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The Solti Elektra
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RANDY WOLFGANG
2019-09-19 00:12:03 UTC
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For me this recording is invaluable for two contributionas - the Elektra of Nilsson who is the only soprano I have ever heard who actually sings the role as written (and I'm not talking about the fact the set is complete but more on that later) and Resniks Klytemnestra. Marie Collier is perfectly dreadful but she was a last minute replacement for another soprano who bailed after the sessions had started. Its interesting that although Culshaw, Solti and Decca wanted to record the score complete, Nilsson (armed with a letter from Bohm saying that Strauss sanctioned the cuts) was adamant that the score be recorded with the usual cuts. They tried everything to convince her even adding up the timings between the two versions as less than seven minutes. So they went on and recorded the usual cut version and prepared it for release. Then Nilsson gave in and consented to give them one day to record the missing portions. Solti rearranged his schedule and it just happened the Sofiensaal was available that day The problem is the Vienna Phil was on tour that day although some members were still home in Vienna. So Decca augmented them with players from other orchestras to record the missing seven minutes. They also spliced in Colliers interjections during that seven minutes recorded in another country and another hall. This all happened six months after the cut version was completed. The engineers must be given credit for putting everythung together - I sure don't hear any differences
Jerry
2019-09-19 13:20:52 UTC
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Many thanks for pointing out that detail. I confess that I don't know Elektra, or for that matter any of the other Strauss operas, as well as his core orchestral repertoire. So, perhaps it's time to dip into Elektra.

My copy of the Solti Elektra (417 345-2) with notes by Michael Kennedy
gives no clue as to which tracks represent these usual cuts. Can anyone
familiar with this recording point those out?

Also, any suggestions on which tracks might be best to sample first? *

Jerry

* A cautious approach, I know, but one that seems to work best for me in coming to grips with longer works.
Mandryka
2019-09-19 13:53:46 UTC
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Post by Jerry
Many thanks for pointing out that detail. I confess that I don't know Elektra, or for that matter any of the other Strauss operas, as well as his core orchestral repertoire. So, perhaps it's time to dip into Elektra.
My copy of the Solti Elektra (417 345-2) with notes by Michael Kennedy
gives no clue as to which tracks represent these usual cuts. Can anyone
familiar with this recording point those out?
Also, any suggestions on which tracks might be best to sample first? *
Jerry
* A cautious approach, I know, but one that seems to work best for me in coming to grips with longer works.
You could try Clytemnestra's "Ich will nichts hören" and the following track in the streaming version, "Ich habe keine guten Nächte." That'll give a feeling for the style of the music and the interpretation!
RANDY WOLFGANG
2019-09-19 16:41:22 UTC
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Post by Jerry
Many thanks for pointing out that detail. I confess that I don't know Elektra, or for that matter any of the other Strauss operas, as well as his core orchestral repertoire. So, perhaps it's time to dip into Elektra.
My copy of the Solti Elektra (417 345-2) with notes by Michael Kennedy
gives no clue as to which tracks represent these usual cuts. Can anyone
familiar with this recording point those out?
Also, any suggestions on which tracks might be best to sample first? *
Jerry
* A cautious approach, I know, but one that seems to work best for me in coming to grips with longer works.
When I was in school a frined of mine who knew nothng about Elektra loved to listen to Elektras opening monologue - Allein weh ganz allein! It is spectaculalry sung bu Nilsson and gives you an idea of the music and plot
RANDY WOLFGANG
2019-09-19 16:46:01 UTC
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Post by Jerry
Many thanks for pointing out that detail. I confess that I don't know Elektra, or for that matter any of the other Strauss operas, as well as his core orchestral repertoire. So, perhaps it's time to dip into Elektra.
My copy of the Solti Elektra (417 345-2) with notes by Michael Kennedy
gives no clue as to which tracks represent these usual cuts. Can anyone
familiar with this recording point those out?
Also, any suggestions on which tracks might be best to sample first? *
Jerry
* A cautious approach, I know, but one that seems to work best for me in coming to grips with longer works.
The usual cuts are at the end of the Elektra-Klytemnestra confrontation where Klytemnestra tells Elektra what she will do to stop her dreams and Elektras reply as to to how Klytemnestra will be killed. The other cut is the following scene with Elektra and Chrysothemis where Elektra tells her sister how she will treat her if she aids in killing thier mother and father. Those are the two big ones
Dana John Hill
2019-09-19 20:40:50 UTC
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Post by RANDY WOLFGANG
Post by Jerry
Many thanks for pointing out that detail. I confess that I don't know Elektra, or for that matter any of the other Strauss operas, as well as his core orchestral repertoire. So, perhaps it's time to dip into Elektra.
My copy of the Solti Elektra (417 345-2) with notes by Michael Kennedy
gives no clue as to which tracks represent these usual cuts. Can anyone
familiar with this recording point those out?
Also, any suggestions on which tracks might be best to sample first? *
Jerry
* A cautious approach, I know, but one that seems to work best for me in coming to grips with longer works.
The usual cuts are at the end of the Elektra-Klytemnestra confrontation where Klytemnestra tells Elektra what she will do to stop her dreams and Elektras reply as to to how Klytemnestra will be killed. The other cut is the following scene with Elektra and Chrysothemis where Elektra tells her sister how she will treat her if she aids in killing thier mother and father. Those are the two big ones
Thanks for the explanation. I've never understood what is believed to be gained by such cuts, particularly in a work that's not terribly long to begin with.

