Discussion:
Hough's Rachmaninov Concertos
(too old to reply)
Raab Himself
2004-10-17 18:14:16 UTC
Permalink
It seems that every review of the new Rachmaninov Concerto set by Stephen
Hough has ranged from very positive to a rave. This includes both the
British and American press. Can any of the denizens of this group give an
opinion on the performances and sound quality? Much obliged!
Peter Lemken
2004-10-17 20:05:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Raab Himself
It seems that every review of the new Rachmaninov Concerto set by Stephen
Hough has ranged from very positive to a rave. This includes both the
British and American press. Can any of the denizens of this group give an
opinion on the performances and sound quality? Much obliged!
Try reading rec.music.classical.recordings once in a while.

Peter Lemken
Berlin
--
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in
a pretty and well-preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly
used up, totally worn out and loudly proclaiming, 'Wow, what a ride!'
Frank Berger
2004-10-18 16:43:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Lemken
Post by Raab Himself
It seems that every review of the new Rachmaninov Concerto set by Stephen
Hough has ranged from very positive to a rave. This includes both the
British and American press. Can any of the denizens of this group give an
opinion on the performances and sound quality? Much obliged!
Try reading rec.music.classical.recordings once in a while.
Peter Lemken
Berlin
Did you get up on the wrong side of the bid this morning? If you try, I'll
bet you can probably think of a nicer way to get your message across.
Peter Lemken
2004-10-21 23:11:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Raab Himself
Post by Peter Lemken
Post by Raab Himself
It seems that every review of the new Rachmaninov Concerto set by
Stephen
Post by Peter Lemken
Post by Raab Himself
Hough has ranged from very positive to a rave. This includes both the
British and American press. Can any of the denizens of this group give
an
Post by Peter Lemken
Post by Raab Himself
opinion on the performances and sound quality? Much obliged!
Try reading rec.music.classical.recordings once in a while.
Peter Lemken
Berlin
Did you get up on the wrong side of the bid this morning? If you try, I'll
bet you can probably think of a nicer way to get your message across.
No, I can't. I expect people to read the newsgroup they are posting to.
We've just had the same discussion a couple of days ago.

Is that asked too much? Don't think so.

Peter Lemken
Berlin
--
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in
a pretty and well-preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly
used up, totally worn out and loudly proclaiming, 'Wow, what a ride!'
Dan Koren
2004-10-18 17:48:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Lemken
Post by Raab Himself
It seems that every review of the new Rachmaninov Concerto set by Stephen
Hough has ranged from very positive to a rave. This includes both the
British and American press. Can any of the denizens of this group give an
opinion on the performances and sound quality? Much obliged!
Try reading rec.music.classical.recordings once in a while.
Many people read/post groups
through servers that do not
keep old(er) messages.



dk
Dan Koren
2004-10-18 17:46:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Raab Himself
It seems that every review of the new Rachmaninov Concerto set by Stephen
Hough has ranged from very positive to a rave. This includes both the
British and American press. Can any of the denizens of this group give an
opinion on the performances and sound quality? Much obliged!
Mechanical and dry.



dk
Todd Schurk
2004-10-18 22:32:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan Koren
Post by Raab Himself
It seems that every review of the new Rachmaninov Concerto set by Stephen
Hough has ranged from very positive to a rave. This includes both the
British and American press. Can any of the denizens of this group give an
opinion on the performances and sound quality? Much obliged!
Mechanical and dry.
dk
Wrong Koren. I say smart and sassy. At least it doesn't wallow in a
syrupy morass as is usually the case. I enjoyed them alot. And,yes,
I've heard & own Rubinstein,Horowitz, Janis etc. These measure up to
the best with ease.
Tom Deacon
2004-10-19 01:22:11 UTC
Permalink
On 10/18/04 6:32 PM, in article
Post by Todd Schurk
Wrong Koren. I say smart and sassy. At least it doesn't wallow in a
syrupy morass as is usually the case. I enjoyed them alot. And,yes,
I've heard & own Rubinstein,Horowitz, Janis etc. These measure up to
the best with ease.
Nobody would question the "ease" of Hough's playing. But many would question
its depth.

