Discussion:
Debussy Orchestral recordings - recommendations
Add Reply
Randy Lane
2012-02-25 15:43:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.

How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra, and what I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest
it will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?

Major works:

La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes

I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in fact did
more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few very good
recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing Debussy, so
perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over the top and make
me a true fan.

Are there any great recordings no longer available that we could
"wish" into a reissue during these celebrations?
Gerard
2012-02-25 15:59:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra, and what I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest
it will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in fact did
more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few very good
recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing Debussy, so
perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over the top and make
me a true fan.
It would be convenient to know which many recordings you did not like.
For the works mentioned I would recommend Haitink (on a Philips Duo, maybe
reissued on Decca), specially for Images and for Nocturnes.
Also Boulez (Sony).
(The orchestral works by Debussy don't form a cycle. Most recordings contain a
few works, recorded individually.)
Randy Lane
2012-02-25 16:15:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gerard
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra, and what I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest
it will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in fact did
more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few very good
recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing Debussy, so
perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over the top and make
me a true fan.
It would be convenient to know which many recordings you did not like.
For the works mentioned I would recommend Haitink (on a Philips Duo, maybe
reissued on Decca), specially for Images and for Nocturnes.
Also Boulez (Sony).
(The orchestral works by Debussy don't form a cycle. Most recordings contain a
few works, recorded individually.)- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Funny thing is the Boulez Sony recordings (heard on LPs in teh late
1970s) were some that (at the time) did the most to turned me off to
Debusssy.
Haitink's Nocturnes and the classic Karajan La Mer have probably done
the most to keep interested.
Gerard
2012-02-25 16:33:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Randy Lane
Post by Gerard
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works,
including the major oft performed works and the few efforts made
to record everything (or nearly everything) with one
orchestra/conductor? In the cycle category I only know of the
Martinon set and the forthcoming Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears
at least, suffers from a sub-standard orchestra, and what I have
read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest it will get a pass.
Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in
fact did more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few
very good recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing
Debussy, so perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over
the top and make me a true fan.
It would be convenient to know which many recordings you did not like.
For the works mentioned I would recommend Haitink (on a Philips
Duo, maybe reissued on Decca), specially for Images and for
Nocturnes.
Also Boulez (Sony).
(The orchestral works by Debussy don't form a cycle. Most
recordings contain a few works, recorded individually.)- Hide
quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Funny thing is the Boulez Sony recordings (heard on LPs in teh late
1970s) were some that (at the time) did the most to turned me off to
Debusssy.
Haitink's Nocturnes and the classic Karajan La Mer have probably done
the most to keep interested.
For those who would like to give recommendations it would still by convenient to
know what (other) Debussy recordings you don't like.
I don't know which recordings by Boulez exactly you've heard. Or why they turned
you off. That's interesting stuff to know for people who would like to give
recommendations to you.
Randy Lane
2012-02-25 17:31:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gerard
Post by Randy Lane
Post by Gerard
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works,
including the major oft performed works and the few efforts made
to record everything (or nearly everything) with one
orchestra/conductor? In the cycle category I only know of the
Martinon set and the forthcoming Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears
at least, suffers from a sub-standard orchestra, and what I have
read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest it will get a pass.
Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in
fact did more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few
very good recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing
Debussy, so perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over
the top and make me a true fan.
It would be convenient to know which many recordings you did not like.
For the works mentioned I would recommend Haitink (on a Philips
Duo, maybe reissued on Decca), specially for Images and for
Nocturnes.
Also Boulez (Sony).
(The orchestral works by Debussy don't form a cycle. Most
recordings contain a few works, recorded individually.)- Hide
quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Funny thing is the Boulez Sony recordings (heard on LPs in teh late
1970s) were some that (at the time) did the most to turned me off to
Debusssy.
Haitink's Nocturnes and the classic Karajan La Mer have probably done
the most to keep interested.
For those who would like to give recommendations it would still by convenient to
know what (other) Debussy recordings you don't like.
I don't know which recordings by Boulez exactly you've heard. Or why they turned
you off. That's interesting stuff to know for people who would like to give
recommendations to you.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
I'd rather hear about recordings people regard as truly great
exponents of this music rather than reactions/responses about my not-
so-delightful experiences with the music.
Other than some of the Boulez 1960s recordings, I don't really recall
what exact recordings I heard 30+ years ago that didn't go far to win
my heart in favor of Debussy's orchestral music.
Gerard
2012-02-25 17:43:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Randy Lane
Post by Gerard
Post by Randy Lane
Post by Gerard
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many
special releases and compilations. With the release of
Ferber's piano recordings the instrumental works have had
much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works,
including the major oft performed works and the few efforts
made to record everything (or nearly everything) with one
orchestra/conductor? In the cycle category I only know of the
Martinon set and the forthcoming Naxos; the Martinon, to my
ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard orchestra, and
what I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest it
will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings
did little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and
some in fact did more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me
on. A few very good recordings though have kept me from
totally dismissing Debussy, so perhaps a few more great
recordings can put me over the top and make me a true fan.
It would be convenient to know which many recordings you did not like.
For the works mentioned I would recommend Haitink (on a Philips
Duo, maybe reissued on Decca), specially for Images and for
Nocturnes.
Also Boulez (Sony).
(The orchestral works by Debussy don't form a cycle. Most
recordings contain a few works, recorded individually.)- Hide
quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Funny thing is the Boulez Sony recordings (heard on LPs in teh
late 1970s) were some that (at the time) did the most to turned
me off to Debusssy.
Haitink's Nocturnes and the classic Karajan La Mer have probably
done the most to keep interested.
For those who would like to give recommendations it would still by
convenient to know what (other) Debussy recordings you don't like.
I don't know which recordings by Boulez exactly you've heard. Or
why they turned you off. That's interesting stuff to know for
people who would like to give recommendations to you.- Hide quoted
text -
- Show quoted text -
I'd rather hear about recordings people regard as truly great
exponents of this music
OK, but that changes your question (which was "Are there other sets/cycles?").
Post by Randy Lane
rather than reactions/responses about my not-
so-delightful experiences with the music.
I did not ask to react about your experiences, but because it's useful to know
what you don't like when giving recommendations. Recommending what you don't
like is a form of wasting time.
Post by Randy Lane
Other than some of the Boulez 1960s recordings, I don't really recall
what exact recordings I heard 30+ years ago that didn't go far to win
my heart in favor of Debussy's orchestral music.
Terry
2012-02-26 03:17:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 26 Feb 2012 04:31:55 +1100, Randy Lane wrote
(in article
Post by Randy Lane
Post by Gerard
Post by Randy Lane
Post by Gerard
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works,
including the major oft performed works and the few efforts made
to record everything (or nearly everything) with one
orchestra/conductor? In the cycle category I only know of the
Martinon set and the forthcoming Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears
at least, suffers from a sub-standard orchestra, and what I have
read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest it will get a pass.
Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in
fact did more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few
very good recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing
Debussy, so perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over
the top and make me a true fan.
It would be convenient to know which many recordings you did not like.
For the works mentioned I would recommend Haitink (on a Philips
Duo, maybe reissued on Decca), specially for Images and for
Nocturnes.
Also Boulez (Sony).
(The orchestral works by Debussy don't form a cycle. Most
recordings contain a few works, recorded individually.)- Hide
quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Funny thing is the Boulez Sony recordings (heard on LPs in teh late
1970s) were some that (at the time) did the most to turned me off to
Debusssy.
Haitink's Nocturnes and the classic Karajan La Mer have probably done
the most to keep interested.
For those who would like to give recommendations it would still by convenient to
know what (other) Debussy recordings you don't like.
I don't know which recordings by Boulez exactly you've heard. Or why they turned
you off. That's interesting stuff to know for people who would like to give
recommendations to you.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
I'd rather hear about recordings people regard as truly great
exponents of this music rather than reactions/responses about my not-
so-delightful experiences with the music.
Other than some of the Boulez 1960s recordings, I don't really recall
what exact recordings I heard 30+ years ago that didn't go far to win
my heart in favor of Debussy's orchestral music.
The most useful approach might be to recommend some conductors who are
particularly good in this repertoire. My list is short: Haitink, von Karajan
and Abbado.
--
Cheers!

Terry
Gerard
2012-02-26 08:49:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Terry
(in article
Post by Randy Lane
Post by Gerard
Post by Randy Lane
Post by Gerard
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many
special releases and compilations. With the release of
Ferber's piano recordings the instrumental works have had
much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works,
including the major oft performed works and the few efforts
made to record everything (or nearly everything) with one
orchestra/conductor? In the cycle category I only know of
the Martinon set and the forthcoming Naxos; the Martinon,
to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard orchestra,
and what I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest
it will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many
recordings did little for me when I was a fledgling music
lover, and some in fact did more to turn me off to Debussy
than spur me on. A few very good recordings though have
kept me from totally dismissing Debussy, so perhaps a few
more great recordings can put me over the top and make me a
true fan.
It would be convenient to know which many recordings you did not like.
For the works mentioned I would recommend Haitink (on a
Philips Duo, maybe reissued on Decca), specially for Images
and for Nocturnes.
Also Boulez (Sony).
(The orchestral works by Debussy don't form a cycle. Most
recordings contain a few works, recorded individually.)- Hide
quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Funny thing is the Boulez Sony recordings (heard on LPs in teh
late 1970s) were some that (at the time) did the most to turned
me off to Debusssy.
Haitink's Nocturnes and the classic Karajan La Mer have
probably done the most to keep interested.
For those who would like to give recommendations it would still by convenient to
know what (other) Debussy recordings you don't like.
I don't know which recordings by Boulez exactly you've heard. Or why they turned
you off. That's interesting stuff to know for people who would
like to give recommendations to you.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
I'd rather hear about recordings people regard as truly great
exponents of this music rather than reactions/responses about my
not- so-delightful experiences with the music.
Other than some of the Boulez 1960s recordings, I don't really
recall what exact recordings I heard 30+ years ago that didn't go
far to win my heart in favor of Debussy's orchestral music.
The most useful approach might be to recommend some conductors who are
particularly good in this repertoire. My list is short: Haitink, von
Karajan and Abbado.
This could be useful if those conductors recorded the whole bunch. Specially
Karajan did not so. Abbado didn't record much Debussy too.
M forever
2012-02-26 09:31:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Terry
(in article
Post by Randy Lane
Post by Gerard
Post by Randy Lane
Post by Gerard
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works,
including the major oft performed works and the few efforts made
to record everything (or nearly everything) with one
orchestra/conductor? In the cycle category I only know of the
Martinon set and the forthcoming Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears
at least, suffers from a sub-standard orchestra, and what I have
read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest it will get a pass.
Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in
fact did more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few
very good recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing
Debussy, so perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over
the top and make me a true fan.
It would be convenient to know which many recordings you did not like.
For the works mentioned I would recommend Haitink (on a Philips
Duo, maybe reissued on Decca), specially for Images and for
Nocturnes.
Also Boulez (Sony).
(The orchestral works by Debussy don't form a cycle. Most
recordings contain a few works, recorded individually.)- Hide
quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Funny thing is the Boulez Sony recordings (heard on LPs in teh late
1970s) were some that (at the time) did the most to turned me off to
Debusssy.
Haitink's Nocturnes and the classic Karajan La Mer have probably done
the most to keep interested.
For those who would like to give recommendations it would still by convenient to
know what (other) Debussy recordings you don't like.
I don't know which recordings by Boulez exactly you've heard. Or why they turned
you off. That's interesting stuff to know for people who would like to give
recommendations to you.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
I'd rather hear about recordings people regard as truly great
exponents of this music rather than reactions/responses about my not-
so-delightful experiences with the music.
Other than some of the Boulez 1960s recordings, I don't really recall
what exact recordings I heard 30+ years ago that didn't go far to win
my heart in favor of Debussy's orchestral music.
The most useful approach might be to recommend some conductors who are
particularly good in this repertoire. My list is short: Haitink, von Karajan
and Abbado.
Yes, Abbado - good tip! His La Mer from Lucerne is excellent, and he
recorded a number of very nice Debussy albums with the LSO and BP,
including some rarer items such as La damoiselle elue and a suite from
Pelleas et Melisande (and, of course, he recorded the whole opera,
too), the clarinet rhapsody with Sabine Meyer - the lady Karajan and
the BP fought over in the early 80s, that was her return to the
orchestra as solist. Also includes a great version of the Mozart
concerto and an interesting piece by Takemitsu.
There is also a very good Nocturnes with the BSO from the 70s. In
fact, I remember one of his last concerts in Berlin before he was
elected principal conductor was an outstanding performance of
Nocturnes.
Ray Hall
2012-02-25 20:09:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gerard
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra, and what I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest
it will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in fact did
more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few very good
recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing Debussy, so
perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over the top and make
me a true fan.
It would be convenient to know which many recordings you did not like.
For the works mentioned I would recommend Haitink (on a Philips Duo, maybe
reissued on Decca), specially for Images and for Nocturnes.
Also Boulez (Sony).
(The orchestral works by Debussy don't form a cycle. Most recordings contain a
few works, recorded individually.)
I second the Haitink Duo for the main orchestral works.

