Discussion:
What is the BEST recording of Beethoven's 7th?
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g***@gmail.com
2020-06-07 13:40:00 UTC
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On Saturday, I took my wife to see the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra
perform Beethoven's seventh symphony. Needless to say she enjoyed the
evening thouroughly.
As the orchestra hit the final note of the piece, the audience
immediately roared with approval. The performance was excellent.
Beethoven's 7th is only one of two of his symphonies I do not have on
CD and I'd like to purchase a copy for us. I'd like the opinion of
the group as to what the best recorded performance is.
So lend me your opinion. Which recording do you feel is the
quintessential 7th? Which one diplays the raw energy and power
without overdoing it and losing the subtle nuances of the piece?
_______________________________________________________
http://www.sugapablo.com
To email me, remove "Sugapablo-" from my email address.
https://slippedisc.com/2020/06/beethovens-seventh-everyone-agrees/
gggg gggg
2021-03-26 15:57:37 UTC
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On Saturday, I took my wife to see the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra
perform Beethoven's seventh symphony. Needless to say she enjoyed the
evening thouroughly.
As the orchestra hit the final note of the piece, the audience
immediately roared with approval. The performance was excellent.
Beethoven's 7th is only one of two of his symphonies I do not have on
CD and I'd like to purchase a copy for us. I'd like the opinion of
the group as to what the best recorded performance is.
So lend me your opinion. Which recording do you feel is the
quintessential 7th? Which one diplays the raw energy and power
without overdoing it and losing the subtle nuances of the piece?
_______________________________________________________
http://www.sugapablo.com
To email me, remove "Sugapablo-" from my email address.
(Recent Youtube upload):

Repertoire: The BEST Beethoven Seventh Symphony
Owen
2021-03-26 16:56:12 UTC
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Post by gggg gggg
On Saturday, I took my wife to see the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra
perform Beethoven's seventh symphony. Needless to say she enjoyed the
evening thouroughly.
As the orchestra hit the final note of the piece, the audience
immediately roared with approval. The performance was excellent.
Beethoven's 7th is only one of two of his symphonies I do not have on
CD and I'd like to purchase a copy for us. I'd like the opinion of
the group as to what the best recorded performance is.
So lend me your opinion. Which recording do you feel is the
quintessential 7th? Which one diplays the raw energy and power
without overdoing it and losing the subtle nuances of the piece?
_______________________________________________________
http://www.sugapablo.com
To email me, remove "Sugapablo-" from my email address.
Repertoire: The BEST Beethoven Seventh Symphony
The best one is the one where it sounds like all yaks jumping about.

-Owen
Phl Maestro
2021-03-26 17:00:09 UTC
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I see I some how missed this one in 2001, so:

C. Kleiber/Orfeo
Barenboim/Teldec (he also led the best 7th I've seen live; with the CSO)
Furtwangler wartime
dk
2021-03-26 21:20:24 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Phl Maestro
C. Kleiber/Orfeo
Barenboim/Teldec (he also led the best 7th I've seen live; with the CSO)
Furtwangler wartime
Asking about performance, recording, or both? To
my ears, the best LvB Symphony no. 7 is this one:

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/kcqmkn2upttlnze/AABswlEMXT5TC5j8Sgi6UytFa?dl=0

It can be played as a single work by pointing the
VLC player to the folder, rather than to individual
files.It can also be played directly in one's browser
if one would rather not download the files without
knowing their provenance

In the interest of saving download bandwidth and
space, I encoded the files at as MP4a/AAC at the
highest quality level -- 512 kbps FBR.

I can also provide FLAC if anyone is interested,
however the size is more than double even at
the highest compression level.

Enjoy!

dk

PS. I am particularly interested in finding out if
MELMOTH can identify the semi-conductor and
the orchestra through his magnificent system!
Randy Lane
2021-03-26 22:10:07 UTC
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Permalink
Post by dk
Post by Phl Maestro
C. Kleiber/Orfeo
Barenboim/Teldec (he also led the best 7th I've seen live; with the CSO)
Furtwangler wartime
Asking about performance, recording, or both? To
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/kcqmkn2upttlnze/AABswlEMXT5TC5j8Sgi6UytFa?dl=0
It can be played as a single work by pointing the
VLC player to the folder, rather than to individual
files.It can also be played directly in one's browser
if one would rather not download the files without
knowing their provenance
In the interest of saving download bandwidth and
space, I encoded the files at as MP4a/AAC at the
highest quality level -- 512 kbps FBR.
I can also provide FLAC if anyone is interested,
however the size is more than double even at
the highest compression level.
Enjoy!
dk
PS. I am particularly interested in finding out if
MELMOTH can identify the semi-conductor and
the orchestra through his magnificent system!
Nothing has changed my mind on this question for a few decades now.
Colin Davis (or perhaps it is really the ghost of Sir Thomas Beecham) with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra in 1961 on EMI/Warner.
dk
2021-03-26 22:18:00 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Randy Lane
Post by dk
Post by Phl Maestro
C. Kleiber/Orfeo
Barenboim/Teldec (he also led the best 7th I've seen live; with the CSO)
Furtwangler wartime
Asking about performance, recording, or both? To
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/kcqmkn2upttlnze/AABswlEMXT5TC5j8Sgi6UytFa?dl=0
It can be played as a single work by pointing the
VLC player to the folder, rather than to individual
files.It can also be played directly in one's browser
if one would rather not download the files without
knowing their provenance
In the interest of saving download bandwidth and
space, I encoded the files at as MP4a/AAC at the
highest quality level -- 512 kbps FBR.
I can also provide FLAC if anyone is interested,
however the size is more than double even at
the highest compression level.
Enjoy!
dk
PS. I am particularly interested in finding out if
MELMOTH can identify the semi-conductor and
the orchestra through his magnificent system!
Nothing has changed my mind on this question for a few decades now.
Colin Davis (or perhaps it is really the ghost of Sir Thomas Beecham)
with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra in 1961 on EMI/Warner.
Close, but no cigar! ;-)

dk
dk
2021-03-27 04:10:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
Post by Phl Maestro
C. Kleiber/Orfeo
Barenboim/Teldec (he also led the best 7th I've seen live; with the CSO)
Furtwangler wartime
Asking about performance, recording, or both? To
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/kcqmkn2upttlnze/AABswlEMXT5TC5j8Sgi6UytFa?dl=0
It can be played as a single work by pointing the
VLC player to the folder, rather than to individual
files.It can also be played directly in one's browser
if one would rather not download the files without
knowing their provenance
In the interest of saving download bandwidth and
space, I encoded the files at as MP4a/AAC at the
highest quality level -- 512 kbps FBR.
I can also provide FLAC if anyone is interested,
however the size is more than double even at
the highest compression level.
The FLAC version sounds very slightly "better", at
least on my PC and through my headphones. The
sound seems a little "rounder" and less edgy.

dk
tonyh
2021-03-27 20:00:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
Post by Phl Maestro
C. Kleiber/Orfeo
Barenboim/Teldec (he also led the best 7th I've seen live; with the CSO)
Furtwangler wartime
Asking about performance, recording, or both? To
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/kcqmkn2upttlnze/AABswlEMXT5TC5j8Sgi6UytFa?dl=0
It can be played as a single work by pointing the
VLC player to the folder, rather than to individual
files.It can also be played directly in one's browser
if one would rather not download the files without
knowing their provenance
In the interest of saving download bandwidth and
space, I encoded the files at as MP4a/AAC at the
highest quality level -- 512 kbps FBR.
I can also provide FLAC if anyone is interested,
however the size is more than double even at
the highest compression level.
The FLAC version sounds very slightly "better", at
least on my PC and through my headphones. The
sound seems a little "rounder" and less edgy.
dk
Well I like what I hear but as I’m rubbish with music quizzes I’d like to know who it is (please...))
dk
2021-03-27 20:07:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tonyh
Post by dk
Post by Phl Maestro
C. Kleiber/Orfeo
Barenboim/Teldec (he also led the best 7th I've seen live; with the CSO)
Furtwangler wartime
Asking about performance, recording, or both? To
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/kcqmkn2upttlnze/AABswlEMXT5TC5j8Sgi6UytFa?dl=0
It can be played as a single work by pointing the
VLC player to the folder, rather than to individual
files.It can also be played directly in one's browser
if one would rather not download the files without
knowing their provenance
In the interest of saving download bandwidth and
space, I encoded the files at as MP4a/AAC at the
highest quality level -- 512 kbps FBR.
I can also provide FLAC if anyone is interested,
however the size is more than double even at
the highest compression level.
The FLAC version sounds very slightly "better", at
least on my PC and through my headphones. The
sound seems a little "rounder" and less edgy.
Well I like what I hear but as I’m rubbish with music
quizzes I’d like to know who it is (please...))
Thanks for listening. The purpose of posting a recording
anonymously is definitely not to start a guessing contest.

