Discussion:
OT - Personal Preferences for Narrated Works
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Jerry
2019-08-27 18:08:25 UTC
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Here’s a question on personal preferences for works with or without spoken narration (sure to elicit strong opinions). Would be interested in reading any comments on the following or others worth mentioning.

Britten: Variations and Fugue on a Theme of Purcell (a.k.a. Young Person’s Guide)
Mendelssohn: Midsummer Night’s Dream
Prokofiev: Peter and the Wolf
Saint-Saens: Carnival of the Animals
Stravinsky: L’Histoire du Soldat
Vaughan Williams: Symphony No. 7 (Sinfonia Antartica)

Jerry
Gerard
2019-08-27 18:34:49 UTC
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Post by Jerry
Here’s a question on personal preferences for works with or without spoken narration (sure to elicit strong opinions). Would be interested in reading any comments on the following or others worth mentioning.
Britten: Variations and Fugue on a Theme of Purcell (a.k.a. Young Person’s Guide)
Mendelssohn: Midsummer Night’s Dream
Prokofiev: Peter and the Wolf
Saint-Saens: Carnival of the Animals
Stravinsky: L’Histoire du Soldat
Vaughan Williams: Symphony No. 7 (Sinfonia Antartica)
Jerry
(Not mentioned in your list: Peer Gynt.)
Generally I prefer the music 'sec' - without spoken words - as much as possible.
But has there ever been a recording of Peter and the wolf without spoken words? They are essential in this piece.
Not a Dentist
2019-08-28 03:31:05 UTC
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Post by Gerard
But has there ever been a recording of Peter and the wolf without spoken words? They are essential in this piece.
I was thrilled when I discovered that a narration-free version of the Bernstein had been issued (listed as "Orchestral Suite," I believe) on the old series of Composer's Greatest Hits by Columbia Records. There is also an Everest with and without narration by Captain Kangaroo, with no less than Stokowski conducting. Probably some others have appeared by now...

Some of the connecting episodes of this music are very interesting heard "in the clear," as they say.
Arno Schuh
2019-08-28 08:30:27 UTC
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Post by Not a Dentist
Post by Gerard
But has there ever been a recording of Peter and the wolf without
spoken words? They are essential in this piece.
I was thrilled when I discovered that a narration-free version of the
Bernstein had been issued (listed as "Orchestral Suite," I believe)
on the old series of Composer's Greatest Hits by Columbia Records.
There is also an Everest with and without narration by Captain
Kangaroo, with no less than Stokowski conducting. Probably some
others have appeared by now...
Some of the connecting episodes of this music are very interesting
heard "in the clear," as they say.
I have one, may be two, versions of Peter and the Wolf on piano without
spoken words. In addition some versions that didn't use the common text etc.

