Discussion:
Fou Ts'ong NYT obit
Add Reply
Graham
2020-12-31 23:05:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
This is more detailed than the BBC one I posted a few days ago.
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/12/31/obituaries/fou-tsong-dead.html
Sol L. Siegel
2021-01-09 03:25:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Graham
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/12/31/obituaries/fou-tsong-dead.html
This is a far cry from Harold Schonberg's absolutely laughable review of
Fou's 1961 New York debut, in which the venerated critic expended much
print space in his attempt to wrap his consciousness around the reality
of a concert pianist from China before finally getting around to
lambasting his playing. You can look it up if you're really that
morbidly curious.

BTW, rediscovery.us has a couple of his Westminster LPs, listed under
"Paperback Classics". I had to use a cue splitter to break the works -
Mozart K. 503 & 595, and the Chopin F minor and Schumann concertos -
into separate tracks. I suspect that is still the case. I like the
Mozart recording better.

- Sol L. Siegel, Philadelphia, PA USA
--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
Ricardo Jimenez
2021-01-09 17:13:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sol L. Siegel
Post by Graham
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/12/31/obituaries/fou-tsong-dead.html
This is a far cry from Harold Schonberg's absolutely laughable review of
Fou's 1961 New York debut, in which the venerated critic expended much
print space in his attempt to wrap his consciousness around the reality
of a concert pianist from China before finally getting around to
lambasting his playing. You can look it up if you're really that
morbidly curious.
For those who don't have access to the NYT archives, here is an
excerpt:

"But it cannot be said that his performance on this occasion sugested
(sic) that the Oriental mind can hurdle the cultural barrier.
Obviously he had been well schooled, in that he had most of the notes
in hand. He is not a big technician, however; and his musical
conception was heavy and sometimes awkward, with little of the grace,
charm or sophistication that the Chopin F minor contains.

His tone was big, but his detaché finger work militated against any
form of a true legato. The opening phrase of the finale should move
upward with sinuous grace and suppleness, As Mr. Ts'Ong played it, the
music sounded almost elephantine. He is doubtless a sincere musician,
and in years to come he will make up in large part his present
deficiencies. Whether he can in the long run completely make up for
an accident of birth--in which he was not exposed during his formative
years to the ambience that nourishes a great Western musician--is
another question".
Frank Berger
2021-01-09 22:57:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ricardo Jimenez
Post by Sol L. Siegel
Post by Graham
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/12/31/obituaries/fou-tsong-dead.html
This is a far cry from Harold Schonberg's absolutely laughable review of
Fou's 1961 New York debut, in which the venerated critic expended much
print space in his attempt to wrap his consciousness around the reality
of a concert pianist from China before finally getting around to
lambasting his playing. You can look it up if you're really that
morbidly curious.
For those who don't have access to the NYT archives, here is an
"But it cannot be said that his performance on this occasion sugested
(sic) that the Oriental mind can hurdle the cultural barrier.
Obviously he had been well schooled, in that he had most of the notes
in hand. He is not a big technician, however; and his musical
conception was heavy and sometimes awkward, with little of the grace,
charm or sophistication that the Chopin F minor contains.
His tone was big, but his detaché finger work militated against any
form of a true legato. The opening phrase of the finale should move
upward with sinuous grace and suppleness, As Mr. Ts'Ong played it, the
music sounded almost elephantine. He is doubtless a sincere musician,
and in years to come he will make up in large part his present
deficiencies. Whether he can in the long run completely make up for
an accident of birth--in which he was not exposed during his formative
years to the ambience that nourishes a great Western musician--is
another question".
Laughable is not the adjective I would have used.

Loading...