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Vladimir Horowitz - the Great Comeback Box - 15CD Set
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Hank Drake
2019-06-14 18:11:26 UTC
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Just announced on German Amazon. This includes all of Horowitz's Carnegie Hall rehearsals and at least one studio session recorded from January - April 1965. Most of this is newly released, except for Chopin's Nouvelle Etude in A-flat major and Debussy Etude which were released in the early 1990s. And, of course, the material that was used to patch the original "Historic Return" issue. Release schedule for August.

https://www.amazon.de/Vladimir-Horowitz-Great-Comeback-Horowitz/dp/B07PGX7KPW
p***@gmail.com
2019-06-14 19:04:06 UTC
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Post by Hank Drake
https://www.amazon.de/Vladimir-Horowitz-Great-Comeback-Horowitz/dp/B07PGX7KPW
This is very good news!

Details here: https://www.sonyclassical.es/post/185566821246/vladimir-horowitz
graham
2019-06-14 19:19:46 UTC
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Post by p***@gmail.com
Post by Hank Drake
https://www.amazon.de/Vladimir-Horowitz-Great-Comeback-Horowitz/dp/B07PGX7KPW
This is very good news!
Details here: https://www.sonyclassical.es/post/185566821246/vladimir-horowitz
All those duplications yet only ONE Träumerei!
Hank Drake
2019-06-14 19:31:02 UTC
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Post by graham
All those duplications yet only ONE Träumerei!
Usually we get too many Träumerei to shake a stick at. :)

Hank
JohnA
2019-06-16 00:29:44 UTC
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Post by p***@gmail.com
Post by Hank Drake
https://www.amazon.de/Vladimir-Horowitz-Great-Comeback-Horowitz/dp/B07PGX7KPW
This is very good news!
Details here: https://www.sonyclassical.es/post/185566821246/vladimir-horowitz
English: https://www.sonyclassical.com/news/vladimir-horowitz-the-great-comeback-horowitz-at-carnegie-hall
collector78
2019-06-14 23:46:56 UTC
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are there any plans to release more 40's and 50's stuff though?
AB
2019-06-16 18:05:30 UTC
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Post by collector78
are there any plans to release more 40's and 50's stuff though?
right......

AB
piano4tay
2019-06-15 06:25:48 UTC
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Interesting. I notice that according to the notes, Horowitz's 1953 retirement was triggered by a row with Szell concerning their Tschaik 1 collaboration that January. That's an interesting claim I don't think I've heard before...

AMN
Hank Drake
2019-06-15 11:28:52 UTC
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Post by piano4tay
Interesting. I notice that according to the notes, Horowitz's 1953 retirement was triggered by a row with Szell concerning their Tschaik 1 collaboration that January. That's an interesting claim I don't think I've heard before...
AMN
Yes, I also read that in Bernard Horowitz's blurb. I've seen ZERO evidence to support that and am very skeptical of his claim.

First, it makes no sense chronologically. The concert with Szell took place on January 12. Following that, Horowitz traveled to Washington DC where he gave a recital at Constitution Hall. Then he returned to NYC for his Silver Jubilee Recital on February 25 - almost six weeks after the Szell concert. Then Horowitz traveled to Minneapolis, where he cancelled a recital scheduled for early March and returned to NYC by plane (his first plane ride).

So, are we to believe Szell said something to Horowitz and he had a nervous breakdown seven weeks later? After 20 years of having Toscanini as a father in law?

Hank
piano4tay
2019-06-16 12:48:23 UTC
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I'd agree; there may well have been some row with Szell, but there were plenty of other stressors in Horowitz's life that must have had a cumulative effect on his decision to take a break from touring, which he never intended or expected to be for so long. He'd only got together with Wanda again two years prior ((after a separation during which she'd had an affaire with his youthful pupil Byron Janis), and living out of a suitcase touring the country largely by train was no joke. I've always wondered how the death of his class mate and fellow Blumenfeld pupil Simon Barere affected him about this time (April 1951). Already hypochondriacal, seeing a fellow student and colleague drop dead on stage at his home turf of Carnegie Hall would have had some impact, I imagine.. Kappell's death on October 1953 can't have encouraged him to have faith in air travel either.....