It is to allow listeners to focus on what they hear without
allowing themselves to be influenced by pre-conceived
notions about the performer, or possibly even prejudice.

Since you liked what you heard, please elaborate on
your experience -- what you liked and why, what you
liked less and why, and so on.

I will reveal the identity of the conductor and of the
orchestra in a few days.

Thanks again!

dk
tonyh
2021-03-28 10:30:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
Post by dk
Post by Phl Maestro
C. Kleiber/Orfeo
Barenboim/Teldec (he also led the best 7th I've seen live; with the CSO)
Furtwangler wartime
Asking about performance, recording, or both? To
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/kcqmkn2upttlnze/AABswlEMXT5TC5j8Sgi6UytFa?dl=0
It can be played as a single work by pointing the
VLC player to the folder, rather than to individual
files.It can also be played directly in one's browser
if one would rather not download the files without
knowing their provenance
In the interest of saving download bandwidth and
space, I encoded the files at as MP4a/AAC at the
highest quality level -- 512 kbps FBR.
I can also provide FLAC if anyone is interested,
however the size is more than double even at
the highest compression level.
The FLAC version sounds very slightly "better", at
least on my PC and through my headphones. The
sound seems a little "rounder" and less edgy.
Well I like what I hear but as I’m rubbish with music
quizzes I’d like to know who it is (please...))
Thanks for listening. The purpose of posting a recording
anonymously is definitely not to start a guessing contest.
It is to allow listeners to focus on what they hear without
allowing themselves to be influenced by pre-conceived
notions about the performer, or possibly even prejudice.
Since you liked what you heard, please elaborate on
your experience -- what you liked and why, what you
liked less and why, and so on.
I will reveal the identity of the conductor and of the
orchestra in a few days.
Thanks again!
dk
Well I'm no expert but will give it a go !
Having listened for the last few years to mainly HIPP or HIPP-influenced readings, with their very swift tempos, tailed-off phrase endings, sharp drum thwacks, lack of vibrato etc etc., it was a nice re-acquaintance in this recording with a more 'old school' type of performance that I grew up with. It's obviously a traditional modern orchestra, and for a live concert very fine playing. No first movement exposition repeat is fine by me, as the lead back in is a bit clumsy to my ears, and the tempo of the first three movements is on the steady side. This doesn't matter as the conductor sounds like he's thought about internal balance of instruments and energy and pulse coming from the bass lines, so there's plenty of rhythmic vigour and no madcap rushing through phrases, which is welcome. The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where it should be - the ending !!
It does remind me as I say of records I grew up with, which in the case of the 7th were Davis/ RPO and Cluytens/ BPO, then latterly Leibowitz/ RPO. I really couldn't hazard a guess out of the multitude around these days, but have certainly gone back to it more than once !
dk
2021-03-28 22:29:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tonyh
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
Post by dk
Post by Phl Maestro
C. Kleiber/Orfeo
Barenboim/Teldec (he also led the best 7th I've seen live; with the CSO)
Furtwangler wartime
Asking about performance, recording, or both? To
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/kcqmkn2upttlnze/AABswlEMXT5TC5j8Sgi6UytFa?dl=0
It can be played as a single work by pointing the
VLC player to the folder, rather than to individual
files.It can also be played directly in one's browser
if one would rather not download the files without
knowing their provenance
In the interest of saving download bandwidth and
space, I encoded the files at as MP4a/AAC at the
highest quality level -- 512 kbps FBR.
I can also provide FLAC if anyone is interested,
however the size is more than double even at
the highest compression level.
The FLAC version sounds very slightly "better", at
least on my PC and through my headphones. The
sound seems a little "rounder" and less edgy.
Well I like what I hear but as I’m rubbish with music
quizzes I’d like to know who it is (please...))
Thanks for listening. The purpose of posting a recording
anonymously is definitely not to start a guessing contest.
It is to allow listeners to focus on what they hear without
allowing themselves to be influenced by pre-conceived
notions about the performer, or possibly even prejudice.
Since you liked what you heard, please elaborate on
your experience -- what you liked and why, what you
liked less and why, and so on.
I will reveal the identity of the conductor and of the
orchestra in a few days.
Thanks again!
Well I'm no expert but will give it a go !
Thanks again for listening and for your thoughtful comments.
Post by tonyh
Having listened for the last few years to mainly HIP or HIP-influenced
readings, with their very swift tempos, tailed-off phrase endings, sharp
drum thwacks, lack of vibrato etc etc., it was a nice re-acquaintance in
this recording with a more 'old school' type of performance that I grew
up with.
It is not obvious to me how (and even if) the "HIP" concept applies to
romantic or late romantic composers' music.
Post by tonyh
It's obviously a traditional modern orchestra, and for a live concert very
fine playing.
It is one of the best known orchestras on the planet! ;-)
Post by tonyh
No first movement exposition repeat is fine by me, as the lead back in
is a bit clumsy to my ears, and the tempo of the first three movements
is on the steady side.
No exposition repeat is great! This allows more time for intermission
and for coffee and chitchat.
Post by tonyh
This doesn't matter as the conductor sounds like he's thought about
internal balance of instruments and energy and pulse coming from
the bass lines, so there's plenty of rhythmic vigour and no madcap
rushing through phrases, which is welcome.
This is good to hear! Does this remind you of any conductor you know?
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
Post by tonyh
It does remind me as I say of records I grew up with, which in the
case of the 7th were Davis/ RPO and Cluytens/ BPO, then latterly
Leibowitz/ RPO. I really couldn't hazard a guess out of the multitude
around these days, but have certainly gone back to it more than once!
The orchestra is actually the LSO. Would you say this is a British,
German, American or Russian conductor? None of the above? All
of the above? French? An alien from another planet? ;-)

dk
raymond....@gmail.com
2021-03-28 23:19:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
Post by dk
Post by Phl Maestro
C. Kleiber/Orfeo
Barenboim/Teldec (he also led the best 7th I've seen live; with the CSO)
Furtwangler wartime
Asking about performance, recording, or both? To
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/kcqmkn2upttlnze/AABswlEMXT5TC5j8Sgi6UytFa?dl=0
It can be played as a single work by pointing the
VLC player to the folder, rather than to individual
files.It can also be played directly in one's browser
if one would rather not download the files without
knowing their provenance
In the interest of saving download bandwidth and
space, I encoded the files at as MP4a/AAC at the
highest quality level -- 512 kbps FBR.
I can also provide FLAC if anyone is interested,
however the size is more than double even at
the highest compression level.
The FLAC version sounds very slightly "better", at
least on my PC and through my headphones. The
sound seems a little "rounder" and less edgy.
Well I like what I hear but as I’m rubbish with music
quizzes I’d like to know who it is (please...))
Thanks for listening. The purpose of posting a recording
anonymously is definitely not to start a guessing contest.
It is to allow listeners to focus on what they hear without
allowing themselves to be influenced by pre-conceived
notions about the performer, or possibly even prejudice.
Since you liked what you heard, please elaborate on
your experience -- what you liked and why, what you
liked less and why, and so on.
I will reveal the identity of the conductor and of the
orchestra in a few days.
Thanks again!
Well I'm no expert but will give it a go !
Thanks again for listening and for your thoughtful comments.
Post by tonyh
Having listened for the last few years to mainly HIP or HIP-influenced
readings, with their very swift tempos, tailed-off phrase endings, sharp
drum thwacks, lack of vibrato etc etc., it was a nice re-acquaintance in
this recording with a more 'old school' type of performance that I grew
up with.
It is not obvious to me how (and even if) the "HIP" concept applies to
romantic or late romantic composers' music.
Post by tonyh
It's obviously a traditional modern orchestra, and for a live concert very
fine playing.
It is one of the best known orchestras on the planet! ;-)
Post by tonyh
No first movement exposition repeat is fine by me, as the lead back in
is a bit clumsy to my ears, and the tempo of the first three movements
is on the steady side.
No exposition repeat is great! This allows more time for intermission
and for coffee and chitchat.
Post by tonyh
This doesn't matter as the conductor sounds like he's thought about
internal balance of instruments and energy and pulse coming from
the bass lines, so there's plenty of rhythmic vigour and no madcap
rushing through phrases, which is welcome.
This is good to hear! Does this remind you of any conductor you know?
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
Post by tonyh
It does remind me as I say of records I grew up with, which in the
case of the 7th were Davis/ RPO and Cluytens/ BPO, then latterly
Leibowitz/ RPO. I really couldn't hazard a guess out of the multitude
around these days, but have certainly gone back to it more than once!
The orchestra is actually the LSO. Would you say this is a British,
German, American or Russian conductor? None of the above? All
of the above? French? An alien from another planet? ;-)
dk
Surely it must be Pierre Monteux/LSO.