TD
Stephen North
2004-10-19 10:36:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Deacon
On 10/18/04 6:32 PM, in article
Post by Todd Schurk
Wrong Koren. I say smart and sassy. At least it doesn't wallow in a
syrupy morass as is usually the case. I enjoyed them alot. And,yes,
I've heard & own Rubinstein,Horowitz, Janis etc. These measure up to
the best with ease.
Nobody would question the "ease" of Hough's playing. But many would question
its depth.
TD
Is there any depth in the Rachmaninov PCs ?

S
Ian Pace
2004-10-19 10:46:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stephen North
Post by Tom Deacon
On 10/18/04 6:32 PM, in article
Post by Todd Schurk
Wrong Koren. I say smart and sassy. At least it doesn't wallow in a
syrupy morass as is usually the case. I enjoyed them alot. And,yes,
I've heard & own Rubinstein,Horowitz, Janis etc. These measure up to
the best with ease.
Nobody would question the "ease" of Hough's playing. But many would question
its depth.
TD
Is there any depth in the Rachmaninov PCs ?
Yes.

And the composer's own recordings (not to mention a number of others) amply
demonstrate this.

Ian
Todd Schurk
2004-10-19 14:43:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Deacon
Post by Stephen North
Post by Tom Deacon
On 10/18/04 6:32 PM, in article
Post by Todd Schurk
Wrong Koren. I say smart and sassy. At least it doesn't wallow in a
syrupy morass as is usually the case. I enjoyed them alot. And,yes,
I've heard & own Rubinstein,Horowitz, Janis etc. These measure up to
the best with ease.
Nobody would question the "ease" of Hough's playing. But many would
question
Post by Stephen North
Post by Tom Deacon
its depth.
TD
Is there any depth in the Rachmaninov PCs ?
Yes.
And the composer's own recordings (not to mention a number of others) amply
demonstrate this.
Ian
And these recordings by Hough are the closest I've heard to coming
close to the depth demonstrated by the composer.They are not
lightweight or on the surface. They just refuse to sit there and be
the romantic blob. Oh & Deacon-have you actually heard these? Or are
you guessing again?
Tom Deacon
2004-10-19 17:07:41 UTC
Permalink
On 10/19/04 10:43 AM, in article
Post by Todd Schurk
Post by Tom Deacon
Post by Stephen North
Post by Tom Deacon
On 10/18/04 6:32 PM, in article
Post by Todd Schurk
Wrong Koren. I say smart and sassy. At least it doesn't wallow in a
syrupy morass as is usually the case. I enjoyed them alot. And,yes,
I've heard & own Rubinstein,Horowitz, Janis etc. These measure up to
the best with ease.
Nobody would question the "ease" of Hough's playing. But many would
question
Post by Stephen North
Post by Tom Deacon
its depth.
TD
Is there any depth in the Rachmaninov PCs ?
Yes.
And the composer's own recordings (not to mention a number of others) amply
demonstrate this.
Ian
And these recordings by Hough are the closest I've heard to coming
close to the depth demonstrated by the composer.They are not
lightweight or on the surface. They just refuse to sit there and be
the romantic blob. Oh & Deacon-have you actually heard these? Or are
you guessing again?
Never heard them. Said so. Check the archives.

Thing is. I have heard each and every one of Hough's recordings to date. All
of them.

The best: "My favourite things", Volumes I & II. Hough reaches his level of
artistic competence in his treatment of musical fluff. He thought S-S was
fluff. He was wrong. Big time.

TD
Tom Deacon
2004-10-19 13:18:18 UTC
Permalink
On 10/19/04 6:36 AM, in article
Post by Stephen North
Post by Tom Deacon
On 10/18/04 6:32 PM, in article
Post by Todd Schurk
Wrong Koren. I say smart and sassy. At least it doesn't wallow in a
syrupy morass as is usually the case. I enjoyed them alot. And,yes,
I've heard & own Rubinstein,Horowitz, Janis etc. These measure up to
the best with ease.
Nobody would question the "ease" of Hough's playing. But many would question
its depth.
TD
Is there any depth in the Rachmaninov PCs ?
Not for you if you haven't found any.