Arno
n***@gmail.com
2019-08-29 14:27:57 UTC
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Post by Arno Schuh
Post by Not a Dentist
Post by Gerard
But has there ever been a recording of Peter and the wolf without
spoken words? They are essential in this piece.
I was thrilled when I discovered that a narration-free version of the
Bernstein had been issued (listed as "Orchestral Suite," I believe)
on the old series of Composer's Greatest Hits by Columbia Records.
There is also an Everest with and without narration by Captain
Kangaroo, with no less than Stokowski conducting. Probably some
others have appeared by now...
Some of the connecting episodes of this music are very interesting
heard "in the clear," as they say.
I have one, may be two, versions of Peter and the Wolf on piano without
spoken words. In addition some versions that didn't use the common text etc.
Arno
The Royal Edition, Volume 58 SMK 47596 has Bernstein/NY Phil performances of both Prokofiev's Peter (called a suite) and Saint-Saen's Carnival, both without narration and available inexpensively from Amazon:
https://www.amazon.com/Mussorgsky-Sorcerers-Apprentice-Prokofiev-Saint-Saens/dp/B0000027N4/ref=sr_1_8?keywords=leonard+bernstein+prokofiev+peter+and+the+wolf&qid=1567035482&s=gateway&sr=8-8#customerReviews
JohnA
2019-08-29 15:24:25 UTC
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Post by n***@gmail.com
Post by Arno Schuh
Post by Not a Dentist
Post by Gerard
But has there ever been a recording of Peter and the wolf without
spoken words? They are essential in this piece.
I was thrilled when I discovered that a narration-free version of the
Bernstein had been issued (listed as "Orchestral Suite," I believe)
on the old series of Composer's Greatest Hits by Columbia Records.
There is also an Everest with and without narration by Captain
Kangaroo, with no less than Stokowski conducting. Probably some
others have appeared by now...
Some of the connecting episodes of this music are very interesting
heard "in the clear," as they say.
I have one, may be two, versions of Peter and the Wolf on piano without
spoken words. In addition some versions that didn't use the common text etc.
Arno
https://www.amazon.com/Mussorgsky-Sorcerers-Apprentice-Prokofiev-Saint-Saens/dp/B0000027N4/ref=sr_1_8?keywords=leonard+bernstein+prokofiev+peter+and+the+wolf&qid=1567035482&s=gateway&sr=8-8#customerReviews
They are also in the Concertos & Orchestral Works box, with a narration-less Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra (also part of the Royal Edition), along with the original narrated versions of all three.
n***@gmail.com
2019-08-29 18:08:55 UTC
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Post by JohnA
Post by n***@gmail.com
Post by Arno Schuh
Post by Not a Dentist
Post by Gerard
But has there ever been a recording of Peter and the wolf without
spoken words? They are essential in this piece.
I was thrilled when I discovered that a narration-free version of the
Bernstein had been issued (listed as "Orchestral Suite," I believe)
on the old series of Composer's Greatest Hits by Columbia Records.
There is also an Everest with and without narration by Captain
Kangaroo, with no less than Stokowski conducting. Probably some
others have appeared by now...
Some of the connecting episodes of this music are very interesting
heard "in the clear," as they say.
I have one, may be two, versions of Peter and the Wolf on piano without
spoken words. In addition some versions that didn't use the common text etc.
Arno
https://www.amazon.com/Mussorgsky-Sorcerers-Apprentice-Prokofiev-Saint-Saens/dp/B0000027N4/ref=sr_1_8?keywords=leonard+bernstein+prokofiev+peter+and+the+wolf&qid=1567035482&s=gateway&sr=8-8#customerReviews
They are also in the Concertos & Orchestral Works box, with a narration-less Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra (also part of the Royal Edition), along with the original narrated versions of all three.
Thanks, but that collection seems to be available. I should look for the YPG alone.
n***@gmail.com
2019-08-29 18:15:17 UTC
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Post by JohnA
Post by n***@gmail.com
Post by Arno Schuh
Post by Not a Dentist
Post by Gerard
But has there ever been a recording of Peter and the wolf without
spoken words? They are essential in this piece.
I was thrilled when I discovered that a narration-free version of the
Bernstein had been issued (listed as "Orchestral Suite," I believe)
on the old series of Composer's Greatest Hits by Columbia Records.
There is also an Everest with and without narration by Captain
Kangaroo, with no less than Stokowski conducting. Probably some
others have appeared by now...
Some of the connecting episodes of this music are very interesting
heard "in the clear," as they say.
I have one, may be two, versions of Peter and the Wolf on piano without
spoken words. In addition some versions that didn't use the common text etc.
Arno
https://www.amazon.com/Mussorgsky-Sorcerers-Apprentice-Prokofiev-Saint-Saens/dp/B0000027N4/ref=sr_1_8?keywords=leonard+bernstein+prokofiev+peter+and+the+wolf&qid=1567035482&s=gateway&sr=8-8#customerReviews
They are also in the Concertos & Orchestral Works box, with a narration-less Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra (also part of the Royal Edition), along with the original narrated versions of all three.
Is this it (and without narration)?