Ray Hall, Taree
Ed Presson
2012-02-26 03:06:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gerard
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra, and what I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest
it will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in fact did
more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few very good
recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing Debussy, so
perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over the top and make
me a true fan.
It would be convenient to know which many recordings you did not like.
For the works mentioned I would recommend Haitink (on a Philips Duo, maybe
reissued on Decca), specially for Images and for Nocturnes.
Also Boulez (Sony).
(The orchestral works by Debussy don't form a cycle. Most recordings contain a
few works, recorded individually.)
I second the Haitink Duo for the main orchestral works.
Ray Hall, Taree
Haitink is almost universally praised for his Debussy—except by me. I
recently re-listened to the Duo set, and while I admire the beautiful
playing, somehow Haitink's Debussy manages to leave me cold. I admire
Debussy recordings by Monteux, Munch, Reiner, Stokowski, Karajan (La Mer on
DG) and Martinon. But not Haitink. Every five years or so I re-listen to
reconsider my opinion. So far, it remains the same: few of the things I
love in Debussy's orchestral music are to be found in Haitink's readings.

Odd man out, I guess.

Regards,

Ed Presson
pianomaven
2012-02-26 13:43:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gerard
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra, and what I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest
it will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in fact did
more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few very good
recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing Debussy, so
perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over the top and make
me a true fan.
It would be convenient to know which many recordings you did not like.
For the works mentioned I would recommend Haitink (on a Philips Duo, maybe
reissued on Decca), specially for Images and for Nocturnes.
Also Boulez (Sony).
(The orchestral works by Debussy don't form a cycle. Most recordings contain a
few works, recorded individually.)
I second the Haitink Duo for the main orchestral works.
Ray Hall, Taree
Haitink is almost universally praised for his Debussy—except by me.  I
recently re-listened to the Duo set, and while I admire the beautiful
playing, somehow Haitink's Debussy manages to leave me cold.  I admire
Debussy recordings by Monteux, Munch, Reiner, Stokowski, Karajan (La Mer on
DG) and Martinon.  But not Haitink.  Every five years or so I re-listen to
reconsider my opinion.  So far, it remains the same:  few of the things I
love in Debussy's orchestral music are to be found in Haitink's readings.
It is a cooler take, of course, but incredibly beautiful and
magnificently played.

TD
Randy Lane
2012-02-27 17:36:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gerard
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra, and what I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest
it will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in fact did
more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few very good
recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing Debussy, so
perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over the top and make
me a true fan.
It would be convenient to know which many recordings you did not like.
For the works mentioned I would recommend Haitink (on a Philips Duo, maybe
reissued on Decca), specially for Images and for Nocturnes.
Also Boulez (Sony).
(The orchestral works by Debussy don't form a cycle. Most recordings contain a
few works, recorded individually.)
I second the Haitink Duo for the main orchestral works.
Ray Hall, Taree
Haitink is almost universally praised for his Debussy—except by me.  I
recently re-listened to the Duo set, and while I admire the beautiful
playing, somehow Haitink's Debussy manages to leave me cold.  I admire
Debussy recordings by Monteux, Munch, Reiner, Stokowski, Karajan (La Mer on
DG) and Martinon.  But not Haitink.  Every five years or so I re-listen to
reconsider my opinion.  So far, it remains the same:  few of the things I
love in Debussy's orchestral music are to be found in Haitink's readings.
Odd man out, I guess.
Regards,
Ed Presson- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Has anyone compared Haitink's recordings on the Philps Duo CD:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00000417P

with the same recordings on the Philips 50 CD:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00005IB58

The Philips 50 were all supposedly "newly remastered" when issued in
2001, so one would think there would be some difference between the
two, with the Philips Duo being issued 7 years earlier in 1994.
Gerard
2012-02-27 18:01:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Randy Lane
Post by Gerard
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many
special releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's
piano recordings the instrumental works have had much
discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works,
including the major oft performed works and the few efforts
made to record everything (or nearly everything) with one
orchestra/conductor? In the cycle category I only know of the
Martinon set and the forthcoming Naxos; the Martinon, to my
ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard orchestra, and what
I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest it will get a
pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings
did little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some
in fact did more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A
few very good recordings though have kept me from totally
dismissing Debussy, so perhaps a few more great recordings can
put me over the top and make me a true fan.
It would be convenient to know which many recordings you did not
like. For the works mentioned I would recommend Haitink (on a
Philips Duo, maybe reissued on Decca), specially for Images and
for Nocturnes.
Also Boulez (Sony).
(The orchestral works by Debussy don't form a cycle. Most
recordings contain a
few works, recorded individually.)
I second the Haitink Duo for the main orchestral works.
Ray Hall, Taree
Haitink is almost universally praised for his Debussy—except by me.
I recently re-listened to the Duo set, and while I admire the
beautiful playing, somehow Haitink's Debussy manages to leave me
cold. I admire Debussy recordings by Monteux, Munch, Reiner,
Stokowski, Karajan (La Mer on DG) and Martinon. But not Haitink.
Every five years or so I re-listen to reconsider my opinion. So
far, it remains the same: few of the things I love in Debussy's
orchestral music are to be found in Haitink's readings.
Odd man out, I guess.
Regards,
Ed Presson- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00000417P
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00005IB58
The Philips 50 were all supposedly "newly remastered" when issued in
2001, so one would think there would be some difference between the
two, with the Philips Duo being issued 7 years earlier in 1994.
I didn't compare them (and I don't have the Philips 50 issue).
As far as I have heard Philips 50 reissues and their previous issues,
differences are very hard to detect.
The recordings on the Debussy Duo issue were already very nicely remastered.
Ray Hall
2012-02-27 18:29:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gerard
I didn't compare them (and I don't have the Philips 50 issue).
As far as I have heard Philips 50 reissues and their previous issues,
differences are very hard to detect.
The recordings on the Debussy Duo issue were already very nicely remastered.
The timings of La Mer, especially the last movement, are different. Not
that that would be a sure indicator.

Ray Hall, Taree
Gerard
2012-02-27 18:40:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ray Hall
Post by Gerard
I didn't compare them (and I don't have the Philips 50 issue).
As far as I have heard Philips 50 reissues and their previous
issues, differences are very hard to detect.
The recordings on the Debussy Duo issue were already very nicely remastered.
The timings of La Mer, especially the last movement, are different.
Not that that would be a sure indicator.
No, that difference is just a few seconds, and they are probably both wrong (and
should be 7'50).
Matthew B. Tepper
2012-02-27 20:21:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Randy Lane <***@gmail.com> appears to have caused the following
letters to be typed in news:3337592c-bd5b-41d7-bedc-897139466a32
Post by Randy Lane
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00000417P
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00005IB58
The Philips 50 were all supposedly "newly remastered" when issued in
2001, so one would think there would be some difference between the
two, with the Philips Duo being issued 7 years earlier in 1994.
Wasn't there at least one notorious example -- I think it was the 1962 Kna
"Parsifal" -- in which the claim of remastering turned out to be false?
Somebody compared issues using Exact Audio Copy, as I recall, and found it
to be identical to the earlier one.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers.
Gerard
2012-02-26 13:20:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gerard
It would be convenient to know which many recordings you did not like.
For the works mentioned I would recommend Haitink (on a Philips Duo,
maybe reissued on Decca), specially for Images and for Nocturnes.
The Philips Duo has been reissued by Decca indeed, in the same format (I've seen
it in a store today).
BTW the EMI recordings by Martinon have been reissued by Brilliant Classics, in
a very cheap 4CD box.
pianomaven
2012-02-26 13:45:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gerard
Post by Gerard
It would be convenient to know which many recordings you did not like.
For the works mentioned I would recommend Haitink (on a Philips Duo,
maybe reissued on Decca), specially for Images and for Nocturnes.
The Philips Duo has been reissued by Decca indeed, in the same format (I've seen
it in a store today).
BTW the EMI recordings by Martinon have been reissued by Brilliant Classics, in
a very cheap 4CD box.
Brilliant, if I recall correctly.

TD
Lawrence Chalmers
2012-02-25 16:29:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
To the 'usual' suspects, I'd add the Inghelbrecht
set on Naive. I'm looking forward to the new Sony set by 'established'
artists like Monteux, Munch, i'm not sure who else. Called The Debussy
collection it
has over its 18+ cds nearly all the Debussy you would want. I've been
recently listening to some of the old Ansemet recordings and like them
very much.