Ray Hall, Taree
dk
2021-03-28 23:26:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
Post by dk
Post by Phl Maestro
C. Kleiber/Orfeo
Barenboim/Teldec (he also led the best 7th I've seen live; with the CSO)
Furtwangler wartime
Asking about performance, recording, or both? To
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/kcqmkn2upttlnze/AABswlEMXT5TC5j8Sgi6UytFa?dl=0
It can be played as a single work by pointing the
VLC player to the folder, rather than to individual
files.It can also be played directly in one's browser
if one would rather not download the files without
knowing their provenance
In the interest of saving download bandwidth and
space, I encoded the files at as MP4a/AAC at the
highest quality level -- 512 kbps FBR.
I can also provide FLAC if anyone is interested,
however the size is more than double even at
the highest compression level.
The FLAC version sounds very slightly "better", at
least on my PC and through my headphones. The
sound seems a little "rounder" and less edgy.
Well I like what I hear but as I’m rubbish with music
quizzes I’d like to know who it is (please...))
Thanks for listening. The purpose of posting a recording
anonymously is definitely not to start a guessing contest.
It is to allow listeners to focus on what they hear without
allowing themselves to be influenced by pre-conceived
notions about the performer, or possibly even prejudice.
Since you liked what you heard, please elaborate on
your experience -- what you liked and why, what you
liked less and why, and so on.
I will reveal the identity of the conductor and of the
orchestra in a few days.
Thanks again!
Well I'm no expert but will give it a go !
Thanks again for listening and for your thoughtful comments.
Post by tonyh
Having listened for the last few years to mainly HIP or HIP-influenced
readings, with their very swift tempos, tailed-off phrase endings, sharp
drum thwacks, lack of vibrato etc etc., it was a nice re-acquaintance in
this recording with a more 'old school' type of performance that I grew
up with.
It is not obvious to me how (and even if) the "HIP" concept applies to
romantic or late romantic composers' music.
Post by tonyh
It's obviously a traditional modern orchestra, and for a live concert very
fine playing.
It is one of the best known orchestras on the planet! ;-)
Post by tonyh
No first movement exposition repeat is fine by me, as the lead back in
is a bit clumsy to my ears, and the tempo of the first three movements
is on the steady side.
No exposition repeat is great! This allows more time for intermission
and for coffee and chitchat.
Post by tonyh
This doesn't matter as the conductor sounds like he's thought about
internal balance of instruments and energy and pulse coming from
the bass lines, so there's plenty of rhythmic vigour and no madcap
rushing through phrases, which is welcome.
This is good to hear! Does this remind you of any conductor you know?
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
Post by tonyh
It does remind me as I say of records I grew up with, which in the
case of the 7th were Davis/ RPO and Cluytens/ BPO, then latterly
Leibowitz/ RPO. I really couldn't hazard a guess out of the multitude
around these days, but have certainly gone back to it more than once!
The orchestra is actually the LSO. Would you say this is a British,
German, American or Russian conductor? None of the above? All
of the above? French? An alien from another planet? ;-)
Surely it must be Pierre Monteux/LSO.
No Monteux, just the LSO! ;-)

Have you listened?

dk
raymond....@gmail.com
2021-03-29 00:43:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by dk
The orchestra is actually the LSO. Would you say this is a British,
German, American or Russian conductor? None of the above? All
of the above? French? An alien from another planet? ;-)
Surely it must be Pierre Monteux/LSO.
No Monteux, just the LSO! ;-)
Have you listened?
dk
No, but I will.

Ray Hall, Taree
dk
2021-03-29 03:08:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
Post by dk
Post by Phl Maestro
C. Kleiber/Orfeo
Barenboim/Teldec (he also led the best 7th I've seen live; with the CSO)
Furtwangler wartime
Asking about performance, recording, or both? To
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/kcqmkn2upttlnze/AABswlEMXT5TC5j8Sgi6UytFa?dl=0
It can be played as a single work by pointing the
VLC player to the folder, rather than to individual
files.It can also be played directly in one's browser
if one would rather not download the files without
knowing their provenance
In the interest of saving download bandwidth and
space, I encoded the files at as MP4a/AAC at the
highest quality level -- 512 kbps FBR.
I can also provide FLAC if anyone is interested,
however the size is more than double even at
the highest compression level.
The FLAC version sounds very slightly "better", at
least on my PC and through my headphones. The
sound seems a little "rounder" and less edgy.
Well I like what I hear but as I’m rubbish with music
quizzes I’d like to know who it is (please...))
Thanks for listening. The purpose of posting a recording
anonymously is definitely not to start a guessing contest.
It is to allow listeners to focus on what they hear without
allowing themselves to be influenced by pre-conceived
notions about the performer, or possibly even prejudice.
Since you liked what you heard, please elaborate on
your experience -- what you liked and why, what you
liked less and why, and so on.
I will reveal the identity of the conductor and of the
orchestra in a few days.
Thanks again!
Well I'm no expert but will give it a go !
Thanks again for listening and for your thoughtful comments.
Post by tonyh
Having listened for the last few years to mainly HIP or HIP-influenced
readings, with their very swift tempos, tailed-off phrase endings, sharp
drum thwacks, lack of vibrato etc etc., it was a nice re-acquaintance in
this recording with a more 'old school' type of performance that I grew
up with.
It is not obvious to me how (and even if) the "HIP" concept applies to
romantic or late romantic composers' music.
Post by tonyh
It's obviously a traditional modern orchestra, and for a live concert very
fine playing.
It is one of the best known orchestras on the planet! ;-)
Post by tonyh
No first movement exposition repeat is fine by me, as the lead back in
is a bit clumsy to my ears, and the tempo of the first three movements
is on the steady side.
No exposition repeat is great! This allows more time for intermission
and for coffee and chitchat.
Post by tonyh
This doesn't matter as the conductor sounds like he's thought about
internal balance of instruments and energy and pulse coming from
the bass lines, so there's plenty of rhythmic vigour and no madcap
rushing through phrases, which is welcome.
This is good to hear! Does this remind you of any conductor you know?
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
Post by tonyh
It does remind me as I say of records I grew up with, which in the
case of the 7th were Davis/ RPO and Cluytens/ BPO, then latterly
Leibowitz/ RPO. I really couldn't hazard a guess out of the multitude
around these days, but have certainly gone back to it more than once!
The orchestra is actually the LSO. Would you say this is a British,
German, American or Russian conductor? None of the above? All
of the above? French? An alien from another planet? ;-)
Surely it must be Pierre Monteux/LSO.
No Monteux, just the LSO! ;-)
I just noticed another cockpit error! It isn't the LSO, it is the RPO!
Mea culpa!

To alleviate the injury, here is a Mahler 5th from the same concert!