TD
Stephen North
2004-10-19 19:28:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Deacon
On 10/19/04 6:36 AM, in article
Post by Stephen North
Post by Tom Deacon
On 10/18/04 6:32 PM, in article
Post by Todd Schurk
Wrong Koren. I say smart and sassy. At least it doesn't wallow in a
syrupy morass as is usually the case. I enjoyed them alot. And,yes,
I've heard & own Rubinstein,Horowitz, Janis etc. These measure up to
the best with ease.
Nobody would question the "ease" of Hough's playing. But many would question
its depth.
TD
Is there any depth in the Rachmaninov PCs ?
Not for you if you haven't found any.
TD
I have found depth in them, but it wasn't very good depth.

S
Tom Deacon
2004-10-19 21:41:55 UTC
Permalink
On 10/19/04 3:28 PM, in article
Post by Stephen North
Post by Tom Deacon
On 10/19/04 6:36 AM, in article
Post by Stephen North
Post by Tom Deacon
On 10/18/04 6:32 PM, in article
Post by Todd Schurk
Wrong Koren. I say smart and sassy. At least it doesn't wallow in a
syrupy morass as is usually the case. I enjoyed them alot. And,yes,
I've heard & own Rubinstein,Horowitz, Janis etc. These measure up to
the best with ease.
Nobody would question the "ease" of Hough's playing. But many would question
its depth.
TD
Is there any depth in the Rachmaninov PCs ?
Not for you if you haven't found any.
TD
I have found depth in them, but it wasn't very good depth.
You must have waded in at the shallow end.

Dive in the deep end and report back what you find.

TD
Dan Koren
2004-10-19 14:13:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stephen North
Post by Tom Deacon
On 10/18/04 6:32 PM, in article
Post by Todd Schurk
Wrong Koren. I say smart and sassy. At least it doesn't wallow in a
syrupy morass as is usually the case. I enjoyed them alot. And,yes,
I've heard & own Rubinstein,Horowitz, Janis etc. These measure up to
the best with ease.
Nobody would question the "ease" of Hough's playing. But many would question
its depth.
Is there any depth in the Rachmaninov PCs ?
You can only find how deep they are
if you jump in from very high....




dk
Owen Hartnett
2004-10-19 23:16:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stephen North
Post by Tom Deacon
On 10/18/04 6:32 PM, in article
Post by Todd Schurk
Wrong Koren. I say smart and sassy. At least it doesn't wallow in a
syrupy morass as is usually the case. I enjoyed them alot. And,yes,
I've heard & own Rubinstein,Horowitz, Janis etc. These measure up to
the best with ease.
Nobody would question the "ease" of Hough's playing. But many would question
its depth.
TD
Is there any depth in the Rachmaninov PCs ?
We have sounded them, marked the twain, and determined about six
fathoms on the average, with some shoaling near the middle of the last
movement of the second concerto. A lighthouse will soon be erected in
the score to mark this spot for future intrepid mariners, paid for by
public funds and schoolchildren's pennies.

-Owen
RX-01
2004-10-18 17:50:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Raab Himself
It seems that every review of the new Rachmaninov Concerto set by Stephen
Hough has ranged from very positive to a rave. This includes both the
British and American press. Can any of the denizens of this group give an
opinion on the performances and sound quality? Much obliged!
All these reviews can't be wrong since they seem to agree unanimously.
And we are talking about LOTS of reviews from all around the world, as
you also mention.

RX-01
Tom Deacon
2004-10-19 01:20:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by RX-01
Post by Raab Himself
It seems that every review of the new Rachmaninov Concerto set by Stephen
Hough has ranged from very positive to a rave. This includes both the
British and American press. Can any of the denizens of this group give an
opinion on the performances and sound quality? Much obliged!
All these reviews can't be wrong since they seem to agree unanimously.
Lots of people also raved about Hough's loathsome S-S Concerti. I think they
even won a Gramophone Award. Shame on Gramophone, is all it can say.

