lot like, I don't know, Gershwin?)
A Hyperion CD - recommended.
If I was forced to name my single most favorite composition
it might be #2. I have around 30 recordings. Tops for me
are Perlman/Ashkenazy and Wilkomirska/Schein but there are
plenty of good ones. I enjoy watching Kremer/Argerich on YT.
Bozo
2020-06-05 13:26:00 UTC
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Post by Frank Berger
Tops for me
are Perlman/Ashkenazy and Wilkomirska/Schein but there are
plenty of good ones. I enjoy watching Kremer/Argerich on YT.
Agree with you and Al, the Prokofieff violin sonatas great works, my recording the Perlman/Ashkenazy RCA lp.For me , not as effective in the flute version.I have not heard the Ibragimova/Osborne, but usually find both artists excellent in anything they play.
Steve Emerson
2020-06-05 18:43:15 UTC
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Post by Frank Berger
Post by Al Eisner
Alina Ibragimova (a fine violinist) and Steven Osborne (one
of my
favorite pianists) in Prokofiev's two Violin Sonatas and "Five
Melodies".  I'm pretty familiar with #2, but I doubt if I've
ever
heard #1 before - I surely would have remembered the work if I
had encountered it in a performance this convincing.  (It's
also
the first time I can recall a tempo marking of
"allegrissimo".) THe Melodies (not new to me) are at least
worth hearing.  (The opening theme and some later moments
sound a lot like, I don't know, Gershwin?)
A Hyperion CD - recommended.
If I was forced to name my single most favorite composition
it might be #2. I have around 30 recordings. Tops for me
are Perlman/Ashkenazy and Wilkomirska/Schein but there are
plenty of good ones. I enjoy watching Kremer/Argerich on YT.
Oistrakh, who asked the composer to create the violin version, is breathtaking with Yampolsky; as much as I like Wilkomirska/Schein.

Ibragimova in #1 sounds irresistible.

SE.
Frank Berger
2020-06-05 18:52:58 UTC
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Post by Steve Emerson
Post by Frank Berger
Post by Al Eisner
Alina Ibragimova (a fine violinist) and Steven Osborne (one
of my
favorite pianists) in Prokofiev's two Violin Sonatas and "Five
Melodies".  I'm pretty familiar with #2, but I doubt if I've
ever
heard #1 before - I surely would have remembered the work if I
had encountered it in a performance this convincing.  (It's
also
the first time I can recall a tempo marking of
"allegrissimo".) THe Melodies (not new to me) are at least
worth hearing.  (The opening theme and some later moments
sound a lot like, I don't know, Gershwin?)
A Hyperion CD - recommended.
If I was forced to name my single most favorite composition
it might be #2. I have around 30 recordings. Tops for me
are Perlman/Ashkenazy and Wilkomirska/Schein but there are
plenty of good ones. I enjoy watching Kremer/Argerich on YT.
Oistrakh, who asked the composer to create the violin version, is breathtaking with Yampolsky; as much as I like Wilkomirska/Schein.
Ibragimova in #1 sounds irresistible.
SE.
I was about to order it, but checked and I have it already.
Now I have to find it.
c***@gmail.com
2020-06-05 19:23:29 UTC
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Post by Steve Emerson
Oistrakh, who asked the composer to create the violin version, is breathtaking with Yampolsky; as much as I like Wilkomirska/Schein.
Ibragimova in #1 sounds irresistible.
SE
I agree with Steve, although I keep encountering excellent recordings of the Prokofiev Violin Sonatas. One that took me by surprise recently was Catherine Courtois with Catherine Collard. I had never heard of the violinist and would not have associated Collard with Prokofiev. But they're terrific. I also just heard Mayumi Fujikawa with Craig Sheppard for the first time. Also excellent, esp. in #1. My longtime sleeper recommendation in these works is Amoyal/Chiu. Amoyal is always great, and while I'm up and down about Chiu's Prokofiev, he rises to the occasion in these works.

AC
Frank Berger
2020-06-05 20:01:54 UTC
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Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Steve Emerson
Oistrakh, who asked the composer to create the violin version, is breathtaking with Yampolsky; as much as I like Wilkomirska/Schein.
Ibragimova in #1 sounds irresistible.
SE
I agree with Steve, although I keep encountering excellent recordings of the Prokofiev Violin Sonatas. One that took me by surprise recently was Catherine Courtois with Catherine Collard. I had never heard of the violinist and would not have associated Collard with Prokofiev. But they're terrific. I also just heard Mayumi Fujikawa with Craig Sheppard for the first time. Also excellent, esp. in #1. My longtime sleeper recommendation in these works is Amoyal/Chiu. Amoyal is always great, and while I'm up and down about Chiu's Prokofiev, he rises to the occasion in these works.
AC
From a review of a 1983 NYT concert given by Courtois and
Collard.

"To call the teaming of the violinist Catherine Courtois and
the pianist Catherine Collard a duo is not only democratic,
but truthful as well."

Were they elected to play together?

https://www.nytimes.com/1983/04/24/arts/music-debuts-in-review-120005.html
Frank Berger
2020-06-05 20:13:32 UTC
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Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Steve Emerson
Oistrakh, who asked the composer to create the violin version, is breathtaking with Yampolsky; as much as I like Wilkomirska/Schein.
Ibragimova in #1 sounds irresistible.
SE
I agree with Steve, although I keep encountering excellent recordings of the Prokofiev Violin Sonatas. One that took me by surprise recently was Catherine Courtois with Catherine Collard. I had never heard of the violinist and would not have associated Collard with Prokofiev. But they're terrific. I also just heard Mayumi Fujikawa with Craig Sheppard for the first time. Also excellent, esp. in #1. My longtime sleeper recommendation in these works is Amoyal/Chiu. Amoyal is always great, and while I'm up and down about Chiu's Prokofiev, he rises to the occasion in these works.
AC
Courtois/Collard recorded both Prokofiev sonatas (as you
know). But for CD they paired #1 with 2 Schumann sonatas.
That wouldn't have occurred to me. Guessing why: They
wanted to release the Schumann sonatas on CD but had enough
room only for 1 of the Prokofiev sonatas and picked #1
because it was a throw in anyway so why not? Or not.
Al Eisner
2020-06-05 21:50:04 UTC
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Post by Steve Emerson
Post by Frank Berger
Post by Al Eisner
Alina Ibragimova (a fine violinist) and Steven Osborne (one
of my
favorite pianists) in Prokofiev's two Violin Sonatas and "Five
Melodies".  I'm pretty familiar with #2, but I doubt if I've
ever
heard #1 before - I surely would have remembered the work if I
had encountered it in a performance this convincing.  (It's
also
the first time I can recall a tempo marking of
"allegrissimo".) THe Melodies (not new to me) are at least
worth hearing.  (The opening theme and some later moments
sound a lot like, I don't know, Gershwin?)
A Hyperion CD - recommended.
If I was forced to name my single most favorite composition
it might be #2. I have around 30 recordings. Tops for me
are Perlman/Ashkenazy and Wilkomirska/Schein but there are
plenty of good ones. I enjoy watching Kremer/Argerich on YT.
Oistrakh, who asked the composer to create the violin version, is breathtaking with Yampolsky; as much as I like Wilkomirska/Schein.
Ibragimova in #1 sounds irresistible.
SE.
Is that Oistrakh the Testament? I see he has a recording of #1 (and a
Brahms sonata with Richter on Orfeo.
--
Al Eisner
Frank Berger
2020-06-05 22:24:05 UTC
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On Thursday, June 4, 2020 at 8:41:23 PM UTC-7, Frank
Post by Frank Berger
Post by Al Eisner
Alina Ibragimova (a fine violinist) and Steven Osborne (one
of my
favorite pianists) in Prokofiev's two Violin Sonatas and
"Five
Melodies".  I'm pretty familiar with #2, but I doubt if
I've
ever
heard #1 before - I surely would have remembered the
work if I
had encountered it in a performance this convincing.  (It's
also
the first time I can recall a tempo marking of
"allegrissimo".) THe Melodies (not new to me) are at least
worth hearing.  (The opening theme and some later moments
sound a lot like, I don't know, Gershwin?)
A Hyperion CD - recommended.
If I was forced to name my single most favorite composition
it might be #2.  I have around 30 recordings. Tops for me
are Perlman/Ashkenazy and Wilkomirska/Schein but there are
plenty of good ones.  I enjoy watching Kremer/Argerich on
YT.
Oistrakh, who asked the composer to create the violin
version, is breathtaking with Yampolsky; as much as I like
Wilkomirska/Schein.
Ibragimova in #1 sounds irresistible.
SE.
Is that Oistrakh the Testament?  I see he has a recording of
#1 (and a
Brahms sonata with Richter on Orfeo.
No. Oistrakh/Richter on Orfeo, Oistrakh/Yampolsky on
Testement (previously on EMI).
Al Eisner
2020-06-06 01:01:38 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
Post by Steve Emerson
Post by Frank Berger
Post by Al Eisner
Alina Ibragimova (a fine violinist) and Steven Osborne (one
of my
favorite pianists) in Prokofiev's two Violin Sonatas and "Five
Melodies".  I'm pretty familiar with #2, but I doubt if I've
ever
heard #1 before - I surely would have remembered the work if I
had encountered it in a performance this convincing.  (It's
also
the first time I can recall a tempo marking of
"allegrissimo".) THe Melodies (not new to me) are at least
worth hearing.  (The opening theme and some later moments
sound a lot like, I don't know, Gershwin?)
A Hyperion CD - recommended.
If I was forced to name my single most favorite composition
it might be #2. I have around 30 recordings. Tops for me
are Perlman/Ashkenazy and Wilkomirska/Schein but there are
plenty of good ones. I enjoy watching Kremer/Argerich on YT.
Oistrakh, who asked the composer to create the violin version, is
breathtaking with Yampolsky; as much as I like Wilkomirska/Schein.
Ibragimova in #1 sounds irresistible.
SE.
Is that Oistrakh the Testament? I see he has a recording of #1 (and a
Brahms sonata with Richter on Orfeo.
Sorry, missing ")" after "Brahms sonata".
--
Al Eisner
number_six
2020-06-06 21:13:19 UTC
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Weill on a Polydor CD --