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/0ufpicefa5e6017/AACWyvNr3uy0JMGqfAFcFo3Ua?dl=0

This should narrow things down quite a bit! ;-)

dk
tonyh
2021-03-29 11:17:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
Post by dk
Post by Phl Maestro
C. Kleiber/Orfeo
Barenboim/Teldec (he also led the best 7th I've seen live; with the CSO)
Furtwangler wartime
Asking about performance, recording, or both? To
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/kcqmkn2upttlnze/AABswlEMXT5TC5j8Sgi6UytFa?dl=0
It can be played as a single work by pointing the
VLC player to the folder, rather than to individual
files.It can also be played directly in one's browser
if one would rather not download the files without
knowing their provenance
In the interest of saving download bandwidth and
space, I encoded the files at as MP4a/AAC at the
highest quality level -- 512 kbps FBR.
I can also provide FLAC if anyone is interested,
however the size is more than double even at
the highest compression level.
The FLAC version sounds very slightly "better", at
least on my PC and through my headphones. The
sound seems a little "rounder" and less edgy.
Well I like what I hear but as I’m rubbish with music
quizzes I’d like to know who it is (please...))
Thanks for listening. The purpose of posting a recording
anonymously is definitely not to start a guessing contest.
It is to allow listeners to focus on what they hear without
allowing themselves to be influenced by pre-conceived
notions about the performer, or possibly even prejudice.
Since you liked what you heard, please elaborate on
your experience -- what you liked and why, what you
liked less and why, and so on.
I will reveal the identity of the conductor and of the
orchestra in a few days.
Thanks again!
Well I'm no expert but will give it a go !
Thanks again for listening and for your thoughtful comments.
Post by tonyh
Having listened for the last few years to mainly HIP or HIP-influenced
readings, with their very swift tempos, tailed-off phrase endings, sharp
drum thwacks, lack of vibrato etc etc., it was a nice re-acquaintance in
this recording with a more 'old school' type of performance that I grew
up with.
It is not obvious to me how (and even if) the "HIP" concept applies to
romantic or late romantic composers' music.
Post by tonyh
It's obviously a traditional modern orchestra, and for a live concert very
fine playing.
It is one of the best known orchestras on the planet! ;-)
Post by tonyh
No first movement exposition repeat is fine by me, as the lead back in
is a bit clumsy to my ears, and the tempo of the first three movements
is on the steady side.
No exposition repeat is great! This allows more time for intermission
and for coffee and chitchat.
Post by tonyh
This doesn't matter as the conductor sounds like he's thought about
internal balance of instruments and energy and pulse coming from
the bass lines, so there's plenty of rhythmic vigour and no madcap
rushing through phrases, which is welcome.
This is good to hear! Does this remind you of any conductor you know?
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
Post by tonyh
It does remind me as I say of records I grew up with, which in the
case of the 7th were Davis/ RPO and Cluytens/ BPO, then latterly
Leibowitz/ RPO. I really couldn't hazard a guess out of the multitude
around these days, but have certainly gone back to it more than once!
The orchestra is actually the LSO. Would you say this is a British,
German, American or Russian conductor? None of the above? All
of the above? French? An alien from another planet? ;-)
Surely it must be Pierre Monteux/LSO.
No Monteux, just the LSO! ;-)
I just noticed another cockpit error! It isn't the LSO, it is the RPO!
Mea culpa!
To alleviate the injury, here is a Mahler 5th from the same concert!
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/0ufpicefa5e6017/AACWyvNr3uy0JMGqfAFcFo3Ua?dl=0
This should narrow things down quite a bit! ;-)
dk
Tut tut - and there's me losing a night's sleep trying to figure out a recent LSO live concert NOT in the Barbican...))
The RPO have a distinguished history in this work (Davis, Leibowitz, Wordsworth) but I think this one is your alien...
dk
2021-03-29 20:04:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tonyh
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
Post by dk
Post by Phl Maestro
C. Kleiber/Orfeo
Barenboim/Teldec (he also led the best 7th I've seen live; with the CSO)
Furtwangler wartime
Asking about performance, recording, or both? To
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/kcqmkn2upttlnze/AABswlEMXT5TC5j8Sgi6UytFa?dl=0
It can be played as a single work by pointing the
VLC player to the folder, rather than to individual
files.It can also be played directly in one's browser
if one would rather not download the files without
knowing their provenance
In the interest of saving download bandwidth and
space, I encoded the files at as MP4a/AAC at the
highest quality level -- 512 kbps FBR.
I can also provide FLAC if anyone is interested,
however the size is more than double even at
the highest compression level.
The FLAC version sounds very slightly "better", at
least on my PC and through my headphones. The
sound seems a little "rounder" and less edgy.
Well I like what I hear but as I’m rubbish with music
quizzes I’d like to know who it is (please...))
Thanks for listening. The purpose of posting a recording
anonymously is definitely not to start a guessing contest.
It is to allow listeners to focus on what they hear without
allowing themselves to be influenced by pre-conceived
notions about the performer, or possibly even prejudice.
Since you liked what you heard, please elaborate on
your experience -- what you liked and why, what you
liked less and why, and so on.
I will reveal the identity of the conductor and of the
orchestra in a few days.
Thanks again!
Well I'm no expert but will give it a go !
Thanks again for listening and for your thoughtful comments.
Post by tonyh
Having listened for the last few years to mainly HIP or HIP-influenced
readings, with their very swift tempos, tailed-off phrase endings, sharp
drum thwacks, lack of vibrato etc etc., it was a nice re-acquaintance in
this recording with a more 'old school' type of performance that I grew
up with.
It is not obvious to me how (and even if) the "HIP" concept applies to
romantic or late romantic composers' music.
Post by tonyh
It's obviously a traditional modern orchestra, and for a live concert very
fine playing.
It is one of the best known orchestras on the planet! ;-)
Post by tonyh
No first movement exposition repeat is fine by me, as the lead back in
is a bit clumsy to my ears, and the tempo of the first three movements
is on the steady side.
No exposition repeat is great! This allows more time for intermission
and for coffee and chitchat.
Post by tonyh
This doesn't matter as the conductor sounds like he's thought about
internal balance of instruments and energy and pulse coming from
the bass lines, so there's plenty of rhythmic vigour and no madcap
rushing through phrases, which is welcome.
This is good to hear! Does this remind you of any conductor you know?
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
Post by tonyh
It does remind me as I say of records I grew up with, which in the
case of the 7th were Davis/ RPO and Cluytens/ BPO, then latterly
Leibowitz/ RPO. I really couldn't hazard a guess out of the multitude
around these days, but have certainly gone back to it more than once!
The orchestra is actually the LSO. Would you say this is a British,
German, American or Russian conductor? None of the above? All
of the above? French? An alien from another planet? ;-)
Surely it must be Pierre Monteux/LSO.
No Monteux, just the LSO! ;-)
I just noticed another cockpit error! It isn't the LSO, it is the RPO!
Mea culpa!
To alleviate the injury, here is a Mahler 5th from the same concert!
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/0ufpicefa5e6017/AACWyvNr3uy0JMGqfAFcFo3Ua?dl=0
This should narrow things down quite a bit! ;-)
Tut tut - and there's me losing a night's sleep trying to figure
out a recent LSO live concert NOT in the Barbican...))
The RPO have a distinguished history in this work (Davis,
Leibowitz, Wordsworth) but I think this one is your alien...
Did you hear the Mahler?