Not the OP's topic but I would urge you to become familiar with his
piano music available by so many greats its hard to make one
recommendation. I'm talking complete sets. Furgus Thomson, Ciccolini,
and recently the new Ogawa set. Haven't heard
Bavouzet yet. And I hope to navigate french amazon to get a set by
Phillipe Cassard. My first Debussy piano music was Robert Casadesus
(and I think its in the new Sony Box)
Randy Lane
2012-02-25 17:36:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lawrence Chalmers
To the 'usual' suspects, I'd add the Inghelbrecht
set on Naive.  I'm looking forward to the new Sony set by 'established'
artists like Monteux, Munch, i'm not sure who else.  Called The Debussy
collection it
has over its 18+ cds nearly all the Debussy you would want.  I've been
recently listening to some of the old Ansemet recordings and like them
very much.
Not the OP's topic but I would urge you to become familiar with his
piano music available by so many greats its hard to make one
recommendation.  I'm talking complete sets.  Furgus Thomson, Ciccolini,
and recently the new Ogawa set.  Haven't heard
Bavouzet yet.  And I hope to navigate french amazon to get a set by
Phillipe Cassard.  My first Debussy piano music was Robert Casadesus
(and I think its in the new Sony Box)
As I mentioned, there's been plenty of discussion about the composr's
piano music recently. Debussy as a keyboard composer has my attentiaon
and interest, and I already own an enjoy the recordings you specify,
and many many more. I too am contemplating an AMazon.fr order to
include teh Cassard music.
I started this thread in hopes others would share their memorable
experiences with recordings of the Debussy orchestral oeuvre, as my
experience tehre has not been as good as it has been with the keyboard
works, chamber music, and songs.
pianomaven
2012-02-25 17:44:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lawrence Chalmers
To the 'usual' suspects, I'd add the Inghelbrecht
set on Naive.
Naive?

Do you mean this?

http://www.amazon.fr/Inghelbrecht-conducts-Debussy-Pell%C3%A9as-Nocturnes/dp/B00004YW1G/ref=sr_1_3?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1330191496&sr=1-3

These recordings come from INA and are issued on Montaigne.

Or do you mean this?

http://www.amazon.fr/Mer-Orchestre-Chansons-Charles-DOrl%C3%A9ans/dp/B00005KAOY/ref=sr_1_4?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1330191496&sr=1-4

Or this?

http://www.amazon.fr/Pr%C3%A9lude-Lapr%C3%A8s-Midi-Dun-Faune-Damoiselle/dp/B00005K3Q1/ref=sr_1_2?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1330191740&sr=1-2

Or this?

http://www.amazon.fr/Martyre-S%C3%A9bastien-ballades-Fran%C3%A7ois-Villon/dp/B00005KAOZ/ref=sr_1_7?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1330191496&sr=1-7

TD
pianomaven
2012-02-25 17:34:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra,
What?

The Orchestra National de ORTF (now called the Orchestra National de
France) is "substandard"?

According to whom, precisely?

Based on what, precisely?

TD
M forever
2012-02-25 21:41:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by pianomaven
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra,
What?
The Orchestra National de ORTF (now called the Orchestra National de
France) is "substandard"?
The French word for orchestra is "orchestre", not orchestra.
Post by pianomaven
According to whom, precisely?
Based on what, precisely?
TD
EM
2012-02-25 23:46:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by pianomaven
The Orchestra National de ORTF (now called the Orchestra National de
France) is "substandard"?
Which of their recordings of major orchestral works would be a first
choice?

EM
Ray Hall
2012-02-26 02:34:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by EM
Post by pianomaven
The Orchestra National de ORTF (now called the Orchestra National de
France) is "substandard"?
Which of their recordings of major orchestral works would be a first
choice?
EM
The Ravel collection by Martinon is pretty first choice for me. Lovely
playing.

Ray Hall, Taree
Gerard
2012-02-26 08:51:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ray Hall
Post by EM
Post by pianomaven
The Orchestra National de ORTF (now called the Orchestra National
de France) is "substandard"?
Which of their recordings of major orchestral works would be a first
choice?
EM
The Ravel collection by Martinon is pretty first choice for me. Lovely
playing.
But .. that collection was recorded with the Orchestre de Paris.
Ray Hall
2012-02-26 09:19:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gerard
Post by Ray Hall
Post by EM
Post by pianomaven
The Orchestra National de ORTF (now called the Orchestra National
de France) is "substandard"?
Which of their recordings of major orchestral works would be a first
choice?
EM
The Ravel collection by Martinon is pretty first choice for me. Lovely
playing.
But .. that collection was recorded with the Orchestre de Paris.
Correct. But I always confuse the two orchestras.
;)

Ray Hall, Taree
M forever
2012-02-26 09:31:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ray Hall
Post by EM
Post by pianomaven
The Orchestra National de ORTF (now called the Orchestra National de
France) is "substandard"?
Which of their recordings of major orchestral works would be a first
choice?
EM
The Ravel collection by Martinon is pretty first choice for me. Lovely
playing.
Except that is actually a different orchestra - the Orchestre de
Paris.
Terry
2014-11-29 05:38:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ray Hall
Post by EM
Post by pianomaven
The Orchestra National de ORTF (now called the Orchestra National de
France) is "substandard"?
Which of their recordings of major orchestral works would be a first
choice?
EM
The Ravel collection by Martinon is pretty first choice for me. Lovely
playing.
Ray Hall, Taree
I agree. A fine set. I am at a loss to understand why someone considered his orchestra "second rate".
Mark S
2012-02-26 02:52:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by pianomaven
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra,
What?
The Orchestra National de ORTF (now called the Orchestra National de
France) is "substandard"?
According to whom, precisely?
Based on what, precisely?
TD
Yeah. What's THAT about? That Martinon set is my go-to version as a
set.

I also second the Karajan La Mer, and Toscanini in this rep must be
heard.
Matthew B. Tepper
2012-02-26 20:37:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Yeah. What's THAT about? That Martinon set is my go-to version as a set.
Mine too! I bought the original Angel LPs, then replaced them with the
European pressings (and was able to play them in SQ quad, at that), and now I
have the Debussy/Ravel box on EMI. Sure, there are individual recordings of
some of the works I might prefer (Reiner in "La Mer," Toscanini in "Ibéria"
and "Marche écossaise," and lots of different "Faunes"), but for the whole of
the output I can't imagine how this set could be beat.
I also second the Karajan La Mer, and Toscanini in this rep must be heard.
I suppose I ought to hear the Karajan sometime.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers.
dw
2012-02-25 17:46:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra, and what I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest
it will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in fact did
more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few very good
recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing Debussy, so
perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over the top and make
me a true fan.
Are there any great recordings no longer available that we could
"wish" into a reissue during these celebrations?
Bernstein/Sony is the only rendition of Jeux I know that really tells
a story. He is also very very good in the final movement of La Mer.

D
Matthew B. Tepper
2012-02-25 17:56:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
From "Images pour Orchestre," don't miss the Toscanini/Philadelphia "Ibéria."
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers.
Al Eisner
2012-02-29 18:56:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
From "Images pour Orchestre," don't miss the Toscanini/Philadelphia "Ib?ria."
I think "La Mer" in that Philadelphia set is even better. I'm surprised
how good Toscanini is in this music -- great sweep, or ebb-and-flow in
this case. (The whole set is recommendable, IMO.)
--
Al Eisner
San Mateo Co., CA
John Hood
2012-02-25 18:16:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Are the Orchestral Images versions of the piano Images?

JH
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra, and what I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest
it will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in fact did
more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few very good
recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing Debussy, so
perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over the top and make
me a true fan.
Are there any great recordings no longer available that we could
"wish" into a reissue during these celebrations?
Kip Williams
2012-02-25 18:34:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Hood
Are the Orchestral Images versions of the piano Images?
No. There have been 2-hands (Garban) and 4-hands (Caplet) arrangements
of them, but I don't recall coming across any recordings of these.

The Garban transcriptions are still covered by copyright, apparently.


Kip W
Matthew B. Tepper
2012-02-26 20:37:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kip Williams
Post by John Hood
Are the Orchestral Images versions of the piano Images?
No. There have been 2-hands (Garban) and 4-hands (Caplet) arrangements
of them, but I don't recall coming across any recordings of these.
The Garban transcriptions are still covered by copyright, apparently.
I'm afraid it won't be too long before we will all be able to just shrug and
say, "What isn't?"
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers.
Kip Williams
2012-02-26 21:38:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Kip Williams
Post by John Hood
Are the Orchestral Images versions of the piano Images?
No. There have been 2-hands (Garban) and 4-hands (Caplet) arrangements
of them, but I don't recall coming across any recordings of these.
The Garban transcriptions are still covered by copyright, apparently.
I'm afraid it won't be too long before we will all be able to just shrug and
say, "What isn't?"
I remember in the early 70s, when Ravel was still covered by copyright,
and that was unusual for something of that vintage. Some years later,
all the cheap editions started coming out, and I knew that Durand had
lost its choke hold.

I thought this was going to be the way things were. Eventually, a
composer would be dead enough that his music could change hands without
a ton of money going to some suit somewhere. Maybe only a half ton of
money, or a few pounds.

God Damn You, Sonny Bono.
Sonny Bono, you Miserable little Piece of Shit.
And damn all those parasites who never wrote a note, whose only
contribution was starving the writer all his life and then slowly
consuming their preserved body for decades after that.


Kip W
Bob Harper
2012-02-26 22:40:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kip Williams
letters
Post by Kip Williams
Post by John Hood
Are the Orchestral Images versions of the piano Images?
No. There have been 2-hands (Garban) and 4-hands (Caplet) arrangements
of them, but I don't recall coming across any recordings of these.
The Garban transcriptions are still covered by copyright, apparently.
I'm afraid it won't be too long before we will all be able to just shrug and
say, "What isn't?"
I remember in the early 70s, when Ravel was still covered by copyright,
and that was unusual for something of that vintage. Some years later,
all the cheap editions started coming out, and I knew that Durand had
lost its choke hold.
I thought this was going to be the way things were. Eventually, a
composer would be dead enough that his music could change hands without
a ton of money going to some suit somewhere. Maybe only a half ton of
money, or a few pounds.
God Damn You, Sonny Bono.
Sonny Bono, you Miserable little Piece of Shit.
And damn all those parasites who never wrote a note, whose only
contribution was starving the writer all his life and then slowly
consuming their preserved body for decades after that.
Kip W
Sonny serves a good whipping boy, but he's by no means the only guilty
party in the ridiculous extension of copyright. Let's hope that an
adjunct of the coming reform of our outrageously overcomplicated tax
system is a similar reform of copyright to conform it to the
Constitution's plain words.