I have not heard this new effort by Hough, but I doubt this leopard has
changed his spots. Presumably Koren has heard them and he finds them dry as
dust, just the way I would imagine them to be.

TD
RX-01
2004-10-19 10:13:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Deacon
Post by RX-01
Post by Raab Himself
It seems that every review of the new Rachmaninov Concerto set by Stephen
Hough has ranged from very positive to a rave. This includes both the
British and American press. Can any of the denizens of this group give an
opinion on the performances and sound quality? Much obliged!
All these reviews can't be wrong since they seem to agree unanimously.
Lots of people also raved about Hough's loathsome S-S Concerti. I think they
even won a Gramophone Award. Shame on Gramophone, is all it can say.
I have not heard this new effort by Hough, but I doubt this leopard has
changed his spots. Presumably Koren has heard them and he finds them dry as
dust, just the way I would imagine them to be.
TD
OK but as I said in my post here we are not talking about Gramophone but
about virtually all classical music media that have reviewed this.

I don't know his SS concerti, but his Brahms 1st is my all-time favorite
(I even convinced a hardcore Brahmsian friend of mine to buy that one
and he agreed with me).

Well it seems I'll have to but the Rachmaninov concerti and judge for
myself (incidentally MDT offers them for £20 I think, and £23 for the
SACD version).

RX-01
Tom Deacon
2004-10-19 13:17:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by RX-01
OK but as I said in my post here we are not talking about Gramophone but
about virtually all classical music media that have reviewed this.
What constitutes "virtually all classical music media", in your opinion?
Post by RX-01
I don't know his SS concerti
If you did, you would know what Koren and I are talking about.
Post by RX-01
, but his Brahms 1st is my all-time favorite (I even convinced a hardcore
Brahmsian friend of mine to buy that one and he agreed with me).

Glad you like it. Personally I don't think it is worth a pinch of coon-shit.
But that's just my take on it.
Post by RX-01
Well it seems I'll have to but the Rachmaninov concerti and judge for
myself (incidentally MDT offers them for £20 I think, and £23 for the
SACD version).
Always the best way to proceed.

TD
Danny Goodman
2004-10-19 03:46:25 UTC
Permalink
I had high expectations from Hough's interview in Gramo, but was very
disappointed, especially #1 and #2. Recording balance didn't give enough to
the piano to my ears.

For a modern recording antidote, I listened to Wild's set. Ah, that's
better.

Danny
http://www.dannyg.com
Chris Martin
2004-10-19 16:16:15 UTC
Permalink
In his interview on CD review, Hough mentioned that he and Litton were
aiming for a historically informed performance, so the tempi are
similar to the Horowitz '41 and Rachmaninov recordings. And there's
more string portamento. The interview is worth a listen if you have
the time,
-Chris
Post by Raab Himself
It seems that every review of the new Rachmaninov Concerto set by Stephen
Hough has ranged from very positive to a rave. This includes both the
British and American press. Can any of the denizens of this group give an
opinion on the performances and sound quality? Much obliged!
Tom Deacon
2004-10-19 17:09:02 UTC
Permalink
On 10/19/04 12:16 PM, in article
Post by Chris Martin
In his interview on CD review, Hough mentioned that he and Litton were
aiming for a historically informed performance, so the tempi are
similar to the Horowitz '41 and Rachmaninov recordings.
So his idea of an artistic statement is to copy Rachmaninoff?

Some artist! Some statement!