Der Jasager - 1955 recording conducted by Siegfried Kohler, Dusseldorf CO, Children's Chorus, and soloists

Concerto for Violin and Wind Orch
Anahid Ajemian violin, Izler Solomon conducts MGM Wind Orch

+ another couple of tracks conducted by Arthur Winograd
Bozo
2020-06-06 22:53:58 UTC
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Post by number_six
Concerto for Violin and Wind Orch
Anahid Ajemian violin, Izler Solomon conducts MGM Wind Orch
I actually have the original MGM lp which paired Webern's four Pieces for Violin and piano, Op.7. Was completely put off by the Weill on first hearing, did not listen again for about 55 years (!), now find it interesting.Youth is wasted on the young.
number_six
2020-06-07 17:40:21 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Post by number_six
Concerto for Violin and Wind Orch
Anahid Ajemian violin, Izler Solomon conducts MGM Wind Orch
I actually have the original MGM lp which paired Webern's four Pieces for Violin and piano, Op.7. Was completely put off by the Weill on first hearing, did not listen again for about 55 years (!), now find it interesting.Youth is wasted on the young.
55 years ago, I wouldn't have liked it either!

Not much chance, but a box set of some MGM classical would be interesting.
number_six
2020-06-08 16:18:02 UTC
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Szell Haydn box with Sym 88, 92 - 99, 104
there are two recordings of 97 included here
Bozo
2020-06-10 20:48:55 UTC
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The great pianist Beveridge Webster’s distinctive Brahms playing, Dover Publications lp(s)issued in the ’60’s, never made it to cd to my knowledge. If Webster had been a painter, he may have been of the Pointillism School (?)

Schumann Variations , Op.9 :



Intermezzo,Op.119,# 3 :


Rhapsody,Op.119,# 4:

v***@protonmail.com
2020-06-10 21:50:47 UTC
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Richter's Concertgebouw Diabelli Variations. Sounds real good to me, mostly.


C.
number_six
2020-06-12 01:01:56 UTC
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Mahler 3 with Tennstedt, LPO on EMI

A coherent, compelling reading of this expansive symphonic canvas

Those Szell Haydn Syms were a good lead-in for this.
Bob Harper
2020-06-12 04:21:54 UTC
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Mahler 2, Tennstedt, LPO Live from 2/20/89. Stupendous is a gross
understatement.

Bob Harper
Alex Brown
2020-06-12 12:34:32 UTC
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Post by Bob Harper
Mahler 2, Tennstedt, LPO Live from 2/20/89. Stupendous is a gross
understatement.
Bob Harper
That is indeed an amazing performance/recording. After hearing that, no
other M2 cuts it for me ...
--
- Alex Brown
Bozo
2020-06-12 13:32:07 UTC
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Back to Joaquin Turina's piano trios, mine the Naxos cd with Trio Arbos, here a fine recording of the 1904 Trio in F major,Lincoln Trio,Cedille cd. Recommended:






Al Eisner
2020-06-12 20:37:00 UTC
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I heard a little of Bruce Hungerford's LvB some time ago, but never
listened systematically. The performances are conveniently collected
in a 5-CD box from Piano Classics: 18 sonatas plus several short works.
The booklet effectively describes the music, but, strangely, makes no
mention of Hungerford. Track timings are given only on the individual
cardboard sleeves, and limited recording information only on the box.

So far: sonatas 2, 4, 5, 6, and 7. Only #5 disappointed - it seemed
rather out of balance, with a very slow adagio that on first hearing
didn't seem to be sustainable. That may be surprising in light of
Hungerford's superb development of the largos of #4 and #7. There were
places throughout where I heard things about the works that I hadn't
previously consciously noted, as well as a sense that this can be weightier
music than "early Beethoven" might suggest.

Unmissable. So far so good.
--
Al Eisner
Bozo
2020-06-12 22:36:14 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
Unmissable. So far so good.
Thanks , Al. Please keep reporting. I may have to consider a purchase.I have a single Vanguard cd of Hungerford playing Opa.109-111 which I esteem highly.
Al Eisner
2020-06-13 00:13:02 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Post by Al Eisner
Unmissable. So far so good.
Thanks , Al. Please keep reporting. I may have to consider a purchase.I have a single Vanguard cd of Hungerford playing Opa.109-111 which I esteem highly.
Will do. Amazon still sells the set. (Or if MP3 suffices, it's all
in the Bach Guild Big Beethoven Box, 99-cents for the whole box).
--
Al Eisner
Al Eisner
2020-06-13 01:02:01 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
Post by Bozo
Post by Al Eisner
Unmissable. So far so good.
Thanks , Al. Please keep reporting. I may have to consider a purchase.I
have a single Vanguard cd of Hungerford playing Opa.109-111 which I esteem
highly.
Will do. Amazon still sells the set. (Or if MP3 suffices, it's all
in the Bach Guild Big Beethoven Box, 99-cents for the whole box).
Sorry, the Big Beethoven PIANO box. That listing at Amazon has some
mistakes: the 18 and 25 are I assume misattributed to Hungerford (maybe
Novaes, who is listed for 26?) and 9-10 are listed instead of 19-20.
That box also includes the Bagatelles by Denis Matthews, Diabelli by
Peter Serkin, and more.
--
Al Eisner
Bozo
2020-06-13 16:30:02 UTC
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String works of Anton Rubinstein :

String Quartet No.2,Op.17,Royal String Quartet Copenhagen, Etc.. cd :



Cello Concerto No.2,Op.96,Werner Thomas-Mifune,cello,Bamberger Symphony,Yuri Ahronovich, VMS cd:



Violin Concerto, Op.46, Mikhail Bezverkhny,violin,Moscow State Symphony,Veronika Dudarova, EMG Classics cd:

(Autoplay)
Bozo
2020-06-13 17:59:12 UTC
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And so I did not start to suffer withdrawal symptoms:

Anton Rubinstein’s Piano Sonata No.1, Ludovico Troncanetti,pianist, Fuori Rotta Music cd released May 19,2020,my first hearing of the pianist :


c***@gmail.com
2020-06-13 20:01:28 UTC
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Post by Bozo
http://youtu.be/sGZ3umDNuRc
Wow, Steve! Either you're a glutton for punishment or there is something in this music that I've missed on previous hearings. What did you particularly enjoy? (I confess to ongoing affection for the Cello Sonatas, but they weren't included in your binge-listen [yet].)

