Discussion:
rachmaninov recordings
(too old to reply)
Brandan Glendenning
2004-10-21 11:42:50 UTC
Permalink
i am fairly new to 'classical' music (is there an alternate genre title?
'classical' seems so trite) and am very interested in rachmaninov.
the many different recordings for the many different composers are
fairly intimidating, and when reading reviews for performances i have no
prior knowledge to go by. i understand that composers incorporate their
own style into performances, and being an obsessive compulsive person i
find myself put off by this.

are there any 'original' recordings of composers such as sergei
rachmaninov and antonin dvorak? is it even worth my time to wonder on
such subjects?
Bill McCutcheon
2004-10-21 15:54:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brandan Glendenning
i am fairly new to 'classical' music (is there an alternate genre title?
'classical' seems so trite) and am very interested in rachmaninov. the
many different recordings for the many different composers are fairly
intimidating, and when reading reviews for performances i have no prior
knowledge to go by. i understand that composers incorporate their own
style into performances, and being an obsessive compulsive person i find
myself put off by this.
are there any 'original' recordings of composers such as sergei
rachmaninov and antonin dvorak? is it even worth my time to wonder on
such subjects?
Different interpretations of the same music is one of the things that
makes classical music interesting, not a shortcoming. There really is no
such thing as a definitive recording.

Certainly there are recordings of composers performing their own works,
including Rachmaninov. However, if you're "obsessive compulsive" about
sound quality, these might disappoint you; Rach died in 1943. As for
Dvorak, he died in 1904.

You might read some of the threads in this NG which discuss music that
interests you, or ask for recommendations regarding specific pieces.
Don't be surprised by the variety of responses nor by the disagreement
which ensues.

-- Bill McC.
Brandan Glendenning
2004-10-22 09:22:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill McCutcheon
Post by Brandan Glendenning
i am fairly new to 'classical' music (is there an alternate genre
title? 'classical' seems so trite) and am very interested in
rachmaninov. the many different recordings for the many different
composers are fairly intimidating, and when reading reviews for
performances i have no prior knowledge to go by. i understand that
composers incorporate their own style into performances, and being an
obsessive compulsive person i find myself put off by this.
are there any 'original' recordings of composers such as sergei
rachmaninov and antonin dvorak? is it even worth my time to wonder on
such subjects?
Different interpretations of the same music is one of the things that
makes classical music interesting, not a shortcoming. There really is
no such thing as a definitive recording.
Certainly there are recordings of composers performing their own works,
including Rachmaninov. However, if you're "obsessive compulsive" about
sound quality, these might disappoint you; Rach died in 1943. As for
Dvorak, he died in 1904.
You might read some of the threads in this NG which discuss music that
interests you, or ask for recommendations regarding specific pieces.
Don't be surprised by the variety of responses nor by the disagreement
which ensues.
-- Bill McC.
i am curious only to hear the composer's original intent, that is the
extent of my 'obsessive compulsive' nature. for casual listening
anything that isn't overly tacky will suffice!
Paul Goldstein
2004-10-21 15:43:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brandan Glendenning
i am fairly new to 'classical' music (is there an alternate genre title?
'classical' seems so trite) and am very interested in rachmaninov.
the many different recordings for the many different composers are
fairly intimidating, and when reading reviews for performances i have no
prior knowledge to go by. i understand that composers incorporate their
own style into performances, and being an obsessive compulsive person i
find myself put off by this.
are there any 'original' recordings of composers such as sergei
rachmaninov and antonin dvorak? is it even worth my time to wonder on
such subjects?
Do you mean recordings by the composer(s)? If so, you are in luck with
Rachmaninoff. He recorded all four of his piano concerti, as well as his
Paganini Variations, plus a fair amount of his solo piano works. You can get
the concerti on a couple of Naxos CDs. Be forewarned, however, the recordings
were made in the 1920s and 1930s, and they have very limited sound.
Rachmaninoff also recorded his 3rd Symphony and Isle of the Dead.

Dvorak, on the other hand, unfortunately did not live long enough to have a
chance to record his music.
--
Paul Goldstein
Matthew B. Tepper
2004-10-21 19:25:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Goldstein
Do you mean recordings by the composer(s)? If so, you are in luck with
Rachmaninoff. He recorded all four of his piano concerti, as well as his
Paganini Variations,
Uh, "Rhapsody on a Theme by Paganini." You know that and I know that and
everyone else here knows that, but I just wanted to give the precise title in
case the OP goes out and does a search.
Post by Paul Goldstein
plus a fair amount of his solo piano works.
I would have said "a small selection of his piano solo works and several of
his transcriptions." Neither of the sonatas, unfortunately, and precious few
of the Etudes-Tableaux.
Post by Paul Goldstein
You can get the concerti on a couple of Naxos CDs. Be forewarned, however,
the recordings were made in the 1920s and 1930s, and they have very limited
sound. Rachmaninoff also recorded his 3rd Symphony and Isle of the Dead.
And the Vocalise. ;--) The caution against the sound is correct, although I
imagine you and others will agree that these is still much to enjoy about
these recordings.
Post by Paul Goldstein
Dvorak, on the other hand, unfortunately did not live long enough to
have a chance to record his music.
His great-grandson, the still-living violinist Josef Suk, has recorded
several of his forebear's fiddle works, including the Violin Concerto.

My flippant cavils aside, great answers, guys.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Take THAT, Daniel Lin, Mark Sadek, James Lin & Christopher Chung!
Paul Goldstein
2004-10-21 20:09:10 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@207.217.125.201>, Matthew B. Tepper
says...
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Paul Goldstein
Do you mean recordings by the composer(s)? If so, you are in luck with
Rachmaninoff. He recorded all four of his piano concerti, as well as his
Paganini Variations,
Uh, "Rhapsody on a Theme by Paganini." You know that and I know that and
everyone else here knows that, but I just wanted to give the precise title in
case the OP goes out and does a search.
Point well taken. Un-coincidentally, I listened to the Brahms Paganini-thing
last night, and I guess it was still on my mind.
--
Paul Goldstein
I Throw Thumbers
2004-10-22 04:48:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
I would have said "a small selection of his piano solo works and several of
his transcriptions." Neither of the sonatas, unfortunately, and precious few
of the Etudes-Tableaux.
Of his own works that SVR never recorded, I lament the lack of the
Corelli variations the most. Of course, there's the gigantic 'what
if': about 6 weeks after SVR died is when SVR and Horowitz were
scheduled to record the 2nd Suite for 2 Pianos...
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Paul Goldstein
You can get the concerti on a couple of Naxos CDs. Be forewarned, however,
the recordings were made in the 1920s and 1930s, and they have very limited
sound. Rachmaninoff also recorded his 3rd Symphony and Isle of the Dead.
And the Vocalise. ;--)
....And possibly the greatest Carnaval put to disc. And an excellent
Diabelli variations. And (this has been less critically mentioned,
but I'm a big fan), the Handel air & variations. Ahhhhh, that RCA
10-CD set is remarkable.
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Paul Goldstein
Dvorak, on the other hand, unfortunately did not live long enough to
have a chance to record his music.
His great-grandson, the still-living violinist Josef Suk, has recorded
several of his forebear's fiddle works, including the Violin Concerto.
Please, tell me more, for I am confused and intrigued! I knew of a
Josef Suk, Czech violinist and composer and conservatory head who I
thought was a contemporary (perhaps a half-generation later) of
Dvorak's. In fact, IIRC, there was a father-son Suk team at that
time. Are they related to this Suk of whom you speak? Did Dvorak's
family marry into Suk's family? Is he a good violinist?