https://www.amazon.com/Britten-Variations-Fugue-Grimes-excerpts/dp/B0000027M9/ref=sr_1_7?keywords=britten+bernstein&qid=1567102216&s=music&sr=1-7
JohnA
2019-08-29 20:52:31 UTC
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Post by n***@gmail.com
Post by JohnA
Post by n***@gmail.com
Post by Arno Schuh
Post by Not a Dentist
Post by Gerard
But has there ever been a recording of Peter and the wolf without
spoken words? They are essential in this piece.
I was thrilled when I discovered that a narration-free version of the
Bernstein had been issued (listed as "Orchestral Suite," I believe)
on the old series of Composer's Greatest Hits by Columbia Records.
There is also an Everest with and without narration by Captain
Kangaroo, with no less than Stokowski conducting. Probably some
others have appeared by now...
Some of the connecting episodes of this music are very interesting
heard "in the clear," as they say.
I have one, may be two, versions of Peter and the Wolf on piano without
spoken words. In addition some versions that didn't use the common text etc.
Arno
https://www.amazon.com/Mussorgsky-Sorcerers-Apprentice-Prokofiev-Saint-Saens/dp/B0000027N4/ref=sr_1_8?keywords=leonard+bernstein+prokofiev+peter+and+the+wolf&qid=1567035482&s=gateway&sr=8-8#customerReviews
They are also in the Concertos & Orchestral Works box, with a narration-less Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra (also part of the Royal Edition), along with the original narrated versions of all three.
Is this it (and without narration)?
https://www.amazon.com/Britten-Variations-Fugue-Grimes-excerpts/dp/B0000027M9/ref=sr_1_7?keywords=britten+bernstein&qid=1567102216&s=music&sr=1-7
It's the one without the narration.
Arno Schuh
2019-08-29 17:21:06 UTC
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Post by n***@gmail.com
Post by Arno Schuh
Post by Not a Dentist
Post by Gerard
But has there ever been a recording of Peter and the wolf without
spoken words? They are essential in this piece.
I was thrilled when I discovered that a narration-free version of
the Bernstein had been issued (listed as "Orchestral Suite," I
believe) on the old series of Composer's Greatest Hits by Columbia
Records. There is also an Everest with and without narration by
Captain Kangaroo, with no less than Stokowski conducting. Probably
some others have appeared by now...
Some of the connecting episodes of this music are very interesting
heard "in the clear," as they say.
I have one, may be two, versions of Peter and the Wolf on piano
without spoken words. In addition some versions that didn't use the
common text etc.
Arno
The Royal Edition, Volume 58 SMK 47596 has Bernstein/NY Phil
performances of both Prokofiev's Peter (called a suite) and
Saint-Saen's Carnival, both without narration and available
https://www.amazon.com/Mussorgsky-Sorcerers-Apprentice-Prokofiev-Saint-Saens/dp/B0000027N4/ref=sr_1_8?keywords=leonard+bernstein+prokofiev+peter+and+the+wolf&qid=1567035482&s=gateway&sr=8-8#customerReviews
I also have some versions without spoken text. AfaIk. one is in a box with
several forreign versions. One is in a teacher|s CDR with text files, MIDI,
pictures etc. One is on an DVD, also with a film. One is on a CD with Peter
and the Wolf in the Lxembourgian language (RTL SO, Leopold Hager). And iIrc.
there is a version of the Naxos label version that Naxos uses for their
several forreign versions.

Arno
Jerry
2019-08-29 20:52:34 UTC
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And still another Peter and the Wolf without narration is on
Infinity Digital CD QK 57234 (a super-budget label issued
from Sony c. 1993-1994.)

Stanislav Gorkovenko conducting the St. Petersburg Radio & TV S.O.
which also has a four-movement Prokofiev: Tales of an Old Grandmother, Op. 31 though not orchestrated by Prokofiev (as well as Carnival of the
Animals).

Bought for the "Grandmother" items that I hoped might be another undiscovered
Prokofiev gem. Undiscovered, perhaps. Gem, not.
Bob Harper
2019-08-28 03:46:29 UTC
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Post by Gerard
Post by Jerry
Here’s a question on personal preferences for works with or without spoken narration (sure to elicit strong opinions). Would be interested in reading any comments on the following or others worth mentioning.
Britten: Variations and Fugue on a Theme of Purcell (a.k.a. Young Person’s Guide)
Mendelssohn: Midsummer Night’s Dream
Prokofiev: Peter and the Wolf
Saint-Saens: Carnival of the Animals
Stravinsky: L’Histoire du Soldat
Vaughan Williams: Symphony No. 7 (Sinfonia Antartica)
Jerry
(Not mentioned in your list: Peer Gynt.)
Generally I prefer the music 'sec' - without spoken words - as much as possible.
But has there ever been a recording of Peter and the wolf without spoken words? They are essential in this piece.
My 4-year-old granddaughter agrees :).