We just listened to a rebroadcast of "La Sonnambula" from the Met. Plenty of star power (Damrau & Camarena) and some spectacular moments, but the opera itself is a potboiler supreme (imo, obviously), offering little but those show-off opportunities. Moving on soon to the Rosbaud Beethoven box, which arrived from Germany today. There should be some pretty good music there, not to mention the conducting :-) Listened early this morning to vol. 1 of Ian Hobson's set of Hummel Piano Sonatas (##1 and 6). Thoroughly enjoyable.

AC
Ricardo Jimenez
2020-06-13 20:42:07 UTC
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Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Bozo
http://youtu.be/sGZ3umDNuRc
Wow, Steve! Either you're a glutton for punishment or there is something in this music that I've missed on previous hearings. What did you particularly enjoy? (I confess to ongoing affection for the Cello Sonatas, but they weren't included in your binge-listen [yet].)
We just listened to a rebroadcast of "La Sonnambula" from the Met. Plenty of star power (Damrau & Camarena) and some spectacular moments, but the opera itself is a potboiler supreme (imo, obviously), offering little but those show-off opportunities. Moving on soon to the Rosbaud Beethoven box, which arrived from Germany today. There should be some pretty good music there, not to mention the conducting :-) Listened early this morning to vol. 1 of Ian Hobson's set of Hummel Piano Sonatas (##1 and 6). Thoroughly enjoyable.
AC
As for Anton Rubinstein, I have found that I like best his opera "The
Demon." Next the cello sonatas, symphony #2 (Ocean, 7 movements for
the 7 seas) and piano concerto #4. Like Siegfried Wagner, everybody
has heard of him but almost nothing he wrote is ever performed in
front of a live audience.
Bozo
2020-06-14 16:36:20 UTC
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Permalink
Wow, Steve! Either you're a glutton for punishment or there is something in this music that I've missed >on >previous hearings. What did you particularly enjoy? (I confess to ongoing affection for the Cello >Sonatas, >but they weren't included in your binge-listen [yet].)
In general, I find most of his solo piano and PC’s forced, ostentatious,even trite, but the works linked previously and here had more “honest”, appealing lyricism, better development, more self-effacing, if occasionally wander and occasionally a bit long for the material.Interesting this “ lion of the piano” had such a wide compositional range ( and quantity ) while keeping in his fingers a large piano repertoire and conducting works of others.”Demon” opera I have not heard, “Ocean” symphony was not my cup of tea ( listened to only a little of it ). Also heard favorably:

Piano Trio No.3,Op.52,Eleonora Teplukhina,piano,Marat Bisengaliev,violin,Turi Semenov,cello, recorded 1990, re-issued Dec. 2019 Bomba-Piter :


Viola Sonata, Op.49, Ilario Gastaldello,viola,Marina Baudoux,piano,Contralto Records cd :


Violin Sonata No.3, Op.98,Daniela Cammarano, violin,Alessandro Deljavan, from their set of all 3 sonatas on Brilliant Classics:


Had not heard the cello sonatas before.Thanks for the suggestion.Agree, No.1 worth hearing, for same reasons as the other works I linked, and more “ tightly knit.” Here an Etcetera cd of both, Gert Von Buelow,cello,Jose Ribera,piano:

Al Eisner
2020-06-13 22:53:02 UTC
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On Fri, 12 Jun 2020, Bozo wrote:

[Hungerford's LvB]
Post by Bozo
Post by Al Eisner
Unmissable. So far so good.
Thanks , Al. Please keep reporting. I may have to consider a purchase.I have a single Vanguard cd of Hungerford playing Opa.109-111 which I esteem highly.
Continuing: #13, Andante favori, 8, 14, 17 and 23, maintaining the
generally high standards, He brings out something fresh and interesting
in most works. Well, not so much in the "Moonlight" (where I find
the percussive finale a bit unpleasant), but listen to the "Pathétique"
or the mysterious opening movement of the "Tempest". Even the Andante
favori (too often dull) gains some life.
--
Al Eisner
Al Eisner
2020-06-16 01:05:56 UTC
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Permalink
1) Next CD in Hungerford LvB set: Sonatas 1, 12, 19, 20 and several short
works.

2) Andrea Lucchesini, "Dialogues" (listened twice)

a) The first half consists of 6 Encores by Berio, interleaved with
six very well chosen (and brilliantly executed) D. Scarlatti
sonatas. At first a few of the shorter and slower-moving Berio
pieces were getting lost among the Scarlatti, but I was eventually
able to appreciate these interesting pieces on their own, and
also getting some of the rationale for the juxtapositions.
A success, I think. Useful notes by the pianist.*

b) Then Jörg Widmann's "Idyll and Abyss", six miniaturess inspired by
Schubert (and sometimes directly quoting him), interleaved (the
pianist's suggestion) with the Moments Musicaux. Widmann is
quite eclectic, so I'm less sure what to make of his work. I've
long had the impression that MM was hard to put across. I think
AL's is quite a good effort (although there were times I was
wishing for Schnabel). The combination is worth hearing.

* There is a still-available CD of Lucchesini playing the complete
piano works of Berio (they were friends). I have such a CD (no longer
available) played by Tristano (Schlimé). Any comparisons?
--
Al Eisner
Oscar
2020-06-16 03:10:05 UTC
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1) Next CD in Hungerford LvB set: Sonatas 1, 12, 19, 20 and several short works.
Very nice. Is this part of the Piano Classics set?
Al Eisner
2020-06-16 03:41:04 UTC
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Post by Oscar
1) Next CD in Hungerford LvB set: Sonatas 1, 12, 19, 20 and several short works.
Very nice. Is this part of the Piano Classics set?
Yes. I had already recently posted under WAYLTl abiyt the first
three CD's. This one had relatively simple works, so I didn't have
additional comments. (I might have expected something a bit more
special about #12, given how good most of the other works were. And
I could have said that #20 did strike me as special.)

The set is still at Amazon, although no longer on the Piano Classics
web site. (The label seems to be part of Brilliant Classics.)
--
Al Eisner
Al Eisner
2020-06-18 03:46:01 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
1) Next CD in Hungerford LvB set: Sonatas 1, 12, 19, 20 and several short
works.
And, finally, saving the best for last: sonatas 24, 30, 31, 32.
The last three are wonderful. There is a lot of strange stuff from
LvB here, e.g., in the opening movement of 30 and much of 32. The
pianist brings this out, yet these movements, as well as the long last
movements of 30 and 32, seem entirely coherent. 32 ends by taking
flight, as it should.

Even allowing for Hungerford's premature death, he seems to have recorded
very little. I see that some of his Schubert (D959) and Chopin (the 3rd
sonata and more) are on Bach Guildm Big Boxes. But I'm curious about
his Brahms (also originally on a Vanguard CD) - has anyone heard it?
I didn't find a CD. There is various stuff on youtube (including some
of the above, some Bach-Busoni - may be on a 1955 recital which also
includes a Schibert Impromptu). Not yet investigated.
--
Al Eisner
Frank Berger
2020-06-18 04:05:20 UTC
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Permalink
1) Next CD in Hungerford LvB set:  Sonatas 1, 12, 19, 20
and several short
  works.
And, finally, saving the best for last:  sonatas 24, 30, 31,
32.
The last three are wonderful.  There is a lot of strange
stuff from
LvB here, e.g., in the opening movement of 30 and much of
32.  The
pianist brings this out, yet these movements, as well as the
long last
movements of 30 and 32, seem entirely coherent.  32 ends by
taking
flight, as it should.
Even allowing for Hungerford's premature death, he seems to
have recorded very little.  I see that  some of his Schubert
(D959) and Chopin (the 3rd
sonata and more) are on Bach Guildm Big Boxes.  But I'm
curious about
his Brahms (also originally on a Vanguard CD) - has anyone
heard it? I didn't find a CD.
There is one copy of the Vanguard CD on Ebay. 30 something
dollars.