v
Matthew B. Tepper
2004-10-22 05:42:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by I Throw Thumbers
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
I would have said "a small selection of his piano solo works and several
of his transcriptions." Neither of the sonatas, unfortunately, and
precious few of the Etudes-Tableaux.
Of his own works that SVR never recorded, I lament the lack of the
about 6 weeks after SVR died is when SVR and Horowitz were scheduled to
record the 2nd Suite for 2 Pianos...
I agree. If I could have had him record one of his large-scale piano solo
works, it would have been that one.
Post by I Throw Thumbers
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Paul Goldstein
You can get the concerti on a couple of Naxos CDs. Be forewarned,
however, the recordings were made in the 1920s and 1930s, and they
have very limited sound. Rachmaninoff also recorded his 3rd Symphony
and Isle of the Dead.
And the Vocalise. ;--)
....And possibly the greatest Carnaval put to disc. And an excellent
Diabelli variations. And (this has been less critically mentioned, but
I'm a big fan), the Handel air & variations. Ahhhhh, that RCA 10-CD set
is remarkable.
I agree about the Schumann and the Handel, but the Beethoven variation set
was the WoO. 80 in C Minor, alas not the "Diabellis."
Post by I Throw Thumbers
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Paul Goldstein
Dvorak, on the other hand, unfortunately did not live long enough to
have a chance to record his music.
His great-grandson, the still-living violinist Josef Suk, has recorded
several of his forebear's fiddle works, including the Violin Concerto.
Please, tell me more, for I am confused and intrigued! I knew of a Josef
Suk, Czech violinist and composer and conservatory head who I thought was
a contemporary (perhaps a half-generation later) of Dvorak's. In fact,
IIRC, there was a father-son Suk team at that time. Are they related to
this Suk of whom you speak? Did Dvorak's family marry into Suk's family?
Is he a good violinist?
From memory -- Josef Suk the elder (also pretty well-known as a composer)
married Ottilie Dvorak, the composer's daughter. Indeed, his "Asrael"
Symphony was written after the deaths of his wife and father-in-law.

Josef Suk, the currently-living violinist, is the grandson and namesake of
the composer Josef Suk. He is a very fine fiddler indeed, appearing on
many splendid recordings of chamber music as well as concerti.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Take THAT, Daniel Lin, Mark Sadek, James Lin & Christopher Chung!
Jonathan Yungkans
2004-10-22 12:24:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by I Throw Thumbers
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
I would have said "a small selection of his piano solo works and several of
his transcriptions." Neither of the sonatas, unfortunately, and precious few
of the Etudes-Tableaux.
Of his own works that SVR never recorded, I lament the lack of the
Corelli variations the most.
Me too, though I honestly don't know whether it crossed his mind.
When he played the Corellis in concert, he had a tendency to leave out
some of the variations if he heard coughing or noise in the audience,
to the point where he sometimes left out half the piece. Maybe he
would have been more confident about the work in the recording studio,
but who knows.
Post by I Throw Thumbers
Of course, there's the gigantic 'what
if': about 6 weeks after SVR died is when SVR and Horowitz were
scheduled to record the 2nd Suite for 2 Pianos...
Interesting, but I'd read the opposite in IPQ's Rachmaninov issue --
that Rachmaninov had run the idea by producer Charles O'Connell and
O'Connell nixed the idea. Where did you read or her that?

My gigantic "what if": What if Rachmaninov and Horowitz had been
allowed to record hot only the suite, but also the two-piano version
of the Symphonic Dances? Or if we could at been flies on the wall of
SVR's house on the night they played it there for friends?

jy
Matthew B. Tepper
2004-10-22 14:24:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jonathan Yungkans
Post by I Throw Thumbers
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
I would have said "a small selection of his piano solo works and
several of his transcriptions." Neither of the sonatas,
unfortunately, and precious few of the Etudes-Tableaux.
Of his own works that SVR never recorded, I lament the lack of the
Corelli variations the most.
Me too, though I honestly don't know whether it crossed his mind.
When he played the Corellis in concert, he had a tendency to leave out
some of the variations if he heard coughing or noise in the audience,
to the point where he sometimes left out half the piece. Maybe he
would have been more confident about the work in the recording studio,
but who knows.
Post by I Throw Thumbers
Of course, there's the gigantic 'what if': about 6 weeks after SVR died
is when SVR and Horowitz were scheduled to record the 2nd Suite for 2
Pianos...
Interesting, but I'd read the opposite in IPQ's Rachmaninov issue --
that Rachmaninov had run the idea by producer Charles O'Connell and
O'Connell nixed the idea. Where did you read or her that?
My gigantic "what if": What if Rachmaninov and Horowitz had been allowed
to record hot only the suite, but also the two-piano version of the
Symphonic Dances? Or if we could at been flies on the wall of SVR's
house on the night they played it there for friends?
I thought they played it in the Steinway basement. Or maybe that would
have been the Suites.