dk
tonyh
2021-03-29 21:34:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
Post by dk
Post by Phl Maestro
C. Kleiber/Orfeo
Barenboim/Teldec (he also led the best 7th I've seen live; with the CSO)
Furtwangler wartime
Asking about performance, recording, or both? To
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/kcqmkn2upttlnze/AABswlEMXT5TC5j8Sgi6UytFa?dl=0
It can be played as a single work by pointing the
VLC player to the folder, rather than to individual
files.It can also be played directly in one's browser
if one would rather not download the files without
knowing their provenance
In the interest of saving download bandwidth and
space, I encoded the files at as MP4a/AAC at the
highest quality level -- 512 kbps FBR.
I can also provide FLAC if anyone is interested,
however the size is more than double even at
the highest compression level.
The FLAC version sounds very slightly "better", at
least on my PC and through my headphones. The
sound seems a little "rounder" and less edgy.
Well I like what I hear but as I’m rubbish with music
quizzes I’d like to know who it is (please...))
Thanks for listening. The purpose of posting a recording
anonymously is definitely not to start a guessing contest.
It is to allow listeners to focus on what they hear without
allowing themselves to be influenced by pre-conceived
notions about the performer, or possibly even prejudice.
Since you liked what you heard, please elaborate on
your experience -- what you liked and why, what you
liked less and why, and so on.
I will reveal the identity of the conductor and of the
orchestra in a few days.
Thanks again!
Well I'm no expert but will give it a go !
Thanks again for listening and for your thoughtful comments.
Post by tonyh
Having listened for the last few years to mainly HIP or HIP-influenced
readings, with their very swift tempos, tailed-off phrase endings, sharp
drum thwacks, lack of vibrato etc etc., it was a nice re-acquaintance in
this recording with a more 'old school' type of performance that I grew
up with.
It is not obvious to me how (and even if) the "HIP" concept applies to
romantic or late romantic composers' music.
Post by tonyh
It's obviously a traditional modern orchestra, and for a live concert very
fine playing.
It is one of the best known orchestras on the planet! ;-)
Post by tonyh
No first movement exposition repeat is fine by me, as the lead back in
is a bit clumsy to my ears, and the tempo of the first three movements
is on the steady side.
No exposition repeat is great! This allows more time for intermission
and for coffee and chitchat.
Post by tonyh
This doesn't matter as the conductor sounds like he's thought about
internal balance of instruments and energy and pulse coming from
the bass lines, so there's plenty of rhythmic vigour and no madcap
rushing through phrases, which is welcome.
This is good to hear! Does this remind you of any conductor you know?
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
Post by tonyh
It does remind me as I say of records I grew up with, which in the
case of the 7th were Davis/ RPO and Cluytens/ BPO, then latterly
Leibowitz/ RPO. I really couldn't hazard a guess out of the multitude
around these days, but have certainly gone back to it more than once!
The orchestra is actually the LSO. Would you say this is a British,
German, American or Russian conductor? None of the above? All
of the above? French? An alien from another planet? ;-)
Surely it must be Pierre Monteux/LSO.
No Monteux, just the LSO! ;-)
I just noticed another cockpit error! It isn't the LSO, it is the RPO!
Mea culpa!
To alleviate the injury, here is a Mahler 5th from the same concert!
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/0ufpicefa5e6017/AACWyvNr3uy0JMGqfAFcFo3Ua?dl=0
This should narrow things down quite a bit! ;-)
Tut tut - and there's me losing a night's sleep trying to figure
out a recent LSO live concert NOT in the Barbican...))
The RPO have a distinguished history in this work (Davis,
Leibowitz, Wordsworth) but I think this one is your alien...
Did you hear the Mahler?
dk
Not yet but plan to - it'll be enjoyable I'm sure as the recording quality here is first rate (acoustic, balance etc) and I also have a favourite Mahler 5 in my collection from the RPO and Gatti, so I know they do it well...
dk
2021-03-29 22:41:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tonyh
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
Post by dk
Post by Phl Maestro
C. Kleiber/Orfeo
Barenboim/Teldec (he also led the best 7th I've seen live; with the CSO)
Furtwangler wartime
Asking about performance, recording, or both? To
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/kcqmkn2upttlnze/AABswlEMXT5TC5j8Sgi6UytFa?dl=0
It can be played as a single work by pointing the
VLC player to the folder, rather than to individual
files.It can also be played directly in one's browser
if one would rather not download the files without
knowing their provenance
In the interest of saving download bandwidth and
space, I encoded the files at as MP4a/AAC at the
highest quality level -- 512 kbps FBR.
I can also provide FLAC if anyone is interested,
however the size is more than double even at
the highest compression level.
The FLAC version sounds very slightly "better", at
least on my PC and through my headphones. The
sound seems a little "rounder" and less edgy.
Well I like what I hear but as I’m rubbish with music
quizzes I’d like to know who it is (please...))
Thanks for listening. The purpose of posting a recording
anonymously is definitely not to start a guessing contest.
It is to allow listeners to focus on what they hear without
allowing themselves to be influenced by pre-conceived
notions about the performer, or possibly even prejudice.
Since you liked what you heard, please elaborate on
your experience -- what you liked and why, what you
liked less and why, and so on.
I will reveal the identity of the conductor and of the
orchestra in a few days.
Thanks again!
Well I'm no expert but will give it a go !
Thanks again for listening and for your thoughtful comments.
Post by tonyh
Having listened for the last few years to mainly HIP or HIP-influenced
readings, with their very swift tempos, tailed-off phrase endings, sharp
drum thwacks, lack of vibrato etc etc., it was a nice re-acquaintance in
this recording with a more 'old school' type of performance that I grew
up with.
It is not obvious to me how (and even if) the "HIP" concept applies to
romantic or late romantic composers' music.
Post by tonyh
It's obviously a traditional modern orchestra, and for a live concert very
fine playing.
It is one of the best known orchestras on the planet! ;-)
Post by tonyh
No first movement exposition repeat is fine by me, as the lead back in
is a bit clumsy to my ears, and the tempo of the first three movements
is on the steady side.
No exposition repeat is great! This allows more time for intermission
and for coffee and chitchat.
Post by tonyh
This doesn't matter as the conductor sounds like he's thought about
internal balance of instruments and energy and pulse coming from
the bass lines, so there's plenty of rhythmic vigour and no madcap
rushing through phrases, which is welcome.
This is good to hear! Does this remind you of any conductor you know?
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
Post by tonyh
It does remind me as I say of records I grew up with, which in the
case of the 7th were Davis/ RPO and Cluytens/ BPO, then latterly
Leibowitz/ RPO. I really couldn't hazard a guess out of the multitude
around these days, but have certainly gone back to it more than once!
The orchestra is actually the LSO. Would you say this is a British,
German, American or Russian conductor? None of the above? All
of the above? French? An alien from another planet? ;-)
Surely it must be Pierre Monteux/LSO.
No Monteux, just the LSO! ;-)
I just noticed another cockpit error! It isn't the LSO, it is the RPO!
Mea culpa!
To alleviate the injury, here is a Mahler 5th from the same concert!
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/0ufpicefa5e6017/AACWyvNr3uy0JMGqfAFcFo3Ua?dl=0
This should narrow things down quite a bit! ;-)
Tut tut - and there's me losing a night's sleep trying to figure
out a recent LSO live concert NOT in the Barbican...))
The RPO have a distinguished history in this work (Davis,
Leibowitz, Wordsworth) but I think this one is your alien...
Did you hear the Mahler?
Not yet but plan to - it'll be enjoyable I'm sure as the recording
quality here is first rate (acoustic, balance etc) and I also have
a favourite Mahler 5 in my collection from the RPO and Gatti,
so I know they do it well...
Please do -- and let us know what you think! The recording
comes from the same live performance as the Beethoven 7th.
Heads up: it is a faster take on the music than Gatti and you
may not enjoy it as much if you prefer Mahler played slowly.

dk
Owen
2021-03-30 03:22:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
I found the finale completely without yaks, much to my disappointment.
No sense of being on the edge of losing it, being completely and
comfortably in control. I was impressed with the majesty of the 2nd
movement, but the lack of yaks makes it a deal breaker for me.

-Owen
dk
2021-03-30 03:45:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
I found the finale completely without yaks, much to my disappointment.
No sense of being on the edge of losing it, being completely and
comfortably in control. I was impressed with the majesty of the 2nd
movement, but the lack of yaks makes it a deal breaker for me.
Thanks for listening. Are these comments about the Beethoven 7
or about the Mahler 5? What are "yaks" and how do they sound?

dk
dk
2021-03-30 03:52:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
I found the finale completely without yaks, much to my disappointment.
No sense of being on the edge of losing it, being completely and
comfortably in control. I was impressed with the majesty of the 2nd
movement, but the lack of yaks makes it a deal breaker for me.
Thanks for listening. Are these comments about the Beethoven 7
or about the Mahler 5? What are "yaks" and how do they sound?
Could you please provide some yak examples for illustration?
Camels too if you can spare some for Sheherazade! ;-)

dk
Owen
2021-03-30 14:46:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
I found the finale completely without yaks, much to my disappointment.
No sense of being on the edge of losing it, being completely and
comfortably in control. I was impressed with the majesty of the 2nd
movement, but the lack of yaks makes it a deal breaker for me.
Thanks for listening. Are these comments about the Beethoven 7
or about the Mahler 5? What are "yaks" and how do they sound?
Could you please provide some yak examples for illustration?
Camels too if you can spare some for Sheherazade! ;-)
I have no camels, but I am happy to provide a surfeit of yaks:
http://www.woodsedge.com/tibetan-yak

These yaks take their Beethoven seriously!

Of course, I am referring to the Beethoven 7th, a la Beecham, who
famously remarked about it:

"well, what can you do with it? It's like a bunch of yaks jumping about."



