Discussion:
Beethoven piano sonatas- Backhaus on Eloquence 2 CD
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v***@protonmail.com
2020-07-21 20:40:23 UTC
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Having been very taken by his playing on an Audite live disc, I found this from his stereo cycle;
containing the Pathetique, Moonlight, Appassionata, Les Adieux, Pastoral, Tempest, and Waldstein
sonatas. One possibly-unfortunate thing is the recordings are apparently treated with something
called 'AMSI Surround Imaging' from Emil Berliner studios in Hanover, but it (luckily!) sounds pretty good
to me. A nice compilation disc, and the catalog # is 467 487-2, for anyone interested..

So glad to have found out about Backhaus here- I think his playing is often glorious, and
makes some others sound contrived.


C.
g***@gmail.com
2020-07-22 07:19:29 UTC
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Post by v***@protonmail.com
Having been very taken by his playing on an Audite live disc, I found this from his stereo cycle;
containing the Pathetique, Moonlight, Appassionata, Les Adieux, Pastoral, Tempest, and Waldstein
sonatas. One possibly-unfortunate thing is the recordings are apparently treated with something
called 'AMSI Surround Imaging' from Emil Berliner studios in Hanover, but it (luckily!) sounds pretty good
to me. A nice compilation disc, and the catalog # is 467 487-2, for anyone interested..
So glad to have found out about Backhaus here- I think his playing is often glorious, and
makes some others sound contrived.
C.
According to this:

- Wilhelm Backhaus Wilhelm Backhaus (1960, London LP)

While conceding his reputation as a Beethoven specialist, Schonberg views Backhaus (1884 - 1969) as an exemplar of the "German school" of piano playing, which he characterizes as "one of scrupulous musicianship, severity, strength rather than charm, solidity rather than sensuosity, intellect rather than instinct, sobriety rather than brilliance. It is a school that stresses planning and leaves nothing to chance." He singles Backhaus out for monumental solidity and impassivity. To the extent that this suggests reliable integrity that lets the music speak for itself, it'貞 an accurate and fair characterization of his latter performances, including this Appassionata, the product of a fully mature artist, which grips with its rich patina and unfolds with inexorable logic (although Backhaus'貞 earlier Beethoven sonata recordings tended to be considerably more expressive).

http://classicalnotes.net/classics3/appassionata.html
g***@gmail.com
2020-07-22 07:20:41 UTC
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Post by v***@protonmail.com
Having been very taken by his playing on an Audite live disc, I found this from his stereo cycle;
containing the Pathetique, Moonlight, Appassionata, Les Adieux, Pastoral, Tempest, and Waldstein
sonatas. One possibly-unfortunate thing is the recordings are apparently treated with something
called 'AMSI Surround Imaging' from Emil Berliner studios in Hanover, but it (luckily!) sounds pretty good
to me. A nice compilation disc, and the catalog # is 467 487-2, for anyone interested..
So glad to have found out about Backhaus here- I think his playing is often glorious, and
makes some others sound contrived.
C.
According to this:

- Wilhelm Backhaus (1960, London LP)

While conceding his reputation as a Beethoven specialist, Schonberg views Backhaus (1884 - 1969) as an exemplar of the "German school" of piano playing, which he characterizes as "one of scrupulous musicianship, severity, strength rather than charm, solidity rather than sensuosity, intellect rather than instinct, sobriety rather than brilliance. It is a school that stresses planning and leaves nothing to chance." He singles Backhaus out for monumental solidity and impassivity. To the extent that this suggests reliable integrity that lets the music speak for itself, it'貞 an accurate and fair characterization of his latter performances, including this Appassionata, the product of a fully mature artist, which grips with its rich patina and unfolds with inexorable logic (although Backhaus'貞 earlier Beethoven sonata recordings tended to be considerably more expressive).

http://classicalnotes.net/classics3/appassionata.html
v***@protonmail.com
2020-07-23 21:27:02 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
While conceding his reputation as a Beethoven specialist, Schonberg views Backhaus (1884 - 1969) as an exemplar of the "German school" of piano playing, which he characterizes as "one of scrupulous musicianship, severity, strength rather than charm, solidity rather than sensuosity, intellect rather than instinct, sobriety rather than brilliance
"Well, that's just his opinion, man.." -The Dude


.and not what I hear in Backhaus's Beethoven. It's frickin' alive, present. Interesting to me how many
lukewarm or negative reviews there are of his LvB, not even mentioning or apparently noticing those
great qualities.


C.
Frank Lekens
2020-07-24 18:52:59 UTC
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Post by v***@protonmail.com
Post by g***@gmail.com
While conceding his reputation as a Beethoven specialist, Schonberg views Backhaus (1884 - 1969) as an exemplar of the "German school" of piano playing, which he characterizes as "one of scrupulous musicianship, severity, strength rather than charm, solidity rather than sensuosity, intellect rather than instinct, sobriety rather than brilliance
"Well, that's just his opinion, man.." -The Dude
.and not what I hear in Backhaus's Beethoven. It's frickin' alive, present. Interesting to me how many
lukewarm or negative reviews there are of his LvB, not even mentioning or apparently noticing those
great qualities.
C.
I think many people like Backhaus' Beethoven. I do.
--
Frank Lekens

http://fmlekens.home.xs4all.nl/
https://franklekens.blogspot.nl/
Henk vT
2020-07-24 19:21:50 UTC
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Post by Frank Lekens
I think many people like Backhaus' Beethoven. I do.
So do I. Somehow I like his Brahms even better.

Henk
v***@protonmail.com
2020-07-24 23:07:02 UTC
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Post by Henk vT
Post by Frank Lekens
I think many people like Backhaus' Beethoven. I do.
So do I. Somehow I like his Brahms even better.
Henk
Yes, it was positive comments here that got me to listen to Backhaus, and I'm glad for that.
I was mainly reacting to praise-with-faint-damn reviews I'd read online and off.
To not hear him would be a big loss, I think.

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