Dana
RANDY WOLFGANG
2019-09-20 00:38:59 UTC
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Post by Dana John Hill
Post by RANDY WOLFGANG
Post by Jerry
Many thanks for pointing out that detail. I confess that I don't know Elektra, or for that matter any of the other Strauss operas, as well as his core orchestral repertoire. So, perhaps it's time to dip into Elektra.
My copy of the Solti Elektra (417 345-2) with notes by Michael Kennedy
gives no clue as to which tracks represent these usual cuts. Can anyone
familiar with this recording point those out?
Also, any suggestions on which tracks might be best to sample first? *
Jerry
* A cautious approach, I know, but one that seems to work best for me in coming to grips with longer works.
The usual cuts are at the end of the Elektra-Klytemnestra confrontation where Klytemnestra tells Elektra what she will do to stop her dreams and Elektras reply as to to how Klytemnestra will be killed. The other cut is the following scene with Elektra and Chrysothemis where Elektra tells her sister how she will treat her if she aids in killing thier mother and father. Those are the two big ones
Thanks for the explanation. I've never understood what is believed to be gained by such cuts, particularly in a work that's not terribly long to begin with.
Dana
Its easier on the soprano in live performance but I agree for recordings little reason not to have it complete.
Tassilo
2019-09-21 17:03:46 UTC
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Who was Solti's (and Culshaw's) first choice for Chrysothemis? (Christa Ludwig was Boulez's first choice for Marie in his Wozzeck recording but he ended up with the far from adequate Isabel Strauss.) -Tassilo
Post by RANDY WOLFGANG
For me this recording is invaluable for two contributionas - the Elektra of Nilsson who is the only soprano I have ever heard who actually sings the role as written (and I'm not talking about the fact the set is complete but more on that later) and Resniks Klytemnestra. Marie Collier is perfectly dreadful but she was a last minute replacement for another soprano who bailed after the sessions had started. Its interesting that although Culshaw, Solti and Decca wanted to record the score complete, Nilsson (armed with a letter from Bohm saying that Strauss sanctioned the cuts) was adamant that the score be recorded with the usual cuts. They tried everything to convince her even adding up the timings between the two versions as less than seven minutes. So they went on and recorded the usual cut version and prepared it for release. Then Nilsson gave in and consented to give them one day to record the missing portions. Solti rearranged his schedule and it just happened the Sofiensaal was available that day The problem is the Vienna Phil was on tour that day although some members were still home in Vienna. So Decca augmented them with players from other orchestras to record the missing seven minutes. They also spliced in Colliers interjections during that seven minutes recorded in another country and another hall. This all happened six months after the cut version was completed. The engineers must be given credit for putting everythung together - I sure don't hear any differences
furrybear57
2019-09-22 00:11:47 UTC
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Post by Tassilo
Who was Solti's (and Culshaw's) first choice for Chrysothemis? (Christa Ludwig was Boulez's first choice for Marie in his Wozzeck recording but he ended up with the far from adequate Isabel Strauss.) -Tassilo
Post by RANDY WOLFGANG
For me this recording is invaluable for two contributionas - the Elektra of Nilsson who is the only soprano I have ever heard who actually sings the role as written (and I'm not talking about the fact the set is complete but more on that later) and Resniks Klytemnestra. Marie Collier is perfectly dreadful but she was a last minute replacement for another soprano who bailed after the sessions had started. Its interesting that although Culshaw, Solti and Decca wanted to record the score complete, Nilsson (armed with a letter from Bohm saying that Strauss sanctioned the cuts) was adamant that the score be recorded with the usual cuts. They tried everything to convince her even adding up the timings between the two versions as less than seven minutes. So they went on and recorded the usual cut version and prepared it for release. Then Nilsson gave in and consented to give them one day to record the missing portions. Solti rearranged his schedule and it just happened the Sofiensaal was available that day The problem is the Vienna Phil was on tour that day although some members were still home in Vienna. So Decca augmented them with players from other orchestras to record the missing seven minutes. They also spliced in Colliers interjections during that seven minutes recorded in another country and another hall. This all happened six months after the cut version was completed. The engineers must be given credit for putting everythung together - I sure don't hear any differences