-Owen
dk
2021-03-30 18:35:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
I found the finale completely without yaks, much to my disappointment.
No sense of being on the edge of losing it, being completely and
comfortably in control. I was impressed with the majesty of the 2nd
movement, but the lack of yaks makes it a deal breaker for me.
Thanks for listening. Are these comments about the Beethoven 7
or about the Mahler 5? What are "yaks" and how do they sound?
Could you please provide some yak examples for illustration?
Camels too if you can spare some for Sheherazade! ;-)
http://www.woodsedge.com/tibetan-yak
These yaks take their Beethoven seriously!
Of course, I am referring to the Beethoven 7th, a la Beecham, who
"well, what can you do with it? It's like a bunch of yaks jumping about."
Thanks for the clarification. It is not obvious to me where
and how did TB manage to form an impression about yaks.

In any case, I stand by my assessment of the recordings I
posted -- yaks or no yaks.

dk
Owen
2021-03-31 04:22:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
I found the finale completely without yaks, much to my disappointment.
No sense of being on the edge of losing it, being completely and
comfortably in control. I was impressed with the majesty of the 2nd
movement, but the lack of yaks makes it a deal breaker for me.
Thanks for listening. Are these comments about the Beethoven 7
or about the Mahler 5? What are "yaks" and how do they sound?
Could you please provide some yak examples for illustration?
Camels too if you can spare some for Sheherazade! ;-)
http://www.woodsedge.com/tibetan-yak
These yaks take their Beethoven seriously!
Of course, I am referring to the Beethoven 7th, a la Beecham, who
"well, what can you do with it? It's like a bunch of yaks jumping about."
Thanks for the clarification. It is not obvious to me where
and how did TB manage to form an impression about yaks.
Obviously, from deep musical study and countless hours interpreting the
score. You don't get to conduct all those famous orchestras without
doing some study time.
Post by dk
In any case, I stand by my assessment of the recordings I
posted -- yaks or no yaks.
As well you should. Myself and my tin ears remain with Beecham and the
livestock on this point. That symphony simply has to have yaks.

-Owen
dk
2021-03-31 04:38:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
I found the finale completely without yaks, much to my disappointment.
No sense of being on the edge of losing it, being completely and
comfortably in control. I was impressed with the majesty of the 2nd
movement, but the lack of yaks makes it a deal breaker for me.
Thanks for listening. Are these comments about the Beethoven 7
or about the Mahler 5? What are "yaks" and how do they sound?
Could you please provide some yak examples for illustration?
Camels too if you can spare some for Sheherazade! ;-)
http://www.woodsedge.com/tibetan-yak
These yaks take their Beethoven seriously!
Of course, I am referring to the Beethoven 7th, a la Beecham, who
"well, what can you do with it? It's like a bunch of yaks jumping about."
Thanks for the clarification. It is not obvious to me where
and how did TB manage to form an impression about yaks.
Obviously, from deep musical study and countless hours interpreting the
score. You don't get to conduct all those famous orchestras without
doing some study time.
Post by dk
In any case, I stand by my assessment of the recordings I
posted -- yaks or no yaks.
As well you should. Myself and my tin ears remain with Beecham and the
livestock on this point. That symphony simply has to have yaks.
I will listen to the yaks again and find out! ;-)

dk
dk
2021-03-31 04:50:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
I found the finale completely without yaks, much to my disappointment.
No sense of being on the edge of losing it, being completely and
comfortably in control. I was impressed with the majesty of the 2nd
movement, but the lack of yaks makes it a deal breaker for me.
Thanks for listening. Are these comments about the Beethoven 7
or about the Mahler 5? What are "yaks" and how do they sound?
Could you please provide some yak examples for illustration?
Camels too if you can spare some for Sheherazade! ;-)
http://www.woodsedge.com/tibetan-yak
These yaks take their Beethoven seriously!
Of course, I am referring to the Beethoven 7th, a la Beecham, who
"well, what can you do with it? It's like a bunch of yaks jumping about."
Thanks for the clarification. It is not obvious to me where
and how did TB manage to form an impression about yaks.
Obviously, from deep musical study and countless hours interpreting the
score. You don't get to conduct all those famous orchestras without
doing some study time.
Post by dk
In any case, I stand by my assessment of the recordings I
posted -- yaks or no yaks.
As well you should. Myself and my tin ears remain with Beecham and the
livestock on this point. That symphony simply has to have yaks.
I will listen to the yaks again and find out! ;-)
I listened to the yaks

but I could not hear the music! BT must have kept
the orchestra on an LSD diet for months! However
if that makes one happy, then it makes one happy.
To my ears this is a perfect example why I hate
Beethoven's music. Crude, loud and vulgar. I
now have to listen to some Debussy.

dk
dk
2021-03-31 05:03:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
I found the finale completely without yaks, much to my disappointment.
No sense of being on the edge of losing it, being completely and
comfortably in control. I was impressed with the majesty of the 2nd
movement, but the lack of yaks makes it a deal breaker for me.
Thanks for listening. Are these comments about the Beethoven 7
or about the Mahler 5? What are "yaks" and how do they sound?
Could you please provide some yak examples for illustration?
Camels too if you can spare some for Sheherazade! ;-)
http://www.woodsedge.com/tibetan-yak
These yaks take their Beethoven seriously!
Of course, I am referring to the Beethoven 7th, a la Beecham, who
"well, what can you do with it? It's like a bunch of yaks jumping about."
Thanks for the clarification. It is not obvious to me where
and how did TB manage to form an impression about yaks.
Obviously, from deep musical study and countless hours interpreting the
score. You don't get to conduct all those famous orchestras without
doing some study time.
Post by dk
In any case, I stand by my assessment of the recordings I
posted -- yaks or no yaks.
As well you should. Myself and my tin ears remain with Beecham and the
livestock on this point. That symphony simply has to have yaks.
I will listen to the yaks again and find out! ;-)
I listened to the yaks
http://youtu.be/F8UbzRXAVL4
but I could not hear the music! BT must have kept
the orchestra on an LSD diet for months! However
if that makes one happy, then it makes one happy.
To my ears this is a perfect example why I hate
Beethoven's music. Crude, loud and vulgar. I
now have to listen to some Debussy.
Executive summary: yaks don't make music,
they can only make smelly butter! ;-)

dk
dk
2021-03-31 05:07:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
I found the finale completely without yaks, much to my disappointment.
No sense of being on the edge of losing it, being completely and
comfortably in control. I was impressed with the majesty of the 2nd
movement, but the lack of yaks makes it a deal breaker for me.
Thanks for listening. Are these comments about the Beethoven 7
or about the Mahler 5? What are "yaks" and how do they sound?
Could you please provide some yak examples for illustration?
Camels too if you can spare some for Sheherazade! ;-)
http://www.woodsedge.com/tibetan-yak
These yaks take their Beethoven seriously!
Of course, I am referring to the Beethoven 7th, a la Beecham, who
"well, what can you do with it? It's like a bunch of yaks jumping about."
Thanks for the clarification. It is not obvious to me where
and how did TB manage to form an impression about yaks.
Obviously, from deep musical study and countless hours interpreting the
score. You don't get to conduct all those famous orchestras without
doing some study time.
Post by dk
In any case, I stand by my assessment of the recordings I
posted -- yaks or no yaks.
As well you should. Myself and my tin ears remain with Beecham and the
livestock on this point. That symphony simply has to have yaks.
I will listen to the yaks again and find out! ;-)
I listened to the yaks
http://youtu.be/F8UbzRXAVL4
but I could not hear the music! BT must have kept
the orchestra on an LSD diet for months! However
if that makes one happy, then it makes one happy.
To my ears this is a perfect example why I hate
Beethoven's music. Crude, loud and vulgar. I
now have to listen to some Debussy.
Executive summary: yaks don't make music,
they can only make smelly butter! ;-)
Real music without yaks:

And of course the one I posted earlier.