TD
Chris Martin
2004-10-20 18:02:35 UTC
Permalink
You're jumping to conclusions. He explicitly stated he was not copying
Rachmaninoff. He was, however, informed by Rachmaninov's
interpretation as far as tempi were concerned. For example there is a
place in the score where the pianist is not asked to slow down and
Rachmaninov doesn't slow down, but all modern pianists do slow down.
Listen to the interview; it will make more sense.
Chris
Post by Tom Deacon
On 10/19/04 12:16 PM, in article
Post by Chris Martin
In his interview on CD review, Hough mentioned that he and Litton were
aiming for a historically informed performance, so the tempi are
similar to the Horowitz '41 and Rachmaninov recordings.
So his idea of an artistic statement is to copy Rachmaninoff?
Some artist! Some statement!
TD
Tom Deacon
2004-10-20 19:45:29 UTC
Permalink
On 10/20/04 2:02 PM, in article
Post by Chris Martin
You're jumping to conclusions. He explicitly stated he was not copying
Rachmaninoff. He was, however, informed by Rachmaninov's
interpretation as far as tempi were concerned. For example there is a
place in the score where the pianist is not asked to slow down and
Rachmaninov doesn't slow down, but all modern pianists do slow down.
And this is what makes his recording "musically informed"?

TD
Richard Schultz
2004-10-19 17:48:41 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@posting.google.com>, Chris Martin <***@mail.davidson.alumlink.com> wrote:

: In his interview on CD review, Hough mentioned that he and Litton were
: aiming for a historically informed performance,

Which leads to the obvious trivia question: what is the most recently
composed work of music for which there exists a recording of a
"historically informed performance"?

-----
Richard Schultz ***@mail.biu.ac.il
Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan, Israel
Opinions expressed are mine alone, and not those of Bar-Ilan University
-----
"You go on playing Bach your way, and I'll go on playing him *his* way."
-- Wanda Landowska
Poisonous Pixie
2004-10-19 18:10:44 UTC
Permalink
That'd be 'Ill-Informed Pontifications for Arse-Trumpet' by Troll Deacon,
(dedicated to Lily Tomlin, I believe)
Post by Richard Schultz
: In his interview on CD review, Hough mentioned that he and Litton were
: aiming for a historically informed performance,
Which leads to the obvious trivia question: what is the most recently
composed work of music for which there exists a recording of a
"historically informed performance"?
-----
Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan, Israel
Opinions expressed are mine alone, and not those of Bar-Ilan University
-----
"You go on playing Bach your way, and I'll go on playing him *his* way."
-- Wanda Landowska
Alain Dagher
2004-10-19 18:12:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Schultz
: In his interview on CD review, Hough mentioned that he and Litton were
: aiming for a historically informed performance,
Which leads to the obvious trivia question: what is the most recently
composed work of music for which there exists a recording of a
"historically informed performance"?
Presumably any recording made by the composer.

But if we limit ourselves to recordings using a different approach than
what has been conventionally used I would say Brahms is the latest
composer to have been given that treatment.

Harnoncourt and Gardiner have recorded late 19th century music, but I
don't think they claimed to be using historically informed practice.

ad
Gerrit Stolte
2004-10-19 18:17:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alain Dagher
Post by Richard Schultz
: In his interview on CD review, Hough mentioned that he and Litton were
: aiming for a historically informed performance,
Which leads to the obvious trivia question: what is the most recently
composed work of music for which there exists a recording of a
"historically informed performance"?
Presumably any recording made by the composer.
But if we limit ourselves to recordings using a different approach than
what has been conventionally used I would say Brahms is the latest
composer to have been given that treatment.
Harnoncourt and Gardiner have recorded late 19th century music, but I
don't think they claimed to be using historically informed practice.
Mahler has at least been performed on period instruments, as has been
Wagner.
--
Gerrit