Bob Harper
Matthew B. Tepper
2012-02-27 01:35:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kip Williams
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Kip Williams
Post by John Hood
Are the Orchestral Images versions of the piano Images?
No. There have been 2-hands (Garban) and 4-hands (Caplet) arrangements
of them, but I don't recall coming across any recordings of these.
The Garban transcriptions are still covered by copyright, apparently.
I'm afraid it won't be too long before we will all be able to just
shrug and say, "What isn't?"
I remember in the early 70s, when Ravel was still covered by copyright,
and that was unusual for something of that vintage. Some years later,
all the cheap editions started coming out, and I knew that Durand had
lost its choke hold.
I thought this was going to be the way things were. Eventually, a
composer would be dead enough that his music could change hands without
a ton of money going to some suit somewhere. Maybe only a half ton of
money, or a few pounds.
God Damn You, Sonny Bono.
Sonny Bono, you Miserable little Piece of Shit.
And damn all those parasites who never wrote a note, whose only
contribution was starving the writer all his life and then slowly
consuming their preserved body for decades after that.
Kip W
I'd like to put up a statue to honor that tree.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers.
pianomaven
2012-02-27 17:16:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kip Williams
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Kip Williams
Post by John Hood
Are the Orchestral Images versions of the piano Images?
No. There have been 2-hands (Garban) and 4-hands (Caplet) arrangements
of them, but I don't recall coming across any recordings of these.
The Garban transcriptions are still covered by copyright, apparently.
I'm afraid it won't be too long before we will all be able to just shrug and
say, "What isn't?"
I remember in the early 70s, when Ravel was still covered by copyright,
and that was unusual for something of that vintage. Some years later,
all the cheap editions started coming out, and I knew that Durand had
lost its choke hold.
I thought this was going to be the way things were. Eventually, a
composer would be dead enough that his music could change hands without
a ton of money going to some suit somewhere. Maybe only a half ton of
money, or a few pounds.
God Damn You, Sonny Bono.
Sonny Bono, you Miserable little Piece of Shit.
And damn all those parasites who never wrote a note, whose only
contribution was starving the writer all his life and then slowly
consuming their preserved body for decades after that.
I think you'll find that Ravel enjoyed a very comfortable life, thank
you very much all the same.

TD
M forever
2012-02-27 19:24:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by pianomaven
Post by Kip Williams
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Kip Williams
Post by John Hood
Are the Orchestral Images versions of the piano Images?
No. There have been 2-hands (Garban) and 4-hands (Caplet) arrangements
of them, but I don't recall coming across any recordings of these.
The Garban transcriptions are still covered by copyright, apparently.
I'm afraid it won't be too long before we will all be able to just shrug and
say, "What isn't?"
I remember in the early 70s, when Ravel was still covered by copyright,
and that was unusual for something of that vintage. Some years later,
all the cheap editions started coming out, and I knew that Durand had
lost its choke hold.
I thought this was going to be the way things were. Eventually, a
composer would be dead enough that his music could change hands without
a ton of money going to some suit somewhere. Maybe only a half ton of
money, or a few pounds.
God Damn You, Sonny Bono.
Sonny Bono, you Miserable little Piece of Shit.
And damn all those parasites who never wrote a note, whose only
contribution was starving the writer all his life and then slowly
consuming their preserved body for decades after that.
I think you'll find that Ravel enjoyed a very comfortable life, thank
you very much all the same.
Don't thank Kip - thank Richard Strauss who was a pioneer of
copyright. Many of the copyright protections he gained for musicians
in Germany were adopted in neighboring countries pretty quickly.
Gerard
2012-02-25 18:51:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Hood
Are the Orchestral Images versions of the piano Images?
JH
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including
the major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In
the cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the
forthcoming Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from
a sub-standard orchestra, and what I have read of the Naxos set due
out soon suggest it will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in fact
did more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few very good
recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing Debussy, so
perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over the top and make
me a true fan.
Are there any great recordings no longer available that we could
"wish" into a reissue during these celebrations?
No.
You can listen to fragments of the Images pour orchestre at:

http://www.amazon.com/Debussy-lapr%C3%A8s-midi-Printemps-Cleveland-Orchestra/dp/B000001GGI/
Dan Fowler
2012-02-25 18:50:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I must confess to a fondness for Martinon's way with Debussy. And I would
strongly second the recommendation for Inghelbrecht's interpretations (the
Testament recordings and the "Inghelbrecht Conducts Debussy" set that looks
like it sadly may be out of print). Inghelbrecht coaxed some hauntingly
beautiful interpretations out of his orchestras. Another set of hard to find
recommendations would be for those conducted by Manuel Rosenthal.

More easily found is the single disk containing Nocturnes, La Mer, and
Images with Van Beinum/Concertgebouw Orchestra.Sound is a little iffy (but
not bad for 1950s) but the performances are terrific.

Tortelier conducts the Ulster Orchestra in my other set. Sound is very good,
and the orchestra plays very well. I haven't listened to the set in a while
(which may tell you something), but I remember having a particularly
sparking La Boite a Joujoux.

Dan
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra, and what I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest
it will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in fact did
more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few very good
recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing Debussy, so
perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over the top and make
me a true fan.
Are there any great recordings no longer available that we could
"wish" into a reissue during these celebrations?
Angelotti
2012-02-25 18:55:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra, and what I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest
it will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in fact did
more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few very good
recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing Debussy, so
perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over the top and make
me a true fan.
Are there any great recordings no longer available that we could
"wish" into a reissue during these celebrations?
Not being a purist I enjoyed very much recordings by Geoffry Simon
with La Mer, Nocturnes etc.
But they also contain transcriptions, made by Stokovsky, Caplet,
Ravel, Grainger etc.
Review (Gramophone):

http://www.gramophone.net/Issue/Page/May%201991/48/746462/DEBUSSY.+ORCHESTRAL+WORKS%2C+Volumes+1+and+2.+aJames+Campbell+%28c1%29+bwomens+voices+of+the+Philharrnonia+Chorus+Phil+harmonia+Orchestra++Geoffrey+Simon.+Cala+Target+%28D+CACD100102+%28two+discs%2C+oas%3A+70+and+66+minutes%3A+DDD%29.#header-logo

Maybe they are still available.

Hvdlinden
herman
2012-02-25 19:06:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Haitink, Munch, Dutoit, Boulez
David O.
2012-02-25 19:42:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by herman
Haitink, Munch, Dutoit, Boulez
I second Munch+Boston. The 2004 remastered recording of the NOCTURNES
on the Classic Library Series is one of my favorites. (I think it was
originally recorded in 1963.)

Munch & BSO approach this music with a little less gauze on the lens
than other orchestras, but they have a rich tone & they suffuse their
precision with poignant emotion.
Bob Harper
2012-02-25 22:56:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by herman
Haitink, Munch, Dutoit, Boulez
Hard to argue with those, though I might substitute Martinon for Dutoit.
And for something completely different, if you can find the
Celibdache/Munich Debussy disc (La Mer and Iberia), try to hear it. For
me his La Mer, though incredibly slow, is mesmerizing. Not for every
taste, however.

Bob Harper
r***@spiritone.com
2013-07-07 19:00:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bob Harper
Post by herman
Haitink, Munch, Dutoit, Boulez
Hard to argue with those, though I might substitute Martinon for Dutoit.
And for something completely different, if you can find the
Celibdache/Munich Debussy disc (La Mer and Iberia), try to hear it. For
me his La Mer, though incredibly slow, is mesmerizing. Not for every
taste, however.
Bob Harper
Another Celibidache is on DG. I like that one better than the EMI as it is not quite so slow....

Stan Punzel
Dan Fowler
2013-07-07 21:50:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by r***@spiritone.com
Post by Bob Harper
Post by herman
Haitink, Munch, Dutoit, Boulez
Hard to argue with those, though I might substitute Martinon for Dutoit.
And for something completely different, if you can find the
Celibdache/Munich Debussy disc (La Mer and Iberia), try to hear it. For
me his La Mer, though incredibly slow, is mesmerizing. Not for every
taste, however.
Bob Harper
Another Celibidache is on DG. I like that one better than the EMI as it
is not quite so slow....
Stan Punzel
I'll second the two Celibidache recommendations. Slow, especially the EMI,
but exquisite orchestral color. I would also like to recommend
Inghelbrecht's Debussy. Looks like "Inghelbrecht conducts Debussy" may be
out of print (too bad!) but the Testament recordings are still available.
Love the sound Inghelbrecht draws from the orchestras and his
interpretations of these works.
Dan
--
Dan Fowler
David Fox
2012-02-25 19:09:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra, and what I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest
it will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in fact did
more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few very good
recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing Debussy, so
perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over the top and make
me a true fan.
Are there any great recordings no longer available that we could
"wish" into a reissue during these celebrations?
Just yesterday I was listening to Stokowski's EMI collection of
Debussy (featured on Disc 3 of
the "Maverick Conductor" box set, and available separately as well).
The recordings are from
1957-8 with the LSO, ORNF, and his London pickup orchestra. I don't
know that I've heard these
pieces performed better and the sound quality is very good as well -
not surprising given that Stokowski
was very actively involved in the booth and was usually several years
ahead of the pack in recording
techniques. Stokowski's musical personality is an excellent fit for
this music, at least how I perceive it.

DF
Dave Cook
2012-02-25 20:34:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David Fox
Just yesterday I was listening to Stokowski's EMI collection of
Debussy (featured on Disc 3 of
the "Maverick Conductor" box set, and available separately as well).
The recordings are from
1957-8 with the LSO, ORNF, and his London pickup orchestra.
He also recorded La Mer for Decca in "Phase 4" sound, which has been
issued several times on CD.

Dave Cook
Doug McDonald
2012-02-25 21:01:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David Fox
Just yesterday I was listening to Stokowski's EMI collection of
Debussy (featured on Disc 3 of
the "Maverick Conductor" box set, and available separately as well).
The recordings are from
1957-8 with the LSO, ORNF, and his London pickup orchestra. I don't
know that I've heard these
pieces performed better and the sound quality is very good as well -
not surprising given that Stokowski
was very actively involved in the booth and was usually several years
ahead of the pack in recording
techniques. Stokowski's musical personality is an excellent fit for
this music, at least how I perceive it.
I second Stokowski, especially for the Nocturnes. His early
1950's mono recording now on Cala was criticized at the time
for being, if I recall correctly, "lurid" and that it is,
but also very, very good. Because of dated sound it is
only for specialists. I believe that this was only the third LP
I ever bought. The Cala transcription is excellent.

Doug McDonald
Ed Presson
2012-02-26 03:00:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David Fox
Just yesterday I was listening to Stokowski's EMI collection of
Debussy (featured on Disc 3 of
the "Maverick Conductor" box set, and available separately as well).
The recordings are from
1957-8 with the LSO, ORNF, and his London pickup orchestra. I don't
know that I've heard these
pieces performed better and the sound quality is very good as well -
not surprising given that Stokowski
was very actively involved in the booth and was usually several years
ahead of the pack in recording
techniques. Stokowski's musical personality is an excellent fit for
this music, at least how I perceive it.
I second Stokowski, especially for the Nocturnes. His early
1950's mono recording now on Cala was criticized at the time
for being, if I recall correctly, "lurid" and that it is,
but also very, very good. Because of dated sound it is
only for specialists. I believe that this was only the third LP
I ever bought. The Cala transcription is excellent.
Doug McDonald
I concur with the recommendation for Stokowski's Debussy. I like his "La
Mer" on Decca, and "Iberia" and other works on Capitol/EMI.

Has anyone already mentioned Reiner's "Iberia?" It remains my favorite.