O'Connell was the one who nixed Rachmaninoff's requests to record more
substantive repertoire, including (I think) some Beethoven sonatas.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Take THAT, Daniel Lin, Mark Sadek, James Lin & Christopher Chung!
Jonathan Yungkans
2004-10-23 15:57:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Jonathan Yungkans
Post by I Throw Thumbers
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
I would have said "a small selection of his piano solo works and
several of his transcriptions." Neither of the sonatas,
unfortunately, and precious few of the Etudes-Tableaux.
Of his own works that SVR never recorded, I lament the lack of the
Corelli variations the most.
Me too, though I honestly don't know whether it crossed his mind.
When he played the Corellis in concert, he had a tendency to leave out
some of the variations if he heard coughing or noise in the audience,
to the point where he sometimes left out half the piece. Maybe he
would have been more confident about the work in the recording studio,
but who knows.
Post by I Throw Thumbers
Of course, there's the gigantic 'what if': about 6 weeks after SVR died
is when SVR and Horowitz were scheduled to record the 2nd Suite for 2
Pianos...
Interesting, but I'd read the opposite in IPQ's Rachmaninov issue --
that Rachmaninov had run the idea by producer Charles O'Connell and
O'Connell nixed the idea. Where did you read or her that?
My gigantic "what if": What if Rachmaninov and Horowitz had been allowed
to record hot only the suite, but also the two-piano version of the
Symphonic Dances? Or if we could at been flies on the wall of SVR's
house on the night they played it there for friends?
I thought they played it in the Steinway basement. Or maybe that would
have been the Suites.
Actually the 3rd Concerto, not too long after Horowitz had arrived in
the United States.
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
O'Connell was the one who nixed Rachmaninoff's requests to record more
substantive repertoire, including (I think) some Beethoven sonatas.
Also several concerto recordings Rachmaninoff wanted to make,
including the Beethoven 1st and, I think, one of the Liszt concertos.
O'Connell suposedly didn't like either Rachmaninoff's compositions or
his performing style, and really played havoc with the first set of
recording sessions of Rachmaninoff's 3rd Concerto in 1939.

jy
normanstrong
2004-10-23 00:04:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Goldstein
Post by Brandan Glendenning
i am fairly new to 'classical' music (is there an alternate genre title?
'classical' seems so trite) and am very interested in
rachmaninov.
Post by Paul Goldstein
Post by Brandan Glendenning
the many different recordings for the many different composers are
fairly intimidating, and when reading reviews for performances i have no
prior knowledge to go by. i understand that composers incorporate their
own style into performances, and being an obsessive compulsive person i
find myself put off by this.
are there any 'original' recordings of composers such as sergei
rachmaninov and antonin dvorak? is it even worth my time to wonder on
such subjects?
Do you mean recordings by the composer(s)? If so, you are in luck with
Rachmaninoff. He recorded all four of his piano concerti, as well as his
Paganini Variations, plus a fair amount of his solo piano works.
You can get
Post by Paul Goldstein
the concerti on a couple of Naxos CDs. Be forewarned, however, the recordings
were made in the 1920s and 1930s, and they have very limited sound.
Rachmaninoff also recorded his 3rd Symphony and Isle of the Dead.
Rachmaninoff also made quite a few piano rolls. Some of them have
been restored and recordings made from a modern reproducing piano.
This is pretty close to what you would have heard if Rachmaninoff
played them in recital.

Norm Strong
Richard V
2004-10-23 08:24:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Goldstein
says...
Post by Paul Goldstein
Post by Brandan Glendenning
i am fairly new to 'classical' music (is there an alternate genre
title?
Post by Paul Goldstein
Post by Brandan Glendenning
'classical' seems so trite) and am very interested in
rachmaninov.
Post by Paul Goldstein
Post by Brandan Glendenning
the many different recordings for the many different composers are
fairly intimidating, and when reading reviews for performances i
have no
Post by Paul Goldstein
Post by Brandan Glendenning
prior knowledge to go by. i understand that composers incorporate
their
Post by Paul Goldstein
Post by Brandan Glendenning
own style into performances, and being an obsessive compulsive
person i
Post by Paul Goldstein
Post by Brandan Glendenning
find myself put off by this.
are there any 'original' recordings of composers such as sergei
rachmaninov and antonin dvorak? is it even worth my time to wonder
on
Post by Paul Goldstein
Post by Brandan Glendenning
such subjects?
Do you mean recordings by the composer(s)? If so, you are in luck
with
Post by Paul Goldstein
Rachmaninoff. He recorded all four of his piano concerti, as well
as his
Post by Paul Goldstein
Paganini Variations, plus a fair amount of his solo piano works.
You can get
Post by Paul Goldstein
the concerti on a couple of Naxos CDs. Be forewarned, however, the
recordings
Post by Paul Goldstein
were made in the 1920s and 1930s, and they have very limited sound.
Rachmaninoff also recorded his 3rd Symphony and Isle of the Dead.
Rachmaninoff also made quite a few piano rolls. Some of them have
been restored and recordings made from a modern reproducing piano.
This is pretty close to what you would have heard if Rachmaninoff
played them in recital.
Norm Strong
" A Window in Time," the collection of SVR's piano rolls from early in the
century, is a miraculous document of Rachmaninoff's art, not only for the
dazzling technical aplomb but for the incredible subtlety, tonal variety and
understanding of phrasing uncannily captured on the rolls. This simply can't
be appreciated on the scratchy 78rpm transfers.
My spontaneous comment was: "he makes all the rest of them sound like
children."
Glen Gould
2004-10-21 17:21:51 UTC
Permalink
Congratulations on discovering Rachmaninoff and please discover that
he wrote more than just his Piano Concerto No. 2 and Rhapsody on a
Theme of Paganini which are of course both excellent pieces, just
played to often and often poorly. Please note that just because you
can hear a great concerto or sonata in your head and write the notes
down on a piece of paper does not mean that you can make your fingers
or an orchestra reproduce what you hear in your mind. Also, remember
that music and performance is not static and not to be played in
identical manner each time. Rachmaninoff was forced by his audiences
to always end with his Prelude in C-sharp minor. Each time he played
it, he played it completely different, so for a pianist to listen to a
recording of Rachmaninoff performing one of his pieces, and then
trying to play it in the exact same manner, would be a complete
mistake.

I encourage you to find a copy of the above mentioned box set. It is
RCA 09026-6126-2. It contains Rachmaninoff playing his four Piano
Concertos and Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, as well as many of his
solo piano pieces, transcriptions, and works by other composers. It
also includes him conducting his Symphony No. 3 and a totally stunning
Isle of the Dead which I still haven't heard a more magical
performance of. The concertos and Chopin selections are available
from RCA separately. To further explore Rachmaninoff as a performer,
get the two Telarc discs of his player piano recordings titled "A
Window in Time". They are really phenomenal and I highly recommend
them with only one minor reservation in that they are reproduced on a
Bozendorfer which I suppose is a fine piano, but it does not sound
like a Steinway.