"In Deutschland gilt derjenige als viel gefährlicher, der auf den Schmutz
hinweist als der, der ihn gemacht hat." (Carl von Ossietzky, 1889-1938)
Matthew B. Tepper
2004-10-19 19:48:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gerrit Stolte
Post by Alain Dagher
Post by Richard Schultz
: In his interview on CD review, Hough mentioned that he and Litton
: were aiming for a historically informed performance,
Which leads to the obvious trivia question: what is the most recently
composed work of music for which there exists a recording of a
"historically informed performance"?
Presumably any recording made by the composer.
But if we limit ourselves to recordings using a different approach than
what has been conventionally used I would say Brahms is the latest
composer to have been given that treatment.
Harnoncourt and Gardiner have recorded late 19th century music, but I
don't think they claimed to be using historically informed practice.
Mahler has at least been performed on period instruments, as has been
Wagner.
And Elgar, I think.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Take THAT, Daniel Lin, Mark Sadek, James Lin & Christopher Chung!
Michael Smith
2004-10-20 09:36:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Gerrit Stolte
Post by Alain Dagher
Post by Richard Schultz
: In his interview on CD review, Hough mentioned that he and Litton
: were aiming for a historically informed performance,
Which leads to the obvious trivia question: what is the most recently
composed work of music for which there exists a recording of a
"historically informed performance"?
Presumably any recording made by the composer.
But if we limit ourselves to recordings using a different approach than
what has been conventionally used I would say Brahms is the latest
composer to have been given that treatment.
Harnoncourt and Gardiner have recorded late 19th century music, but I
don't think they claimed to be using historically informed practice.
Mahler has at least been performed on period instruments, as has been
Wagner.
And Elgar, I think.
Correct; The New Queens Hall Orchestra (the revived one) have done
both Elgar Symphonies, as well as lots of other repertoire up to the
1930s. They extended themselves into the 1950s last year with
performances of the music from the 1953 Coronation.

They haven't recorded much; just a collection of Wagner Overtures, an
RVW disc (Lark Ascending, Tallis Fantasia etc) and a Planets. There
are, I understand, a few more recordings 'in the can': a mixed English
C20 disc for the Readers Digest and an Elgar Quartet (no release deal
for the latter yet).

Michael
Simon Roberts
2004-10-19 18:31:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alain Dagher
Post by Richard Schultz
: In his interview on CD review, Hough mentioned that he and Litton were
: aiming for a historically informed performance,
Which leads to the obvious trivia question: what is the most recently
composed work of music for which there exists a recording of a
"historically informed performance"?
Presumably any recording made by the composer.
Surely not.

Simon
Bob Lombard
2004-10-19 18:59:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Simon Roberts
Post by Alain Dagher
Post by Richard Schultz
: In his interview on CD review, Hough mentioned that he and Litton were
: aiming for a historically informed performance,
Which leads to the obvious trivia question: what is the most recently
composed work of music for which there exists a recording of a
"historically informed performance"?
Presumably any recording made by the composer.
Surely not.
Simon
Uh-oh. Get ready for a philadelphialawyerism.

bl
Iain Neill Reid
2004-10-19 19:21:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Simon Roberts
Post by Alain Dagher
Post by Richard Schultz
: In his interview on CD review, Hough mentioned that he and Litton were
: aiming for a historically informed performance,
Which leads to the obvious trivia question: what is the most recently
composed work of music for which there exists a recording of a
"historically informed performance"?
Presumably any recording made by the composer.
Actually, isn't any performance of contemporary music `historically
informed'? e.g. Maxwell Davies 8th symphony (which also happens to be
conducted by the composer)
Post by Simon Roberts
Surely not.
Simon
Tom Deacon
2004-10-19 18:42:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alain Dagher
Post by Richard Schultz
: In his interview on CD review, Hough mentioned that he and Litton were
: aiming for a historically informed performance,
Which leads to the obvious trivia question: what is the most recently
composed work of music for which there exists a recording of a
"historically informed performance"?
Presumably any recording made by the composer.
But if we limit ourselves to recordings using a different approach than
what has been conventionally used I would say Brahms is the latest
composer to have been given that treatment.
Harnoncourt and Gardiner have recorded late 19th century music, but I
don't think they claimed to be using historically informed practice.
No.

But they might have both benefited from a bit of musical understanding in
these two instances.

TD
Ian Pace
2004-10-19 19:27:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alain Dagher
Post by Richard Schultz
: In his interview on CD review, Hough mentioned that he and Litton were
: aiming for a historically informed performance, Which leads to the
obvious trivia question: what is the most recently
composed work of music for which there exists a recording of a
"historically informed performance"?
Presumably any recording made by the composer.
But if we limit ourselves to recordings using a different approach than
what has been conventionally used I would say Brahms is the latest
composer to have been given that treatment.
Harnoncourt and Gardiner have recorded late 19th century music, but I
don't think they claimed to be using historically informed practice.
I don't know if they actively use the term 'historically informed' any
longer, but certainly Gardiner and to some extent Harnoncourt applied
strategies of investigation into instruments, performance practice,
orchestral size and layout, etc., to some of the late 19th century music
they recorded (if you count Brahms, Verdi and Faure, as 'late').