AMN
Hank Drake
2019-06-16 12:57:43 UTC
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Post by piano4tay
I'd agree; there may well have been some row with Szell, but there were plenty of other stressors in Horowitz's life that must have had a cumulative effect on his decision to take a break from touring, which he never intended or expected to be for so long. He'd only got together with Wanda again two years prior ((after a separation during which she'd had an affaire with his youthful pupil Byron Janis), and living out of a suitcase touring the country largely by train was no joke. I've always wondered how the death of his class mate and fellow Blumenfeld pupil Simon Barere affected him about this time (April 1951). Already hypochondriacal, seeing a fellow student and colleague drop dead on stage at his home turf of Carnegie Hall would have had some impact, I imagine.. Kappell's death on October 1953 can't have encouraged him to have faith in air travel either.....
AMN
Horowitz was terribly upset by Kapell's death. Here's the transcript of the September 15, 1953 letter from Kapell to Horowitz, from Adelaide, Australia. Horowitz received this letter several days after Kapell's death. It's currently housed at the Yale archives.

Dear and great Horowitz,

This is a fan letter. I only want to tell you that I have been playing for myself some "Songs Without Words" of Mendelssohn, and I am thinking of you. And how moving and beautiful your playing is and always has been, and how important you are to me, deep in my musician's heart. Your tone, and I can hear it at this moment, is one of the most heavenly things in the world. It has influenced me in what I think of as tonal beauty. The sadness of "Dumka", the innocent grace of the little Scarlatti sonatas, the love-music you make of Scriabin, Rachmaninoff and Tchaikovsky, these are among the things I shall never forget as long as I live. And if every recording company offered to let me record the "Pictures [at an Exhibition]" of Mussorgsky (which they won't!), I would never do it because your record of it is like having Tolstoy's books in our library.
Don't be upset at this letter. It is from my heart, and I hope you will be well and strong til you are 80 years old, so you can give us this so wonderful, and so sad message of yours. Don't ever be upset by anything. You are a great genius, and you are desperately needed in this world.
I heard you have been ill. Get well, and play your dolorous songs for us for the rest of your life.

Your devoted,

Willy Kapell
piano4tay
2019-06-17 06:26:39 UTC
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I knew of the letter, but not its contents. Very poignant, in the circumstances. From it, it sounds as though they had never met, though apparently Kapell lived across the street from Horowitz and had approached him for coaching, which Horowitz declined : 'I had nothing to teach him'.

AMN
Hank Drake
2019-06-17 11:52:39 UTC
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On Sunday, June 16, 2019 at 8:48:26 AM UTC-4, piano4tay wrote:
In his essay for 2015's "THE UNRELEASED LIVE RECORDINGS 1966-1983" box, Bernard Horowitz makes a great deal about an incident that took place in 1941 when Szell was invited to conduct the NBC. Szell led two concerts, one of which can be heard has been issued by Pristine Classical (link below). The rehearsals for those concerts were fraught, as Toscanini did not approve of Szell’s rehearsal technique and let Szell know in explosive terms. But the quality of the NBC performance under Szell speaks for itself. Contrast that with Szell’s own behavior two decades later. By then, Toscanini was dead, Szell was music director of the Cleveland Orchestra and had raised their standards to the point that Cleveland was considered to have the best orchestra in the United States – perhaps even the world. Leopold Stokowski, as much a living legend as Toscanini had been and a polar opposite to Szell musically, visited for a series of guest concerts. Szell was present at the first rehearsal as the mercurial conductor began altering balances and encouraged the strings to bow freely. The orchestra manager, sitting next to Szell, feared Szell may explode much as Toscanini had done in 1941. Instead, as Stokowski began conducting a Cleveland Orchestra that suddenly sounded like the pre-1936 Philadelphia Orchestra, Szell looked toward the manager and smiled. In Szell’s smile was the implication that “his” orchestra could turn on a dime and serve the musical needs of any conductor.