Although Rachmaninoff was truly one of the greatest pianists of his -
if not all time, another composer/performer that I enjoy is
Shostakovich. Start with the Piano Concertos on the EMI Great
Recordings of the Century. My copy is the original "Composers in
Person". I don't know if there is any difference in mastering. There
were also some great performances on the Russian Revelations label,
but I don't know if these are still available.

I also have an LP of a piano roll of Stravinsky playing his Firebird
that is really awesome, as well as one of Ravel which is interesting.
A long time ago there was a Columbia 5 LP set of piano rolls by
Debussy, Faure, Saint-Saens, Busoni, Grieg, Leschetizky, D'Albert,
Nikisch, Reger, Paderewski, De Pachmann, De Falla, Granados,
Scharwenka, Marshall, Strauss, Mahler, and Scriabin.

Here is a page describing the various types of piano rolls.

http://www.pianorolls.com.au/rollhist.htm

and one about Stravinsky

http://www.pianola.org/stravinsky.html


Don't be intimidated. There is so much music out there and so many
different performances and there are just as many people telling you
what you should get. Generally from this site, if you can wade past
all of the off topic crap, you will find knowledgeable people who will
sometimes have a general consensus about which are the better
performances. If you find many of the same ones coming up, you
probably won't be disappointed. Only experience tells you which ones
you can trust. If anybody says that something is the "best", mark
there opinion down a couple of notches and listen to people who tell
you what their "favorite" is.

My favorite conductor is Toscanini.

http://www.laden-gould.com/toscanini/index.html

Here are some of my favorite non-Toscanini recordings you might wish
to explore.

http://www.laden-gould.com/toscanini/pages/otherrec.html


Glen

P.S. Back in the 1930's "Classical Music" was referred to as
"long-hair music" so you might try that the next time you go into a
record store and want to know where the Rachmaninoff is.
Post by Brandan Glendenning
i am fairly new to 'classical' music (is there an alternate genre title?
'classical' seems so trite) and am very interested in rachmaninov.
the many different recordings for the many different composers are
fairly intimidating, and when reading reviews for performances i have no
prior knowledge to go by. i understand that composers incorporate their
own style into performances, and being an obsessive compulsive person i
find myself put off by this.
are there any 'original' recordings of composers such as sergei
rachmaninov and antonin dvorak? is it even worth my time to wonder on
such subjects?
Brandan Glendenning
2004-10-22 09:26:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Glen Gould
Congratulations on discovering Rachmaninoff and please discover that
he wrote more than just his Piano Concerto No. 2 and Rhapsody on a
Theme of Paganini which are of course both excellent pieces, just
played to often and often poorly. Please note that just because you
can hear a great concerto or sonata in your head and write the notes
down on a piece of paper does not mean that you can make your fingers
or an orchestra reproduce what you hear in your mind. Also, remember
that music and performance is not static and not to be played in
identical manner each time. Rachmaninoff was forced by his audiences
to always end with his Prelude in C-sharp minor. Each time he played
it, he played it completely different, so for a pianist to listen to a
recording of Rachmaninoff performing one of his pieces, and then
trying to play it in the exact same manner, would be a complete
mistake.
I encourage you to find a copy of the above mentioned box set. It is
RCA 09026-6126-2. It contains Rachmaninoff playing his four Piano
Concertos and Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, as well as many of his
solo piano pieces, transcriptions, and works by other composers. It
also includes him conducting his Symphony No. 3 and a totally stunning
Isle of the Dead which I still haven't heard a more magical
performance of. The concertos and Chopin selections are available
from RCA separately. To further explore Rachmaninoff as a performer,
get the two Telarc discs of his player piano recordings titled "A
Window in Time". They are really phenomenal and I highly recommend
them with only one minor reservation in that they are reproduced on a
Bozendorfer which I suppose is a fine piano, but it does not sound
like a Steinway.
Although Rachmaninoff was truly one of the greatest pianists of his -
if not all time, another composer/performer that I enjoy is
Shostakovich. Start with the Piano Concertos on the EMI Great
Recordings of the Century. My copy is the original "Composers in
Person". I don't know if there is any difference in mastering. There
were also some great performances on the Russian Revelations label,
but I don't know if these are still available.
I also have an LP of a piano roll of Stravinsky playing his Firebird
that is really awesome, as well as one of Ravel which is interesting.
A long time ago there was a Columbia 5 LP set of piano rolls by
Debussy, Faure, Saint-Saens, Busoni, Grieg, Leschetizky, D'Albert,
Nikisch, Reger, Paderewski, De Pachmann, De Falla, Granados,
Scharwenka, Marshall, Strauss, Mahler, and Scriabin.
Here is a page describing the various types of piano rolls.
http://www.pianorolls.com.au/rollhist.htm
and one about Stravinsky
http://www.pianola.org/stravinsky.html
Don't be intimidated. There is so much music out there and so many
different performances and there are just as many people telling you
what you should get. Generally from this site, if you can wade past
all of the off topic crap, you will find knowledgeable people who will
sometimes have a general consensus about which are the better
performances. If you find many of the same ones coming up, you
probably won't be disappointed. Only experience tells you which ones
you can trust. If anybody says that something is the "best", mark
there opinion down a couple of notches and listen to people who tell
you what their "favorite" is.
My favorite conductor is Toscanini.
http://www.laden-gould.com/toscanini/index.html
Here are some of my favorite non-Toscanini recordings you might wish
to explore.
http://www.laden-gould.com/toscanini/pages/otherrec.html
Glen
P.S. Back in the 1930's "Classical Music" was referred to as
"long-hair music" so you might try that the next time you go into a
record store and want to know where the Rachmaninoff is.
Post by Brandan Glendenning
i am fairly new to 'classical' music (is there an alternate genre title?
'classical' seems so trite) and am very interested in rachmaninov.
the many different recordings for the many different composers are
fairly intimidating, and when reading reviews for performances i have no
prior knowledge to go by. i understand that composers incorporate their
own style into performances, and being an obsessive compulsive person i
find myself put off by this.
are there any 'original' recordings of composers such as sergei
rachmaninov and antonin dvorak? is it even worth my time to wonder on
such subjects?
i'm going to save this message and read it once daily. thanks a ton (as
well as to the others who replied).
Brandan Glendenning
2004-10-22 09:35:37 UTC
Permalink
i'm going to save this message and read it once daily. thanks a ton (as
well as to the others who replied).

