Discussion:
WAYLTL August 2020
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number_six
2020-08-04 17:29:04 UTC
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Terra Nova Consort -- Renaissance en Provence -- Dorian
zowie -- a great disk!

on tap next -

Walton - Facade (Pears, Sitwell, Collins), also Henry V, Orb and Sceptre
this Alto cd would "sit well" in any collection
c***@gmail.com
2020-08-04 17:51:35 UTC
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Post by number_six
Terra Nova Consort -- Renaissance en Provence -- Dorian
zowie -- a great disk!
on tap next -
Walton - Facade (Pears, Sitwell, Collins), also Henry V, Orb and Sceptre
this Alto cd would "sit well" in any collection
A self-assembled ca. 75-minute CD of violin concerti from various online sources. Wonderful live performances of underplayed works:

Busoni VC (Parikian/Horenstein)
Martin VC (Schneiderhan/Keilberth)
Krenek VC#2 (Varga/Steinberg)

Have to turn now to some choice Leon Fleisher recordings. RIP.

AC
Lawrence Chalmers
2020-08-04 20:26:20 UTC
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Post by number_six
Terra Nova Consort -- Renaissance en Provence -- Dorian
zowie -- a great disk!
on tap next -
Walton - Facade (Pears, Sitwell, Collins), also Henry V, Orb and Sceptre
this Alto cd would "sit well" in any collection
A traversal of Schubert Symphonies by Wand/Cologne.
v***@protonmail.com
2020-08-05 14:15:42 UTC
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I've been listening again to a CD called 'Lute Masterworks' recorded in 1986 by David Tanenbaum.
He played on a very direct-sounding spruce John Gilbert back then, and was in top form on this
well-recorded disc; one that I don't get tired of. A track listing:

https://www.discogs.com/David-Tanenbaum-Lute-Masterworks/release/6125922
Dirge
2020-08-06 00:42:53 UTC
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I’ve been listening to some of my favorite Kubelik-led recordings from the earlier part of his career …

Arnold SCHOENBERG: Fünf Orchesterstücke, Op. 16 (1909)
:: Kubelik/CSO [Mercury ’53]

Wilhelm STENHAMMAR: Serenade (1913/rev. 1919)
:: Kubelik/Stockholm PO [Heliodor ’64] Swedish Disc

Bohuslav MARTINU: Double Concerto for two string orchestras, piano & timpani (1938)
:: Kubelik/Philharmonia [EMI ’50]

Paul HINDEMITH: Symphonic Metamorphosis on Themes of Carl Maria von Weber (1943)
:: Kubelik/CSO [Mercury ’53]

The three early ’50s performances are of the kick ass & take names virtuoso variety very much suited to the works at hand, while the ’64 performance of Stenhammar’s Serenade shows the promise of Kubelik’s more flexible later style.
c***@gmail.com
2020-08-06 13:16:53 UTC
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Post by Dirge
I’ve been listening to some of my favorite Kubelik-led recordings from the earlier part of his career …
Arnold SCHOENBERG: Fünf Orchesterstücke, Op. 16 (1909)
:: Kubelik/CSO [Mercury ’53]
Wilhelm STENHAMMAR: Serenade (1913/rev. 1919)
:: Kubelik/Stockholm PO [Heliodor ’64] Swedish Disc
Bohuslav MARTINU: Double Concerto for two string orchestras, piano & timpani (1938)
:: Kubelik/Philharmonia [EMI ’50]
Paul HINDEMITH: Symphonic Metamorphosis on Themes of Carl Maria von Weber (1943)
:: Kubelik/CSO [Mercury ’53]
The three early ’50s performances are of the kick ass & take names virtuoso variety very much suited to the works at hand, while the ’64 performance of Stenhammar’s Serenade shows the promise of Kubelik’s more flexible later style.
The first three above are great favorites of mine as well. The Hindemith hasn't worn as well to my ears, however; my longtime benchmark recording is Kondrashin's with the Moscow Philharmonic.

Our AM listening was a beautiful collection called "Adriaan Willaert in Italy" (https://www.amazon.com/Willaert-Italy-Nevel-Currende-Consort/dp/B000EMT0ZK). The Amazon reviewer does a good job of describing what is special about the recording, imo.

AC
Mr. Mike
2020-08-06 17:34:50 UTC
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Willem Pijper - 6 Symphonic Epigrams - Rotterdam PO cond. Simon Rattle
(from Radio Nederland LP)
Gold & Fizdale play Dave Brubeck's Jazz Ballet Points on Jazz
(Columbia CL 1678)
Ravel - Concerto in G - Hollander/Boston SO cond. Leinsdorf (RCA
LSC-2667)
Porgy & Bess - Belafonte and Horne (RCA PJL 1-8049)
Carter - Concerto for Orchestra (augh)/Schuman - In Praise of Shahn -
NYPO cond. Bernstein (Columbia M30112)
Antheil - Music for Violin and Piano - Erickson/Schwartz (Orion ORS
71339) - delightfully nasty
Tribute - Rob McConnell & The Boss Brass (PA USA 7106) - see
www.bossbrass.com
number_six
2020-08-06 20:17:47 UTC
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Post by Mr. Mike
Willem Pijper - 6 Symphonic Epigrams - Rotterdam PO cond. Simon Rattle
(from Radio Nederland LP)
Gold & Fizdale play Dave Brubeck's Jazz Ballet Points on Jazz
(Columbia CL 1678)
Ravel - Concerto in G - Hollander/Boston SO cond. Leinsdorf (RCA
LSC-2667)
Porgy & Bess - Belafonte and Horne (RCA PJL 1-8049)
Carter - Concerto for Orchestra (augh)/Schuman - In Praise of Shahn -
NYPO cond. Bernstein (Columbia M30112)
Antheil - Music for Violin and Piano - Erickson/Schwartz (Orion ORS
71339) - delightfully nasty
Tribute - Rob McConnell & The Boss Brass (PA USA 7106) - see
www.bossbrass.com
Interesting lineup -- my parents had an LP of the Horne /Belafonte PORGY

Not a fan of the Carter Concerto for Orch?

Have not heard Piper -- would you recommend?
Henk vT
2020-08-09 13:05:49 UTC
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Alexandre Kantorow Àl la russe. Rachmaninoff sonata #1 Tchaikovsky Op. 72 nos. 5 and 17 Stravinsky/Agosti L'oiseau de feu Tchaikovsky Op. 1 no. 1 Balakirev Islamey

A mixed bag. I rather liked the Rachmaninoff and Tchaikovsky Op. 72 no. 17. After Rana's recent recording of Stravinsky/Agosti every other version of it sounds clumsy or plodding. The same goes for Islamey after Pogorelic (Carnegie Hall).

Henk
Mr. Mike
2020-08-13 04:49:26 UTC
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On Thu, 6 Aug 2020 13:17:47 -0700 (PDT), number_six
Have not heard Pijper -- would you recommend?
Symphony No. 1


Symphony No. 2


Symphony No. 3



Piano Concerto


Lots more stuff on YouTube!
O***@aol.com
2020-08-13 07:54:05 UTC
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Strauss (R): Ein Heldenleben, Op.40, in Karajan’s final, digital recording w/ BPO from 1985. Soloist is Leon Speier, who was no Michael Schwalbé, concertmaster of the fantastic solo performance in The Hero’s Companion (track 3) and elsewhere from the mid-1970s recording for EMI. Karajan’s Strauss is his most finely tailored, handsome Austro-Germanic suit, IMO. That DG box from approx. 5-6 years ago (oversized LP packaging w/ CDs + BD) gets lots of spins around here. This recording is all over the place sonically. Instruments moving around the soundstage, smeary focus, the typical late Karajan criticisms. No fault with the interpretation, however. Rewarding listening of an emotional performance. Streaming on AppleMusic.
O***@aol.com
2020-08-13 08:18:55 UTC
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Grieg: Piano Concerto in A minor, Op.16 in the justly famous 1973 Decca recording by Lupu and the LSO conducted by Previn. Haven’t played this in about 5 years, and I dare say it isn’t done better by anyone. Transfixing and transcendent pianism of highest order. This is the Grieg here, and one occasionally thinks one is listening to something far more substantial. Taking nothing great away from Edvard in offering that appraisal, of course, but all glory to Radu. Mesmerizing like _no_ other Grieg PC. Who else?

Streaming on AppleMusic.
v***@protonmail.com
2020-08-13 14:23:39 UTC
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Post by O***@aol.com
Grieg: Piano Concerto in A minor, Op.16 in the justly famous 1973 Decca recording by Lupu and the LSO conducted by Previn. Haven’t played this in about 5 years, and I dare say it isn’t done better by anyone. Transfixing and transcendent pianism of highest order. This is the Grieg here, and one occasionally thinks one is listening to something far more substantial. Taking nothing great away from Edvard in offering that appraisal, of course, but all glory to Radu. Mesmerizing like _no_ other Grieg PC. Who else?
Streaming on AppleMusic.
Well, I like Richter/ von Matacic (?) a lot, but haven't heard Lupu.
c***@gmail.com
2020-08-13 18:30:15 UTC
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Post by Mr. Mike
On Thu, 6 Aug 2020 13:17:47 -0700 (PDT), number_six
Have not heard Pijper -- would you recommend?
Symphony No. 1
http://youtu.be/KfSev1yslxU
Symphony No. 2
http://youtu.be/mp2OjcEZ5qs
Symphony No. 3
http://youtu.be/MguYHzgVeYI
http://youtu.be/My_Bq5reVMk
Piano Concerto
http://youtu.be/C8CIAxL7TAU
Lots more stuff on YouTube!
Definitely the Piano Concerto, and there is some nice music for solo piano (Hans Henkemans was a strong advocate) and chamber music, including at least two of the string quartets (##4 and 5) and a charming Flute Sonata. As Mr. Mike said, there's plenty to sample.