https://www.pristineclassical.com/collections/artist-george-szell/products/pasc543

Hank
RiRiIII
2019-06-17 10:23:06 UTC
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Post by piano4tay
Interesting. I notice that according to the notes, Horowitz's 1953 retirement was triggered by a row with Szell concerning their Tschaik 1 collaboration that January. That's an interesting claim I don't think I've heard before...
AMN
BTW, it was Mitropoulos who would conduct this Tchaikovsky 1st but he was indisposed for health reasons at the time of the concert.
j***@gmail.com
2019-06-28 11:03:32 UTC
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Post by Hank Drake
Just announced on German Amazon. This includes all of Horowitz's Carnegie Hall rehearsals and at least one studio session recorded from January - April 1965. Most of this is newly released, except for Chopin's Nouvelle Etude in A-flat major and Debussy Etude which were released in the early 1990s. And, of course, the material that was used to patch the original "Historic Return" issue. Release schedule for August.
https://www.amazon.de/Vladimir-Horowitz-Great-Comeback-Horowitz/dp/B07PGX7KPW
No Beethoven Sonata No.6, Opus 10-2 as having been being described for years by Glenn Plaskin that this was the piece he prepared for November 9, 1965 private recital?
collector78
2019-06-30 20:25:38 UTC
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Coming out on August 23rd!
Hank Drake
2019-08-07 22:28:39 UTC
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Post by collector78
Coming out on August 23rd!
Sony has published two teaser tracks, improvisations by Horowitz played at two of the rehearsals:




John Fowler
2019-08-21 20:54:13 UTC
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Post by Hank Drake
Just announced on German Amazon. This includes all of Horowitz's Carnegie Hall rehearsals and at least one studio session recorded from January - April 1965. Most of this is newly released, except for Chopin's Nouvelle Etude in A-flat major and Debussy Etude which were released in the early 1990s. And, of course, the material that was used to patch the original "Historic Return" issue. Release schedule for August.
https://www.amazon.de/Vladimir-Horowitz-Great-Comeback-Horowitz/dp/B07PGX7KPW
Release date is this Friday.
For once, the US Amazon pre-order price is considerably less than UK, German or French Amazon.
$74.80, which is $20 less than European Amazons.
Mark Obert-Thorn
2019-08-22 13:28:33 UTC
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Post by John Fowler
For once, the US Amazon pre-order price is considerably less than UK, German or French Amazon.
$74.80, which is $20 less than European Amazons.
I cancelled my Amazon order awhile back because pre-order price at ImportCDs was even cheaper -- $69.42. It's now on its way:

https://www.importcds.com/vladimir-horowitz-the-great-comeback/190759353325

Mark O-T
collector78
2019-08-30 23:01:42 UTC
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Any reviews yet?
Hank Drake
2019-08-30 23:50:36 UTC
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Post by collector78
Any reviews yet?
Here's the review I submitted to Amazon.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/customer-reviews/R1IKI6J0QPKV6C

One thing I didn't mention in the review: the piano's tuning and voicing vary from date to date - in particular the April 14th rehearsal where it's quite out of tune. Material from April 14 was used for several of the "patches" in the edited version of the "Historical Return" album - the tuning made the splices stick out like sore thumbs.

Hank
piano4tay
2019-08-31 05:31:38 UTC
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Hank, has there been any re-mastering done on the complete 1965/66 recitals, reissued yet again here? I suppose not, given that these appeared only recently in the complete Carnegie set?

Also, assuming we now have released all the takes from these recording sessions, do you think there's any scope for 'improved' alternative splicing, such as you mention would have been possible with the Schumann Fantasy, if Horowitz had willed it? Having had the 'warts and all' versions, a pitch- and note-corrected 'fan' edition, as we might expect nowadays, might be nice, and I'm sure there are people out there willing and able to do it....

But as you say in your notes, it's hard to fathom why Sony should have invested so much effort into this marginally interesting release while there's more important material from Yale still to be worked on, unless that's what's in the Golden Jubilee Edition supposedly coming out in October....