Bob Harper
HT
2019-08-27 18:38:02 UTC
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Post by Jerry
Prokofiev: Peter and the Wolf
Stravinsky: L’Histoire du Soldat
The narrated version (seems essential in these two cases).

Henk
c***@gmail.com
2019-08-27 19:31:55 UTC
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Post by HT
Post by Jerry
Prokofiev: Peter and the Wolf
Stravinsky: L’Histoire du Soldat
The narrated version (seems essential in these two cases).
Henk
I agree with Henk, and sometimes I also enjoy listening to the complete Peer Gynt as well as MSD with Shakespeare excerpts. Saint-Saens and Britten definitely without narration.

It also seems to be fairly common to perform Haydn's "Seven Last Words" with readings interspersed between the movements. My wife and I have seen it performed live that way, and iirc the Vermeer Quartet issued a 2-CD set--one disc with readings and the other without, so one can choose. Interesting once, imo.

It would be hard to perform Schoenberg's "Survivor from Warsaw" without a narrator :-) And Schulhoff's "H.M.S. Royal Oak" is a total riot (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2010/May10/Ebony_Band_Weill_CCS25109.htm)

AC
Arno Schuh
2019-08-27 18:58:27 UTC
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Post by Jerry
Here’s a question on personal preferences for works with or without
spoken narration (sure to elicit strong opinions). Would be
interested in reading any comments on the following or others worth
mentioning.
Britten: Variations and Fugue on a Theme of Purcell (a.k.a. Young Person’s Guide)
Mendelssohn: Midsummer Night’s Dream
Prokofiev: Peter and the Wolf
Saint-Saens: Carnival of the Animals
Stravinsky: L’Histoire du Soldat
Vaughan Williams: Symphony No. 7 (Sinfonia Antartica)
Weill Die Dreigroschenoper

Poulenc L'Histoire de Babar
Kuhnau Biblische Sonaten
JohnGavin
2019-08-27 19:07:02 UTC
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Poulenc L'Histoire de Babar
Kuhnau Biblische Sonaten

The first 2 recordings of the Biblical Sonatas that I owned both had narrators- Albert Fuller and Fritz Neumeyer (harpsichordists) was mid 1960s. In all the subsequent recordings the narrator was omitted.

Don’t forget R. Strauss’ Enoch Arden (Claude Rains for Gould, Jon Vickers for Hamelin)
Arno Schuh
2019-08-27 20:49:20 UTC
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Post by Arno Schuh
Poulenc L'Histoire de Babar
Kuhnau Biblische Sonaten
The first 2 recordings of the Biblical Sonatas that I owned both had
narrators- Albert Fuller and Fritz Neumeyer (harpsichordists) was mid
1960s. In all the subsequent recordings the narrator was omitted.
Don’t forget R. Strauss’ Enoch Arden (Claude Rains for Gould, Jon Vickers for Hamelin)
Isn't that a Melodram? There are Melodrams by Beethoven, Brahms, von
Schillings; and the Lincoln Portait by Copland.
number_six
2019-08-27 22:39:05 UTC
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Post by Arno Schuh
Post by Jerry
Here’s a question on personal preferences for works with or without
spoken narration (sure to elicit strong opinions). Would be
interested in reading any comments on the following or others worth
mentioning.
Britten: Variations and Fugue on a Theme of Purcell (a.k.a. Young Person’s Guide)
Mendelssohn: Midsummer Night’s Dream
Prokofiev: Peter and the Wolf
Saint-Saens: Carnival of the Animals
Stravinsky: L’Histoire du Soldat
Vaughan Williams: Symphony No. 7 (Sinfonia Antartica)
Weill Die Dreigroschenoper
Poulenc L'Histoire de Babar
Kuhnau Biblische Sonaten
Sure, Ustinov for Babar

The Argerich /Kremer Carnaval des Animaux CD also featured another narrated work adapted from Munro Leaf's Ferdinand the Bull, composed by Alan Ridout.

Prefer no narrator for YPG but liked Connery best among narrators I've heard.

James Earl Jones for Lincoln Portrait
Arno Schuh
2019-08-28 08:51:33 UTC
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Post by Jerry
Here’s a question on personal preferences for works with or without
spoken narration (sure to elicit strong opinions). Would be
interested in reading any comments on the following or others worth
mentioning.
Britten: Variations and Fugue on a Theme of Purcell (a.k.a. Young Person’s Guide)
Mendelssohn: Midsummer Night’s Dream
There are also narrated versions of the complete Bühnenmusik of Egmont op.
84:

Narration is in German. Don't know if it is available in other languages,
too.