Ed Presson
Gerard
2012-02-26 15:14:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ed Presson
Has anyone already mentioned Reiner's "Iberia?" It remains my
favorite.
Maybe it's mentioned.
I've just listened to it, and found it rather harsh (maybe it's just the way it
has been recorded). I compared it only to the recording by Cluytens, which I
prefer. And he recorded the whole piece (Images).
Alan Cooper
2012-02-25 19:41:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many
special releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's
piano recordings the instrumental works have had much
discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works,
including the major oft performed works and the few efforts made
to record everything (or nearly everything) with one
orchestra/conductor? In the cycle category I only know of the
Martinon set and the forthcoming Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears
at least, suffers from a sub-standard orchestra, and what I have
read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest it will get a pass.
Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
...which happen to be the three works on the best single CD of Debussy's
orchestral music in existence:

http://www.buywell.com/cgi-bin/buywellic2/01086.html

More Van Beinum in lesser works here, as part of a CD that is especially valuable
for Monteux's contribution:

http://www.buywell.com/cgi-bin/buywellic2/04025.html

Karajan's "La Mer" would be on the short list of the finest recordings in his vast
discography, imo.

AC
Ray Hall
2012-02-25 20:23:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Alan Cooper
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many
special releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's
piano recordings the instrumental works have had much
discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works,
including the major oft performed works and the few efforts made
to record everything (or nearly everything) with one
orchestra/conductor? In the cycle category I only know of the
Martinon set and the forthcoming Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears
at least, suffers from a sub-standard orchestra, and what I have
read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest it will get a pass.
Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
...which happen to be the three works on the best single CD of Debussy's
http://www.buywell.com/cgi-bin/buywellic2/01086.html
More Van Beinum in lesser works here, as part of a CD that is especially valuable
http://www.buywell.com/cgi-bin/buywellic2/04025.html
Karajan's "La Mer" would be on the short list of the finest recordings in his vast
discography, imo.
AC
I have a Baudo EMI Eminence disc with the LPO which contains La Mer,
Jeux and Prelude to a Faun which can be found on Amazon from independent
sellers. Very contoured renditions and smoothly played, however I give
Haitink the edge.

Ray Hall, Taree
graham
2012-02-25 20:26:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra, and what I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest
it will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
For La Mer, Barbirolli is good but at the moment, AFAIK, it is only
available in a 10CD compilation.
Graham
jrsnfld
2012-02-25 21:51:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Randy Lane
Are there any great recordings no longer available that we could
"wish" into a reissue during these celebrations?
A CD issue of Debussy recorded by Bruno Maderna would be welcome. I
don't know if any of his performances are in print right now, but to
my mind nothing could be more fitting as a celebration of either
Debussy or Maderna.

--Jeff
M forever
2012-02-25 22:20:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra, and what I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest
it will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in fact did
more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few very good
recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing Debussy, so
perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over the top and make
me a true fan.
Are there any great recordings no longer available that we could
"wish" into a reissue during these celebrations?
Yes, the orchestral playing in the Martinon recordings is a little
rough, but it is also very stylish and the orchestra at that time
still had a very noticeably French sound. In particularly the
woodwinds have a lot of color and character, and I think this set
comes pretty close to the sound world Debussy had in mind. In addition
to that Martinon just knew the music very well and his conducting is
spot on stylistically and musically. I think you should have this set
and I also think you will enjoy it a lot if you focus more on color
and character than the many small imperfections of the orchestral
playing.

There are plenty of good Debussy recordings, but I would strongly
recommend Dutoit's recordings from Montreal. The sound and playing
style of the orchestra leans towards the traditional French style, the
playing highly accomplished and polished, and the recorded sound very
good, rich but transparent and detailed. Dutoit is often dismissed as
a boring routinier, but I have never shared that opinion. I find his
conducting stylish and detail-attentive, and not even particularly
understated. I enjoy most if not all his Montreal recordings (not just
of Debussy).

When it comes to La Mer specifically, one of my favorites is
Philharmonia/Sinopoli, perhaps somewhat predictably because I am known
to be a Sinopoli fan, but this recording nicely illustrates why that
is. The orchestral playing is very good, and Sinopoli had a special
sense for color which is very noticeable in this recording.

Another favorite is LA/Giulini, rather darker sounding, but very
lyrical and expressive.

Also - this may surprise some people because it is not fashionable to
praise Barenboim, but I think his Debussy recordings with the
Orchestre de Paris are actually very good. The OdP was specifically
founded, or re-founded because it was felt that the general level of
orchestral playing in France was lacking at the time. After a bumpy
start with Munch, who died soon after the founding of the orchestra,
Karajan, who was never there, and Solti, for whom the orchestra was
not a priority either, Barenboim took over and he did a lot of very
good work there. His Debussy recordings are very meticulously
prepared, the orchestral playing has a French sound and feel but it is
rather more polished than what you hear on earlier French recordings,
there is great attention to detail, so I find these very satisfying to
listen to. The La Mer, for instance, is one of those performances
which sound "just right" to me. Barenboim paid a lot of attention to
all the fine detail but doesn't neglect the overall picture either.
Mark S
2012-02-26 02:54:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by M forever
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra, and what I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest
it will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in fact did
more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few very good
recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing Debussy, so
perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over the top and make
me a true fan.
Are there any great recordings no longer available that we could
"wish" into a reissue during these celebrations?
Yes, the orchestral playing in the Martinon recordings is a little
rough, but it is also very stylish and the orchestra at that time
still had a very noticeably French sound. In particularly the
woodwinds have a lot of color and character, and I think this set
comes pretty close to the sound world Debussy had in mind. In addition
to that Martinon just knew the music very well and his conducting is
spot on stylistically and musically. I think you should have this set
and I also think you will enjoy it a lot if you focus more on color
and character than the many small imperfections of the orchestral
playing.
What he said, and said well.
Ed Presson
2012-02-26 03:17:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra, and what I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest
it will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in fact did
more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few very good
recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing Debussy, so
perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over the top and make
me a true fan.
Are there any great recordings no longer available that we could
"wish" into a reissue during these celebrations?
Yes, the orchestral playing in the Martinon recordings is a little
rough, but it is also very stylish and the orchestra at that time
still had a very noticeably French sound. In particularly the
woodwinds have a lot of color and character, and I think this set
comes pretty close to the sound world Debussy had in mind. In addition
spot on stylistically and musically. I think you should have this set
and I also think you will enjoy it a lot if you focus more on color
and character than the many small imperfections of the orchestral
playing.
There are plenty of good Debussy recordings, but I would strongly
recommend Dutoit's recordings from Montreal. The sound and playing
style of the orchestra leans towards the traditional French style, the
playing highly accomplished and polished, and the recorded sound very
good, rich but transparent and detailed. Dutoit is often dismissed as
a boring routinier, but I have never shared that opinion. I find his
conducting stylish and detail-attentive, and not even particularly
understated. I enjoy most if not all his Montreal recordings (not just
of Debussy).
When it comes to La Mer specifically, one of my favorites is
Philharmonia/Sinopoli, perhaps somewhat predictably because I am known
to be a Sinopoli fan, but this recording nicely illustrates why that
is. The orchestral playing is very good, and Sinopoli had a special
sense for color which is very noticeable in this recording.
Another favorite is LA/Giulini, rather darker sounding, but very
lyrical and expressive.
Also - this may surprise some people because it is not fashionable to
praise Barenboim, but I think his Debussy recordings with the
Orchestre de Paris are actually very good. The OdP was specifically
founded, or re-founded because it was felt that the general level of
orchestral playing in France was lacking at the time. After a bumpy
start with Munch, who died soon after the founding of the orchestra,
Karajan, who was never there, and Solti, for whom the orchestra was
not a priority either, Barenboim took over and he did a lot of very
good work there. His Debussy recordings are very meticulously
prepared, the orchestral playing has a French sound and feel but it is
rather more polished than what you hear on earlier French recordings,
there is great attention to detail, so I find these very satisfying to
listen to. The La Mer, for instance, is one of those performances
which sound "just right" to me. Barenboim paid a lot of attention to
all the fine detail but doesn't neglect the overall picture either.
I concur with the merits of and recommendations for Barenboim and Martinon.
I think
the descriptions of each are spot on.

I don't care much
for Dutoit's Debussy and haven't heard the Giulini for years, nor the
Sinopoli at all. I suspect I
might like the Sinopoli.

Ed Presson
Gerard
2012-02-26 08:56:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ed Presson
I don't care much
for Dutoit's Debussy
Here I agree. I have some Debussy by Dutoit, and it never did much to me. Very
well recorded, that's true.
M forever
2012-02-26 10:05:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ed Presson
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra, and what I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest
it will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in fact did
more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few very good
recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing Debussy, so
perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over the top and make
me a true fan.
Are there any great recordings no longer available that we could
"wish" into a reissue during these celebrations?
Yes, the orchestral playing in the Martinon recordings is a little
rough, but it is also very stylish and the orchestra at that time
still had a very noticeably French sound. In particularly the
woodwinds have a lot of color and character, and I think this set
comes pretty close to the sound world Debussy had in mind. In addition
spot on stylistically and musically. I think you should have this set
and I also think you will enjoy it a lot if you focus more on color
and character than the many small imperfections of the orchestral
playing.
There are plenty of good Debussy recordings, but I would strongly
recommend Dutoit's recordings from Montreal. The sound and playing
style of the orchestra leans towards the traditional French style, the
playing highly accomplished and polished, and the recorded sound very
good, rich but transparent and detailed. Dutoit is often dismissed as
a boring routinier, but I have never shared that opinion. I find his
conducting stylish and detail-attentive, and not even particularly
understated. I enjoy most if not all his Montreal recordings (not just
of Debussy).
When it comes to La Mer specifically, one of my favorites is
Philharmonia/Sinopoli, perhaps somewhat predictably because I am known
to be a Sinopoli fan, but this recording nicely illustrates why that
is. The orchestral playing is very good, and Sinopoli had a special
sense for color which is very noticeable in this recording.
Another favorite is LA/Giulini, rather darker sounding, but very
lyrical and expressive.
Also - this may surprise some people because it is not fashionable to
praise Barenboim, but I think his Debussy recordings with the
Orchestre de Paris are actually very good. The OdP was specifically
founded, or re-founded because it was felt that the general level of
orchestral playing in France was lacking at the time. After a bumpy
start with Munch, who died soon after the founding of the orchestra,
Karajan, who was never there, and Solti, for whom the orchestra was
not a priority either, Barenboim took over and he did a lot of very
good work there. His Debussy recordings are very meticulously
prepared, the orchestral playing has a French sound and feel but it is
rather more polished than what you hear on earlier French recordings,
there is great attention to detail, so I find these very satisfying to
listen to. The La Mer, for instance, is one of those performances
which sound "just right" to me. Barenboim paid a lot of attention to
all the fine detail but doesn't neglect the overall picture either.
I concur with the merits of and recommendations for Barenboim and Martinon.
I think
the descriptions of each are spot on.
I don't care much
for Dutoit's Debussy
I don't understand that at all, especially since you agree about the
merits of the Barenboim versions. The Dutoit recordings are just as
meticulously prepared and detail-attentive, but actually even better
played and recorded, and quite "exciting", too - the finale of La Mer
is one of the most storm-tossed I know, but witha truly magical middle
section, too. Pretty awesome actually.
Post by Ed Presson
and haven't heard the Giulini for years, nor the
Sinopoli at all.  I suspect I
might like the Sinopoli.
I suspect so, too! Very nice, very atmospheric Daphnis et Chloé on the
same disc, too, and a great Boléro which showcases the outstanding
wind soloists of the Philharmonia. You should also check out
Sinopoli's Respighi tone poems and the Ravel/Mussorgsky Pictures, both
with the NYP - outstanding versions, among the very best I know in
each case.
Mark Melson
2012-02-26 03:46:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by M forever
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra, and what I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest
it will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in fact did
more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few very good
recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing Debussy, so
perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over the top and make
me a true fan.
Are there any great recordings no longer available that we could
"wish" into a reissue during these celebrations?
Yes, the orchestral playing in the Martinon recordings is a little
rough, but it is also very stylish and the orchestra at that time
still had a very noticeably French sound. In particularly the
woodwinds have a lot of color and character, and I think this set
comes pretty close to the sound world Debussy had in mind. In addition
to that Martinon just knew the music very well and his conducting is
spot on stylistically and musically. I think you should have this set
and I also think you will enjoy it a lot if you focus more on color
and character than the many small imperfections of the orchestral
playing.
There are plenty of good Debussy recordings, but I would strongly
recommend Dutoit's recordings from Montreal. The sound and playing
style of the orchestra leans towards the traditional French style, the
playing highly accomplished and polished, and the recorded sound very
good, rich but transparent and detailed. Dutoit is often dismissed as
a boring routinier, but I have never shared that opinion. I find his
conducting stylish and detail-attentive, and not even particularly
understated. I enjoy most if not all his Montreal recordings (not just
of Debussy).
When it comes to La Mer specifically, one of my favorites is
Philharmonia/Sinopoli, perhaps somewhat predictably because I am known
to be a Sinopoli fan, but this recording nicely illustrates why that
is. The orchestral playing is very good, and Sinopoli had a special
sense for color which is very noticeable in this recording.
Another favorite is LA/Giulini, rather darker sounding, but very
lyrical and expressive.
Also - this may surprise some people because it is not fashionable to
praise Barenboim, but I think his Debussy recordings with the
Orchestre de Paris are actually very good. The OdP was specifically
founded, or re-founded because it was felt that the general level of
orchestral playing in France was lacking at the time. After a bumpy
start with Munch, who died soon after the founding of the orchestra,
Karajan, who was never there, and Solti, for whom the orchestra was
not a priority either, Barenboim took over and he did a lot of very
good work there. His Debussy recordings are very meticulously
prepared, the orchestral playing has a French sound and feel but it is
rather more polished than what you hear on earlier French recordings,
there is great attention to detail, so I find these very satisfying to
listen to. The La Mer, for instance, is one of those performances
which sound "just right" to me. Barenboim paid a lot of attention to
all the fine detail but doesn't neglect the overall picture either.
I have not heard the Giulini/LA Phil mentioned above, but I have owned
for many years and still enjoy Giulini's "La Mer" and "Nocturnes" with
the Philharmonia. His Debussy does not have the x-ray clarity of
Boulez, nor the sumptuous textures of Karajan, but has a veiled
mystery which suits these pieces well, as well as splendid woodwind
principals. He also lets the music breathe and doesn't hurry it along,
which helps.