There is various stuff on
youtube (including some
of the above, some Bach-Busoni - may be on a 1955 recital
which also
includes a Schibert Impromptu).  Not yet investigated.
Bob Harper
2020-06-12 15:52:07 UTC
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Post by Alex Brown
Post by Bob Harper
Mahler 2, Tennstedt, LPO Live from 2/20/89. Stupendous is a gross
understatement.
Bob Harper
That is indeed an amazing performance/recording. After hearing that, no
other M2 cuts it for me ...
I'm sure I'll listen to others, but I fear the same reaction as you have
had. It's that special.

Bob Harper
Frank Berger
2020-06-12 16:21:33 UTC
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Post by Bob Harper
Post by Alex Brown
Post by Bob Harper
Mahler 2, Tennstedt, LPO Live from 2/20/89. Stupendous is
a gross understatement.
Bob Harper
That is indeed an amazing performance/recording. After
hearing that, no other M2 cuts it for me ...
I'm sure I'll listen to others, but I fear the same reaction
as you have had. It's that special.
Bob Harper
My favorite (not to say best) has been Scherchen. I have
the Tennstedt but don't recall listening to it. Will do.
Owen
2020-06-18 16:42:01 UTC
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Post by Alex Brown
Post by Bob Harper
Mahler 2, Tennstedt, LPO Live from 2/20/89. Stupendous is a gross
understatement.
Bob Harper
That is indeed an amazing performance/recording. After hearing that, no
other M2 cuts it for me ...
Just listened to this. Absolutely agree. Lovingly played by the LPO,
but with fire, passion and warmth, may be the best M2 ever. For those
who still don't "get" Tennstedt not having heard him in concert, this
may be the convincer.

-Owen
Owen
2020-06-19 04:11:24 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Alex Brown
Post by Bob Harper
Mahler 2, Tennstedt, LPO Live from 2/20/89. Stupendous is a gross
understatement.
Bob Harper
That is indeed an amazing performance/recording. After hearing that,
no other M2 cuts it for me ...
Just listened to this.  Absolutely agree. Lovingly played by the LPO,
but with fire, passion and warmth, may be the best M2 ever.  For those
who still don't "get" Tennstedt not having heard him in concert, this
may be the convincer.
-Owen
Oh, and it's on Spotify at:
https://open.spotify.com/album/3LPH5sAMpjayflR2HCy25V?si=uBJVi7JIQ9m12M6UpELiTw

-Owen
number_six
2020-06-19 18:32:39 UTC
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A couple more entries from the DG 20th century classics series, which I believe I have collected in its ebtirety --

Sylvano Busotti - Rara Requiem - Taverna cond, other works cond by Sinopoli
Again I am reminded how time has worn hard-edged modernism into something familiar and comforting

Bernstein - Symphonies 1-3 - Jeremiah /Age of Anxiety /Kaddish

coming up next is the LaSalle Quartet's Lutoslawski /Penderecki /Mayuzuni /Cage
CD from the same series
Al Eisner
2020-06-20 03:02:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by number_six
A couple more entries from the DG 20th century classics series, which I believe I have collected in its ebtirety --
Sylvano Busotti - Rara Requiem - Taverna cond, other works cond by Sinopoli
Again I am reminded how time has worn hard-edged modernism into something familiar and comforting
Bernstein - Symphonies 1-3 - Jeremiah /Age of Anxiety /Kaddish
coming up next is the LaSalle Quartet's Lutoslawski /Penderecki /Mayuzuni /Cage
CD from the same series
Tippett, "A Child of our Time", Decca slim-line CD, from the 70's Phillps
album: Colin Davis, BBC Symphony (and choruses) and a mostly-all-star
set of soloists (Norma, Baker, Cassily, Shorley-Quirk). An impressive and
powerfu; oratorio. The use of spirituals is especially effective (and
reflects at least a loose tie-in to Juneteenth). Terrific.

This issue has no texts (useful especially for the choral singing),
but I was able to find something (approximately right?) on the web.

This reissue is part of a Decca series which covers the first half ot the
20th century, findable as a aet at Amazon as "Shaping the Century". A second
set (second half of the century) is also listed, but I haven't found
the contents. Both are labelled Decca/DG. I found somewhere a listing
of the first set, which has one work per composer, so I'm pretty sure the
second set is different from what number_six refers to above; his may be
https://www.isrbx.net/3137506046-va-deutsche-grammophons-20th-century-classics-series-1988-1998.html
It seems diffitult to find information on these series.
--
Al Eisner
Al Eisner
2020-06-20 03:09:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Al Eisner
Post by number_six
A couple more entries from the DG 20th century classics series, which I
believe I have collected in its ebtirety --
Sylvano Busotti - Rara Requiem - Taverna cond, other works cond by Sinopoli
Again I am reminded how time has worn hard-edged modernism into something
familiar and comforting
Bernstein - Symphonies 1-3 - Jeremiah /Age of Anxiety /Kaddish
coming up next is the LaSalle Quartet's Lutoslawski /Penderecki /Mayuzuni /Cage
CD from the same series
Tippett, "A Child of our Time", Decca slim-line CD, from the 70's Phillps
album: Colin Davis, BBC Symphony (and choruses) and a mostly-all-star
set of soloists (Norma, Baker, Cassily, Shorley-Quirk). An impressive and
powerfu; oratorio. The use of spirituals is especially effective (and
reflects at least a loose tie-in to Juneteenth). Terrific.
This issue has no texts (useful especially for the choral singing),
but I was able to find something (approximately right?) on the web.
This reissue is part of a Decca series which covers the first half ot the
20th century, findable as a aet at Amazon as "Shaping the Century". A second
set (second half of the century) is also listed, but I haven't found
the contents. Both are labelled Decca/DG. I found somewhere a listing
of the first set, which has one work per composer, so I'm pretty sure the
second set is different from what number_six refers to above; his may be
https://www.isrbx.net/3137506046-va-deutsche-grammophons-20th-century-classics-series-1988-1998.html
It seems diffitult to find information on these series.
A listing of the first "Shaping the Century" set is at
https://store.deccaclassics.com/*/Box-Sets/SHAPING-THE-CENTURY-VOL-1-1900-1949/5PUS0FG8000
but the seond set at the same site does not have such a listing.
--
Al Eisner
number_six
2020-06-20 17:42:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Al Eisner
Post by number_six
A couple more entries from the DG 20th century classics series, which I believe I have collected in its ebtirety --
Sylvano Busotti - Rara Requiem - Taverna cond, other works cond by Sinopoli
Again I am reminded how time has worn hard-edged modernism into something familiar and comforting
Bernstein - Symphonies 1-3 - Jeremiah /Age of Anxiety /Kaddish
coming up next is the LaSalle Quartet's Lutoslawski /Penderecki /Mayuzuni /Cage
CD from the same series
Tippett, "A Child of our Time", Decca slim-line CD, from the 70's Phillps
album: Colin Davis, BBC Symphony (and choruses) and a mostly-all-star
set of soloists (Norma, Baker, Cassily, Shorley-Quirk). An impressive and
powerfu; oratorio. The use of spirituals is especially effective (and
reflects at least a loose tie-in to Juneteenth). Terrific.
This issue has no texts (useful especially for the choral singing),
but I was able to find something (approximately right?) on the web.
This reissue is part of a Decca series which covers the first half ot the
20th century, findable as a aet at Amazon as "Shaping the Century". A second
set (second half of the century) is also listed, but I haven't found
the contents. Both are labelled Decca/DG. I found somewhere a listing
of the first set, which has one work per composer, so I'm pretty sure the
second set is different from what number_six refers to above; his may be
https://www.isrbx.net/3137506046-va-deutsche-grammophons-20th-century-classics-series-1988-1998.html
It seems diffitult to find information on these series.
--
Al Eisner
Yes, the link you posted relates to the DG series I was referring to.