AC
number_six
2020-08-14 16:39:16 UTC
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Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Mr. Mike
On Thu, 6 Aug 2020 13:17:47 -0700 (PDT), number_six
Have not heard Pijper -- would you recommend?
Symphony No. 1
http://youtu.be/KfSev1yslxU
Symphony No. 2
http://youtu.be/mp2OjcEZ5qs
Symphony No. 3
http://youtu.be/MguYHzgVeYI
http://youtu.be/My_Bq5reVMk
Piano Concerto
http://youtu.be/C8CIAxL7TAU
Lots more stuff on YouTube!
Definitely the Piano Concerto, and there is some nice music for solo piano (Hans Henkemans was a strong advocate) and chamber music, including at least two of the string quartets (##4 and 5) and a charming Flute Sonata. As Mr. Mike said, there's plenty to sample.
AC
Mike, thanks for the links, and AC, thanks for these comments.

I liked the Six Epigrams, so I look forward to hearing more of his music.
Bob Harper
2020-08-15 18:56:08 UTC
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I;ve been listening to several Beethoven Symphonies in the Edel boz of
performances by Franz Konwitschny and the LGO. So far, excellent or better.

I see on Amazon that this Beethoven cycle has been reissued on Berlin
Classics. From Amazon review s from the UK:

Thankfully I waited until 2017 - for this new & complete set has been
newly ADD remastered from the original Eterna tapes. And what a sonic
treasure it is. Konwitschny's conducting, the clean sound quality & the
orchestral interpretation are the finest I have ever heard, (the 6th,
"Scene by the Brook" is exquisite) - such is Konwitschny's conducting
and the Gewandhaus response. The bloom of the stereo sound - and the
various orchestral instrumental parts come through with clarity - and
the originally recording was..1959!

and

Berlin Classics deserves high praise for this Konwitschny/Beethoven set
of recordings. The original VEB Deutsche Schallplatten analogue master
tapes - 1959-61 vintage - have been remastered and sound quality is
absolutely superb.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

The performances I have heard so far are of a quality that would justify
the modest investment if the sound is indeed so greatly improved. So the
question: has anyone heard these and able to comment on the sound?

Thanks.
Al Eisner
2020-08-16 01:27:12 UTC
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On medici.tv: Blomstedt/Argerich/Beethoven (all three in fine form) in
the first Piano Concerto, with the excellent Lucern Festival
Orchestra. The surprise was that it was recorded this summer, with
a live audience (first broadcast earlier today, actual performance
date not given). The orchestra was on the small side (social
distancing, no masks; the audience was more closely spaced, probably
more than half with masks, but many without). Anyway, a very
satisfying performance. As an encore, MA actually played solo,
but only for about 90 seconds. I'll later listen to the Eroica
which concludes the program.
--
Al Eisner
Reinhold Gliere
2020-08-16 17:04:44 UTC
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Post by Bob Harper
I;ve been listening to several Beethoven Symphonies in the Edel boz of
performances by Franz Konwitschny and the LGO. So far, excellent or better.
I see on Amazon that this Beethoven cycle has been reissued on Berlin
Thankfully I waited until 2017 - for this new & complete set has been
newly ADD remastered from the original Eterna tapes. And what a sonic
treasure it is. Konwitschny's conducting, the clean sound quality & the
orchestral interpretation are the finest I have ever heard, (the 6th,
"Scene by the Brook" is exquisite) - such is Konwitschny's conducting
and the Gewandhaus response. The bloom of the stereo sound - and the
various orchestral instrumental parts come through with clarity - and
the originally recording was..1959!
and
Berlin Classics deserves high praise for this Konwitschny/Beethoven set
of recordings. The original VEB Deutsche Schallplatten analogue master
tapes - 1959-61 vintage - have been remastered and sound quality is
absolutely superb.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The performances I have heard so far are of a quality that would justify
the modest investment if the sound is indeed so greatly improved. So the
question: has anyone heard these and able to comment on the sound?
Thanks.
Listening to clips I can hear nothing special to write home about:

https://www.allmusic.com/album/beethoven-complete-symphonies-mw0003061066






;
number_six
2020-08-17 19:05:59 UTC
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Post by number_six
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Mr. Mike
On Thu, 6 Aug 2020 13:17:47 -0700 (PDT), number_six
Have not heard Pijper -- would you recommend?
Symphony No. 1
http://youtu.be/KfSev1yslxU
Symphony No. 2
http://youtu.be/mp2OjcEZ5qs
Symphony No. 3
http://youtu.be/MguYHzgVeYI
http://youtu.be/My_Bq5reVMk
Piano Concerto
http://youtu.be/C8CIAxL7TAU
Lots more stuff on YouTube!
Definitely the Piano Concerto, and there is some nice music for solo piano (Hans Henkemans was a strong advocate) and chamber music, including at least two of the string quartets (##4 and 5) and a charming Flute Sonata. As Mr. Mike said, there's plenty to sample.
AC
Mike, thanks for the links, and AC, thanks for these comments.
I liked the Six Epigrams, so I look forward to hearing more of his music.
So far I've listened to Symphony no. 1.

I thought it offered a wealth of thematic interest.

A couple of Youtube commenters likened it to a continuation of Mahler.
Mr. Mike
2020-08-19 14:33:38 UTC
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On Mon, 17 Aug 2020 12:05:59 -0700 (PDT), number_six
Post by number_six
So far I've listened to Symphony no. 1.
I thought it offered a wealth of thematic interest.
A couple of Youtube commenters likened it to a continuation of Mahler.
It is very "Mahlerian."

Would be interested to hear what Symphony 2 (a real mish-mash) and the
Piano Concerto remind you of...
Frank Berger
2020-08-19 15:53:09 UTC
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Post by Mr. Mike
On Mon, 17 Aug 2020 12:05:59 -0700 (PDT), number_six
Post by number_six
So far I've listened to Symphony no. 1.
I thought it offered a wealth of thematic interest.
A couple of Youtube commenters likened it to a continuation of Mahler.
It is very "Mahlerian."
Would be interested to hear what Symphony 2 (a real mish-mash) and the
Piano Concerto remind you of...
Symphony #3 was recorded by Van Beinum and Monteux. #2 was
on a Composers' Voice CD and LP.

Couldn't find reference to a CD for #1.
Mr. Mike
2020-08-20 00:15:56 UTC
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Re: Pijpher...

On Wed, 19 Aug 2020 11:53:09 -0400, Frank Berger
Post by Frank Berger
Symphony #3 was recorded by Van Beinum and Monteux. #2 was
on a Composers' Voice CD and LP.
Couldn't find reference to a CD for #1.
http://youtu.be/KfSev1yslxU

No CD release for #1 as far as I know, it is on LP, Composer Voice
Special 1987 #3 (same performance as YouTube above).
Mr. Mike
2020-08-20 01:37:26 UTC
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Re: Pijper...
I scanned in the liner notes from the Composer's Voice 2-LP set and
put them here:

http://mjq.net/classical/Pijper/pijper.pdf
number_six
2020-08-23 22:01:16 UTC
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On Wed, 19 Aug 2020 17:15:56 -0700, Mr. Mike wrote>
Re: Pijper...
I scanned in the liner notes from the Composer's Voice 2-LP set and
http://mjq.net/classical/Pijper/pijper.pdf
Interesting, thanks for posting this.

Having now heard both, I think it makes sense that the discussion of Symphony 1 focuses on thematic content whereas the discussion of Symphony 2 focuses more on the harmonic language of the work.

Finally, I also listened to the piano concerto -- my favorite passage was near the end -- a moment of near cacophony that was deftly built and then resolved.
number_six
2020-08-19 19:49:23 UTC
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Post by Mr. Mike
On Mon, 17 Aug 2020 12:05:59 -0700 (PDT), number_six
Post by number_six
So far I've listened to Symphony no. 1.
I thought it offered a wealth of thematic interest.
A couple of Youtube commenters likened it to a continuation of Mahler.
It is very "Mahlerian."
Would be interested to hear what Symphony 2 (a real mish-mash) and the
Piano Concerto remind you of...
Listened to Symphony 2 this morning.

It's hard to say, but if I had listened to it "blind" I might thought the composer was French, or at least influenced by Debussy and perhaps prefiguring Milhaud. Interested to hear other perspectives.

Will try the concerto later in the week...
number_six
2020-08-10 21:37:43 UTC
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Post by Mr. Mike
Willem Pijper - 6 Symphonic Epigrams - Rotterdam PO cond. Simon Rattle
(from Radio Nederland LP
I listened to the Pijper Epigrams on youtube, Haitink conducting

First work I've heard from this composer, thanks

Would not have guessed he died in '47
Lawrence Chalmers
2020-08-09 15:32:29 UTC
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Post by number_six
Terra Nova Consort -- Renaissance en Provence -- Dorian
zowie -- a great disk!
on tap next -
Walton - Facade (Pears, Sitwell, Collins), also Henry V, Orb and Sceptre
this Alto cd would "sit well" in any collection
I just finished a set of Schubert Symphonies by Wand/Cologne and was impressed. I started a traversal of Bruckner Symphonies in a new re-issue by Warner of the Bruckner Symphonies by Jochum. So far I've listened to ! and 2
and was mightily impressed by the 2nd, which I heard for the first time. The sound was surprisingly good, especially with headphones. Any comments about the Gielen set?
JohnGavin
2020-08-09 16:07:35 UTC
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Listening to all recordings of music by Maurice Duruflé. Multiple recordings of hid choral works, organ works, plus rarer works for chamber ensembles and 2 pianos.
Great composer, without a doubt. He left us with far too few works.

I will go as far to say that he is the greatest organ composer after Bach - and yes, I hold Franck and Messiaen in high esteem.
v***@protonmail.com
2020-08-09 17:11:54 UTC
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Post by Lawrence Chalmers
I just finished a set of Schubert Symphonies by Wand/Cologne and was impressed.
I sure like the 'Unfinished' from that set.