Mark
herman
2012-02-26 08:47:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mark Melson
Post by M forever
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra, and what I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest
it will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in fact did
more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few very good
recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing Debussy, so
perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over the top and make
me a true fan.
Are there any great recordings no longer available that we could
"wish" into a reissue during these celebrations?
Yes, the orchestral playing in the Martinon recordings is a little
rough, but it is also very stylish and the orchestra at that time
still had a very noticeably French sound. In particularly the
woodwinds have a lot of color and character, and I think this set
comes pretty close to the sound world Debussy had in mind. In addition
to that Martinon just knew the music very well and his conducting is
spot on stylistically and musically. I think you should have this set
and I also think you will enjoy it a lot if you focus more on color
and character than the many small imperfections of the orchestral
playing.
There are plenty of good Debussy recordings, but I would strongly
recommend Dutoit's recordings from Montreal. The sound and playing
style of the orchestra leans towards the traditional French style, the
playing highly accomplished and polished, and the recorded sound very
good, rich but transparent and detailed. Dutoit is often dismissed as
a boring routinier, but I have never shared that opinion. I find his
conducting stylish and detail-attentive, and not even particularly
understated. I enjoy most if not all his Montreal recordings (not just
of Debussy).
When it comes to La Mer specifically, one of my favorites is
Philharmonia/Sinopoli, perhaps somewhat predictably because I am known
to be a Sinopoli fan, but this recording nicely illustrates why that
is. The orchestral playing is very good, and Sinopoli had a special
sense for color which is very noticeable in this recording.
Another favorite is LA/Giulini, rather darker sounding, but very
lyrical and expressive.
Also - this may surprise some people because it is not fashionable to
praise Barenboim, but I think his Debussy recordings with the
Orchestre de Paris are actually very good. The OdP was specifically
founded, or re-founded because it was felt that the general level of
orchestral playing in France was lacking at the time. After a bumpy
start with Munch, who died soon after the founding of the orchestra,
Karajan, who was never there, and Solti, for whom the orchestra was
not a priority either, Barenboim took over and he did a lot of very
good work there. His Debussy recordings are very meticulously
prepared, the orchestral playing has a French sound and feel but it is
rather more polished than what you hear on earlier French recordings,
there is great attention to detail, so I find these very satisfying to
listen to. The La Mer, for instance, is one of those performances
which sound "just right" to me. Barenboim paid a lot of attention to
all the fine detail but doesn't neglect the overall picture either.
I have not heard the Giulini/LA Phil mentioned above, but I have owned
for many years and still enjoy Giulini's "La Mer" and "Nocturnes" with
the Philharmonia. His Debussy does not have the x-ray clarity of
Boulez, nor the sumptuous textures of Karajan, but has a veiled
mystery which suits these pieces well, as well as splendid woodwind
principals. He also lets the music breathe and doesn't hurry it along,
which helps.
Mark
Guilini recorded La Mer one last time in 1994 with the Concertgebouw
for Sony, together with L'après Midi.
Gerard
2012-02-26 13:17:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by herman
Post by Mark Melson
I have not heard the Giulini/LA Phil mentioned above, but I have
owned for many years and still enjoy Giulini's "La Mer" and
"Nocturnes" with the Philharmonia. His Debussy does not have the
x-ray clarity of Boulez, nor the sumptuous textures of Karajan, but
has a veiled mystery which suits these pieces well, as well as
splendid woodwind principals. He also lets the music breathe and
doesn't hurry it along, which helps.
Mark
Guilini recorded La Mer one last time in 1994 with the Concertgebouw
for Sony, together with L'après Midi.
Around the time he recorded La Mer for DG I've heard a life performance
(broadcasted) - I don't remember with what orchestra. I hoped for a recording of
that performance; it was the best La Mer I could imagine (then). But it did not
happen. His LA recording was not what I hoped for.
M forever
2012-02-26 10:39:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mark Melson
Post by M forever
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra, and what I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest
it will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in fact did
more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few very good
recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing Debussy, so
perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over the top and make
me a true fan.
Are there any great recordings no longer available that we could
"wish" into a reissue during these celebrations?
Yes, the orchestral playing in the Martinon recordings is a little
rough, but it is also very stylish and the orchestra at that time
still had a very noticeably French sound. In particularly the
woodwinds have a lot of color and character, and I think this set
comes pretty close to the sound world Debussy had in mind. In addition
to that Martinon just knew the music very well and his conducting is
spot on stylistically and musically. I think you should have this set
and I also think you will enjoy it a lot if you focus more on color
and character than the many small imperfections of the orchestral
playing.
There are plenty of good Debussy recordings, but I would strongly
recommend Dutoit's recordings from Montreal. The sound and playing
style of the orchestra leans towards the traditional French style, the
playing highly accomplished and polished, and the recorded sound very
good, rich but transparent and detailed. Dutoit is often dismissed as
a boring routinier, but I have never shared that opinion. I find his
conducting stylish and detail-attentive, and not even particularly
understated. I enjoy most if not all his Montreal recordings (not just
of Debussy).
When it comes to La Mer specifically, one of my favorites is
Philharmonia/Sinopoli, perhaps somewhat predictably because I am known
to be a Sinopoli fan, but this recording nicely illustrates why that
is. The orchestral playing is very good, and Sinopoli had a special
sense for color which is very noticeable in this recording.
Another favorite is LA/Giulini, rather darker sounding, but very
lyrical and expressive.
Also - this may surprise some people because it is not fashionable to
praise Barenboim, but I think his Debussy recordings with the
Orchestre de Paris are actually very good. The OdP was specifically
founded, or re-founded because it was felt that the general level of
orchestral playing in France was lacking at the time. After a bumpy
start with Munch, who died soon after the founding of the orchestra,
Karajan, who was never there, and Solti, for whom the orchestra was
not a priority either, Barenboim took over and he did a lot of very
good work there. His Debussy recordings are very meticulously
prepared, the orchestral playing has a French sound and feel but it is
rather more polished than what you hear on earlier French recordings,
there is great attention to detail, so I find these very satisfying to
listen to. The La Mer, for instance, is one of those performances
which sound "just right" to me. Barenboim paid a lot of attention to
all the fine detail but doesn't neglect the overall picture either.
I have not heard the Giulini/LA Phil mentioned above, but I have owned
for many years and still enjoy Giulini's "La Mer" and "Nocturnes" with
the Philharmonia. His Debussy does not have the x-ray clarity of
Boulez, nor the sumptuous textures of Karajan, but has a veiled
mystery which suits these pieces well, as well as splendid woodwind
principals. He also lets the music breathe and doesn't hurry it along,
which helps.
I don't actually know the Philharmonia recording but I should
definitely check it out. All of what you said applies to the LA
recording, too, and while the textures may not be quite as "sumptuous"
as Karajan's, as you may have heard on other LAP/Giulini recordings,
the orchestra had a rather dark and rich sound back then and that,
combined with Giulini's expressive shaping of the music, makes it very
attractive. I agree he was particularly good at letting the music
breathe, he even finds a melodic line in the "howling wind" passage 1
minute or so before the end, where in most performances, you just hear
frenetic tremolo.
Giulini also made another recording in later years in Amsterdam and
while this still exhibits many of these qualities, it is actually a
little more "sumptuous" because of the acoustics of the hall and the
rich sound of the orchestra. The LA recording is a little more focused
sonically, not as "x-ray" as Boulez' recordings, but still quite
transparent and well balanced.