As regards more recent music, those performing Stockhausen's electronic
works sometimes choose to stick with the technology available to the
composer at the time of writing rather than using more recent equipment.
Also, Steffen Schleiermacher recorded Cage prepared piano works after
hunting down the types of materials available in New York in the 1940s (e.g.
weather stripping) so as to get the precise sound, and try and work out the
correct size of piano and placing of the materials as Cage intended it
(multiple recordings of, say, the Sonatas and Interludes, demonstrate vast
differences of timbre in this respect). Some may listen to performances by
eminent virtuosos associated with composers (or composers themselves)
including Tudor, Kontarsky, Holliger, Globokar, Palm and others and this
might affect their own later interpretations of various contemporary works.
Do these count as 'historically informed'?

Ian
Bill McCutcheon
2004-10-19 19:08:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Schultz
Which leads to the obvious trivia question: what is the most recently
composed work of music for which there exists a recording of a
"historically informed performance"?
How about Holst's Planets (1920)? The New Queen's Hall Orchestra used
mostly early 20th century, some late 19th century, instruments in their
recording of The Planets and St. Paul's Suite. Roy Goodman conducted.
-- Bill McC.
Ian Pace
2004-10-19 19:31:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill McCutcheon
Post by Richard Schultz
Which leads to the obvious trivia question: what is the most recently
composed work of music for which there exists a recording of a
"historically informed performance"?
How about Holst's Planets (1920)? The New Queen's Hall Orchestra used
mostly early 20th century, some late 19th century, instruments in their
recording of The Planets and St. Paul's Suite. Roy Goodman conducted.
-- Bill McC.
Post by Richard Schultz
: In his interview on CD review, Hough mentioned that he and Litton were
: aiming for a historically informed performance, Which leads to the
obvious trivia question: what is the most recently
composed work of music for which there exists a recording of a
"historically informed performance"?
Presumably any recording made by the composer.
But if we limit ourselves to recordings using a different approach than
what has been conventionally used I would say Brahms is the latest
composer to have been given that treatment.
Harnoncourt and Gardiner have recorded late 19th century music, but I
don't think they claimed to be using historically informed practice.
I don't know if they actively use the term 'historically informed' any
longer, but certainly Gardiner and to some extent Harnoncourt applied
strategies of investigation into instruments, performance practice,
orchestral size and layout, etc., to some of the late 19th century music
they recorded (if you count Brahms, Verdi and Faure, as 'late').

As regards more recent music, those performing Stockhausen's electronic
works sometimes choose to stick with the technology available to the
composer at the time of writing rather than using more recent equipment.
Also, Steffen Schleiermacher recorded Cage prepared piano works after
hunting down the types of materials available in New York in the 1940s (e.g.
weather stripping) so as to get the precise sound, and try and work out the
correct size of piano and placing of the materials as Cage intended it
(multiple recordings of, say, the Sonatas and Interludes, demonstrate vast
differences of timbre in this respect). Some may listen to performances by
eminent virtuosos associated with composers (or composers themselves)
including Tudor, Kontarsky, Holliger, Globokar, Palm and others and this
might affect their own later interpretations of various contemporary works.
Do these count as 'historically informed'?

Ian
M-e-i-j-e-r
2004-10-20 22:56:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill McCutcheon
How about Holst's Planets (1920)? The New Queen's Hall Orchestra used
mostly early 20th century, some late 19th century, instruments in their
recording of The Planets and St. Paul's Suite. Roy Goodman conducted.
How HIP is Harnoncourt's Bartók?