C
Al Eisner
2020-08-10 00:35:04 UTC
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Sofronitzky: Disks 2 and 3 of the 5-CD Melodiya set of live recordings
from aroind 1960. Most of those who care are probably familiar with this
set. Nearly all impressive, but if I had to pick a single highlight
it would be a superb rendition of Schubert's 3rd Impromptu. Close
behind for me are the Mozart Fantasia (K475) and the Schumann 1st
sonata - the latter the most coherent an d effective performance
I've heard (although I still find the finale rather a hodgepodge
of interesting fragments). Also worth a mention are a very fine
Carnaval and the Scriabin 4th Sonata.

James Ehnes and Andrew Armstrong (Onyx) in the violin sonatas by
Franck and Strauss. The Franck is one of my favorite violin sonatas,
and this may well be my favorite modern performance. The faster
movements are exciting, there's plenty of forward momentum, yet a lot
of flexibility (not just in the third movement), and Ehnes has both
the technique and a gorgeous tone. I've only heard the Strauss a few
times (including in concert by Ehnes with a diferent pianist). I'm
not prepared to rank it among the greats, but it is well-constructed,
lyrical (with the finale in Straussian-heroic mode), and quite enjoyable.
The performers make a very good case for it.
--
Al Eisner
dk
2020-08-10 09:25:52 UTC
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I have temporarily suspended listening to
classical music, awaiting SCOTUS decision
on whether it is racist or not. Until then
I will stick with a diet of jazz and folk.

dk
Raymond Hall
2020-08-10 09:58:38 UTC
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-I have temporarily suspended listening to  
-classical music, awaiting SCOTUS decision  
-on whether it is racist or not. Until then
-I will stick with a diet of jazz and folk.

-dk

Thelonius Monk rules imho.

Ray Hall, Taree
Not a Dentist
2020-08-10 13:58:41 UTC
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Post by Raymond Hall
-I have temporarily suspended listening to
-classical music, awaiting SCOTUS decision
-on whether it is racist or not. Until then
-I will stick with a diet of jazz and folk.
-dk
Thelonius Monk rules imho.
Ray Hall, Taree
The ruler deserves proper spelling!! It's Thelonious...
Raymond Hall
2020-08-10 14:49:50 UTC
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-The ruler deserves proper spelling!! It's Thelonious..

Yes, it is.

Ray Hall, Taree
Andrew Clarke
2020-08-12 08:23:43 UTC
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Post by Raymond Hall
-The ruler deserves proper spelling!! It's Thelonious..
Yes, it is.
Ray Hall, Taree
Well, you needn't ;-)

Andrew Clarke
Canberra
Oscar
2020-08-10 22:57:49 UTC
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Post by Raymond Hall
Thelonius Monk rules imho.
Indeed!
number_six
2020-08-11 00:41:51 UTC
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Post by Oscar
Post by Raymond Hall
Thelonius Monk rules imho.
Indeed!
I'm going to advocate some power sharing here --

T-Monk absolutely gets a permanent seat on my swingin' security council

But so do Duke, Louis, Mingus, Miles and Trane.

The floor is also open for nominations to fill three or so rotating slots --

I'll start with Django, Benny Green, Cannonball Adderley

After they serve a term, I'd rotate in, say, Bird, Bonfa and Toots...

Another round, maybe Bill Evans, Ornette, Hank Mobley?
number_six
2020-08-11 00:45:31 UTC
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Post by number_six
Post by Oscar
Post by Raymond Hall
Thelonius Monk rules imho.
Indeed!
I'm going to advocate some power sharing here --
T-Monk absolutely gets a permanent seat on my swingin' security council
But so do Duke, Louis, Mingus, Miles and Trane.
The floor is also open for nominations to fill three or so rotating slots --
I'll start with Django, Benny Green, Cannonball Adderley
After they serve a term, I'd rotate in, say, Bird, Bonfa and Toots...
Another round, maybe Bill Evans, Ornette, Hank Mobley?
Yikes.........and Rahsaan Roland Kirk...
Oscar
2020-08-11 00:54:34 UTC
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Post by number_six
T-Monk absolutely gets a permanent seat on my swingin' security council
Umm, hello, you left off Albert Ayler and Pharaoh Sanders and Cecil Taylor. You cannot be trusted to have yr finger on the button.
number_six
2020-08-11 01:30:21 UTC
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Post by Oscar
Post by number_six
T-Monk absolutely gets a permanent seat on my swingin' security council
Umm, hello, you left off Albert Ayler and Pharaoh Sanders and Cecil Taylor. You cannot be trusted to have yr finger on the button.
Without doubt, those three were master musicians.

But my point wasn't to start a list that would satisfy everyone -- an impossible order!

No, my intent was simply to show that the jazz cosmos is too great to be ruled by a single star -- not even one as brilliant as Thelonious Monk!
dk
2020-08-11 06:43:46 UTC
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Post by number_six
Post by Oscar
Post by number_six
T-Monk absolutely gets a permanent seat on my swingin' security council
Umm, hello, you left off Albert Ayler and Pharaoh Sanders and Cecil Taylor. You cannot be trusted to have yr finger on the button.
Without doubt, those three were master musicians.
But my point wasn't to start a list that would satisfy everyone -- an impossible order!
No, my intent was simply to show that the jazz cosmos is too great to be ruled by a single star -- not even one as brilliant as Thelonious Monk!
The Jazz Cosmos isn't ruled -- IT RULES !!!

dk
v***@protonmail.com
2020-08-11 14:24:37 UTC
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Post by number_six
Post by Oscar
Post by Raymond Hall
Thelonius Monk rules imho.
Indeed!
I'm going to advocate some power sharing here --
T-Monk absolutely gets a permanent seat on my swingin' security council
But so do Duke, Louis, Mingus, Miles and Trane.
The floor is also open for nominations to fill three or so rotating slots --
I'll start with Django, Benny Green, Cannonball Adderley
After they serve a term, I'd rotate in, say, Bird, Bonfa and Toots...
Another round, maybe Bill Evans, Ornette, Hank Mobley?
I'd add Wynton Kelly to that list, for sure.
Lawrence Kart
2020-08-11 14:35:24 UTC
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Post by number_six
Post by Oscar
Post by Raymond Hall
Thelonius Monk rules imho.
Indeed!
I'm going to advocate some power sharing here --
T-Monk absolutely gets a permanent seat on my swingin' security council
But so do Duke, Louis, Mingus, Miles and Trane.
The floor is also open for nominations to fill three or so rotating slots --
I'll start with Django, Benny Green, Cannonball Adderley
After they serve a term, I'd rotate in, say, Bird, Bonfa and Toots...
Another round, maybe Bill Evans, Ornette, Hank Mobley?
Benny Green? The trombonist or the pianist? I vote for the former. The pianist is just another guy. At least the trombonist, with his flaws, had a distinctive sound and style.
number_six
2020-08-11 16:05:57 UTC
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Post by Lawrence Kart
Post by number_six
Post by Oscar
Post by Raymond Hall
Thelonius Monk rules imho.
Indeed!
I'm going to advocate some power sharing here --
T-Monk absolutely gets a permanent seat on my swingin' security council
But so do Duke, Louis, Mingus, Miles and Trane.
The floor is also open for nominations to fill three or so rotating slots --
I'll start with Django, Benny Green, Cannonball Adderley
After they serve a term, I'd rotate in, say, Bird, Bonfa and Toots...
Another round, maybe Bill Evans, Ornette, Hank Mobley?
Benny Green? The trombonist or the pianist? I vote for the former. The pianist is just another guy. At least the trombonist, with his flaws, had a distinctive sound and style.
Yes, I meant Bennie Green the trombonist.

Had I spelled his nickname correctly, the confusion would've been averted.
Oscar
2020-08-11 20:04:10 UTC
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From Sir John Barbirolli: The Complete Warner Recordings (CD 17):

-Elgar: Symphony No.2 in E-flat major, Op.63
-Elgar: Cockaigne Overture, Op.40 (In London Town)
-Elgar: Introduction and Allegro for strings, Op.47

Hallé Orchestra / Sir John Barbirolli

Warner Classics 019029536085 ℗ 1955 (Op.40), ℗ 1957 (Opp.63 & 47), Remastered ℗ 2020 Parlophone Records Ltd, A Warner Music Company. CD.
Recorded at Free Trade Hall, Manchester, September 1, 1953 (Op.47); January 4, 1954 (Op.40); June 8 & 9, 1954 (Op.63) [Mono].
Producers: Alan Melville (Opp.63 & 40); Lawrence Collingwood (Op.47).
Balance engineers: Francis Dillnutt (Opp.63 & 47); Robert Beckett (Op.40).
Newly remastered in 192 kHz/24-bit from original tapes by Studio Art et Son, Annecy.

First release as HMV ALP 1242, matrix 2XEA 645/648 (Op.63); BLP 1065 matrix 0XEA532 (Op.40); BLP 1049 matrix 0XEA 478 (Op.47).