Arno
Mandryka
2019-08-28 09:35:31 UTC
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There are three which come to mind for me.

1. Berio's Sequenzas with poems by Edoardo Sanguineti performed by Enzo Salomone on Mode.

2. The Biber Mystery Sonatas with readings by Timothy West on Avie

3. Gustav Leohardt's recording of the Kuhnau Biblical Sonatas

(maybe)

3. The recording of Cipriano de Rore's settings of Petrarch's Le Vergine, with readings before each madrigal.
Tatonik
2019-08-29 02:29:01 UTC
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Post by number_six
Post by Arno Schuh
Here's a question on personal preferences for works with or without
spoken narration (sure to elicit strong opinions). Would be
interested in reading any comments on the following or others worth
mentioning.
Britten: Variations and Fugue on a Theme of Purcell (a.k.a. Young
Person's Guide) Mendelssohn: Midsummer Night's Dream Prokofiev: Peter
L'Histoire du Soldat Vaughan Williams: Symphony No. 7 (Sinfonia
Antartica)
Weill Die Dreigroschenoper
Poulenc L'Histoire de Babar
Kuhnau Biblische Sonaten
Sure, Ustinov for Babar
The Argerich /Kremer Carnaval des Animaux CD also featured another
narrated work adapted from Munro Leaf's Ferdinand the Bull, composed by
Alan Ridout.
Prefer no narrator for YPG but liked Connery best among narrators I've heard.
James Earl Jones for Lincoln Portrait
I can do a pretty good impression of the aged Katherine Hepburn on the
Telarc release of Copland's Lincoln Portrait. I reserve this for
special occasions. One can't go doing Katherine Hepburn impressions
willy-nilly.

Not sure I would recommend the recording, but it does make a strong
impression (so to speak).
r***@gmail.com
2019-08-28 00:20:30 UTC
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Stravinsky: L’Histoire du Soldat
Vaughan Williams: Symphony No. 7 (Sinfonia Antartica)
---------------

Essential for Stravinsky, and can never think beyond Jean Costeau and conducted by Markevitch for L'Histoire.

For RVW 7 then Sir Ralph Richardson with Previn is still a favoured imprint. Not essential, but I prefer a narrator.

For Poulenc I cannot imagine Ustinov being a bad choice.

Ray Hall, Taree
r***@gmail.com
2019-08-31 08:28:14 UTC
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Post by Jerry
Stravinsky: L’Histoire du Soldat
Vaughan Williams: Symphony No. 7 (Sinfonia Antartica)
---------------
Essential for Stravinsky, and can never think beyond Jean Costeau and conducted by Markevitch for L'Histoire.
For RVW 7 then Sir Ralph Richardson with Previn is still a favoured imprint. Not essential, but I prefer a narrator.
For Poulenc I cannot imagine Ustinov being a bad choice.
Ray Hall, Taree
Ustinov is never a bad choice. He made the BBC TV series 'Clochemerle' the hilarious series that it was. Better even than the book!
music lover
2019-08-31 15:06:48 UTC
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Ustinov is really in his element providing all the voices for a complete Hary Janos conducted by Kertesz. Anyone ever heard that complete Janos live?
m***@gmail.com
2019-08-28 03:19:34 UTC
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Post by Jerry
Here’s a question on personal preferences for works with or without spoken narration (sure to elicit strong opinions). Would be interested in reading any comments on the following or others worth mentioning.
Britten: Variations and Fugue on a Theme of Purcell (a.k.a. Young Person’s Guide)
Mendelssohn: Midsummer Night’s Dream
Prokofiev: Peter and the Wolf
Saint-Saens: Carnival of the Animals
Stravinsky: L’Histoire du Soldat
Vaughan Williams: Symphony No. 7 (Sinfonia Antartica)
Jerry
Normally I prefer the Mendelssohn without a narrator. But there is a recording of it with Ozawa and the BSO with Dame Judi Dench that I adore. Her voice is as magical as the music. By the way, this recording is complete and contains the marvelous short funeral march -- sounds very much like proto-Mahler!