as to my obsessive compulsive nature, i only mentioned it in passing to
note that i seem hellbent on hearing the composer's original intents
with the pieces. glancing through these replies i can hardly even begin
to comprehend the mesh of interconnecting relationships that are
involved in understanding classical music. i believe that 21 years of
pop music history is going to have to be deleted from my mind to make room.
Congratulations on discovering Rachmaninoff...Glen
P.S. Back in the 1930's "Classical Music" was referred to as
"long-hair music" so you might try that the next time you go into a
record store and want to know where the Rachmaninoff is.
Matthew B. Tepper
2004-10-22 14:24:00 UTC
Permalink
Brandan Glendenning <***@gmail.com> appears to have caused
the following letters to be typed in news:10nhdkldidb9ja4
Post by Brandan Glendenning
i'm going to save this message and read it once daily. thanks a ton (as
well as to the others who replied).
as to my obsessive compulsive nature, i only mentioned it in passing to
note that i seem hellbent on hearing the composer's original intents with
the pieces. glancing through these replies i can hardly even begin
to comprehend the mesh of interconnecting relationships that are involved
in understanding classical music. i believe that 21 years of pop music
history is going to have to be deleted from my mind to make room.
If it's the last 21 years, small loss.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Take THAT, Daniel Lin, Mark Sadek, James Lin & Christopher Chung!
Carl Tait
2004-10-21 17:19:32 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 21 Oct 2004 04:42:50 -0700, Brandan Glendenning
Post by Brandan Glendenning
i am fairly new to 'classical' music (is there an alternate genre title?
'classical' seems so trite)
Welcome! "Classical music" is indeed the standard name; sorry about that.
Post by Brandan Glendenning
and am very interested in rachmaninov.
Glad to hear it. Rachmaninoff is a first-rate composer who sometimes draws
unjustified sneers for his unabashed romanticism. (By the way,
Rachmaninoff always spelled his name "-noff" when using the Latin alphabet.
Impress your friends by avoiding the "-nov" ending that has become popular
with many record labels.)
Post by Brandan Glendenning
the many different recordings for the many different composers are
fairly intimidating, and when reading reviews for performances i have no
prior knowledge to go by. i understand that composers incorporate their
own style into performances, and being an obsessive compulsive person i
find myself put off by this.
Oh, but that's a major part of the interest! Think of all the different
interpretations that actors have given to Hamlet or Macbeth. A rich text
-- literary or musical -- fused with the personality of a great performer
results in a memorable performance. ("The words of a dead man / Are
modified in the guts of the living." --W. H. Auden)
Post by Brandan Glendenning
are there any 'original' recordings of composers such as sergei
rachmaninov and antonin dvorak? is it even worth my time to wonder on
such subjects?
As others have noted, we're lucky that Rachmaninoff made quite a few
recordings, both of his own music and works by others. Many of the
performances are outstanding: Rachmaninoff's pianistic skills are admired
even by those who don't particularly like his compositions. Unfortunately,
all the recordings are from the era of 78 RPM records. If you're not used
to that scratchy old mono sound, this may not be the best place to start.

Members of this group are happy to offer their opinions -- which will
invariably differ, but don't let that bother you. You'll probably discover
that one or more posters have tastes similar to yours. Listen to as many
recordings as you can and find out what appeals to you, both in terms of
composers and performers.

A recommendation: Abbey Simon's Vox Box of Rachmaninoff's Piano Concertos
is both inexpensive *and* excellent. You can (and probably will) find
individual performances of the concertos that you like better, but Simon's
set is very enjoyable.

Best of luck.

- Carl Tait
David7Gable
2004-10-21 21:42:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Carl Tait
Glad to hear it. Rachmaninoff is a first-rate composer who sometimes draws
unjustified sneers for his unabashed romanticism.
You mean his unabashed conservatism? Not that there's anything wrong with
that, but you should set the bar for Romanticism a little higher than that.

-david gable
Carl Tait
2004-10-21 22:18:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by David7Gable
Post by Carl Tait
Glad to hear it. Rachmaninoff is a first-rate composer who sometimes draws
unjustified sneers for his unabashed romanticism.
You mean his unabashed conservatism? Not that there's anything wrong with
that, but you should set the bar for Romanticism a little higher than that.
It's true that Rachmaninoff is sometimes criticized for his conservatism,
but I was thinking of critics who find his romanticism too heart-on-sleeve
and maudlin. (They're wrong, of course.)

- Carl Tait
David7Gable
2004-10-21 21:39:44 UTC
Permalink
There are recordings of any number of composers of the last century playing or
conducting their own music including Richard Strauss, Schoenberg, Bartók,
Stravinsky, Copland, Britten, Boulez, Berio, etc.

-david gable
joe at salerno dot com
2004-10-26 12:12:34 UTC
Permalink
Nickolai Medtner also

--
Joe Salerno
Video Works! Is it working for you?
PO Box 273405 - Houston TX 77277-3405
http://joe.salerno.com
Post by David7Gable
There are recordings of any number of composers of the last century playing or
conducting their own music including Richard Strauss, Schoenberg, Bartók,
Stravinsky, Copland, Britten, Boulez, Berio, etc.
-david gable
Matthew B. Tepper
2004-10-26 14:40:45 UTC
Permalink
"joe at salerno dot com" <***@yahoo.com> appears to have caused
the following letters to be typed in news:Sarfd.2836$kM.1860
Post by joe at salerno dot com
Nickolai Medtner also
I like Medtner's music, and I've made a point of acquiring many recordings
of his music, including some played by the composer; but I scarcely think
he is on the same plane as David's "Richard Strauss, Schoenberg, Bartók,
Stravinsky, Copland, Britten, Boulez, Berio, etc."
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Take THAT, Daniel Lin, Mark Sadek, James Lin & Christopher Chung!
joe at salerno dot com
2004-10-30 21:27:44 UTC
Permalink
I would probably agree, but I mentioned his name because I thought the
fellow who made the original post might also enjoy his music.