COMMENTS: These recordings are old chestnuts to me, my first real appreciation for Elgar came by way of them. The Hallé Orchestra does not play with such refinement as the Staatskapelle Berlin under Daniel Barenboim, my favorite DDD cycle of the Elgar symphonic masterpieces, but there are unique qualities to these performances that separate them from those recorded 60 years later: a rumbustiousness married to that trademark British sentimentality of the Edwardian era, a nobility in its Straussian flair, piquant winds, all while never spilling over into self-importance as is sometimes the case in this music. The Symphony No.2 here is still a benchmark for me. It was originally recorded for and released on HMV, and in 2012 Andrew Rose remastered it in Ambient Stereo on Pristine (PASC337) c/w Enigma Variations.
Oscar
2020-08-11 21:34:41 UTC
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From Sir John Barbirolli: The Complete Warner Recordings (CD 24):

-Delius: Prelude and Idyll RT II/10
-Delius: Irmelin Prelude RT VI/27
-Delius: On Hearing the First Cuckoo in Spring RT VI/9
-Delius: Fennimore and Gerda Intermezzo RT I/8 (arr. Fenby)
-Delius: A Village Romeo and Juliet - The Walk to the Paradise Garden RT I/6 (arr. Beecham)
-trad.: Irish Tune from Country Derry (Londonberry Air)
-Grainger: Molly on the Shore
-Grainger: Mock Morris
-Grainger: Shepherd's Hey

Sylvia Fisher (S)
Jess Walters (Bar, Delius Idyll)
Hallé Orchestra / Sir John Barbirolli

Warner Classics 019029536085 ℗ 1957 (Delius), 1958 (trad., Grainger), Remastered ℗ 2020 Parlophone Records Ltd, A Warner Music Company. CD.
Recorded at Free Trade Hall, Manchester, June 22, 1956 [3]-[6]; December 29, 1956 [1]-[2]; May 4, 1957 [7]-[10]. [Mono, 7-10 • Stereo, 1-6].
Producer: Wilma Cozart & Alan Melville [3]-[6]; Douglas Terry [1]-[2], [7]-[10].
Balance engineer: John Mosely [1]-[2], C. Robert Fine [3]-[6], Robert Auger [7]-[10].
Newly remastered in 192 kHz/24-bit from original tapes by Studio Art et Son, Annecy.
First release as Pye GSGC 14075, matrix GSGC 14075 A/B [1]-[6], CEC 32022 (45 r.p.m.), matrix APC 0069/70 [7]-[10].

COMMENTS: More inimitable Barbirolli with the Hallé Orchestra, straight from his wheelhouse.
Oscar
2020-08-11 22:21:31 UTC
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From Sir John Barbirolli: The Complete Warner Recordings (CD 105):

-Berlioz: Les Nuits d’été, Op.7 (Théophile Gautier)
-Ravel: Shéhérazade (Tristan Klingsor)
-Elgar: Sea Pictures, Op.37

Dame Janet Baker (Mz)
New Philharmonia Orchestra (Berlioz, Ravel)
London Symphony Orchestra (Elgar)
Sir John Barbirolli

Warner Classics 019029536085 ℗ 1965 (Elgar) & 1968 (Berlioz, Ravel), Remastered ℗ 2020 Parlophone Records Ltd, A Warner Music Company. CD.
Recorded at No.1 Studio, Abbey Road, London, August 30, 1965 (Elgar); Kingsway Hall, London, December 23 (Berlioz), 27 & 28, 1967 (Ravel).
Producer: Christopher Bishop (Berlioz, Ravel); Ronald Kinloch Anderson (Elgar)
Balance engineer: Christopher Parker.
Newly remastered in 192 kHz/24-bit from original tapes by Studio Art et Son, Annecy..
First release as HMV ASD 2244, matrix 2YEA 3467 (Berlioz, Ravel); ASD 655, matrix 2YEA 1144 (Elgar).

COMMENTS: What's more to say? I couldn't resist going for this one next, even as I have these programs on multiple CDs and LPs, both originals and reissues, imports and domestic. One of the greatest vocal recital albums (thinking specifically of EMI's Great Recordings of the Century CD) of all-time. Dame Janet Baker is my among my favorite mezzo-sopranos in song, lieder and lighter opera fare. Listening to this program is like taking a warm bath after a strenuous day's work or exercise.
JohnGavin
2020-08-10 10:13:10 UTC
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Franck complete Major Organ Music sets. Organ recordings have more variables than other instruments IMO. What instrument is more spaced widely than the pipes of a 19th century organ? So microphone placement makes or breaks a recording. To my ears many organ recordings are marred by a lack of clarity. The high reverberation of churches is another factor. Generally, I find that the big classical labels like DG and Sony do a better job of recording large organs than the labels like Loft and Pro Organo or Raven that specialize in organ music. Of course, the performance itself is the main consideration.

So, IMO the best of the sets is by Michael Murray on Telarc. Murray’s performances are beautifully cohesive and his registrations transition subtly. There are no tastelessly overpowering areas which mar many recordings. A runner up would be David Sanger on BIS. There are those who revere the old Andre Marchal recording, but for organ, I can’t be satisfied with monoral sound.
James Goodzeit
2020-08-13 13:54:02 UTC
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Post by JohnGavin
Franck complete Major Organ Music sets. Organ recordings have more variables than other instruments IMO. What instrument is more spaced widely than the pipes of a 19th century organ? So microphone placement makes or breaks a recording. To my ears many organ recordings are marred by a lack of clarity. The high reverberation of churches is another factor. Generally, I find that the big classical labels like DG and Sony do a better job of recording large organs than the labels like Loft and Pro Organo or Raven that specialize in organ music. Of course, the performance itself is the main consideration.
So, IMO the best of the sets is by Michael Murray on Telarc. Murray’s performances are beautifully cohesive and his registrations transition subtly. There are no tastelessly overpowering areas which mar many recordings. A runner up would be David Sanger on BIS. There are those who revere the old Andre Marchal recording, but for organ, I can’t be satisfied with monoral sound.
Even live, an organ sounds very different depending on where you are sitting. I think the small organ-specialized labels do a better job at recording the instrument as you might actually hear it, but I do prefer the sound on the big labels, even if it is not something you would actually hear in a live performance. I suppose they can place mics in locations that bring out the best for particulars only and mix them to get the best of everywhere.
Frank Berger
2020-08-10 13:03:09 UTC
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Post by dk
I have temporarily suspended listening to
classical music, awaiting SCOTUS decision
on whether it is racist or not. Until then
I will stick with a diet of jazz and folk.
dk
Listening to jazz is cultural misappropriation.
Oscar
2020-08-10 22:57:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
I have temporarily suspended listening to
classical music, awaiting SCOTUS decision
on whether it is racist or not. Until then
I will stick with a diet of jazz and folk.
No Bill Evans, DAN!
Oscar
2020-08-10 23:45:00 UTC
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Returning to the best Rach cycle of the last 40 years.

Rachmaninoff: Piano Concertos Nos.2 & 4; Suite from J.S. Bach's Partita for Violin in E major, BWV 1006

Danil Trifonov (pf, Steinway)
Philadelphia Orchestra / Yannick Nézet-Séguin

DG B0028799-02 © ℗ 2018. CD.
Recorded at Verizon Center, Kimmel Center, Phildadelphia, Pa., October 2015 (No.4, LIVE), and April 2018 (No.2, Partita).
Executive producers: Ute Fesquet, Misha Aster.
Recording producer: Sid McLauchlan.
Recording engineers: Charles Gagnon, Andrew Mellor.
Assistant recording engineer: Dave Conner.

Steinway piano provided by the Philadelphia Orchestra.
Piano technician: Greg Sikora.

Post-production: Andrew Mellor.
Post-production coordinator: Malene Hill.
Project manager: Nikki Kawamura.
Project coordinator: Corinna Höhn.

Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes.

Booklet note: Oscar Alan.
Booklet editor: Eva Zöllner, texthouse.
Cover & artist photos: Dario Acosta.
Creative management: Oliver Kreyssig.
Design: Mareike Walter.

COMMENT: Trifinov magisterially bends these concertos trickiest and thorniest passages to his will, creating a marvelous whole out of the Fourth through an artful controlled dynamism where it is frequently delivered piecemeal, and a second of rapturous beauty while not resorting to the all-too-usual cloying effects. The orchestral accompaniment is colorful, vigorous and in full comportment with the soloist at all times. But this is Trifonov's show.
dk
2020-08-11 08:23:31 UTC
Reply
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Post by Oscar
Post by dk
I have temporarily suspended listening to
classical music, awaiting SCOTUS decision
on whether it is racist or not. Until then
I will stick with a diet of jazz and folk.
No Bill Evans, DAN!
I can survive on Garner, Tatum and
Peterson, with a sprinkling of Monk
and Bud Powell.

dk
c***@gmail.com
2020-08-11 13:20:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
Post by Oscar
Post by dk
I have temporarily suspended listening to
classical music, awaiting SCOTUS decision
on whether it is racist or not. Until then
I will stick with a diet of jazz and folk.
No Bill Evans, DAN!
I can survive on Garner, Tatum and
Peterson, with a sprinkling of Monk
and Bud Powell.
dk
On Peterson (nothing to do with his wonderful music), did you catch this item: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/08/10/world/canada/oscar-peterson-montreal-little-burgundy.html.

AC
dk
2020-08-12 08:03:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Oscar
Post by dk
I have temporarily suspended listening to
classical music, awaiting SCOTUS decision
on whether it is racist or not. Until then
I will stick with a diet of jazz and folk.
No Bill Evans, DAN!
Can I have some Japanese jazz pianists?

dk
Lawrence Kart
2020-08-11 14:31:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
I have temporarily suspended listening to
classical music, awaiting SCOTUS decision
on whether it is racist or not. Until then
I will stick with a diet of jazz and folk.
dk
William Barr wants to ban all folk music as Left-Wing propaganda. I don't listen to folk music because 98 percent of it is crap musically, as well as not being folk music by any standard.
dk
2020-08-12 08:02:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lawrence Kart
Post by dk
I have temporarily suspended listening to
classical music, awaiting SCOTUS decision
on whether it is racist or not. Until then
I will stick with a diet of jazz and folk.
William Barr wants to ban all folk music as
Left-Wing propaganda. I don't listen to folk
music because 98 percent of it is crap musically,
as well as not being folk music by any standard.
I do not listen to American folk music. I
listen to French, Brazilian, Portuguese
and Spanish folk music.