I like L'Histoire..." with narration. Somewhere I have a wonderful old one on Kapp records with Melvyn Douglas doing the devil.

While we're on Stravinsky, I can't imagine Oedipus Rex without Cocteau narrating it in French.

Martin
Al Eisner
2019-09-05 20:16:19 UTC
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Here’s a question on personal preferences for works with or without spoken narration (sure to elicit strong opinions). Would be interested in reading any comments on the following or others worth mentioning.
Britten: Variations and Fugue on a Theme of Purcell (a.k.a. Young Person’s Guide)
Mendelssohn: Midsummer Night’s Dream
Prokofiev: Peter and the Wolf
Saint-Saens: Carnival of the Animals
Stravinsky: L’Histoire du Soldat
Vaughan Williams: Symphony No. 7 (Sinfonia Antartica)
Jerry
A rather late reply.... Very much "it depends".

I agree with Henk that the narration is needed in the Prokofiev and
the Stravinsky. The former is basicaly a work for children, and it
very much tells a story. And in the Stravinsky, the narration seems
to me to be actually part of the music. (And for different reasons I'd
say the same of "Oedipus Rex".) The Britten is wonderful in
both versions. On the other hand, I don't think the words add much
to either the Mendelssohn or the Sain-Saens (and perhaps the VW), rather
they just seem to get in the way.

Now, what I really wonder is whether there is a viable version os
"A Lincoln Portrait" without the narration, which I find completely
intolerable. :)
--
Al Eisner
c***@gmail.com
2019-09-05 21:32:34 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
Now, what I really wonder is whether there is a viable version os
"A Lincoln Portrait" without the narration, which I find completely
intolerable. :)
--
The music isn't so hot either. Bottom-drawer Copland Americana afaic.

AC
Al Eisner
2019-09-05 22:22:53 UTC
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Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Al Eisner
Now, what I really wonder is whether there is a viable version os
"A Lincoln Portrait" without the narration, which I find completely
intolerable. :)
--
The music isn't so hot either. Bottom-drawer Copland Americana afaic.
AC
So maybe the narration has the benefit of obscuring that?
--
Al Eisner
Arno Schuh
2019-09-06 06:58:04 UTC
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Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Al Eisner
Now, what I really wonder is whether there is a viable version os
"A Lincoln Portrait" without the narration, which I find completely
intolerable. :)
--
The music isn't so hot either. Bottom-drawer Copland Americana afaic.
May be, but there could be reasons why you need the "backround music" alone.
There are several recordings of the Schubert cycles with the piano part
only; also some concerts, chamber music without the solo instrument etc. So
you can sing it yourself, play it yourself - and speak it yourself. :-)

Arno
graham
2019-09-06 12:22:46 UTC
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Post by Arno Schuh
Post by Al Eisner
Now, what I really wonder is whether there is a viable version os
"A Lincoln Portrait" without the narration, which I find completely
intolerable.  :)
--
The music isn't so hot either.  Bottom-drawer Copland Americana afaic.
May be, but there could be reasons why you need the "backround music"
alone. There are several recordings of the Schubert cycles with the
piano part only; also some concerts, chamber music without the solo
instrument etc. So you can sing it yourself, play it yourself - and
speak it yourself. :-)
Music Minus One!
c***@gmail.com
2019-09-06 13:44:44 UTC
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Post by graham
Post by Arno Schuh
Post by Al Eisner
Now, what I really wonder is whether there is a viable version os
"A Lincoln Portrait" without the narration, which I find completely
intolerable.  :)
--
The music isn't so hot either.  Bottom-drawer Copland Americana afaic.
May be, but there could be reasons why you need the "backround music"
alone. There are several recordings of the Schubert cycles with the
piano part only; also some concerts, chamber music without the solo
instrument etc. So you can sing it yourself, play it yourself - and
speak it yourself. :-)
Music Minus One!
I remember MMO well from my days as a student oboist. It was such a treat to be able to practice with accompaniment :-) I got a chuckle from the idea of a MMO version of "Lincoln Portrait." I'd never be able to get through the narration with a straight face.