--
Joe Salerno
Video Works! Is it working for you?
PO Box 273405 - Houston TX 77277-3405
http://joe.salerno.com
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
the following letters to be typed in news:Sarfd.2836$kM.1860
Post by joe at salerno dot com
Nickolai Medtner also
I like Medtner's music, and I've made a point of acquiring many recordings
of his music, including some played by the composer; but I scarcely think
he is on the same plane as David's "Richard Strauss, Schoenberg, Bartók,
Stravinsky, Copland, Britten, Boulez, Berio, etc."
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Take THAT, Daniel Lin, Mark Sadek, James Lin & Christopher Chung!
Jonathan Yungkans
2004-10-22 12:37:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brandan Glendenning
i am fairly new to 'classical' music (is there an alternate genre title?
'classical' seems so trite)
and am very interested in rachmaninov.
the many different recordings for the many different composers are
fairly intimidating, and when reading reviews for performances i have no
prior knowledge to go by.
Understood. What I do is read the details about the performance more
than the opinion itself. It gives me more information through which
to make my own decisions.
Post by Brandan Glendenning
i understand that composers incorporate their
own style into performances, and being an obsessive compulsive person i
find myself put off by this.
I'm a little confused by this. You'd think a composer's performance
of his or her own work might be more authentic to the intentions
behind that work, regardless of performing style. Could you explain
what you mean?
Post by Brandan Glendenning
are there any 'original' recordings of composers such as sergei
rachmaninov and antonin dvorak?
Rachmaninoff (thanks, Carl, for correcting my spelling) was one of the
first composers who had the chance to record a sizable chunk of his
compositional output. Elgar was another. Before tham, there's not
much, recording-wise. After them chronologically, Benjamin Britten is
probably the composer with the largest recorded output of his own
copositions.
Post by Brandan Glendenning
is it even worth my time to wonder on such subjects?
Depends. Sometimes it doesn't hurt. (-:

jy
Glen Gould
2004-10-22 15:05:50 UTC
Permalink
Let's help Brandan out with some Rachmaninoff recommendations.

Here are a few from me.

The Complete Recordings - All of R's own piano and orchestra
recordings on RCA

A Window in Time (2 discs) of piano rolls on Telarc

Helene Grimaud plays Rachmaninoff on Denon. At fifteen years old
playing way beyond her years.

Piano Concertos and Rhapsody with Rachmaninoff on Naxos
which have better sound than RCA, but you need the RCA box anyway for
all of the rest of the stuff. Being a record collector means you are
going to end up with a lot of duplicates. As someone who also
collects historic recordings, you need to not be afraid of old sound.
You will eventually learn that you can get more enjoyment listening to
a great performance from the 1930's than a mediocre one on the latest
SACD.

Piano Concerto No. 2 Rubinstein/Reiner on RCA an older Red Seal
RCD14934 has slightly better sound than the AR Edition.

Piano Concerto No.2 Grimaud/Ashkenazy on Teldec with solo pieces

Piano Concerto No. 3 Argerich/Chailly/RSO on Great Pianists or
Philips

Symphonic Dances Kondrashin/Moscow Philharmonic on RCA better
performance than Ashkenazy

Symphonic Dances Ashkenazy/Concertgebouw on London - Excellent sound.
I skip the Isle of the Dead on this disc because Rachmaninoff's own
performance is so much better and has amazingly good sound considering
it was recorded in 1929.

Symphony No. 2 Rozhdestvensky/London Symphony on IMP

Symphony No. 3 Stokowski/National Philharmonic on EMI

Vespers Polianski/USSR Ministry of Culture

Enjoy,
Glen
Post by Brandan Glendenning
i am fairly new to 'classical' music (is there an alternate genre title?
'classical' seems so trite) and am very interested in rachmaninov.
the many different recordings for the many different composers are
fairly intimidating, and when reading reviews for performances i have no
prior knowledge to go by. i understand that composers incorporate their
own style into performances, and being an obsessive compulsive person i
find myself put off by this.
are there any 'original' recordings of composers such as sergei
rachmaninov and antonin dvorak? is it even worth my time to wonder on
such subjects?
Matthew B. Tepper
2004-10-22 22:50:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Glen Gould
Let's help Brandan out with some Rachmaninoff recommendations.
Here are a few from me.
The Complete Recordings - All of R's own piano and orchestra recordings
on RCA
Apart from alternate takes (does anybody actually own all of the Edisons?),
and it does omit the so-called "Party Record" where SR improvises an
accompaniment to some friends singing a folksong at a party. Afterwards,
he supposedly can be heard telling them that they are all drunk. This was
on a private-issue LP, possibly on the MJA label. My copy is in a box
somewhere in the second bedroom.
Post by Glen Gould
A Window in Time (2 discs) of piano rolls on Telarc
Helene Grimaud plays Rachmaninoff on Denon. At fifteen years old playing
way beyond her years.
I saw her play a fine PC #2 at the Hollywood Bowl back in the mid-1990s.
Post by Glen Gould
Piano Concertos and Rhapsody with Rachmaninoff on Naxos which have better
sound than RCA, but you need the RCA box anyway for all of the rest of
the stuff. Being a record collector means you are going to end up with a
lot of duplicates. As someone who also collects historic recordings, you
need to not be afraid of old sound.
I would also suggest the Naxos release of the Kreisler/Rachmaninoff
recordings; MO-T's excellent transfers include a second version of the
Beethoven Op. 30 #3 based on alternate takes.
Post by Glen Gould
You will eventually learn that you can get more enjoyment listening to a
great performance from the 1930's than a mediocre one on the latest SACD.
I agree wholeheartedly.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Take THAT, Daniel Lin, Mark Sadek, James Lin & Christopher Chung!
joe at salerno dot com
2004-10-26 12:12:34 UTC
Permalink
I was told he said that they sang badly, but not that they are drunk. Since
I don't speak Russian, I can't say definitively.

I don't believe all the Edisons were issued commercially. There are 4 sides
(of 30) that I have never been able to find. I have all the rest.