dk
Lawrence Kart
2020-08-14 01:59:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
Post by Lawrence Kart
Post by dk
I have temporarily suspended listening to
classical music, awaiting SCOTUS decision
on whether it is racist or not. Until then
I will stick with a diet of jazz and folk.
William Barr wants to ban all folk music as
Left-Wing propaganda. I don't listen to folk
music because 98 percent of it is crap musically,
as well as not being folk music by any standard.
I do not listen to American folk music. I
listen to French, Brazilian, Portuguese
and Spanish folk music.
dk
That's OK then. Just no Woody Guthrie or Pete Seeger.
Frank Berger
2020-08-14 02:15:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lawrence Kart
Post by dk
Post by Lawrence Kart
Post by dk
I have temporarily suspended listening to
classical music, awaiting SCOTUS decision
on whether it is racist or not. Until then
I will stick with a diet of jazz and folk.
William Barr wants to ban all folk music as
Left-Wing propaganda. I don't listen to folk
music because 98 percent of it is crap musically,
as well as not being folk music by any standard.
I do not listen to American folk music. I
listen to French, Brazilian, Portuguese
and Spanish folk music.
dk
That's OK then. Just no Woody Guthrie or Pete Seeger.
My high school is infamous for having cancelled a scheduled
Pete Seeger concert in 1966 because of his leftist
orientation. A backlash against the school board decision
resulted in him performing in 1967. In addition to producing
an astronaut, a Nazi-hunter, actors, judges and major league
baseball players, it also produced a jihadist killed by an
American drone strike.
dk
2020-08-14 02:19:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Frank Berger
Post by Lawrence Kart
Post by dk
Post by Lawrence Kart
Post by dk
I have temporarily suspended listening to
classical music, awaiting SCOTUS decision
on whether it is racist or not. Until then
I will stick with a diet of jazz and folk.
William Barr wants to ban all folk music as
Left-Wing propaganda. I don't listen to folk
music because 98 percent of it is crap musically,
as well as not being folk music by any standard.
I do not listen to American folk music. I
listen to French, Brazilian, Portuguese
and Spanish folk music.
That's OK then. Just no Woody Guthrie or Pete Seeger.
My high school is infamous for having cancelled a scheduled
Pete Seeger concert in 1966 because of his leftist
orientation. A backlash against the school board decision
resulted in him performing in 1967. In addition to producing
an astronaut, a Nazi-hunter, actors, judges and major league
baseball players, it also produced a jihadist killed by an
American drone strike.
You were still in high school in 1966?
Spring chicken...

dk
Frank Berger
2020-08-14 03:32:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
Post by Frank Berger
Post by Lawrence Kart
Post by dk
Post by Lawrence Kart
Post by dk
I have temporarily suspended listening to
classical music, awaiting SCOTUS decision
on whether it is racist or not. Until then
I will stick with a diet of jazz and folk.
William Barr wants to ban all folk music as
Left-Wing propaganda. I don't listen to folk
music because 98 percent of it is crap musically,
as well as not being folk music by any standard.
I do not listen to American folk music. I
listen to French, Brazilian, Portuguese
and Spanish folk music.
That's OK then. Just no Woody Guthrie or Pete Seeger.
My high school is infamous for having cancelled a scheduled
Pete Seeger concert in 1966 because of his leftist
orientation. A backlash against the school board decision
resulted in him performing in 1967. In addition to producing
an astronaut, a Nazi-hunter, actors, judges and major league
baseball players, it also produced a jihadist killed by an
American drone strike.
You were still in high school in 1966?
Spring chicken...
dk
Not quite. I was graduated in 1965.
dk
2020-08-14 02:20:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lawrence Kart
Post by dk
Post by Lawrence Kart
Post by dk
I have temporarily suspended listening to
classical music, awaiting SCOTUS decision
on whether it is racist or not. Until then
I will stick with a diet of jazz and folk.
William Barr wants to ban all folk music as
Left-Wing propaganda. I don't listen to folk
music because 98 percent of it is crap musically,
as well as not being folk music by any standard.
I do not listen to American folk music. I
listen to French, Brazilian, Portuguese
and Spanish folk music.
That's OK then.
Thanks! I appreciate your magnanimity! ;-)
Post by Lawrence Kart
Just no Woody Guthrie or Pete Seeger.
Of course not!

dk
Dirge
2020-08-12 20:19:43 UTC
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Jean SIBELIUS: Symphony No. 4 (1911)
:: Ormandy/Philadelphia [Columbia ’54] LP transfer by The Shellackophile

This performance is wonderfully and relentlessly grim and intense and to my liking, especially for the nervous edge that’s present throughout—Ormandy’s focus and concentration is simply unflagging on this occasion. The third movement is taken a good deal faster than I’m used to, but it sounds wholly inevitable here (although most any tempo probably would have worked given playing of this caliber and intensity). This is now my favorite recording of the Fourth, and by no small margin, kicking Karajan/Philharmonia [EMI ’53] to the curb.

I haven’t heard any other transfers of this recording, but the one by The Shellackophile sounds very good to me in isolation, with good detail and plenty of atmosphere (along with the expected distortion, of course). Apparently, neither CBS nor Sony have released it in digital format. (After this length of time, I worry that the original tapes have been lost or destroyed or have deteriorated beyond use.)
Frank Berger
2020-08-12 20:21:54 UTC
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Post by Dirge
Jean SIBELIUS: Symphony No. 4 (1911)
:: Ormandy/Philadelphia [Columbia ’54] LP transfer by The Shellackophile
This performance is wonderfully and relentlessly grim and intense and to my liking, especially for the nervous edge that’s present throughout—Ormandy’s focus and concentration is simply unflagging on this occasion. The third movement is taken a good deal faster than I’m used to, but it sounds wholly inevitable here (although most any tempo probably would have worked given playing of this caliber and intensity). This is now my favorite recording of the Fourth, and by no small margin, kicking Karajan/Philharmonia [EMI ’53] to the curb.
I haven’t heard any other transfers of this recording, but the one by The Shellackophile sounds very good to me in isolation, with good detail and plenty of atmosphere (along with the expected distortion, of course). Apparently, neither CBS nor Sony have released it in digital format. (After this length of time, I worry that the original tapes have been lost or destroyed or have deteriorated beyond use.)
Haydn House has done it.
Dirge
2020-08-13 16:54:16 UTC
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Arnold SCHOENBERG: «Pierrot lunaire», Op. 21 (1912)
:: DeGaetani, Weisberg/Contemporary Chamber Ensemble [Nonesuch ’70]


I flirt with new recordings of «Pierrot lunaire» as they come my way, but I always end up returning home to this one at the end of the listening day. DeGaetani’s portrayal is more multifaceted, intricately wrought, subtly shaded, and just plain sophisticated than anyone else’s, generating melodrama and a quirkily tense and moonstruck atmosphere with great expressive economy and efficiency. Her sprechstimme is lyrical without devolving into singing, and she always sounds as if she’s telling a story to you the listener (rather than simply emoting), which I think is the great underlying strength of her performance—think of her as an atonal Expressionist Scheherazade. She also sounds like the same character throughout, only in different moods, whereas many singers change their voice so drastically from one song to the next that they often sound like different vocalists/characters altogether. Weisberg and company are well-matched partners, deftly setting the scene and establishing the atmosphere while still complementing DeGaetani. It’s not an especially bold, dynamic, and volatile performance, but it’s shrewdly pointed and contrasted and makes a strong impact in its more insidious and cumulative way.
Dirge
2020-08-13 21:53:57 UTC
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Pyotr TCHAIKOVSKY: Serenade for Strings in C major, Op. 48 (1880)
:: Amoyal/Camerata de Lausanne [Warner ’12]

This is a decidedly pared-down production, employing only 13 string all told, including Amoyal on violin … and it sounds like it, as there’s no attempt by the engineers to make them sound like more than they are. This is not going to please listeners who take Tchaikovsky’s stated preference for a highly populated string orchestra as gospel: “The larger number of players in the string orchestra, the more this shall be in accordance with the author’s wishes.” If you can accept the pared-down premise, however, the performance is worth a listen, as it’s quite different and interesting apart from its distilled chamber music-like scale and scope. The strings are bright in tone, and the playing is alert, energetic and, in the non-Élégie movements, ostensibly cheerful, but there’s a slight disturbance in the Force, a just-perceptible feeling of anxiety in the air, that’s not normally associated with the usually suave and confident Serenade. The almost painfully intimate account of the Élégie is especially fascinating, unlike any other I’ve heard. This, then, is not a “library choice” by any stretch, but it’s a pretty interesting one-off for adventurous listeners.
Gerard
2020-08-14 08:20:03 UTC
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"Dirge" wrote in message news:5f9904ac-1e1e-431d-b3ae-***@googlegroups.com...

Pyotr TCHAIKOVSKY: Serenade for Strings in C major, Op. 48 (1880)
:: Amoyal/Camerata de Lausanne [Warner ’12]

This is a decidedly pared-down production, employing only 13 string all
told, including Amoyal on violin … and it sounds like it, as there’s no
attempt by the engineers to make them sound like more than they are. This is
not going to please listeners who take Tchaikovsky’s stated preference for a
highly populated string orchestra as gospel: “The larger number of players
in the string orchestra, the more this shall be in accordance with the
author’s wishes.” If you can accept the pared-down premise, however, the
performance is worth a listen, as it’s quite different and interesting apart
from its distilled chamber music-like scale and scope. The strings are
bright in tone, and the playing is alert, energetic and, in the non-Élégie
movements, ostensibly cheerful, but there’s a slight disturbance in the
Force, a just-perceptible feeling of anxiety in the air, that’s not normally
associated with the usually suave and confident Serenade. The almost
painfully intimate account of the Élégie is especially fascinating, unlike
any other I’ve heard. This, then, is not a “library choice” by any stretch,
but it’s a pretty interesting one-off for adventurous listeners.
---------------------------------