Speaking of sumptuous vs. x-ray, while I find the orchestral culture
and the sense for sound color and texture exhibited in Karajan's
recordings very impressive - I also heard him do the piece live which
was a very impressive concert, you were washed over by waves of sound
(pun intended) - I don't think that is actually the "right" approach
to the music. Debussy is often labeled as an "impressionist" but while
some of his earlier music exhibits some features which one might call
that - Debussy himself didn't like the term, BTW - I think he had
something very different in mind in La Mer, Yes, there are some
"vague", "blurred" and "suggestive" textures, but most of the musical
shapes are actually rather sharply defined in the score.
Debussy selected a Japanese woodcut "The Great Wave Off Kanagawa" by
Hokusai as the cover picture of the first edition of the score - I
think he wanted to send us a message!
gggg gggg
2021-05-01 15:43:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by M forever
Post by Mark Melson
Post by M forever
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra, and what I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest
it will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in fact did
more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few very good
recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing Debussy, so
perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over the top and make
me a true fan.
Are there any great recordings no longer available that we could
"wish" into a reissue during these celebrations?
Yes, the orchestral playing in the Martinon recordings is a little
rough, but it is also very stylish and the orchestra at that time
still had a very noticeably French sound. In particularly the
woodwinds have a lot of color and character, and I think this set
comes pretty close to the sound world Debussy had in mind. In addition
to that Martinon just knew the music very well and his conducting is
spot on stylistically and musically. I think you should have this set
and I also think you will enjoy it a lot if you focus more on color
and character than the many small imperfections of the orchestral
playing.
There are plenty of good Debussy recordings, but I would strongly
recommend Dutoit's recordings from Montreal. The sound and playing
style of the orchestra leans towards the traditional French style, the
playing highly accomplished and polished, and the recorded sound very
good, rich but transparent and detailed. Dutoit is often dismissed as
a boring routinier, but I have never shared that opinion. I find his
conducting stylish and detail-attentive, and not even particularly
understated. I enjoy most if not all his Montreal recordings (not just
of Debussy).
When it comes to La Mer specifically, one of my favorites is
Philharmonia/Sinopoli, perhaps somewhat predictably because I am known
to be a Sinopoli fan, but this recording nicely illustrates why that
is. The orchestral playing is very good, and Sinopoli had a special
sense for color which is very noticeable in this recording.
Another favorite is LA/Giulini, rather darker sounding, but very
lyrical and expressive.
Also - this may surprise some people because it is not fashionable to
praise Barenboim, but I think his Debussy recordings with the
Orchestre de Paris are actually very good. The OdP was specifically
founded, or re-founded because it was felt that the general level of
orchestral playing in France was lacking at the time. After a bumpy
start with Munch, who died soon after the founding of the orchestra,
Karajan, who was never there, and Solti, for whom the orchestra was
not a priority either, Barenboim took over and he did a lot of very
good work there. His Debussy recordings are very meticulously
prepared, the orchestral playing has a French sound and feel but it is
rather more polished than what you hear on earlier French recordings,
there is great attention to detail, so I find these very satisfying to
listen to. The La Mer, for instance, is one of those performances
which sound "just right" to me. Barenboim paid a lot of attention to
all the fine detail but doesn't neglect the overall picture either.
I have not heard the Giulini/LA Phil mentioned above, but I have owned
for many years and still enjoy Giulini's "La Mer" and "Nocturnes" with
the Philharmonia. His Debussy does not have the x-ray clarity of
Boulez, nor the sumptuous textures of Karajan, but has a veiled
mystery which suits these pieces well, as well as splendid woodwind
principals. He also lets the music breathe and doesn't hurry it along,
which helps.
I don't actually know the Philharmonia recording but I should
definitely check it out. All of what you said applies to the LA
recording, too, and while the textures may not be quite as "sumptuous"
as Karajan's, as you may have heard on other LAP/Giulini recordings,
the orchestra had a rather dark and rich sound back then and that,
combined with Giulini's expressive shaping of the music, makes it very
attractive. I agree he was particularly good at letting the music
breathe, he even finds a melodic line in the "howling wind" passage 1
minute or so before the end, where in most performances, you just hear
frenetic tremolo.
Giulini also made another recording in later years in Amsterdam and
while this still exhibits many of these qualities, it is actually a
little more "sumptuous" because of the acoustics of the hall and the
rich sound of the orchestra. The LA recording is a little more focused
sonically, not as "x-ray" as Boulez' recordings, but still quite
transparent and well balanced.
Speaking of sumptuous vs. x-ray, while I find the orchestral culture
and the sense for sound color and texture exhibited in Karajan's
recordings very impressive - I also heard him do the piece live which
was a very impressive concert, you were washed over by waves of sound
(pun intended) - I don't think that is actually the "right" approach
to the music. Debussy is often labeled as an "impressionist" but while
some of his earlier music exhibits some features which one might call
that - Debussy himself didn't like the term, BTW - I think he had
something very different in mind in La Mer, Yes, there are some
"vague", "blurred" and "suggestive" textures, but most of the musical
shapes are actually rather sharply defined in the score.
Debussy selected a Japanese woodcut "The Great Wave Off Kanagawa" by
Hokusai as the cover picture of the first edition of the score - I
think he wanted to send us a message!
(Recent Y. upload):

What links ‘The Great Wave’ and Debussy’s ‘La Mer’?

Paul Goldstein
2012-02-27 15:34:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
In article <6e226753-61f0-49f4-85d1-***@32g2000yqn.googlegroups.com>, M
forever says...
Post by M forever
There are plenty of good Debussy recordings, but I would strongly
recommend Dutoit's recordings from Montreal. The sound and playing
style of the orchestra leans towards the traditional French style, the
playing highly accomplished and polished, and the recorded sound very
good, rich but transparent and detailed. Dutoit is often dismissed as
a boring routinier, but I have never shared that opinion. I find his
conducting stylish and detail-attentive, and not even particularly
understated. I enjoy most if not all his Montreal recordings (not just
of Debussy).
I have not heard Dutoit's studio recordings of Debussy, but I did hear him lead
the LA Philharmonic in La Mer this past Saturday at the Disney Concert Hall. It
was a stunning performance, featuring extremely variable tempi (the first
movement in particular was remarkable, with tempi sometimes slowed more than
I've ever heard before; this allowed an astonishing range of detail to be fully
appreciated) and superb solo and sectional playing. If a broadcast of this
performance becomes available, it will be well worth your attention.
M forever
2012-02-27 21:01:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Paul Goldstein
forever says...
Post by M forever
There are plenty of good Debussy recordings, but I would strongly
recommend Dutoit's recordings from Montreal. The sound and playing
style of the orchestra leans towards the traditional French style, the
playing highly accomplished and polished, and the recorded sound very
good, rich but transparent and detailed. Dutoit is often dismissed as
a boring routinier, but I have never shared that opinion. I find his
conducting stylish and detail-attentive, and not even particularly
understated. I enjoy most if not all his Montreal recordings (not just
of Debussy).
I have not heard Dutoit's studio recordings of Debussy, but I did hear him lead
the LA Philharmonic in La Mer this past Saturday at the Disney Concert Hall.  It
was a stunning performance, featuring extremely variable tempi (the first
movement in particular was remarkable, with tempi sometimes slowed more than
I've ever heard before; this allowed an astonishing range of detail to be fully
appreciated) and superb solo and sectional playing.  If a broadcast of this
performance becomes available, it will be well worth your attention.
Sounds very interesting. I will look out for it on Concertarchive and
Symphonyshare. I see there is already a live recording of a concert
that Dutoit conducted last year with the Staatskapelle Dresden, I will
grab that tonight. What you describe doesn't sound all that typical
for Dutoit - he is more a man of small, subtle tempo shifts and
usually avoids unusually slow tempi - but he does a lot to highlight
small details in subtle ways, too subtle perhaps for some, which is
the only explanation I have for why some find his conducting "bland".
Or maybe it is just prejudices. Dutoit doesn't have the sunniest and
most endearing image, maybe that is why some just don't like whatever
he does - like I said, I don't understand that at all because I find a
lot of what he does musically very convincing and not just solid, but
often subtle and detailed and also usually quite "exciting".
g***@gmail.com
2014-04-10 22:22:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by M forever
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra, and what I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest
it will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in fact did
more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few very good
recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing Debussy, so
perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over the top and make
me a true fan.
Are there any great recordings no longer available that we could
"wish" into a reissue during these celebrations?
Yes, the orchestral playing in the Martinon recordings is a little
rough, but it is also very stylish and the orchestra at that time
still had a very noticeably French sound. In particularly the
woodwinds have a lot of color and character, and I think this set
comes pretty close to the sound world Debussy had in mind. In addition
to that Martinon just knew the music very well and his conducting is
spot on stylistically and musically. I think you should have this set
and I also think you will enjoy it a lot if you focus more on color
and character than the many small imperfections of the orchestral
playing.
There are plenty of good Debussy recordings, but I would strongly
recommend Dutoit's recordings from Montreal. The sound and playing
style of the orchestra leans towards the traditional French style, the
playing highly accomplished and polished, and the recorded sound very
good, rich but transparent and detailed. Dutoit is often dismissed as
a boring routinier, but I have never shared that opinion. I find his
conducting stylish and detail-attentive, and not even particularly
understated. I enjoy most if not all his Montreal recordings (not just
of Debussy).
When it comes to La Mer specifically, one of my favorites is
Philharmonia/Sinopoli, perhaps somewhat predictably because I am known
to be a Sinopoli fan, but this recording nicely illustrates why that
is. The orchestral playing is very good, and Sinopoli had a special
sense for color which is very noticeable in this recording.
Another favorite is LA/Giulini, rather darker sounding, but very
lyrical and expressive.
Also - this may surprise some people because it is not fashionable to
praise Barenboim, but I think his Debussy recordings with the
Orchestre de Paris are actually very good. The OdP was specifically
founded, or re-founded because it was felt that the general level of
orchestral playing in France was lacking at the time. After a bumpy
start with Munch, who died soon after the founding of the orchestra,
Karajan, who was never there, and Solti, for whom the orchestra was
not a priority either, Barenboim took over and he did a lot of very
good work there. His Debussy recordings are very meticulously
prepared, the orchestral playing has a French sound and feel but it is
rather more polished than what you hear on earlier French recordings,
there is great attention to detail, so I find these very satisfying to
listen to. The La Mer, for instance, is one of those performances
which sound "just right" to me. Barenboim paid a lot of attention to
all the fine detail but doesn't neglect the overall picture either.
The following also praises Barenboim's recording:

http://users.ece.utexas.edu/~perry/fun/music/pgr-comp.html
m***@gmail.com
2013-07-06 05:16:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra, and what I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest
it will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in fact did
more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few very good
recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing Debussy, so
perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over the top and make
me a true fan.
Are there any great recordings no longer available that we could
"wish" into a reissue during these celebrations?
If anyone has heard Colin Davis' Debussy cd, do you recommend it?:

Loading Image...
jrsnfld
2013-07-06 05:51:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I tried it on LP and was disappointed; tried it on CD and was disappointed again. The sound is not all that great (think his first Sibelius cycle). Maybe you need to turn the volume all the way up to get the detail one would want in Debussy. Anyway, it is not so much that the disc is bad but that given the possibilities, it isn't what it should be--not a particularly striking performance, not particularly great sound. There are many great discs of this music, so you only need to get the Davis disc if you're a fan of the conductor or desperate to have the BSO in this music (which I was and that's why I bought it twice with high hopes).