There are a number of alternates in private hands that have never been
reissued.
--
Joe Salerno
Video Works! Is it working for you?
PO Box 273405 - Houston TX 77277-3405
http://joe.salerno.com
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Glen Gould
Let's help Brandan out with some Rachmaninoff recommendations.
Here are a few from me.
The Complete Recordings - All of R's own piano and orchestra recordings
on RCA
Apart from alternate takes (does anybody actually own all of the Edisons?),
and it does omit the so-called "Party Record" where SR improvises an
accompaniment to some friends singing a folksong at a party. Afterwards,
he supposedly can be heard telling them that they are all drunk. This was
on a private-issue LP, possibly on the MJA label. My copy is in a box
somewhere in the second bedroom.
Post by Glen Gould
A Window in Time (2 discs) of piano rolls on Telarc
Helene Grimaud plays Rachmaninoff on Denon. At fifteen years old playing
way beyond her years.
I saw her play a fine PC #2 at the Hollywood Bowl back in the mid-1990s.
Post by Glen Gould
Piano Concertos and Rhapsody with Rachmaninoff on Naxos which have better
sound than RCA, but you need the RCA box anyway for all of the rest of
the stuff. Being a record collector means you are going to end up with a
lot of duplicates. As someone who also collects historic recordings, you
need to not be afraid of old sound.
I would also suggest the Naxos release of the Kreisler/Rachmaninoff
recordings; MO-T's excellent transfers include a second version of the
Beethoven Op. 30 #3 based on alternate takes.
Post by Glen Gould
You will eventually learn that you can get more enjoyment listening to a
great performance from the 1930's than a mediocre one on the latest SACD.
I agree wholeheartedly.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Take THAT, Daniel Lin, Mark Sadek, James Lin & Christopher Chung!
Jonathan Yungkans
2004-10-23 16:18:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Glen Gould
Let's help Brandan out with some Rachmaninoff recommendations.
Here are a few from me.
The Complete Recordings - All of R's own piano and orchestra
recordings on RCA
A Window in Time (2 discs) of piano rolls on Telarc
Helene Grimaud plays Rachmaninoff on Denon. At fifteen years old
playing way beyond her years.
Agreed.
Post by Glen Gould
Piano Concertos and Rhapsody with Rachmaninoff on Naxos
which have better sound than RCA, but you need the RCA box anyway for
all of the rest of the stuff. Being a record collector means you are
going to end up with a lot of duplicates. As someone who also
collects historic recordings, you need to not be afraid of old sound.
You will eventually learn that you can get more enjoyment listening to
a great performance from the 1930's than a mediocre one on the latest
SACD.
Piano Concerto No. 2 Rubinstein/Reiner on RCA an older Red Seal
RCD14934 has slightly better sound than the AR Edition.
Piano Concerto No.2 Grimaud/Ashkenazy on Teldec with solo pieces
Piano Concertos 1 & 2: Zimerman/Ozawa on DG.
Post by Glen Gould
Piano Concerto No. 3 Argerich/Chailly/RSO on Great Pianists or
Philips
Piano Concertos 2 & 3: Janis/Dorati on Mercury

Piano Concertos 1 & 4: Rudy/Janssons on EMI
Post by Glen Gould
Symphonic Dances Kondrashin/Moscow Philharmonic on RCA better
performance than Ashkenazy
Symphonic Dances Ashkenazy/Concertgebouw on London - Excellent sound.
I skip the Isle of the Dead on this disc because Rachmaninoff's own
performance is so much better and has amazingly good sound considering
it was recorded in 1929.
Symphony No. 1: Pletnev/RNO on DG. Much more animated and powerful
than Pletnev's other Rach recoredings with the RNO and showing the
Might Five's influence on the early Rachmaninoff more clearly and
strongly than other recordings.
Post by Glen Gould
Symphony No. 2 Rozhdestvensky/London Symphony on IMP
Symphony No 2: Previn/LSO on EMI GROC
Post by Glen Gould
Symphony No. 3 Stokowski/National Philharmonic on EMI
Symphony No. 3: Zinman/Baltimore SO. More flexible tempos and
emotionally more connected to the music than his Sympnony #2. Shows
he'd been listening to Rachmaninoff's recording.
Post by Glen Gould
Vespers Polianski/USSR Ministry of Culture
Homage a Rachmaninov: Pletnev on DG. Pieces taken from Rachaninoff's
recital programs and played on Rachmaninoff's personal Steinway at
SEnAR in Switzerland. Includes the Corelli Variations and 4
Etudes-Tableaux: Op 33 #6, 9 & 8; Op 39 #5.

Suites 1 & 2: Raim/Wehr on Connoisseir Society.

Transcriptions: Ashkenazy on Decca. Nice complement to Rachmaninoff's
own recording of some of these pieces, plus some others he didn't
record. Some of Ashkenazy's best playing in years.
What about the preludes? I have Lympany on Erato, which I'd recomend,
but what others would you suggest?

jy
Post by Glen Gould
Post by Brandan Glendenning
i am fairly new to 'classical' music (is there an alternate genre title?
'classical' seems so trite) and am very interested in rachmaninov.
the many different recordings for the many different composers are
fairly intimidating, and when reading reviews for performances i have no
prior knowledge to go by. i understand that composers incorporate their
own style into performances, and being an obsessive compulsive person i
find myself put off by this.
are there any 'original' recordings of composers such as sergei
rachmaninov and antonin dvorak? is it even worth my time to wonder on
such subjects?
Alan Cooper
2004-10-23 17:33:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jonathan Yungkans
What about the preludes? I have Lympany on Erato, which I'd recomend,
but what others would you suggest?
Try Jung-Ja Kim on Kleos--an excellent recording that seems to be
virtually unkown.

AC
Jonathan Yungkans
2004-10-25 11:57:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alan Cooper
Post by Jonathan Yungkans
What about the preludes? I have Lympany on Erato, which I'd recomend,
but what others would you suggest?
Try Jung-Ja Kim on Kleos--an excellent recording that seems to be
virtually unkown.
Listened to clips of several of the preludes at Amazon. Love Kim's
touch and playing overall -- great feel for Rachmaninoff. Ordered the
disc right away. Hopefully he'll record the etudes-tableau as well.

jy
Owen Hartnett
2004-10-23 17:59:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jonathan Yungkans
Post by Glen Gould
Let's help Brandan out with some Rachmaninoff recommendations.
Piano Concerto No. 2 Rubinstein/Reiner on RCA an older Red Seal
RCD14934 has slightly better sound than the AR Edition.
Piano Concerto No.2 Grimaud/Ashkenazy on Teldec with solo pieces
Piano Concertos 1 & 2: Zimerman/Ozawa on DG.
Post by Glen Gould
Piano Concerto No. 3 Argerich/Chailly/RSO on Great Pianists or
Philips
Piano Concertos 2 & 3: Janis/Dorati on Mercury
Piano Concertos 1 & 4: Rudy/Janssons on EMI
Piano Concerto #2: Van Cliburn
Rhapsody/Paganini: Van Cliburn

Piano Concerto #3: Horowitz/Reiner (on the Horowitz plays Rachmaninoff
budget disk - you can find it often for about $8)

-Owen
Matthew B. Tepper
2004-10-23 19:10:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Owen Hartnett
Piano Concerto #3: Horowitz/Reiner (on the Horowitz plays Rachmaninoff
budget disk - you can find it often for about $8)
Any idea where I might find the entire BMG Horowitz box? Yes, I know it
was just a compilation of the already-issued BMG CDs, but I'd still like to
have it. The Sony Horowitz box has been steadily record-clubbed, and for a
time turned up frequently on eBay (which is how I bought mine).
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Take THAT, Daniel Lin, Mark Sadek, James Lin & Christopher Chung!
Owen Hartnett
2004-10-23 21:17:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Owen Hartnett
Piano Concerto #3: Horowitz/Reiner (on the Horowitz plays Rachmaninoff
budget disk - you can find it often for about $8)
Any idea where I might find the entire BMG Horowitz box? Yes, I know it
was just a compilation of the already-issued BMG CDs, but I'd still like to
have it. The Sony Horowitz box has been steadily record-clubbed, and for a
time turned up frequently on eBay (which is how I bought mine).
The only sources I know for OOP is eBay, Amazon, and forays into the
used bins at Orpheus in Boston.