Interesting.
Are there other recordings with small groups comparable to this one?
I'm thinking of Zhislin, but that is with 18 musicians, a lot more. Do you
know his recording?
Dirge
2020-08-14 16:23:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dirge
Pyotr TCHAIKOVSKY: Serenade for Strings in C major, Op. 48 (1880)
:: Amoyal/Camerata de Lausanne [Warner ’12]
This is a decidedly pared-down production, employing only 13 string all
told, including Amoyal on violin … and it sounds like it, as there’s no
attempt by the engineers to make them sound like more than they are. This is
not going to please listeners who take Tchaikovsky’s stated preference for a
highly populated string orchestra as gospel: “The larger number of players
in the string orchestra, the more this shall be in accordance with the
author’s wishes.” If you can accept the pared-down premise, however, the
performance is worth a listen, as it’s quite different and interesting apart
from its distilled chamber music-like scale and scope. The strings are
bright in tone, and the playing is alert, energetic and, in the non-Élégie
movements, ostensibly cheerful, but there’s a slight disturbance in the
Force, a just-perceptible feeling of anxiety in the air, that’s not normally
associated with the usually suave and confident Serenade. The almost
painfully intimate account of the Élégie is especially fascinating, unlike
any other I’ve heard. This, then, is not a “library choice” by any stretch,
but it’s a pretty interesting one-off for adventurous listeners.
---------------------------------
Interesting.
Are there other recordings with small groups comparable to this one?
I'm thinking of Zhislin, but that is with 18 musicians, a lot more. Do you
know his recording?
I don't know of any other accounts with as few as 13 strings. I don't know Zhislin either, but Bashmet/Moscow Soloists [RCA ’89] uses around 18 musicians if I remember correctly; it still manages to sound like a chamber orchestra, a very small chamber orchestra, rather than a chamber music ensemble, however. The performance is very Romantic in character, with extreme dynamics/dynamic contrasts and bold expressive gestures. It’s well-played in that context, but it’s all a bit too much for me to fully embrace.
Gerard
2020-08-14 17:17:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dirge
Pyotr TCHAIKOVSKY: Serenade for Strings in C major, Op. 48 (1880)
:: Amoyal/Camerata de Lausanne [Warner ’12]
This is a decidedly pared-down production, employing only 13 string all
told, including Amoyal on violin … and it sounds like it, as there’s no
attempt by the engineers to make them sound like more than they are. This is
not going to please listeners who take Tchaikovsky’s stated preference for a
highly populated string orchestra as gospel: “The larger number of players
in the string orchestra, the more this shall be in accordance with the
author’s wishes.” If you can accept the pared-down premise, however, the
performance is worth a listen, as it’s quite different and interesting apart
from its distilled chamber music-like scale and scope. The strings are
bright in tone, and the playing is alert, energetic and, in the non-Élégie
movements, ostensibly cheerful, but there’s a slight disturbance in the
Force, a just-perceptible feeling of anxiety in the air, that’s not normally
associated with the usually suave and confident Serenade. The almost
painfully intimate account of the Élégie is especially fascinating, unlike
any other I’ve heard. This, then, is not a “library choice” by any stretch,
but it’s a pretty interesting one-off for adventurous listeners.
---------------------------------
Interesting.
Are there other recordings with small groups comparable to this one?
I'm thinking of Zhislin, but that is with 18 musicians, a lot more. Do you
know his recording?
I don't know of any other accounts with as few as 13 strings. I don't know
Zhislin either, but Bashmet/Moscow Soloists [RCA ’89] uses around 18
musicians if I remember correctly; it still manages to sound like a chamber
orchestra, a very small chamber orchestra, rather than a chamber music
ensemble, however. The performance is very Romantic in character, with
extreme dynamics/dynamic contrasts and bold expressive gestures. It’s
well-played in that context, but it’s all a bit too much for me to fully
embrace.

-------------------------------------------------------------------

Curiously, the Gramophone review can be read without subscription:
https://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/tchaikovsky-souvenir-de-florence
(Here Zinman's recording of Souvenir is mentiond - a recording I really
would like to see on CD any time.)

The booklet of the recording of Bashmet does not mention the number of
musicians involved. I remember it as sounding like a rather large ensemble.
Larger than Marriner's Academy (Decca), in the Serenade.
I've listened to snippets of Amoyal's recording (but on computer speakers
only); I think the sound is close to those by Marriner and Zhislin.
I should listen to Zhislin again - but I remember his performance as very
vivid and attractive. It went straight to "the top" for me at first
listening. Recommended.
Unfortunately the Amoyal recording is not availabe at the (Dutch) sites I
usually visit for ordering.
Gerard
2020-08-14 18:04:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dirge
Pyotr TCHAIKOVSKY: Serenade for Strings in C major, Op. 48 (1880)
:: Amoyal/Camerata de Lausanne [Warner ’12]
This is a decidedly pared-down production, employing only 13 string all
told, including Amoyal on violin … and it sounds like it, as there’s no
attempt by the engineers to make them sound like more than they are. This is
not going to please listeners who take Tchaikovsky’s stated preference for a
highly populated string orchestra as gospel: “The larger number of players
in the string orchestra, the more this shall be in accordance with the
author’s wishes.” If you can accept the pared-down premise, however, the
performance is worth a listen, as it’s quite different and interesting apart
from its distilled chamber music-like scale and scope. The strings are
bright in tone, and the playing is alert, energetic and, in the non-Élégie
movements, ostensibly cheerful, but there’s a slight disturbance in the
Force, a just-perceptible feeling of anxiety in the air, that’s not normally
associated with the usually suave and confident Serenade. The almost
painfully intimate account of the Élégie is especially fascinating, unlike
any other I’ve heard. This, then, is not a “library choice” by any stretch,
but it’s a pretty interesting one-off for adventurous listeners.
---------------------------------
Interesting.
Are there other recordings with small groups comparable to this one?
I'm thinking of Zhislin, but that is with 18 musicians, a lot more. Do you
know his recording?
I don't know of any other accounts with as few as 13 strings. I don't know
Zhislin either, but Bashmet/Moscow Soloists [RCA ’89] uses around 18
musicians if I remember correctly; it still manages to sound like a chamber
orchestra, a very small chamber orchestra, rather than a chamber music
ensemble, however. The performance is very Romantic in character, with
extreme dynamics/dynamic contrasts and bold expressive gestures. It’s
well-played in that context, but it’s all a bit too much for me to fully
embrace.

-------------------------------------------------------------------

Curiously, the Gramophone review can be read without subscription:
https://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/tchaikovsky-souvenir-de-florence
(Here Zinman's recording of Souvenir is mentiond - a recording I really
would like to see on CD any time.)

The booklet of the recording of Bashmet does not mention the number of
musicians involved. I remember it as sounding like a rather large ensemble.
Larger than Marriner's Academy (Decca), in the Serenade.
I've listened to snippets of Amoyal's recording (but on computer speakers
only); I think the sound is close to those by Marriner and Zhislin.
I should listen to Zhislin again - but I remember his performance as very
vivid and attractive. It went straight to "the top" for me at first
listening. Recommended.
Unfortunately the Amoyal recording is not availabe at the (Dutch) sites I
usually visit for ordering.
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Another review:
https://classicalcandor.blogspot.com/2013/08/tchaikovsky-serenade-for-strings-cd.html
Dirge
2020-08-25 16:07:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I’ve been listening to the better part of Brahms’s solo piano output …

Sonata in F minor, Op. 5 :: Annie Fischer [live in Edinburgh ’61] BBC Legends
Ballades, Op. 10 :: Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli [live in Lugano ’73] Aura
Capriccio in B minor, Op. 76/2 :: Ivan Moravec [Nonesuch LP ’82]
Rhapsody in B minor, Op. 79/1 :: Martha Argerich [DG ’60]
Rhapsody in G minor, Op. 79/2 :: Ivan Moravec [Nonesuch LP ’82]
Fantasien, Op. 116 :: Emil Gilels [DG ’75]
Intermezzi, Op. 117 :: Ivan Moravec [Nonesuch LP ’82]
Klavierstücke, Op. 118 :: Radu Lupu [Decca ’76]
Klavierstücke, Op. 119 :: Radu Lupu [Decca ’76]
Opp. 10, 76, 79 & 116–119 :: Wilhelm Kempff [Decca ’50/’53]