I believe it was Leonie Rysanek.....can anyone else verify this?
RANDY WOLFGANG
2019-09-22 05:52:24 UTC
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Post by furrybear57
Post by Tassilo
Who was Solti's (and Culshaw's) first choice for Chrysothemis? (Christa Ludwig was Boulez's first choice for Marie in his Wozzeck recording but he ended up with the far from adequate Isabel Strauss.) -Tassilo
Post by RANDY WOLFGANG
For me this recording is invaluable for two contributionas - the Elektra of Nilsson who is the only soprano I have ever heard who actually sings the role as written (and I'm not talking about the fact the set is complete but more on that later) and Resniks Klytemnestra. Marie Collier is perfectly dreadful but she was a last minute replacement for another soprano who bailed after the sessions had started. Its interesting that although Culshaw, Solti and Decca wanted to record the score complete, Nilsson (armed with a letter from Bohm saying that Strauss sanctioned the cuts) was adamant that the score be recorded with the usual cuts. They tried everything to convince her even adding up the timings between the two versions as less than seven minutes. So they went on and recorded the usual cut version and prepared it for release. Then Nilsson gave in and consented to give them one day to record the missing portions. Solti rearranged his schedule and it just happened the Sofiensaal was available that day The problem is the Vienna Phil was on tour that day although some members were still home in Vienna. So Decca augmented them with players from other orchestras to record the missing seven minutes. They also spliced in Colliers interjections during that seven minutes recorded in another country and another hall. This all happened six months after the cut version was completed. The engineers must be given credit for putting everythung together - I sure don't hear any differences
I believe it was Leonie Rysanek.....can anyone else verify this?
He only said it was a young British soprano (I have a feeling it was Jones). He also says her name went out on some early American advertising for the set but the only ad in High Fidelity says Collier. I'll check others
g***@gmail.com
2019-09-22 17:56:49 UTC
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Post by furrybear57
Post by Tassilo
Who was Solti's (and Culshaw's) first choice for Chrysothemis? (Christa Ludwig was Boulez's first choice for Marie in his Wozzeck recording but he ended up with the far from adequate Isabel Strauss.) -Tassilo
Post by RANDY WOLFGANG
For me this recording is invaluable for two contributionas - the Elektra of Nilsson who is the only soprano I have ever heard who actually sings the role as written (and I'm not talking about the fact the set is complete but more on that later) and Resniks Klytemnestra. Marie Collier is perfectly dreadful but she was a last minute replacement for another soprano who bailed after the sessions had started. Its interesting that although Culshaw, Solti and Decca wanted to record the score complete, Nilsson (armed with a letter from Bohm saying that Strauss sanctioned the cuts) was adamant that the score be recorded with the usual cuts. They tried everything to convince her even adding up the timings between the two versions as less than seven minutes. So they went on and recorded the usual cut version and prepared it for release. Then Nilsson gave in and consented to give them one day to record the missing portions. Solti rearranged his schedule and it just happened the Sofiensaal was available that day The problem is the Vienna Phil was on tour that day although some members were still home in Vienna. So Decca augmented them with players from other orchestras to record the missing seven minutes. They also spliced in Colliers interjections during that seven minutes recorded in another country and another hall. This all happened six months after the cut version was completed. The engineers must be given credit for putting everythung together - I sure don't hear any differences
I believe it was Leonie Rysanek.....can anyone else verify this?
He only said it was a young British soprano (I have a feeling it was Jones)...
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/rec.music.opera/TlC7NdirQq8
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