Excellent resource by the way. I think it shows most but not quite all of the series. Don't see Egk and Martin, for example. I had some handwritten notes on which I checked these off as I acquired them, but never saw an "official" list.

It's worth noting that most disks in this series -- with the abstract covers by Holger Matthies I believe -- were reissues of earlier vinyl or CD releases that had different covers and were not part of identifiable series. So DG's marketing ploy worked in my case...
number_six
2020-06-20 20:05:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by number_six
Post by Al Eisner
Post by number_six
A couple more entries from the DG 20th century classics series, which I believe I have collected in its ebtirety --
Sylvano Busotti - Rara Requiem - Taverna cond, other works cond by Sinopoli
Again I am reminded how time has worn hard-edged modernism into something familiar and comforting
Bernstein - Symphonies 1-3 - Jeremiah /Age of Anxiety /Kaddish
coming up next is the LaSalle Quartet's Lutoslawski /Penderecki /Mayuzuni /Cage
CD from the same series
Tippett, "A Child of our Time", Decca slim-line CD, from the 70's Phillps
album: Colin Davis, BBC Symphony (and choruses) and a mostly-all-star
set of soloists (Norma, Baker, Cassily, Shorley-Quirk). An impressive and
powerfu; oratorio. The use of spirituals is especially effective (and
reflects at least a loose tie-in to Juneteenth). Terrific.
This issue has no texts (useful especially for the choral singing),
but I was able to find something (approximately right?) on the web.
This reissue is part of a Decca series which covers the first half ot the
20th century, findable as a aet at Amazon as "Shaping the Century". A second
set (second half of the century) is also listed, but I haven't found
the contents. Both are labelled Decca/DG. I found somewhere a listing
of the first set, which has one work per composer, so I'm pretty sure the
second set is different from what number_six refers to above; his may be
https://www.isrbx.net/3137506046-va-deutsche-grammophons-20th-century-classics-series-1988-1998.html
It seems diffitult to find information on these series.
--
Al Eisner
Yes, the link you posted relates to the DG series I was referring to.
Excellent resource by the way. I think it shows most but not quite all of the series. Don't see Egk and Martin, for example. I had some handwritten notes on which I checked these off as I acquired them, but never saw an "official" list.
It's worth noting that most disks in this series -- with the abstract covers by Holger Matthies I believe -- were reissues of earlier vinyl or CD releases that had different covers and were not part of identifiable series. So DG's marketing ploy worked in my case...
The site Al linked is the best one-stop info I've seen for the DG 20th century classics series.

However, on reviewing my notes, there are least nine items in the series that are not shown at the link he found. I can provide a list of those others if anyone's interested.

Wouldn't be surprised if there's something not even on my informal list!
Al Eisner
2020-06-21 21:47:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by number_six
Post by number_six
Post by Al Eisner
Post by number_six
A couple more entries from the DG 20th century classics series, which I believe I have collected in its ebtirety --
Sylvano Busotti - Rara Requiem - Taverna cond, other works cond by Sinopoli
Again I am reminded how time has worn hard-edged modernism into something familiar and comforting
Bernstein - Symphonies 1-3 - Jeremiah /Age of Anxiety /Kaddish
coming up next is the LaSalle Quartet's Lutoslawski /Penderecki /Mayuzuni /Cage
CD from the same series
Tippett, "A Child of our Time", Decca slim-line CD, from the 70's Phillps
album: Colin Davis, BBC Symphony (and choruses) and a mostly-all-star
set of soloists (Norma, Baker, Cassily, Shorley-Quirk). An impressive and
powerfu; oratorio. The use of spirituals is especially effective (and
reflects at least a loose tie-in to Juneteenth). Terrific.
This issue has no texts (useful especially for the choral singing),
but I was able to find something (approximately right?) on the web.
This reissue is part of a Decca series which covers the first half ot the
20th century, findable as a aet at Amazon as "Shaping the Century". A second
set (second half of the century) is also listed, but I haven't found
the contents. Both are labelled Decca/DG. I found somewhere a listing
of the first set, which has one work per composer, so I'm pretty sure the
second set is different from what number_six refers to above; his may be
https://www.isrbx.net/3137506046-va-deutsche-grammophons-20th-century-classics-series-1988-1998.html
It seems diffitult to find information on these series.
--
Al Eisner
Yes, the link you posted relates to the DG series I was referring to.
Excellent resource by the way. I think it shows most but not quite all of the series. Don't see Egk and Martin, for example. I had some handwritten notes on which I checked these off as I acquired them, but never saw an "official" list.
It's worth noting that most disks in this series -- with the abstract covers by Holger Matthies I believe -- were reissues of earlier vinyl or CD releases that had different covers and were not part of identifiable series. So DG's marketing ploy worked in my case...
The site Al linked is the best one-stop info I've seen for the DG 20th century classics series.
However, on reviewing my notes, there are least nine items in the series that are not shown at the link he found. I can provide a list of those others if anyone's interested.
Wouldn't be surprised if there's something not even on my informal list!
While I doubt that anyone else will repeat your full project (really,
I'm only referring to myself), sure, having the rest of the list would be
of interest. Are there a few of the recordings which particularly struck
your fancy? I'd be particularly interested to hear about the LaSalle
recording which you said was upcoming listening.

Thanks.
--
Al Eisner
number_six
2020-06-22 03:22:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Al Eisner
Post by number_six
Post by number_six
Post by Al Eisner
Post by number_six
A couple more entries from the DG 20th century classics series, which I believe I have collected in its ebtirety --
Sylvano Busotti - Rara Requiem - Taverna cond, other works cond by Sinopoli
Again I am reminded how time has worn hard-edged modernism into something familiar and comforting
Bernstein - Symphonies 1-3 - Jeremiah /Age of Anxiety /Kaddish
coming up next is the LaSalle Quartet's Lutoslawski /Penderecki /Mayuzuni /Cage
CD from the same series
Tippett, "A Child of our Time", Decca slim-line CD, from the 70's Phillps
album: Colin Davis, BBC Symphony (and choruses) and a mostly-all-star
set of soloists (Norma, Baker, Cassily, Shorley-Quirk). An impressive and
powerfu; oratorio. The use of spirituals is especially effective (and
reflects at least a loose tie-in to Juneteenth). Terrific.
This issue has no texts (useful especially for the choral singing),
but I was able to find something (approximately right?) on the web.
This reissue is part of a Decca series which covers the first half ot the
20th century, findable as a aet at Amazon as "Shaping the Century". A second
set (second half of the century) is also listed, but I haven't found
the contents. Both are labelled Decca/DG. I found somewhere a listing
of the first set, which has one work per composer, so I'm pretty sure the
second set is different from what number_six refers to above; his may be
https://www.isrbx.net/3137506046-va-deutsche-grammophons-20th-century-classics-series-1988-1998.html
It seems diffitult to find information on these series.
--
Al Eisner
Yes, the link you posted relates to the DG series I was referring to.
Excellent resource by the way. I think it shows most but not quite all of the series. Don't see Egk and Martin, for example. I had some handwritten notes on which I checked these off as I acquired them, but never saw an "official" list.
It's worth noting that most disks in this series -- with the abstract covers by Holger Matthies I believe -- were reissues of earlier vinyl or CD releases that had different covers and were not part of identifiable series. So DG's marketing ploy worked in my case...
The site Al linked is the best one-stop info I've seen for the DG 20th century classics series.
However, on reviewing my notes, there are least nine items in the series that are not shown at the link he found. I can provide a list of those others if anyone's interested.
Wouldn't be surprised if there's something not even on my informal list!
While I doubt that anyone else will repeat your full project (really,
I'm only referring to myself), sure, having the rest of the list would be
of interest. Are there a few of the recordings which particularly struck
your fancy? I'd be particularly interested to hear about the LaSalle
recording which you said was upcoming listening.
Thanks.
--
Al Eisner
Here are the others I know of --