I’m pretty happy with the recordings listed, all of which have been favorites of mine for some years now. I’m compelled to cite Fischer’s gripping account of the cumbersome Op. 5 Sonata as a highlight if only because it’s the only account of the Sonata that I like … or that makes me like the Sonata—no mean feat. Michelangeli’s account of the Op. 10 Ballades is also rather special provided that you’re able to get in sync with the slow, contemplative pace of the final ballade, which is the most controversial aspect of any of the performances listed. Michelangeli is uncontroversially sublime in the first three ballades, however. The rest of the listed performances are pretty much what you’d expect, I should think, given the pianists. Although Kempff isn’t a favorite of mine in any particular opus, I find his disarmingly unaffected Brahms satisfying and easy to live with on the whole, and his recordings make for a refreshing occasional change-up to the variously more stylized and romantic Brahms of the other pianists.
Bob Harper
2020-08-25 18:30:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dirge
I’ve been listening to the better part of Brahms’s solo piano output …
Sonata in F minor, Op. 5 :: Annie Fischer [live in Edinburgh ’61] BBC Legends
Ballades, Op. 10 :: Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli [live in Lugano ’73] Aura
Capriccio in B minor, Op. 76/2 :: Ivan Moravec [Nonesuch LP ’82]
Rhapsody in B minor, Op. 79/1 :: Martha Argerich [DG ’60]
Rhapsody in G minor, Op. 79/2 :: Ivan Moravec [Nonesuch LP ’82]
Fantasien, Op. 116 :: Emil Gilels [DG ’75]
Intermezzi, Op. 117 :: Ivan Moravec [Nonesuch LP ’82]
Klavierstücke, Op. 118 :: Radu Lupu [Decca ’76]
Klavierstücke, Op. 119 :: Radu Lupu [Decca ’76]
Opp. 10, 76, 79 & 116–119 :: Wilhelm Kempff [Decca ’50/’53]
I’m pretty happy with the recordings listed, all of which have been favorites of mine for some years now. I’m compelled to cite Fischer’s gripping account of the cumbersome Op. 5 Sonata as a highlight if only because it’s the only account of the Sonata that I like … or that makes me like the Sonata—no mean feat. Michelangeli’s account of the Op. 10 Ballades is also rather special provided that you’re able to get in sync with the slow, contemplative pace of the final ballade, which is the most controversial aspect of any of the performances listed. Michelangeli is uncontroversially sublime in the first three ballades, however. The rest of the listed performances are pretty much what you’d expect, I should think, given the pianists. Although Kempff isn’t a favorite of mine in any particular opus, I find his disarmingly unaffected Brahms satisfying and easy to live with on the whole, and his recordings make for a refreshing occasional change-up to the variously more stylized and romantic Brahms of the other pianists.
I have a request for anyone here who transfers LPs. Long ago, Antonin
Kubalek, who had just left what was then Czechoslovakia, made a
recording on the Citadel label of Brahms; Op. 116 (the B side was some
Schumann, but I don't remember it very well). The recordings were live,
and I have never heard an Op.116 to match these performances. If anyone
has this record (mine disappeared long ago, alas) and would transfer it
to dig
Frank Berger
2020-08-25 20:01:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bob Harper
Post by Dirge
I’ve been listening to the better part of Brahms’s solo
piano output …
Sonata in F minor, Op. 5 :: Annie Fischer [live in
Edinburgh ’61] BBC Legends
Ballades, Op. 10 :: Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli [live in
Lugano ’73] Aura
Capriccio in B minor, Op. 76/2 :: Ivan Moravec [Nonesuch
LP ’82]
Rhapsody in B minor, Op. 79/1 :: Martha Argerich [DG ’60]
Rhapsody in G minor, Op. 79/2 :: Ivan Moravec [Nonesuch LP
’82]
Fantasien, Op. 116 :: Emil Gilels [DG ’75]
Intermezzi, Op. 117 :: Ivan Moravec [Nonesuch LP ’82]
Klavierstücke, Op. 118 :: Radu Lupu [Decca ’76]
Klavierstücke, Op. 119 :: Radu Lupu [Decca ’76]
Opp. 10, 76, 79 & 116–119 :: Wilhelm Kempff [Decca ’50/’53]
I’m pretty happy with the recordings listed, all of which
have been favorites of mine for some years now. I’m
compelled to cite Fischer’s gripping account of the
cumbersome Op. 5 Sonata as a highlight if only because
it’s the only account of the Sonata that I like … or that
makes me like the Sonata—no mean feat. Michelangeli’s
account of the Op. 10 Ballades is also rather special
provided that you’re able to get in sync with the slow,
contemplative pace of the final ballade, which is the most
controversial aspect of any of the performances listed.
Michelangeli is uncontroversially sublime in the first
three ballades, however. The rest of the listed
performances are pretty much what you’d expect, I should
think, given the pianists. Although Kempff isn’t a
favorite of mine in any particular opus, I find his
disarmingly unaffected Brahms satisfying and easy to live
with on the whole, and his recordings make for a
refreshing occasional change-up to the variously more
stylized and romantic Brahms of the other pianists.
I have a request for anyone here who transfers LPs. Long
ago, Antonin Kubalek, who had just left what was then
Czechoslovakia, made a recording on the Citadel label of
Brahms; Op. 116 (the B side was some Schumann, but I don't
remember it very well). The recordings were live, and I have
never heard an Op.116 to match these performances. If anyone
has this record (mine disappeared long ago, alas) and would
transfer it to digital, I'd be most grateful.
Bob Harper
FIWI, there is a near mint copy on Discogs for $40 including
shipping. I imagine you are aware of the later recordings
Kubalek made for Dorian.
Dirge
2020-08-25 20:33:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tuesday, August 25, 2020 at 1:30:50 PM UTC-5, Bob Harper wrote:
[...]
Post by Bob Harper
I have a request for anyone here who transfers LPs. Long ago, Antonin
Kubalek, who had just left what was then Czechoslovakia, made a
recording on the Citadel label of Brahms; Op. 116 (the B side was some
Schumann, but I don't remember it very well). The recordings were live,
and I have never heard an Op.116 to match these performances. If anyone
has this record (mine disappeared long ago, alas) and would transfer it
to digital, I'd be most grateful.
Bob Harper
There’s a YouTube video of the album to tide you over until a better transfer comes your way ...


Bob Harper
2020-08-25 23:12:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dirge
[...]
Post by Bob Harper
I have a request for anyone here who transfers LPs. Long ago, Antonin
Kubalek, who had just left what was then Czechoslovakia, made a
recording on the Citadel label of Brahms; Op. 116 (the B side was some
Schumann, but I don't remember it very well). The recordings were live,
and I have never heard an Op.116 to match these performances. If anyone
has this record (mine disappeared long ago, alas) and would transfer it
to digital, I'd be most grateful.
Bob Harper
There’s a YouTube video of the album to tide you over until a better transfer comes your way ...
http://youtu.be/YPNsNhzHcWw
I found that after i wrote this. You're right, a better transfer would
be welcome :).

And I'm too cheap to spend $48 on a copy of the LP.

Bob Harper
Frank Berger
2020-08-26 00:11:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bob Harper
Post by Dirge
On Tuesday, August 25, 2020 at 1:30:50 PM UTC-5, Bob
[...]
Post by Bob Harper
I have a request for anyone here who transfers LPs. Long
ago, Antonin
Kubalek, who had just left what was then Czechoslovakia,
made a
recording on the Citadel label of Brahms; Op. 116 (the B
side was some
Schumann, but I don't remember it very well). The
recordings were live,
and I have never heard an Op.116 to match these
performances. If anyone
has this record (mine disappeared long ago, alas) and
would transfer it
to digital, I'd be most grateful.
Bob Harper
There’s a YouTube video of the album to tide you over
until a better transfer comes your way ...
http://youtu.be/YPNsNhzHcWw
I found that after i wrote this. You're right, a better
transfer would be welcome :).
And I'm too cheap to spend $48 on a copy of the LP.
Bob Harper
Can you compare the Citadel op. 116 to the Dorian recorded
some 20+ years later, I think?
Bob Harper
2020-08-26 07:07:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bob Harper
Post by Dirge
[...]
Post by Bob Harper
I have a request for anyone here who transfers LPs. Long ago, Antonin
Kubalek, who had just left what was then Czechoslovakia, made a
recording on the Citadel label of Brahms; Op. 116 (the B side was some
Schumann, but I don't remember it very well). The recordings were live,
and I have never heard an Op.116 to match these performances. If anyone
has this record (mine disappeared long ago, alas) and would transfer it
to digital, I'd be most grateful.
Bob Harper
There’s a YouTube video of the album to tide you over until a better
transfer comes your way ...
http://youtu.be/YPNsNhzHcWw
I found that after i wrote this. You're right, a better transfer would
be welcome :).
And I'm too cheap to spend $48 on a copy of the LP.
Bob Harper
Can you compare the Citadel op. 116 to the Dorian recorded some 20+
years later, I think?
It's been a while, but I did have the Dorian CDs once upon a time, and
let them go. The Op. 116 did not, IMO, compare favorably to the live
recording on Citadel. The live version crackled with energy even in the
slower pieces. the first piece was not so much begun as launched, and
the last piece reminded me, in its way, of the end of Furtwangler's way
with the end of the Fourth Symphony. The entire set kept me on the edge
of my seat. I've since discovered that both performances are on You
Tube, and a quick comparison confirms what my memory was telling me.
Imprint? Maybe, but I think the difference is real and in the earlier
performance's favor.

Bob Harper
Henk vT
2020-08-25 18:59:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dirge
I’m pretty happy with the recordings listed, all of which have been favorites of mine for some years now. I’m compelled to cite Fischer’s gripping account of the cumbersome Op. 5 Sonata as a highlight if only because it’s the only account of the Sonata that I like … or that makes me like the Sonata—no mean feat.
My favorite Op. 5 is Anda, although I really like Fischer. Among youngsters Vondracek stands out - imo. BTW, do you know Katchen's version in his complete Brahms set?
Post by Dirge
Although Kempff isn’t a favorite of mine in any particular opus, I find his disarmingly unaffected Brahms satisfying and easy to live with on the whole, and his recordings make for a refreshing occasional change-up to the variously more stylized and romantic Brahms of the other pianists.
Kempff is great in Beethoven, Brahms, and Schubert. His recordings of the smaller pieces are, as you say, "refreshing". Not the usual brandy and cigar smoke but sheer fun to listen to.

Henk
Henk vT
2020-08-25 19:16:44 UTC
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Permalink
Queffelec, from her 21cd set: a brilliant Scarlatti, and a Scarlatti-esque Bach Partitas cd. Faure's violin sonatas with Amoyal (not my favorite violinist), and a great version (top 10) of the Debussy etudes.

Henk
Dirge
2020-08-25 21:22:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Henk vT
Post by Dirge
I’m pretty happy with the recordings listed, all of which have been favorites of mine for some years now. I’m compelled to cite Fischer’s gripping account of the cumbersome Op. 5 Sonata as a highlight if only because it’s the only account of the Sonata that I like … or that makes me like the Sonata—no mean feat.
My favorite Op. 5 is Anda, although I really like Fischer. Among youngsters Vondracek stands out - imo. BTW, do you know Katchen's version in his complete Brahms set?
[...]
Henk
I most likely heard or sampled Katchen’s Op. 5 back in the late ’90s when I borrowed his Brahms box set from someone, but I don’t have any specific recollection of it. All I remember is that Katchen’s phrasing didn’t strike a chord with me in general, so I didn’t pursue his Brahms after that.