dk
Flowsouth8
2021-03-31 08:27:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
I found the finale completely without yaks, much to my disappointment.
No sense of being on the edge of losing it, being completely and
comfortably in control. I was impressed with the majesty of the 2nd
movement, but the lack of yaks makes it a deal breaker for me.
Thanks for listening. Are these comments about the Beethoven 7
or about the Mahler 5? What are "yaks" and how do they sound?
Could you please provide some yak examples for illustration?
Camels too if you can spare some for Sheherazade! ;-)
http://www.woodsedge.com/tibetan-yak
These yaks take their Beethoven seriously!
Of course, I am referring to the Beethoven 7th, a la Beecham, who
"well, what can you do with it? It's like a bunch of yaks jumping about."
Thanks for the clarification. It is not obvious to me where
and how did TB manage to form an impression about yaks.
Obviously, from deep musical study and countless hours interpreting the
score. You don't get to conduct all those famous orchestras without
doing some study time.
Post by dk
In any case, I stand by my assessment of the recordings I
posted -- yaks or no yaks.
As well you should. Myself and my tin ears remain with Beecham and the
livestock on this point. That symphony simply has to have yaks.
I will listen to the yaks again and find out! ;-)
I listened to the yaks
http://youtu.be/F8UbzRXAVL4
but I could not hear the music! BT must have kept
the orchestra on an LSD diet for months! However
if that makes one happy, then it makes one happy.
To my ears this is a perfect example why I hate
Beethoven's music. Crude, loud and vulgar. I
now have to listen to some Debussy.
Executive summary: yaks don't make music,
they can only make smelly butter! ;-)
http://youtu.be/P6g-u6SiO_M
And of course the one I posted earlier.
dk
Are you going to reveal the mystery performance? The one posted here seems to be different.
dk
2021-03-31 09:26:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Flowsouth8
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
I found the finale completely without yaks, much to my disappointment.
No sense of being on the edge of losing it, being completely and
comfortably in control. I was impressed with the majesty of the 2nd
movement, but the lack of yaks makes it a deal breaker for me.
Thanks for listening. Are these comments about the Beethoven 7
or about the Mahler 5? What are "yaks" and how do they sound?
Could you please provide some yak examples for illustration?
Camels too if you can spare some for Sheherazade! ;-)
http://www.woodsedge.com/tibetan-yak
These yaks take their Beethoven seriously!
Of course, I am referring to the Beethoven 7th, a la Beecham, who
"well, what can you do with it? It's like a bunch of yaks jumping about."
Thanks for the clarification. It is not obvious to me where
and how did TB manage to form an impression about yaks.
Obviously, from deep musical study and countless hours interpreting the
score. You don't get to conduct all those famous orchestras without
doing some study time.
Post by dk
In any case, I stand by my assessment of the recordings I
posted -- yaks or no yaks.
As well you should. Myself and my tin ears remain with Beecham and the
livestock on this point. That symphony simply has to have yaks.
I will listen to the yaks again and find out! ;-)
I listened to the yaks
http://youtu.be/F8UbzRXAVL4
but I could not hear the music! BT must have kept
the orchestra on an LSD diet for months! However
if that makes one happy, then it makes one happy.
To my ears this is a perfect example why I hate
Beethoven's music. Crude, loud and vulgar. I
now have to listen to some Debussy.
Executive summary: yaks don't make music,
they can only make smelly butter! ;-)
http://youtu.be/P6g-u6SiO_M
And of course the one I posted earlier.
Are you going to reveal the mystery performance?
The one posted here seems to be different.
Yes indeed, this was just an example of a non-yakky
performance of Beethoven 7th.

The mystery performances come from the RPO's
Japan tour in 2009.

dk
dk
2021-03-31 09:31:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
Post by Flowsouth8
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
I found the finale completely without yaks, much to my disappointment.
No sense of being on the edge of losing it, being completely and
comfortably in control. I was impressed with the majesty of the 2nd
movement, but the lack of yaks makes it a deal breaker for me.
Thanks for listening. Are these comments about the Beethoven 7
or about the Mahler 5? What are "yaks" and how do they sound?
Could you please provide some yak examples for illustration?
Camels too if you can spare some for Sheherazade! ;-)
http://www.woodsedge.com/tibetan-yak
These yaks take their Beethoven seriously!
Of course, I am referring to the Beethoven 7th, a la Beecham, who
"well, what can you do with it? It's like a bunch of yaks jumping about."
Thanks for the clarification. It is not obvious to me where
and how did TB manage to form an impression about yaks.
Obviously, from deep musical study and countless hours interpreting the
score. You don't get to conduct all those famous orchestras without
doing some study time.
Post by dk
In any case, I stand by my assessment of the recordings I
posted -- yaks or no yaks.
As well you should. Myself and my tin ears remain with Beecham and the
livestock on this point. That symphony simply has to have yaks.
I will listen to the yaks again and find out! ;-)
I listened to the yaks
http://youtu.be/F8UbzRXAVL4
but I could not hear the music! BT must have kept
the orchestra on an LSD diet for months! However
if that makes one happy, then it makes one happy.
To my ears this is a perfect example why I hate
Beethoven's music. Crude, loud and vulgar. I
now have to listen to some Debussy.
Executive summary: yaks don't make music,
they can only make smelly butter! ;-)
http://youtu.be/P6g-u6SiO_M
And of course the one I posted earlier.
Are you going to reveal the mystery performance?
The one posted here seems to be different.
Yes indeed, this was just an example of a non-yakky
performance of Beethoven 7th.
The mystery performances come from the RPO's
Japan tour in 2009.
I happened to be in Tokyo at the right time....

dk
tonyh
2021-03-31 10:22:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Flowsouth8
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
I found the finale completely without yaks, much to my disappointment.
No sense of being on the edge of losing it, being completely and
comfortably in control. I was impressed with the majesty of the 2nd
movement, but the lack of yaks makes it a deal breaker for me.
Thanks for listening. Are these comments about the Beethoven 7
or about the Mahler 5? What are "yaks" and how do they sound?
Could you please provide some yak examples for illustration?
Camels too if you can spare some for Sheherazade! ;-)
http://www.woodsedge.com/tibetan-yak
These yaks take their Beethoven seriously!
Of course, I am referring to the Beethoven 7th, a la Beecham, who
"well, what can you do with it? It's like a bunch of yaks jumping about."
Thanks for the clarification. It is not obvious to me where
and how did TB manage to form an impression about yaks.
Obviously, from deep musical study and countless hours interpreting the
score. You don't get to conduct all those famous orchestras without
doing some study time.
Post by dk
In any case, I stand by my assessment of the recordings I
posted -- yaks or no yaks.
As well you should. Myself and my tin ears remain with Beecham and the
livestock on this point. That symphony simply has to have yaks.
I will listen to the yaks again and find out! ;-)
I listened to the yaks
http://youtu.be/F8UbzRXAVL4
but I could not hear the music! BT must have kept
the orchestra on an LSD diet for months! However
if that makes one happy, then it makes one happy.
To my ears this is a perfect example why I hate
Beethoven's music. Crude, loud and vulgar. I
now have to listen to some Debussy.
Executive summary: yaks don't make music,
they can only make smelly butter! ;-)
http://youtu.be/P6g-u6SiO_M
And of course the one I posted earlier.
Are you going to reveal the mystery performance?
The one posted here seems to be different.
Yes indeed, this was just an example of a non-yakky
performance of Beethoven 7th.
The mystery performances come from the RPO's
Japan tour in 2009.
I happened to be in Tokyo at the right time....
dk
So is this Dutoit ..??
dk
2021-03-31 10:31:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tonyh
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Flowsouth8
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
I found the finale completely without yaks, much to my disappointment.
No sense of being on the edge of losing it, being completely and
comfortably in control. I was impressed with the majesty of the 2nd
movement, but the lack of yaks makes it a deal breaker for me.
Thanks for listening. Are these comments about the Beethoven 7
or about the Mahler 5? What are "yaks" and how do they sound?
Could you please provide some yak examples for illustration?
Camels too if you can spare some for Sheherazade! ;-)
http://www.woodsedge.com/tibetan-yak
These yaks take their Beethoven seriously!
Of course, I am referring to the Beethoven 7th, a la Beecham, who
"well, what can you do with it? It's like a bunch of yaks jumping about."
Thanks for the clarification. It is not obvious to me where
and how did TB manage to form an impression about yaks.
Obviously, from deep musical study and countless hours interpreting the
score. You don't get to conduct all those famous orchestras without
doing some study time.
Post by dk
In any case, I stand by my assessment of the recordings I
posted -- yaks or no yaks.
As well you should. Myself and my tin ears remain with Beecham and the
livestock on this point. That symphony simply has to have yaks.
I will listen to the yaks again and find out! ;-)
I listened to the yaks
http://youtu.be/F8UbzRXAVL4
but I could not hear the music! BT must have kept
the orchestra on an LSD diet for months! However
if that makes one happy, then it makes one happy.
To my ears this is a perfect example why I hate
Beethoven's music. Crude, loud and vulgar. I
now have to listen to some Debussy.
Executive summary: yaks don't make music,
they can only make smelly butter! ;-)
http://youtu.be/P6g-u6SiO_M
And of course the one I posted earlier.
Are you going to reveal the mystery performance?
The one posted here seems to be different.
Yes indeed, this was just an example of a non-yakky
performance of Beethoven 7th.
The mystery performances come from the RPO's
Japan tour in 2009.
I happened to be in Tokyo at the right time....
So is this Dutoit ..??
NOOOOO !!!