AC
Frank Berger
2019-09-06 15:28:17 UTC
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Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by graham
Post by Arno Schuh
Post by Al Eisner
Now, what I really wonder is whether there is a viable version os
"A Lincoln Portrait" without the narration, which I find completely
intolerable.  :)
--
The music isn't so hot either.  Bottom-drawer Copland Americana afaic.
May be, but there could be reasons why you need the "backround music"
alone. There are several recordings of the Schubert cycles with the
piano part only; also some concerts, chamber music without the solo
instrument etc. So you can sing it yourself, play it yourself - and
speak it yourself. :-)
Music Minus One!
I remember MMO well from my days as a student oboist. It was such a treat to be able to practice with accompaniment :-) I got a chuckle from the idea of a MMO version of "Lincoln Portrait." I'd never be able to get through the narration with a straight face.
AC
I could. I would be proud to say, "The dogmas of the quiet past are
inadequate to the stormy present."
c***@gmail.com
2019-09-06 16:12:46 UTC
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Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by graham
Post by Arno Schuh
Post by Al Eisner
Now, what I really wonder is whether there is a viable version os
"A Lincoln Portrait" without the narration, which I find completely
intolerable.  :)
--
The music isn't so hot either.  Bottom-drawer Copland Americana afaic.
May be, but there could be reasons why you need the "backround music"
alone. There are several recordings of the Schubert cycles with the
piano part only; also some concerts, chamber music without the solo
instrument etc. So you can sing it yourself, play it yourself - and
speak it yourself. :-)
Music Minus One!
I remember MMO well from my days as a student oboist. It was such a treat to be able to practice with accompaniment :-) I got a chuckle from the idea of a MMO version of "Lincoln Portrait." I'd never be able to get through the narration with a straight face.
AC
I could. I would be proud to say, "The dogmas of the quiet past are
inadequate to the stormy present."
No problem with the Honest Abe quotations. It's the portentous "This is what he said; this is what Abraham Lincoln said" that puts me off, especially as coupled with the mediocre music.

A propos of Lincoln, many years ago my late mother-in-law, who was an expert Yiddishist, gave me an article about Yiddish translations of the "Gettysburg Address" (referred to on the English t-p as “the Gettysburg Speech”) The Yiddish title of the article is “Let’s Learn Yiddish from Lincoln.” The author compares 21 translations that he commissioned from contemporary Yiddish writers, and then offers a translation of his own.

It’s impossible to gloss “fourscore” literally, so what do you do if you want to get the number (87) right and retain the cadence and gravitas? One translation renders "fourscore and seven" as 27; another as 127. Yet another one reverts to multiplication: 4 times 20 plus 7 (at least the total is right). The author himself comes up with “8 decades and 7 years ago.”

Come to think of it, I might enjoy "Lincoln Portrait" more if it were narrated in a language that I don't understand. Like this:
(Wasn't there a recording narrated by Mme. Prokofieva?)

AC
Frank Berger
2019-09-06 16:40:28 UTC
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Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Frank Berger
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by graham
Post by Arno Schuh
Post by Al Eisner
Now, what I really wonder is whether there is a viable version os
"A Lincoln Portrait" without the narration, which I find completely
intolerable.  :)
--
The music isn't so hot either.  Bottom-drawer Copland Americana afaic.
May be, but there could be reasons why you need the "backround music"
alone. There are several recordings of the Schubert cycles with the
piano part only; also some concerts, chamber music without the solo
instrument etc. So you can sing it yourself, play it yourself - and
speak it yourself. :-)
Music Minus One!
I remember MMO well from my days as a student oboist. It was such a treat to be able to practice with accompaniment :-) I got a chuckle from the idea of a MMO version of "Lincoln Portrait." I'd never be able to get through the narration with a straight face.
AC
I could. I would be proud to say, "The dogmas of the quiet past are
inadequate to the stormy present."
No problem with the Honest Abe quotations. It's the portentous "This is what he said; this is what Abraham Lincoln said" that puts me off, especially as coupled with the mediocre music.
A propos of Lincoln, many years ago my late mother-in-law, who was an expert Yiddishist, gave me an article about Yiddish translations of the "Gettysburg Address" (referred to on the English t-p as “the Gettysburg Speech”) The Yiddish title of the article is “Let’s Learn Yiddish from Lincoln.” The author compares 21 translations that he commissioned from contemporary Yiddish writers, and then offers a translation of his own.
It’s impossible to gloss “fourscore” literally, so what do you do if you want to get the number (87) right and retain the cadence and gravitas? One translation renders "fourscore and seven" as 27; another as 127. Yet another one reverts to multiplication: 4 times 20 plus 7 (at least the total is right). The author himself comes up with “8 decades and 7 years ago.”
Come to think of it, I might enjoy "Lincoln Portrait" more if it were narrated in a language that I don't understand. Like this: http://youtu.be/r-1OWPWzCMM (Wasn't there a recording narrated by Mme. Prokofieva?)
AC
I saw the Lincoln animation at Disneyland around 40 years ago. It
impressed me then. I guess they still have it with improved animation.
As I hate Disneyland, I won't ever see it again.