Britten - Serenade /Illuminations
Egk - Saint Anthony /F Martin - Monologues
Henze - Junge Lord - this is also in the Henze box
Nono - Fragmente
Orff - Antigonae
Orff - oedipus
Takemitsu - Quatrain, Flock Descends...
Weill - Kleine Dregroschenmusik
Zemlinsky - String Quartets

plus the Lutoslawski disk - more about it later

I have not heard the whole series - many are still in my queue

But highlights for me so far would be

Egk /Martin
Ligeti
Takemitsu
Schoenberg VKN chamber version
Bartok SQ

Weakest entry is probably Holliger
Al Eisner
2020-06-22 19:57:06 UTC
Reply
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Post by number_six
Post by Al Eisner
Post by number_six
Post by number_six
Post by Al Eisner
Post by number_six
A couple more entries from the DG 20th century classics series, which I believe I have collected in its ebtirety --
Sylvano Busotti - Rara Requiem - Taverna cond, other works cond by Sinopoli
Again I am reminded how time has worn hard-edged modernism into something familiar and comforting
Bernstein - Symphonies 1-3 - Jeremiah /Age of Anxiety /Kaddish
coming up next is the LaSalle Quartet's Lutoslawski /Penderecki /Mayuzuni /Cage
CD from the same series
Tippett, "A Child of our Time", Decca slim-line CD, from the 70's Phillps
album: Colin Davis, BBC Symphony (and choruses) and a mostly-all-star
set of soloists (Norma, Baker, Cassily, Shorley-Quirk). An impressive and
powerfu; oratorio. The use of spirituals is especially effective (and
reflects at least a loose tie-in to Juneteenth). Terrific.
This issue has no texts (useful especially for the choral singing),
but I was able to find something (approximately right?) on the web.
This reissue is part of a Decca series which covers the first half ot the
20th century, findable as a aet at Amazon as "Shaping the Century". A second
set (second half of the century) is also listed, but I haven't found
the contents. Both are labelled Decca/DG. I found somewhere a listing
of the first set, which has one work per composer, so I'm pretty sure the
second set is different from what number_six refers to above; his may be
https://www.isrbx.net/3137506046-va-deutsche-grammophons-20th-century-classics-series-1988-1998.html
It seems diffitult to find information on these series.
--
Al Eisner
Yes, the link you posted relates to the DG series I was referring to.
Excellent resource by the way. I think it shows most but not quite all of the series. Don't see Egk and Martin, for example. I had some handwritten notes on which I checked these off as I acquired them, but never saw an "official" list.
It's worth noting that most disks in this series -- with the abstract covers by Holger Matthies I believe -- were reissues of earlier vinyl or CD releases that had different covers and were not part of identifiable series. So DG's marketing ploy worked in my case...
The site Al linked is the best one-stop info I've seen for the DG 20th century classics series.
However, on reviewing my notes, there are least nine items in the series that are not shown at the link he found. I can provide a list of those others if anyone's interested.
Wouldn't be surprised if there's something not even on my informal list!
While I doubt that anyone else will repeat your full project (really,
I'm only referring to myself), sure, having the rest of the list would be
of interest. Are there a few of the recordings which particularly struck
your fancy? I'd be particularly interested to hear about the LaSalle
recording which you said was upcoming listening.
Thanks.
--
Al Eisner
Here are the others I know of --
Britten - Serenade /Illuminations
Egk - Saint Anthony /F Martin - Monologues
Henze - Junge Lord - this is also in the Henze box
Nono - Fragmente
Orff - Antigonae
Orff - oedipus
Takemitsu - Quatrain, Flock Descends...
Weill - Kleine Dregroschenmusik
Zemlinsky - String Quartets
plus the Lutoslawski disk - more about it later
I have not heard the whole series - many are still in my queue
But highlights for me so far would be
Egk /Martin
Ligeti
Takemitsu
Schoenberg VKN chamber version
Bartok SQ
Weakest entry is probably Holliger
Thanks. The link I provided had a 2018 date. This looks more complete:
https://www.discogs.com/label/221100-20th-Century-Classics
It has 50 entries, including at least most of your extras. A lot
of it looks quite interesting. (I do have the excellent LaSalle
recordning of Zemlinsky.)

And discogs also has the list for the second "Shaping the Century" set
(one entry per composer) that I hadn't been able to find ealier:
https://www.discogs.com/Various-20-C-Shaping-The-Century-Vol2-1950-2000/release/14391326
(scroll down to the bottom). Discogs doesn't list volume 1, but
that list is available on Amazon.
--
Al Eisner
number_six
2020-06-22 22:06:45 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
https://www.discogs.com/label/221100-20th-Century-Classics
It has 50 entries, including at least most of your extras. A lot
of it looks quite interesting. (I do have the excellent LaSalle
recordning of Zemlinsky.)
Al, this discogs list does the job -- I think they're all here. Repeat of Gurre-lieder pushes the item count to 50.

While DG continued to put out 20th century classics after this, they tended to be in digipacks not jewel boxes, and they had different cover design. For example, see Stockhausen - Gruppen.

BTW, I agree that Colin Davis - Jessye Norman perf of A Child of our Time is a terrific recording.
number_six
2020-06-22 17:50:56 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
I'd be particularly interested to hear about the LaSalle
recording which you said was upcoming listening.
Thanks.
Brief Comments on the LaSalle Quartet disk --
the Mayuzumi and Cage works were not that engaging on first listen

Liked the Penderecki, but it is brief at just < 7 min

It's Lutoslawski that convinced me here! The 2-movement 1964 SQ is well worth hearing IMO.

Playing and sound are fine. LaSalle also have other disks in this series.
Lewis Perin
2020-06-12 19:04:38 UTC
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Post by Bob Harper
Mahler 2, Tennstedt, LPO Live from 2/20/89. Stupendous is a gross
understatement.
Is that with Kenny and Van Nes singing, please?

/Lew
---
Lew Perin / ***@acm.org
https://babelcarp.org
Alex Brown
2020-06-12 19:12:34 UTC
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Post by Lewis Perin
Post by Bob Harper
Mahler 2, Tennstedt, LPO Live from 2/20/89. Stupendous is a gross
understatement.
Is that with Kenny and Van Nes singing, please?
Yes.
--
- Alex Brown
Frank Berger
2020-06-12 19:31:04 UTC
Reply
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Post by Lewis Perin
Post by Bob Harper
Mahler 2, Tennstedt, LPO Live from 2/20/89. Stupendous is
a gross
understatement.
Is that with Kenny and Van Nes singing, please?
Yes.
I just listened. I'm shattered.
Bob Harper
2020-06-12 20:42:44 UTC
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Post by Frank Berger
Post by Lewis Perin
Post by Bob Harper
Mahler 2, Tennstedt, LPO Live from 2/20/89. Stupendous is a gross
understatement.
Is that with Kenny and Van Nes singing, please?
Yes.
I just listened. I'm shattered.
It did that to me as well.

Bob Harper
Bob Harper
2020-06-12 20:42:15 UTC
Reply
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Post by Lewis Perin
Post by Bob Harper
Mahler 2, Tennstedt, LPO Live from 2/20/89. Stupendous is a gross
understatement.
Is that with Kenny and Van Nes singing, please?
/Lew
---
https://babelcarp.org
Yes.
dk
2020-06-13 00:19:09 UTC
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Jazz
Todd Michel McComb
2020-06-13 00:52:33 UTC
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Jazz
Listening to this just now for the first time:

https://www.newworldrecords.org/products/scott-fields-seven-deserts

Enjoying it so far....