E-l_t-j_o M_e-i_j-e_r
***@n@doo.nl
(x=@=a, 5=e)
Bill McCutcheon
2004-10-20 23:23:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by M-e-i-j-e-r
Post by Bill McCutcheon
How about Holst's Planets (1920)? The New Queen's Hall Orchestra used
mostly early 20th century, some late 19th century, instruments in their
recording of The Planets and St. Paul's Suite. Roy Goodman conducted.
How HIP is Harnoncourt's Bartók?
E-l_t-j_o M_e-i_j-e_r
Dunno ... don't have it, don't think I've ever heard it.
-- Bill McC.
William Sommerwerck
2004-10-21 00:25:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by M-e-i-j-e-r
How HIP is Harnoncourt's Bartók?
The liner notes don't say anything, but I assume "zero," as these are 20th
century works. (You _were_ kidding, weren't you?)

Harnoncourt's "Music for Strings, Percussion, and Celeste" is the darkest and
creepiest performance I've ever heard. I like it!

This album includes a sampler disk of selections from other Harnoncourt albums.
The Mozart and Haydn are okay, but the Smetana "Vysehrad" is a disaster. He
starts off slowly and thoughtfully, then slows down to an meandering, unfocused
slog. That's one "Ma Vlast" I can cross of the list.
Tom Deacon
2004-10-21 00:37:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by M-e-i-j-e-r
Post by Bill McCutcheon
How about Holst's Planets (1920)? The New Queen's Hall Orchestra used
mostly early 20th century, some late 19th century, instruments in their
recording of The Planets and St. Paul's Suite. Roy Goodman conducted.
How HIP is Harnoncourt's Bartók?
Harnoncourt couldn't be "hip" if he staked his life on it.

TD
Brendan R. Wehrung
2004-10-20 04:33:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Schultz
: In his interview on CD review, Hough mentioned that he and Litton were
: aiming for a historically informed performance,
Which leads to the obvious trivia question: what is the most recently
composed work of music for which there exists a recording of a
"historically informed performance"?
Matt, isn't it time for you to speak up?

What was the number of the CD again?

Brendan
--
Dan Koren
2004-10-20 05:45:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Schultz
: In his interview on CD review, Hough mentioned that he and Litton were
: aiming for a historically informed performance,
Which leads to the obvious trivia question: what is the most recently
composed work of music for which there exists a recording of a
"historically informed performance"?
4'33".



dk
Brendan R. Wehrung
2004-10-20 06:54:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan Koren
Post by Richard Schultz
: In his interview on CD review, Hough mentioned that he and Litton were
: aiming for a historically informed performance,
Which leads to the obvious trivia question: what is the most recently
composed work of music for which there exists a recording of a
"historically informed performance"?
4'33".
dk
Do you realize the other most-given response on this group (usually to
questions about movie trailers) also fits: Carmina Burana (the early
Jochum recording, supervised by the composer)?

Brendan
--
Michael Smith
2004-10-20 09:42:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Schultz
: In his interview on CD review, Hough mentioned that he and Litton were
: aiming for a historically informed performance,
Which leads to the obvious trivia question: what is the most recently
composed work of music for which there exists a recording of a
"historically informed performance"?
Anima Eterna are, I understand, recording some Ravel next year. And
The Smithsonian Chamber Orchestra has recorded Schoenberg and Richard
Strauss.

Michael
Thomas Wood
2004-10-20 06:04:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Raab Himself
It seems that every review of the new Rachmaninov Concerto set by Stephen
Hough has ranged from very positive to a rave. This includes both the
British and American press. Can any of the denizens of this group give an
opinion on the performances and sound quality? Much obliged!
He's living! He's not Russian! He's not obscure! He doesn't record on
unknown, pirated labels! He has to stink!

Tom Wood
Dan Koren
2004-10-20 07:13:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Thomas Wood
Post by Raab Himself
It seems that every review of the new Rachmaninov Concerto set by Stephen
Hough has ranged from very positive to a rave. This includes both the
British and American press. Can any of the denizens of this group give an
opinion on the performances and sound quality? Much obliged!
He's living! He's not Russian! He's not obscure! He doesn't record on
unknown, pirated labels! He has to stink!
Indeed he does.



dk
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