I get you. My grandson has a job translating a British driving manual
(the thing you learn to get your driver's license) into Hebrew. Since
his English isn't the best (though getting better) sometimes he is
challenged. He had one when we were visiting. The manual said the
driver should be careful when negotiating curves and bends (duh). My
grandson didn't know what a bend was (as different from a curve). I
suggest a bend was a sharp angle turn. He said there was no such word
in Hebrew. So he just left it out of the translation.
number_six
2019-09-07 01:25:46 UTC
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Post by Frank Berger
I get you. My grandson has a job translating a British driving manual
(the thing you learn to get your driver's license) into Hebrew. Since
his English isn't the best (though getting better) sometimes he is
challenged. He had one when we were visiting. The manual said the
driver should be careful when negotiating curves and bends (duh). My
grandson didn't know what a bend was (as different from a curve). I
suggest a bend was a sharp angle turn. He said there was no such word
in Hebrew. So he just left it out of the translation.
To me, "bend" implies impaired visibility (as in you can't see "around the bend"), whereas "curve" could include that aspect but needn't. If it did, we'd probably call it a blind curve...
Andrew Clarke
2019-09-12 01:17:28 UTC
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Post by c***@gmail.com
No problem with the Honest Abe quotations. It's the portentous "This is what he said; this is what Abraham Lincoln said" that puts me off, especially as coupled with the mediocre music.
A propos of Lincoln, many years ago my late mother-in-law, who was an expert Yiddishist, gave me an article about Yiddish translations of the "Gettysburg Address" (referred to on the English t-p as “the Gettysburg Speech”) The Yiddish title of the article is “Let’s Learn Yiddish from Lincoln.” The author compares 21 translations that he commissioned from contemporary Yiddish writers, and then offers a translation of his own.
It’s impossible to gloss “fourscore” literally, so what do you do if you want to get the number (87) right and retain the cadence and gravitas? One translation renders "fourscore and seven" as 27; another as 127. Yet another one reverts to multiplication: 4 times 20 plus 7 (at least the total is right). The author himself comes up with “8 decades and 7 years ago.”
Come to think of it, I might enjoy "Lincoln Portrait" more if it were narrated in a language that I don't understand. Like this: http://youtu.be/r-1OWPWzCMM (Wasn't there a recording narrated by Mme. Prokofieva?)
I think of the number of operas I would enjoy much less if I knew Italian ...

Meanwhile, I have an old school friend, born in Melbourne to Polish Jewish parents, now living in Israel, who learnt Yiddish from scratch in memory of his parents whom he can remember speaking it to each other when he was very, very young.

As for Lincoln, I've never seen what all the fuss was about.

Andrew Clarke
Canberra

JohnA
2019-09-06 00:28:04 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
Now, what I really wonder is whether there is a viable version os
"A Lincoln Portrait" without the narration, which I find completely
intolerable. :)
--
Al Eisner
Sony SK 60593, the soundtrack to the movie "He Got Game" which, believe it or not, consists of the work of Aaron Copland. "Lincoln Portrait" is the version by Aaron Copland and the London Symphony, with Henry Fonda's narration removed.
JohnA
2019-09-06 00:31:57 UTC
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On Thursday, September 5, 2019 at 7:28:07 PM UTC-5, JohnA wrote:
Al Eisner
Post by JohnA
Sony SK 60593, the soundtrack to the movie "He Got Game" which, believe it or not, consists of the work of Aaron Copland. "Lincoln Portrait" is the version by Aaron Copland and the London Symphony, with Henry Fonda's narration removed.
I just realized that it's on youtube


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