(Notes mention some specific jazz & classical influences. A lot
of both, but probably more classical.)
Todd Michel McComb
2020-06-13 00:55:13 UTC
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Jazz
And far, far jazzier, but even more recently released:

https://danielcarternyc.bandcamp.com/album/welcome-adventure-vol-1
Lawrence Chalmers
2020-06-20 21:47:41 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Faure's complete Barcarolles, Collard, EMI ca.1974.Great playing, but I am more partial to the composer's Nocturnes ( also have Collard's EMI ).
Brahms' Piano Quartet # 3,Op.60, the gem of the set for me and one of the composer's greatest works (IMHO), Guarneri Quartet with Rubinstein, RCA box of all 4 plus the Schumann Op.44 Piano Quintet.
De Falla Three Cornered Hat complete new to me a London symphony Orchestra recording w/Gerard Schwartz in a surprisingly appealing performance c/w Nights in the Gardens of Spain and so-so performance w/ Carol Rosenberg both in dynamic sound. It still doesn't beat my top favorite of Ansermet's stereo remake. So much more incisive and crisp.

Also Symphonies No. 1 and 4 of Roberto Gerhard on Chandos in great sound also.
I am waiting for Nos. 3 and 4 to arrive.
Bozo
2020-06-21 01:28:29 UTC
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Post by Lawrence Chalmers
Also Symphonies No. 1 and 4 of Roberto Gerhard on Chandos in great sound also.
Thanks, will have to hear those. Gerhard's Violin Concerto is great.
Oscar
2020-06-21 20:18:06 UTC
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Brahms: String Quintets Nos.1 & 2*
Brahms: Piano Quintet+

Serge Collot (vla)*
Noël Lee (pf)+
Quatuor Danois

Auvidis Valois V 4799 ℗ 1968, 1997 © 1997. 2CD.
Enregistrement réalisé à Copenhague en septembre 1965 (String Quintets) et janvier 1968 (Piano Quintet), par Peter Willemoës.
Booklet note : Harry Halbreich.
Au recto : Lachrymae, F. Leighton, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
Ekta : AKG, Paris.
Durée totale : 1h 33.
Fabriqué en France / Made in France.

COMMENT: A bit too close-miked for my taste yet affecting performances all the same. This was one of those one-and-done reissues wherein if you didn't get it on first issue, you were S.O.L. It exists in the digital cloud sphere now on streaming services (Naïve acquired the Auvidis-Valois some years ago), but I can't say that these performances haven't been bettered by many ensembles many times in the intervening decades, however. Recommended, then, for enthusiasts of Brahms chamber works and CD collectors of the French tradition. If were following the Marie Kondo method of tidying, I would have to say this CD doesn't 'spark joy' and would cull.

Quatuor Danois
-Arne Svendsen (vln)
-Palle Heichelmann (vln)
-Knud Frederiksen (vla)
-Pierre René Honnens (vlc)
Al Eisner
2020-06-22 02:12:08 UTC
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Pavel Haas Quartet, Prokofiev's String Quartets 1-2 and Sonata for 1
Violins (Supraphon, 2009). All excellent works; I think #1 at least
belongs on a short list of great 20th century string quartets.
Performances are superb. (The sounds the ensemble achieves in the
finale of SQ #2 demand to be heard.)
--
Al Eisner
Bozo
2020-06-22 15:20:26 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
Pavel Haas Quartet, Prokofiev's String Quartets 1-2 and Sonata for 1
Violins (Supraphon, 2009). All excellent works;
Mine a different recording, but agree the Quartets are excellent.
Al Eisner
2020-06-24 01:20:47 UTC
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In Naxos American Classics series:

John Harbison, Chamber Music, with Chicago Chamber Musicians, plus
Lorraine Hunt-Lieberson and Emily Lodine (mezzos, in the firs and last
works listed below, respectively)

1) "North and South" (six poems of Elizabeth Bishop) - mezzo with
small ensemble of winds and strings (1999);
2) Six American Painters - flute, violin, viola, and cello (2002);
3) The Three Wise Men - narrator and brass quintet (from Christmas
Vespers, 1988);
4) Book of Hours and Seasons (poems of Goethe) - mezzo, flute, cello,
and piano (1976).

Impressive music and performances.
--
Al Eisner
Lawrence Chalmers
2020-06-25 18:51:08 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Faure's complete Barcarolles, Collard, EMI ca.1974.Great playing, but I am more partial to the composer's Nocturnes ( also have Collard's EMI ).
Brahms' Piano Quartet # 3,Op.60, the gem of the set for me and one of the composer's greatest works (IMHO), Guarneri Quartet with Rubinstein, RCA box of all 4 plus the Schumann Op.44 Piano Quintet.
Nights In the Gardens of Spain by Bavouzet/BBC Menja and The Three Cornered Hat complete. Strangely lacking atmosphere of the latter, rather dull with engineering on the weak side IMO. The real sleeper is by Schwartz/LSO and if you love Le Tricorne, GRAB IT. The best of the many complete versions I have.
number_six
2020-06-26 22:00:21 UTC
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Post by Lawrence Chalmers
Nights In the Gardens of Spain by Bavouzet/BBC Menja and The Three Cornered Hat complete. Strangely lacking atmosphere of the latter, rather dull with engineering on the weak side IMO. The real sleeper is by Schwartz/LSO and if you love Le Tricorne, GRAB IT. The best of the many complete versions I have.
Before you posted this I was eyeing Jorda for Falla.

Now eyeing Schwarz as well.
Lawrence Chalmers
2020-06-26 23:33:04 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Faure's complete Barcarolles, Collard, EMI ca.1974.Great playing, but I am more partial to the composer's Nocturnes ( also have Collard's EMI ).
Brahms' Piano Quartet # 3,Op.60, the gem of the set for me and one of the composer's greatest works (IMHO), Guarneri Quartet with Rubinstein, RCA box of all 4 plus the Schumann Op.44 Piano Quintet.
The Jorda tricorne is vividly recorded (an early Everest issue) and is okay but I suggest going for the Schwarz recording.

Something else: The Saragossa Manuscript, a Polish film by Wodjiech Has, has always been a favorite film and I have watched it many times. The visuals, atmosphere, AND the music by Penderecki is compelling and hypnotic. Some of it conventional music some electronic. I was thrilled to find the soundtrack on YT, but alas couldn't find a cd of it, as it was released on vinyl only. As I was searching I came across a cd of electronic music by Penderecki called Homo Ludens. I went for it. Unlike a lot of electronic music by other composers I've heard, his is totally approachable and draws you in. Its a 2cd set with two of the six tracks by his collaborator E. Rudnick. Those are adventerous but nothing like Penderecki's. I want to suggest trying this if you have a fascination for that kind of music.

For wonderful contrast I've been listening to the DG set of Steinberg's Beethoven cycle. He's one of my favorite conductors. His Brahms cycle is
terrific and is crying out for a commercial release.
Frank Berger
2020-06-27 00:06:58 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Lawrence Chalmers
Post by Bozo
Faure's complete Barcarolles, Collard, EMI ca.1974.Great playing, but I am more partial to the composer's Nocturnes ( also have Collard's EMI ).
Brahms' Piano Quartet # 3,Op.60, the gem of the set for me and one of the composer's greatest works (IMHO), Guarneri Quartet with Rubinstein, RCA box of all 4 plus the Schumann Op.44 Piano Quintet.
The Jorda tricorne is vividly recorded (an early Everest issue) and is okay but I suggest going for the Schwarz recording.
Something else: The Saragossa Manuscript, a Polish film by Wodjiech Has, has always been a favorite film and I have watched it many times. The visuals, atmosphere, AND the music by Penderecki is compelling and hypnotic. Some of it conventional music some electronic. I was thrilled to find the soundtrack on YT, but alas couldn't find a cd of it, as it was released on vinyl only. As I was searching I came across a cd of electronic music by Penderecki called Homo Ludens. I went for it. Unlike a lot of electronic music by other composers I've heard, his is totally approachable and draws you in. Its a 2cd set with two of the six tracks by his collaborator E. Rudnick. Those are adventerous but nothing like Penderecki's. I want to suggest trying this if you have a fascination for that kind of music.
For wonderful contrast I've been listening to the DG set of Steinberg's Beethoven cycle. He's one of my favorite conductors. His Brahms cycle is
terrific and is crying out for a commercial release.
Weren't the MCA versions "commercial?" Or did you mean
re-release. Non-commercially there are HDTT and Klassic
Haus versions that I know of.
Bozo
2020-06-27 17:12:12 UTC
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Over past few days, listened to some selections from cd’s put out in commemorative sets by New York Phil, “ Bernstein Live “ and “The Historic Broadcasts 1923 to 1987. Sound varies , of course, but still very listenable. Hope these are available thru NYPO or elsewhere.