AMN
Hank Drake
2019-08-31 12:33:21 UTC
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Post by piano4tay
Hank, has there been any re-mastering done on the complete 1965/66 recitals, reissued yet again here? I suppose not, given that these appeared only recently in the complete Carnegie set?
Also, assuming we now have released all the takes from these recording sessions, do you think there's any scope for 'improved' alternative splicing, such as you mention would have been possible with the Schumann Fantasy, if Horowitz had willed it? Having had the 'warts and all' versions, a pitch- and note-corrected 'fan' edition, as we might expect nowadays, might be nice, and I'm sure there are people out there willing and able to do it....
But as you say in your notes, it's hard to fathom why Sony should have invested so much effort into this marginally interesting release while there's more important material from Yale still to be worked on, unless that's what's in the Golden Jubilee Edition supposedly coming out in October....
AMN
The dates given for the remastering of the unedited recitals are 2003 for the 1965 recital, and 2013 for the April 1966 recital - both of which are in line for when they were issued.

A "note perfect" edition is an interesting prospect, and if I had the tools and skill I'd probably put one together for my own use. As it is, I've made a playlist with the best tracks for each composition and ported it over to the thumb drive I take in my car (which, like most newer cars, lacks a CD player).

I did receive some interesting news from Allan Steckler, who is in charge of the Horowitz and Toscanini Estates: All of Horowitz's known original compositions, which are in manuscript form at Yale, are to be published this fall. I have yet to see further information including work list and publisher.

Hank
RANDY WOLFGANG
2019-09-03 02:19:58 UTC
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Post by Hank Drake
Post by piano4tay
Hank, has there been any re-mastering done on the complete 1965/66 recitals, reissued yet again here? I suppose not, given that these appeared only recently in the complete Carnegie set?
Also, assuming we now have released all the takes from these recording sessions, do you think there's any scope for 'improved' alternative splicing, such as you mention would have been possible with the Schumann Fantasy, if Horowitz had willed it? Having had the 'warts and all' versions, a pitch- and note-corrected 'fan' edition, as we might expect nowadays, might be nice, and I'm sure there are people out there willing and able to do it....
But as you say in your notes, it's hard to fathom why Sony should have invested so much effort into this marginally interesting release while there's more important material from Yale still to be worked on, unless that's what's in the Golden Jubilee Edition supposedly coming out in October....
AMN
The dates given for the remastering of the unedited recitals are 2003 for the 1965 recital, and 2013 for the April 1966 recital - both of which are in line for when they were issued.
A "note perfect" edition is an interesting prospect, and if I had the tools and skill I'd probably put one together for my own use. As it is, I've made a playlist with the best tracks for each composition and ported it over to the thumb drive I take in my car (which, like most newer cars, lacks a CD player).
I did receive some interesting news from Allan Steckler, who is in charge of the Horowitz and Toscanini Estates: All of Horowitz's known original compositions, which are in manuscript form at Yale, are to be published this fall. I have yet to see further information including work list and publisher.
Hank
BTW Hank Drake is another SUPERB reviewer on Amazon - I have learned so much reading reviews from him and John Fowler!!!!
piano4tay
2019-09-03 05:05:12 UTC
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Yes, Hank's reviews are always something I enjoy and look forward to.

AMN

collector78
2019-09-02 12:47:18 UTC
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Yes, it is strange that those glorious 1945-1950 Yale materials have not been issued in one comprehensive box yet!
s***@nycap.rr.com
2019-08-22 12:39:39 UTC
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Post by Hank Drake
Just announced on German Amazon. This includes all of Horowitz's Carnegie Hall rehearsals and at least one studio session recorded from January - April 1965. Most of this is newly released, except for Chopin's Nouvelle Etude in A-flat major and Debussy Etude which were released in the early 1990s. And, of course, the material that was used to patch the original "Historic Return" issue. Release schedule for August.
https://www.amazon.de/Vladimir-Horowitz-Great-Comeback-Horowitz/dp/B07PGX7KPW
Also available here:

https://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/album.jsp?album_id=2291279#utm_source=ArkivMusic_NL&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=VHGC-8212019&utm_content=Horowitz-15CD

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