-Owen
Paul Goldstein
2004-10-23 22:11:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Owen Hartnett
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Owen Hartnett
Piano Concerto #3: Horowitz/Reiner (on the Horowitz plays Rachmaninoff
budget disk - you can find it often for about $8)
Any idea where I might find the entire BMG Horowitz box? Yes, I know it
was just a compilation of the already-issued BMG CDs, but I'd still like to
have it. The Sony Horowitz box has been steadily record-clubbed, and for a
time turned up frequently on eBay (which is how I bought mine).
The only sources I know for OOP is eBay, Amazon, and forays into the
used bins at Orpheus in Boston.
I wish there were more Faure in the used bins.
--
Paul Goldstein
Matthew B. Tepper
2004-10-24 15:27:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Goldstein
Post by Owen Hartnett
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Owen Hartnett
Piano Concerto #3: Horowitz/Reiner (on the Horowitz plays
Rachmaninoff budget disk - you can find it often for about $8)
Any idea where I might find the entire BMG Horowitz box? Yes, I know
it was just a compilation of the already-issued BMG CDs, but I'd still
like to have it. The Sony Horowitz box has been steadily
record-clubbed, and for a time turned up frequently on eBay (which is
how I bought mine).
The only sources I know for OOP is eBay, Amazon, and forays into the
used bins at Orpheus in Boston.
I wish there were more Faure in the used bins.
More to the point, do they have the "Rocky and Bullwinkle" DVDs?
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Take THAT, Daniel Lin, Mark Sadek, James Lin & Christopher Chung!
Matthew B. Tepper
2004-10-24 15:27:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Owen Hartnett
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Owen Hartnett
Piano Concerto #3: Horowitz/Reiner (on the Horowitz plays
Rachmaninoff budget disk - you can find it often for about $8)
Any idea where I might find the entire BMG Horowitz box? Yes, I know
it was just a compilation of the already-issued BMG CDs, but I'd still
like to have it. The Sony Horowitz box has been steadily
record-clubbed, and for a time turned up frequently on eBay (which is
how I bought mine).
The only sources I know for OOP is eBay, Amazon, and forays into the
used bins at Orpheus in Boston.
I've looked there, I've looked there, and not worth my while to fly out
there for this alone.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Take THAT, Daniel Lin, Mark Sadek, James Lin & Christopher Chung!
joe at salerno dot com
2004-10-26 12:12:35 UTC
Permalink
berkshire record outlet is another I forget the URL

--
Joe Salerno
Video Works! Is it working for you?
PO Box 273405 - Houston TX 77277-3405
http://joe.salerno.com
Post by Owen Hartnett
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Owen Hartnett
Piano Concerto #3: Horowitz/Reiner (on the Horowitz plays Rachmaninoff
budget disk - you can find it often for about $8)
Any idea where I might find the entire BMG Horowitz box? Yes, I know it
was just a compilation of the already-issued BMG CDs, but I'd still like to
have it. The Sony Horowitz box has been steadily record-clubbed, and for a
time turned up frequently on eBay (which is how I bought mine).
The only sources I know for OOP is eBay, Amazon, and forays into the
used bins at Orpheus in Boston.
-Owen
Jonathan Yungkans
2004-10-23 16:46:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Glen Gould
Let's help Brandan out with some Rachmaninoff recommendations.
Forgot to add this one earlier:

Paganini Rhapsody & Piano Concerto No 2: Rosel/Sanderling on Berlin
Eterna. It's a little slower than most recordings but you'll hear
details, atmosphere and characterization in the Paganini that almost
everyone else seems to skim past. Plus the recorded sound is
incredibly clear, warm and transparent. Shows how much the Paganini
is a showcase for piano AND orchestra. The Piano Concerto No 2 is
also slower than usual but very full-blooded and poetic. For the
(budget) price, this disc is definitely worth picking up.

jy
Post by Glen Gould
Here are a few from me.
The Complete Recordings - All of R's own piano and orchestra
recordings on RCA
A Window in Time (2 discs) of piano rolls on Telarc
Helene Grimaud plays Rachmaninoff on Denon. At fifteen years old
playing way beyond her years.
Piano Concertos and Rhapsody with Rachmaninoff on Naxos
which have better sound than RCA, but you need the RCA box anyway for
all of the rest of the stuff. Being a record collector means you are
going to end up with a lot of duplicates. As someone who also
collects historic recordings, you need to not be afraid of old sound.
You will eventually learn that you can get more enjoyment listening to
a great performance from the 1930's than a mediocre one on the latest
SACD.
Piano Concerto No. 2 Rubinstein/Reiner on RCA an older Red Seal
RCD14934 has slightly better sound than the AR Edition.
Piano Concerto No.2 Grimaud/Ashkenazy on Teldec with solo pieces
Piano Concerto No. 3 Argerich/Chailly/RSO on Great Pianists or
Philips
Symphonic Dances Kondrashin/Moscow Philharmonic on RCA better
performance than Ashkenazy
Symphonic Dances Ashkenazy/Concertgebouw on London - Excellent sound.
I skip the Isle of the Dead on this disc because Rachmaninoff's own
performance is so much better and has amazingly good sound considering
it was recorded in 1929.
Symphony No. 2 Rozhdestvensky/London Symphony on IMP
Symphony No. 3 Stokowski/National Philharmonic on EMI
Vespers Polianski/USSR Ministry of Culture
Enjoy,
Glen
Post by Brandan Glendenning
i am fairly new to 'classical' music (is there an alternate genre title?
'classical' seems so trite) and am very interested in rachmaninov.
the many different recordings for the many different composers are
fairly intimidating, and when reading reviews for performances i have no
prior knowledge to go by. i understand that composers incorporate their
own style into performances, and being an obsessive compulsive person i
find myself put off by this.
are there any 'original' recordings of composers such as sergei
rachmaninov and antonin dvorak? is it even worth my time to wonder on
such subjects?
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