Although saying so may well cause me to lose any and all record collector street cred that I’ve built up over the past 40+ years, I’m content with Fischer’s account of Op. 5 and have no real desire to seek out a "better" alternative. Sacrilege, I know, but that’s what Brahms to me.
Dirge
2020-08-26 16:33:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Giovanni Pierluigi da PALESTRINA: Missa Papae Marcelli · Stabat Mater · Alma Redemptoris Mater · Peccantem me quotidie
:: Turner/Pro Cantione Antiqua [ASV ’78] not to be confused with the 1990 Brown/Pro Cantione Antiqua recordings of the same works (on various labels)


I’m not generally a Palestrina kind of guy, finding most of what I’ve heard of his vast output to be rather generalized and anonymous in character (however skillfully constructed and historically important the music may be), but PCA makes the best of it by singing more personally and expressively than other groups, and doing so in an earnest and sincere way that comes across as prayerful and devout in context … helped by the slightly earthy and plaintive tone of the singers’ voices. From a 21st-century HIP perspective, the style of singing will seem dated/old-fashioned, not entirely removed from that of the old Deller Consort, but that’s what makes these performances work for me. PCA uses one voice per part, with countertenors on top—no women or boys here—and the voices are distinctive and contrasting yet complementary (rather than uniform and blended/homogenized in the manner of the Tallis Scholars). Whether this is how these works were performed in Palestrina’s day, I haven’t the foggiest, but the approach yields uncommon lucidity and textural definition throughout, including the great unfolding of “Amen”s at the end of both the Gloria and the Credo of the Mass.

The recording is closer, drier, and less blended than usual for this type of music, which suits/complements the performances, but it’s still reasonably airy and atmospheric, and vocal balances are beautifully judged. Indeed, the layering and interweaving of voices, the sonic tapestry as it were, is presented more clearly and vividly than in any other recording that I’ve heard. On the other hand, it doesn’t have anything like the sense of space and ethereal atmosphere of the famous 1980 Tallis Scholars recording of Missa Papae Marcelli, with its infinite decay and overtones—it’s a much more down to Earth listening experience entirely.
v***@protonmail.com
2020-08-27 14:53:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dirge
Giovanni Pierluigi da PALESTRINA: Missa Papae Marcelli · Stabat Mater · Alma Redemptoris Mater · Peccantem me quotidie
:: Turner/Pro Cantione Antiqua [ASV ’78] not to be confused with the 1990 Brown/Pro Cantione Antiqua recordings of the same works (on various labels)
http://youtu.be/8dbwca9LroM
I’m not generally a Palestrina kind of guy, finding most of what I’ve heard of his vast output to be rather generalized and anonymous in character (however skillfully constructed and historically important the music may be), but PCA makes the best of it by singing more personally and expressively than other groups, and doing so in an earnest and sincere way that comes across as prayerful and devout in context … helped by the slightly earthy and plaintive tone of the singers’ voices. From a 21st-century HIP perspective, the style of singing will seem dated/old-fashioned, not entirely removed from that of the old Deller Consort, but that’s what makes these performances work for me. PCA uses one voice per part, with countertenors on top—no women or boys here—and the voices are distinctive and contrasting yet complementary (rather than uniform and blended/homogenized in the manner of the Tallis Scholars). Whether this is how these works were performed in Palestrina’s day, I haven’t the foggiest, but the approach yields uncommon lucidity and textural definition throughout, including the great unfolding of “Amen”s at the end of both the Gloria and the Credo of the Mass.
The recording is closer, drier, and less blended than usual for this type of music, which suits/complements the performances, but it’s still reasonably airy and atmospheric, and vocal balances are beautifully judged. Indeed, the layering and interweaving of voices, the sonic tapestry as it were, is presented more clearly and vividly than in any other recording that I’ve heard. On the other hand, it doesn’t have anything like the sense of space and ethereal atmosphere of the famous 1980 Tallis Scholars recording of Missa Papae Marcelli, with its infinite decay and overtones—it’s a much more down to Earth listening experience entirely.
Thanks for this post. I'm looking for an alternative to my current favorite of Summerly/Oxford Camerata, and this one sounds like a contender as described.

C.
Dirge
2020-08-31 02:19:34 UTC
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J. S. BACH: Magnificat in D major, BWV 243 (1733)
Reyghere (soprano), Jacobs (alto), Prégardien (tenor), Lika (bass)
:: Kuijken/Nederlands Kamerkoor & La Petite Bande [Virgin Veritas ’88]

Although not extraordinary in any way, this is the most “comfortable” account of the Magnificat that I’ve heard. Soloists, choir, and bande are all to my liking, as is the earnest mien and reluctantly festive spirit of the proceedings—most accounts of the Magnificat are too damn joyous for my taste. That said, the choruses “Omnes generationes” and “Fecit potentiam” might have benefited from a bit more gusto. Highlights include the protracted and tenuously sustained yet somehow still beautiful “Et misericordia,” the ardent tenor of Prégardien’s account of “Deposuit potentes,” and above all the sublime account of the rarefied and precariously delicate “Suscepit Israel.” Kuijken uses alto (countertenor) rather than a second soprano in “Et exultavit,” and the Nederlands Kamerkoor is about 20 strong—a good size, I think, as it provides good clarity yet ample “oomph” when needed.

For something of like size and scope but generally more outgoing and joyous, Herreweghe/La Chapelle Royale [HM ’90] is tough to beat, while Pierlot/Ricercar Ensemble [Mirare ’09] offers up a bracing and eye-openingly/ear-openingly vivid one-voice-per-part alternative that’s HIP without a musicological ax to grind. For all that, I still listen to Kuijken and his little band more often than not in this music.
Oscar
2020-08-31 06:09:01 UTC
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Post by Dirge
J. S. BACH: Magnificat in D major, BWV 243 (1733)
Reyghere (soprano), Jacobs (alto), Prégardien (tenor), Lika (bass)
:: Kuijken/Nederlands Kamerkoor & La Petite Bande [Virgin Veritas ’88]
. . . For all that, I still listen to Kuijken and his little band more often than not in this music.
Hear, hear! I also very much enjoy Kuijken in Bach's choral works. The Cantatas under Siggi's direction sure are not to everyone's taste, but they are for mine. I waddle between Kuijken, Koopman, Herreweghe and Suzuki. So you can see I'm pretty Beneluxian in taste and regard for this, my most cherished classical music. (I am a Lutheran.)
Ed Presson
2020-08-31 02:44:03 UTC
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Magnus Lindberg: Tempus Fugit; Violin Concerto No. 2
Frank Peter Zimmermann, Violin, Hannu Lintu conducting the
Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra. Ondine SACD 1308

Lindberg's early music was described by him as "carved in
stone." Lots of agitated and unpleasant surface activity on
top of a rock solid musical structure.

These newer works are quite different: beautiful orchestration
(occasional hints of Ravel) over a structure that can sound more
rhapsodic and improvisational. I think there is still a
solid structural underpinning. Meaty stuff, but much easier to like.

Ondine's SACD sound is exceptionally good.

Ed Presson
Oscar
2020-08-31 19:51:57 UTC
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Finally arrived from Presto via FedEx:

Elgar: Sea Pictures, Sony cycle for mezzo-soprano and orchestra, Op.37*
Elgar: Falstaff, Symphonic study for orchestra (after Henry IV and Henry V by Shakespeare), Op.68

Elína Garanča (Mz)*
Staatskapelle Berlin / Daniel Barenboim

Decca 000228948509683 ℗ 2020 Daniel Barenboim and Unitel GmbH & Co., KG, Oberhaching, under exclusive licence to Universal Music Operations Limited © 2020 Universal Music Operations Limited. A Decca Classics Release. CD.
Recording dates: October 14 & 15, 2019 (Falstaff), and December 16 & 17, 2019 (Sea Pictures).
Recording locations: Staatsoper, Berlin (October 14 & December 16), and Philharmonie, Berlin (October 15 & December 17).

Executive producer: Helen Lewis.
Recording producer: Friedemann Engelbrecht.
Recorded by Teldex Studio Berlin.
Sound engineers: Wolfgang Schiefermair, René Möller.
Assistant recording engineers: Cornelius Dürst, Thomas Bössl, Philipp Reif.
Postproduction facilities: Teldex Studio Berlin.
Mixing engineer: Sebastian Nattkemper.
Recording editor: Sebastian Nattkemper.
CD mastering: Sebastian Nattkemper.

Cover design: Matt Read.
Booklet editing & art direction: WLP Limited.
Booklet note: Anthony Burton.

COMMENT: This release has grown on me in the intervening 9 weeks since it dropped on AppleMusic. Perhaps it is because of the higher fidelity of the Compact Digital Disc versus 256 Kbps AAC streaming AppleMusic files. I was a bit critical of Garanča's mezzo voice on first listen, having been spoilt for choice over the years (thinking of Dame Janet Baker w/ Barbirolli, natch), but she does have a warm tone and supple phrasing. In the end, as Andrew Clements in The Guardian noted in his review of this disc, all the right notes are hit and gestures made, but there is an overall sense of the sentimental missing that is found in the most satisfying accounts of this great work. Falstaff is excellent, a work that keeps growing on me, although I cannot say I am overly familiar with it. I love Toscanini's heavily-cut version, but one thing about Barenboim is he has a real affinity for the music of Sir Edward Elgar that makes this ongoing series one of my favorites of the decade.
Andrew Clarke
2020-09-08 01:22:28 UTC
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On Tuesday, September 1, 2020 at 5:52:00 AM UTC+10, Oscar wrote:
In the end, as Andrew Clements in The Guardian noted in his review of this disc, all the right notes are hit and gestures made, but there is an overall sense of the sentimental missing that is found in the most satisfying accounts of this great work.

I now feel caught between the Scylla of Oscar, who wants more sentimentality in Elgar, and the Charybdis of Dave the Dude, who wants considerably less of it.

I've just downloaded and listened to, twice, the new recording of the violin concerto with Nicola Benedetti, the LPO and Jurowsky. It is a revelation, and very much at the Dave end of the spectrum, less mist and more drama.

Andrew Clarke
Canberra

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