Hindemith,”Mathis der Maler “, Bernstein conducting,Dec.23,1956. I heard the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra ( conductor not recalled ) ca.1980 do this live on a US tour of theirs. Seems to work better live.

Bruckner,Sym.No.6 (Nowak ed.), Bernstein conducting,Mar.27,1976.My only infrequent venture past No.7.

Bruckner,Sym.No.9 (Original Version) , Otto Klemperer,Oct.14,1934 .Sound not very good , but a one-time hear for me in any event.

Brahms,Violin Concerto, Heifetz,Toscanini,Feb.24,1935.Heifetz more emotionally engaged, freer in tempo and phrasing, than in his 50’s studio with Reiner/CSO.From Lawrence Gilman’s review: “Mr.Heifetz has often negotiated this wickedly treacherous music with amazing security and aplomb.But last evening the sovereign poise and ease and supremacy of his playing assumed a legendary quality as the performance passed from actuality into history.”

Chopin,PC # 1,Rubinstein,Walter,Feb.9,1947.While I prefer slightly the slow mov.in his studio 60’s recording with Skrowaczewski as a bit warmer, more relaxed, for me the 1947 is more effective as a whole, and still one of best I’ve heard.

Wagner,Immolation Scene from “Gotterdammerung”, Flagstaff,Walter,Mar.23,1952.From the Variety review: “ There was continuous applause for 21 minutes and 35 seconds ( official clocking by CBS’s James Fassett) after the Immolation Scene , with the diva taking a dozen bows.Applause didn’t stop till concertmaster John Corigliano announced that Mme.Flagstad had left the building.Philharmonic officials couldn’t recall any such ovation since the one accorded Arturo Toscanini when he retired from conductorship of the orchestra in 1936…” (Of course, the 1952 audience had not already been sitting 4 hours.)

Poulenc, “Concert champetre”, the composer as pianist,Mitropolous,Nov. 14, 1948.Had not heard for years, but I prefer his Piano Concerto.

Shostakovich, VC # 1,David Oistrakh,Mitropolous,American premiere,Jan.1,1956.Despite the sound limits, wonderful, a warmer tone and emotion than the more hard-driven readings most seem to give today.
Bozo
2020-06-27 23:54:06 UTC
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Over past few days, listened to some selections from cd’s put out in commemorative sets by New York >Phil, “ Bernstein Live “ and “The Historic Broadcasts 1923 to 1987. Sound varies , of course, but still very >listenable. Hope these are available thru NYPO or elsewhere.
Finished up today.

Beethoven PC # 3, Schnabel,Szell, June 17,1945.Some dropped, missed notes in climax of first mov. cadenza, and in third mov., but in fairness live, and Schnabel's misses rarely concern me ( not here, but did concern me in his studio Brahms 2nd PC with Boult ) as the musical vision transcends. A relaxed, romantic, not dark, reading. Audience applauded after each of first two movs., and they did with Heifetz' Brahms VC discussed earlier in this thread.

Tchaikovsky Sym. # 2, "Little Russian" , Igor Stravinsky conducting, Jan.7,1940, the only PIT symphony I listen to, and a fine work. NY Sun interview Jan.2, 1940 with Stravinsky : " I say he is the greatest Russian musician because of such things as the way he constructs musical sentences, the originality of his placing of accents, the genius of his harmonic interpretations." Albert Goltzer, NYPO oboe,1938-84 : " He couldn't conduct very well - he was very awkward - so we had to play in spite of him."

Prokofieff PC # 2, Vladimir Ashkenazy,Bernstein, Nov.29,1958, the pianist's NYPO debut during his first USA tour.I believe Ashkenazy shared Gold with John Ogdon at Tchaikovsky Competition in 1962.A magisterial,nostalgiac first mov., with a wonderfully constructed first mov. cadenza, not as anguished and frenzied a first mov., or cadenza, as often the case, yet with plenty of technique.Ashkenazy saves fireworks for the final mov. “Boston has just recovered from a second attack of Prokofiev…The First Piano Concerto ,played by the composer,showed up wretchedly.Truthfully,it is not a good piece…The concert closed with the Second Suite from his ballet ‘Romeo and Juliet.’ This is a more serious work,inclined to be too long for a suite.. and if you could forget that there was a program to it, it could have been very beautiful to hear.” 1938,”Modern Music” review by : 20-year old Harvard student Bernstein.
number_six
2020-06-27 18:22:45 UTC
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On Friday, June 26, 2020 at 4:33:08 PM UTC-7, Lawrence Chalmers wrote:\
Post by Lawrence Chalmers
The Jorda tricorne is vividly recorded (an early Everest issue) and is okay but I suggest going for the Schwarz recording.
Something else: The Saragossa Manuscript, a Polish film by Wodjiech Has, has always been a favorite film and I have watched it many times. The visuals, atmosphere, AND the music by Penderecki is compelling and hypnotic. Some of it conventional music some electronic. I was thrilled to find the soundtrack on YT, but alas couldn't find a cd of it, as it was released on vinyl only. As I was searching I came across a cd of electronic music by Penderecki called Homo Ludens. I went for it. Unlike a lot of electronic music by other composers I've heard, his is totally approachable and draws you in. Its a 2cd set with two of the six tracks by his collaborator E. Rudnick. Those are adventerous but nothing like Penderecki's. I want to suggest trying this if you have a fascination for that kind of music.
I have a dvd of Saragossa MS but have not watched it yet, now likely to see it sooner. Didn't realize music was by Penderecki!
number_six
2020-06-28 18:05:50 UTC
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Post by number_six
On Friday, June 26, 2020 at 4:33:08 PM UTC-7, Lawrence Chalmers wrote:\
Post by Lawrence Chalmers
The Jorda tricorne is vividly recorded (an early Everest issue) and is okay but I suggest going for the Schwarz recording.
Something else: The Saragossa Manuscript, a Polish film by Wodjiech Has, has always been a favorite film and I have watched it many times. The visuals, atmosphere, AND the music by Penderecki is compelling and hypnotic. Some of it conventional music some electronic. I was thrilled to find the soundtrack on YT, but alas couldn't find a cd of it, as it was released on vinyl only. As I was searching I came across a cd of electronic music by Penderecki called Homo Ludens. I went for it. Unlike a lot of electronic music by other composers I've heard, his is totally approachable and draws you in. Its a 2cd set with two of the six tracks by his collaborator E. Rudnick. Those are adventerous but nothing like Penderecki's. I want to suggest trying this if you have a fascination for that kind of music.
I have a dvd of Saragossa MS but have not watched it yet, now likely to see it sooner. Didn't realize music was by Penderecki!
Speaking of Penderecki, I just ordered a copy of Anne-Sophie Mutter's 2-CD Hommage to that composer. Cute cover pic of the violinist with the old goat.
number_six
2020-06-29 17:43:34 UTC
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Closing out the month with

Bernstein - Concerto for orch "Jubilee Games"
and Dybbuk Suites 1 and 2

Concerto is with Israel Phil, suites with NY

These works are better than his Symphonies IMO, both vocally and orchestrally
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