--Jeff
l***@aol.com
2014-04-10 22:45:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Surprised that no one has mentioned Desormiere's "La Mer," which Sviatoslav Richter regarded as the greatest of all recordings:

http://sviatoslavrichter.blogspot.com/2009/02/desormiere-and-la-mer.html

Larry Kart
l***@aol.com
2014-04-10 22:48:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by l***@aol.com
http://sviatoslavrichter.blogspot.com/2009/02/desormiere-and-la-mer.html
Here it is:


Post by l***@aol.com
Larry Kart
l***@aol.com
2014-04-10 22:48:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by l***@aol.com
http://sviatoslavrichter.blogspot.com/2009/02/desormiere-and-la-mer.html
Larry Kart
l***@aol.com
2014-04-10 22:49:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by l***@aol.com
http://sviatoslavrichter.blogspot.com/2009/02/desormiere-and-la-mer.html
http://youtu.be/qcwSGjkHqpk
Post by l***@aol.com
Larry Kart
RiRiIII
2014-04-11 09:32:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by l***@aol.com
http://sviatoslavrichter.blogspot.com/2009/02/desormiere-and-la-mer.html
Larry Kart
It is indeed a magical recording - included in the Debussy box issued by Andante.
g***@gmail.com
2014-11-16 00:22:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra, and what I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest
it will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in fact did
more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few very good
recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing Debussy, so
perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over the top and make
me a true fan.
Are there any great recordings no longer available that we could
"wish" into a reissue during these celebrations?
The following recent list of recommended recordings of LA MER may be of interest (after clicking on link below, scroll down a bit:

http://www.musicweb-international.com/recommends/home.htm
tomdeacon
2014-11-16 19:32:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra, and what I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest
it will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in fact did
more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few very good
recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing Debussy, so
perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over the top and make
me a true fan.
Are there any great recordings no longer available that we could
"wish" into a reissue during these celebrations?
The following recent list of recommended recordings of LA MER may be of
http://www.musicweb-international.com/recommends/home.htm
Not from this link. Debussy Preludes, perhaps?
--
TD
Juan I. Cahis
2014-11-17 13:45:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra, and what I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest
it will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in fact did
more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few very good
recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing Debussy, so
perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over the top and make
me a true fan.
Are there any great recordings no longer available that we could
"wish" into a reissue during these celebrations?
The following recent list of recommended recordings of LA MER may be of
http://www.musicweb-international.com/recommends/home.htm
I would recommend Boulez on DGG. This guy has Debussy in his blood, and the
sound quality of the recordings are superb.
--
Enviado desde mi iPad usando NewsTap, Juan I. Cahis, Santiago de Chile.
Precious Roy
2014-11-18 01:27:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Paray on Mercury not to be missed. (Except his La Mer, not a standout rendition) but everything else is. Mixed with Ravel on CDs.

Toscanini in everything.

Van Beinum/Concertgebouw on a new Australian Eloquence cd.

Ansermet on Decca in La Mer, 1957. And in the Faune
g***@gmail.com
2014-11-19 09:11:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Paray on Mercury not to be missed. (Except his La Mer, not a standout rendition) but everything else is...
According to the following, Paray's LA MER is:

- ...Elegant, crisp, richly detailed and thoroughly engrossing.

http://www.classicalnotes.net/classics/lamer.html

Concerning his NUAGES in NOCTURNES, I found it to be too fast.
Bob Harper
2014-11-19 20:59:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by Precious Roy
Paray on Mercury not to be missed. (Except his La Mer, not a
standout rendition) but everything else is...
- ...Elegant, crisp, richly detailed and thoroughly engrossing.
http://www.classicalnotes.net/classics/lamer.html
Concerning his NUAGES in NOCTURNES, I found it to be too fast.
Ladies and Gentlemen,

A first! Our poster has actually expressed an opinion *of* *his* *own*!
Will wonders never cease?

Bob Harper (who loves the Celi/EMI La Mer, even though he knows it is
absurdly slow)
Herman
2014-11-19 22:29:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bob Harper
Ladies and Gentlemen,
A first! Our poster has actually expressed an opinion *of* *his* *own*!
Will wonders never cease?
not so fast, Bob. It looks like Poster Boy is really trying to say he doesn't quite agree with one of those list books he links.

I'm not betting he's listing a direct response to some piece of music.

That would be too reckless.
Bob Harper
2014-11-19 23:24:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Herman
Post by Bob Harper
Ladies and Gentlemen,
A first! Our poster has actually expressed an opinion *of* *his*
*own*! Will wonders never cease?
not so fast, Bob. It looks like Poster Boy is really trying to say he
doesn't quite agree with one of those list books he links.
I'm not betting he's listing a direct response to some piece of music.
That would be too reckless.
You might be right, Herman, but we all took our first step at some point :)

Bob Harper
Terry
2014-11-29 05:46:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bob Harper
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by Precious Roy
Paray on Mercury not to be missed. (Except his La Mer, not a
standout rendition) but everything else is...
- ...Elegant, crisp, richly detailed and thoroughly engrossing.
http://www.classicalnotes.net/classics/lamer.html
Concerning his NUAGES in NOCTURNES, I found it to be too fast.
Ladies and Gentlemen,
A first! Our poster has actually expressed an opinion *of* *his* *own*!
Will wonders never cease?
Bob Harper (who loves the Celi/EMI La Mer, even though he knows it is
absurdly slow)
You obviously failed to follow the link he provided.
Bob Harper
2014-11-29 13:59:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Terry
Post by Bob Harper
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by Precious Roy
Paray on Mercury not to be missed. (Except his La Mer, not a
standout rendition) but everything else is...
- ...Elegant, crisp, richly detailed and thoroughly engrossing.
http://www.classicalnotes.net/classics/lamer.html
Concerning his NUAGES in NOCTURNES, I found it to be too fast.
Ladies and Gentlemen,
A first! Our poster has actually expressed an opinion *of* *his* *own*!
Will wonders never cease?
Bob Harper (who loves the Celi/EMI La Mer, even though he knows it is
absurdly slow)
You obviously failed to follow the link he provided.
In fact I did, but I don't see your point. What did I miss?

Bob Harper
graham
2014-11-18 02:49:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Note the original posting date!
Bob Harper
2014-11-18 03:00:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Juan I. Cahis
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra, and what I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest
it will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in fact did
more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few very good
recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing Debussy, so
perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over the top and make
me a true fan.
Are there any great recordings no longer available that we could
"wish" into a reissue during these celebrations?
The following recent list of recommended recordings of LA MER may be of
http://www.musicweb-international.com/recommends/home.htm
I would recommend Boulez on DGG. This guy has Debussy in his blood, and the
sound quality of the recordings are superb.
David Gable, who used to post here regularly, would demur in favor of
this (though he was particular about transfers; I don't know if this is
the one he prefers:
http://www.amazon.com/Debussy-Orchestral-Nocturnes-Printemps-LApres-Midi/dp/B000002C00/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1416279524&sr=8-4&keywords=boulez+debussy

Bob Harper
Andy Evans
2014-11-18 10:23:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Van Beinum in La Mer at the very least. Marvellous.

I like Boulez 60s La Mer apart from the horribly out of tune cello theme in the first movement - how was that passed for release? The Apres Midi is good also. But the 60s Jeux isn't as good as the later Cleveland one which is a standout performance in this work. Ironically the La Mer from Cleveland is less good.
Gerard
2014-11-18 12:54:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
"Bob Harper" wrote in message news:iDyaw.497700$***@fx03.iad...
David Gable, who used to post here regularly, would demur in favor of
this (though he was particular about transfers; I don't know if this is
the one he prefers:
http://www.amazon.com/Debussy-Orchestral-Nocturnes-Printemps-LApres-Midi/dp/B000002C00/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1416279524&sr=8-4&keywords=boulez+debussy

================================

He preferred that one to a later reissue in Sony's 'Great performances'
series (which he considered inferior).

See his comment on:

http://www.amazon.com/Debussy-Orchestral-Nocturnes-lapr%C3%A8s-midi-Performances/dp/B0013AWYH8/
Oscar
2014-11-18 21:23:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Has anyone heard Stéphane Denève's recent recordings with Royal Scottish National Orchestra on Chandos SACD?
Ed Presson
2014-11-19 02:50:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Oscar
Has anyone heard Stéphane Denève's recent recordings with Royal Scottish
National Orchestra on Chandos SACD?
I have it. The sounds that he draws from the orchestra are apt and quite
lovely, and are beautifully recorded-except for a slight
deficit in the low frequencies. The performances range from B- to A-.
Enjoyable, all in all.

I have not listened recently, so I am not prepared to talk about individual
works. Maybe I'll revisit the set this evening.

Ed Presson
g***@gmail.com
2014-11-23 08:58:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra, and what I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest
it will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in fact did
more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few very good
recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing Debussy, so
perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over the top and make
me a true fan.
Are there any great recordings no longer available that we could
"wish" into a reissue during these celebrations?
According to the following review:

- Nobody in my experience has shown such an understanding of Debussy's lights and shadows as Sergiu Celibidache. He can galvanize the orchestra into euphoric flights no less thrilling than Munch's, yet he can suddenly still the turmoil and reveal dark happenings below the surface.

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2006/Apr06/Debussy_Monteux_4768472.htm#ixzz3Jsd6tBTu
Terry
2014-11-28 22:42:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra, and what I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest
it will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in fact did
more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few very good
recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing Debussy, so
perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over the top and make
me a true fan.
Are there any great recordings no longer available that we could
"wish" into a reissue during these celebrations?
The conductors I rely upon in this repertoire are Abbado, Haitink and von Karajan. However, none of them recorded the orchestral works complete.
g***@gmail.com
2015-08-17 03:26:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra, and what I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest
it will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
La Mer
Images pour Orchestre
Nocturnes
I have never explored this music extensively. Many recordings did
little for me when I was a fledgling music lover, and some in fact did
more to turn me off to Debussy than spur me on. A few very good
recordings though have kept me from totally dismissing Debussy, so
perhaps a few more great recordings can put me over the top and make
me a true fan.
Are there any great recordings no longer available that we could
"wish" into a reissue during these celebrations?
De Sabata's recording was included in 1001 CLASSICAL RECORDINGS YOU MUST HEAR BEFORE YOU DIE:

http://rateyourmusic.com/list/Satoru/1001_classical_recordings_you_must_hear_before_you_die__2007_us_edition_/7/
Ray Hall
2015-08-17 04:33:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Randy Lane
Debussy is the subject of celebration this year with many special
releases and compilations. With the release of Ferber's piano
recordings the instrumental works have had much discussion.
How about now moving on to discuss the orchestral works, including the
major oft performed works and the few efforts made to record
everything (or nearly everything) with one orchestra/conductor? In the
cycle category I only know of the Martinon set and the forthcoming
Naxos; the Martinon, to my ears at least, suffers from a sub-standard
orchestra, and what I have read of the Naxos set due out soon suggest
it will get a pass. Are there other sets/cycles?
Haitink/RCO on a Philips Duo is a fantastic bet for La Mer, 3 Nocturnes,
Images and the Faune.

Martinon of course for the complete works, which is very good but can be
bettered for works taken individually.

Ray Hall, Taree
Continue reading on narkive:
Loading...