Can you imagine Dan Koren paying to hear Dutoit? ;-)

dk
tonyh
2021-03-31 10:39:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Flowsouth8
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
I found the finale completely without yaks, much to my disappointment.
No sense of being on the edge of losing it, being completely and
comfortably in control. I was impressed with the majesty of the 2nd
movement, but the lack of yaks makes it a deal breaker for me.
Thanks for listening. Are these comments about the Beethoven 7
or about the Mahler 5? What are "yaks" and how do they sound?
Could you please provide some yak examples for illustration?
Camels too if you can spare some for Sheherazade! ;-)
http://www.woodsedge.com/tibetan-yak
These yaks take their Beethoven seriously!
Of course, I am referring to the Beethoven 7th, a la Beecham, who
"well, what can you do with it? It's like a bunch of yaks jumping about."
Thanks for the clarification. It is not obvious to me where
and how did TB manage to form an impression about yaks.
Obviously, from deep musical study and countless hours interpreting the
score. You don't get to conduct all those famous orchestras without
doing some study time.
Post by dk
In any case, I stand by my assessment of the recordings I
posted -- yaks or no yaks.
As well you should. Myself and my tin ears remain with Beecham and the
livestock on this point. That symphony simply has to have yaks.
I will listen to the yaks again and find out! ;-)
I listened to the yaks
http://youtu.be/F8UbzRXAVL4
but I could not hear the music! BT must have kept
the orchestra on an LSD diet for months! However
if that makes one happy, then it makes one happy.
To my ears this is a perfect example why I hate
Beethoven's music. Crude, loud and vulgar. I
now have to listen to some Debussy.
Executive summary: yaks don't make music,
they can only make smelly butter! ;-)
http://youtu.be/P6g-u6SiO_M
And of course the one I posted earlier.
Are you going to reveal the mystery performance?
The one posted here seems to be different.
Yes indeed, this was just an example of a non-yakky
performance of Beethoven 7th.
The mystery performances come from the RPO's
Japan tour in 2009.
I happened to be in Tokyo at the right time....
So is this Dutoit ..??
NOOOOO !!!
Can you imagine Dan Koren paying to hear Dutoit? ;-)
dk
I must admit it seemed unbelievable for this to be him...
tonyh
2021-03-31 10:42:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tonyh
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Flowsouth8
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
I found the finale completely without yaks, much to my disappointment.
No sense of being on the edge of losing it, being completely and
comfortably in control. I was impressed with the majesty of the 2nd
movement, but the lack of yaks makes it a deal breaker for me.
Thanks for listening. Are these comments about the Beethoven 7
or about the Mahler 5? What are "yaks" and how do they sound?
Could you please provide some yak examples for illustration?
Camels too if you can spare some for Sheherazade! ;-)
http://www.woodsedge.com/tibetan-yak
These yaks take their Beethoven seriously!
Of course, I am referring to the Beethoven 7th, a la Beecham, who
"well, what can you do with it? It's like a bunch of yaks jumping about."
Thanks for the clarification. It is not obvious to me where
and how did TB manage to form an impression about yaks.
Obviously, from deep musical study and countless hours interpreting the
score. You don't get to conduct all those famous orchestras without
doing some study time.
Post by dk
In any case, I stand by my assessment of the recordings I
posted -- yaks or no yaks.
As well you should. Myself and my tin ears remain with Beecham and the
livestock on this point. That symphony simply has to have yaks.
I will listen to the yaks again and find out! ;-)
I listened to the yaks
http://youtu.be/F8UbzRXAVL4
but I could not hear the music! BT must have kept
the orchestra on an LSD diet for months! However
if that makes one happy, then it makes one happy.
To my ears this is a perfect example why I hate
Beethoven's music. Crude, loud and vulgar. I
now have to listen to some Debussy.
Executive summary: yaks don't make music,
they can only make smelly butter! ;-)
http://youtu.be/P6g-u6SiO_M
And of course the one I posted earlier.
Are you going to reveal the mystery performance?
The one posted here seems to be different.
Yes indeed, this was just an example of a non-yakky
performance of Beethoven 7th.
The mystery performances come from the RPO's
Japan tour in 2009.
I happened to be in Tokyo at the right time....
So is this Dutoit ..??
NOOOOO !!!
Can you imagine Dan Koren paying to hear Dutoit? ;-)
dk
I must admit it seemed unbelievable for this to be him...
Mackerras and Ashkenazy had close ties with the orchestra, but again....
tonyh
2021-03-31 10:50:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tonyh
Post by tonyh
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
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Post by dk
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Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
I found the finale completely without yaks, much to my disappointment.
No sense of being on the edge of losing it, being completely and
comfortably in control. I was impressed with the majesty of the 2nd
movement, but the lack of yaks makes it a deal breaker for me.
Thanks for listening. Are these comments about the Beethoven 7
or about the Mahler 5? What are "yaks" and how do they sound?
Could you please provide some yak examples for illustration?
Camels too if you can spare some for Sheherazade! ;-)
http://www.woodsedge.com/tibetan-yak
These yaks take their Beethoven seriously!
Of course, I am referring to the Beethoven 7th, a la Beecham, who
"well, what can you do with it? It's like a bunch of yaks jumping about."
Thanks for the clarification. It is not obvious to me where
and how did TB manage to form an impression about yaks.
Obviously, from deep musical study and countless hours interpreting the
score. You don't get to conduct all those famous orchestras without
doing some study time.
Post by dk
In any case, I stand by my assessment of the recordings I
posted -- yaks or no yaks.
As well you should. Myself and my tin ears remain with Beecham and the
livestock on this point. That symphony simply has to have yaks.
I will listen to the yaks again and find out! ;-)
I listened to the yaks
http://youtu.be/F8UbzRXAVL4
but I could not hear the music! BT must have kept
the orchestra on an LSD diet for months! However
if that makes one happy, then it makes one happy.
To my ears this is a perfect example why I hate
Beethoven's music. Crude, loud and vulgar. I
now have to listen to some Debussy.
Executive summary: yaks don't make music,
they can only make smelly butter! ;-)
http://youtu.be/P6g-u6SiO_M
And of course the one I posted earlier.
Are you going to reveal the mystery performance?
The one posted here seems to be different.
Yes indeed, this was just an example of a non-yakky
performance of Beethoven 7th.
The mystery performances come from the RPO's
Japan tour in 2009.
I happened to be in Tokyo at the right time....
So is this Dutoit ..??
NOOOOO !!!
Can you imagine Dan Koren paying to hear Dutoit? ;-)
dk
I must admit it seemed unbelievable for this to be him...
Mackerras and Ashkenazy had close ties with the orchestra, but again....
Or this guy Nishimoto, who I admit I've never heard or heard of, but who recorded Mahler 5 with the RPO Tokyo, 2009...)))
Frank Berger
2021-03-31 14:46:04 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
I found the finale completely without yaks, much to my disappointment.
No sense of being on the edge of losing it, being completely and
comfortably in control. I was impressed with the majesty of the 2nd
movement, but the lack of yaks makes it a deal breaker for me.
Thanks for listening. Are these comments about the Beethoven 7
or about the Mahler 5? What are "yaks" and how do they sound?
Could you please provide some yak examples for illustration?
Camels too if you can spare some for Sheherazade! ;-)
http://www.woodsedge.com/tibetan-yak
These yaks take their Beethoven seriously!
Of course, I am referring to the Beethoven 7th, a la Beecham, who
"well, what can you do with it? It's like a bunch of yaks jumping about."
Thanks for the clarification. It is not obvious to me where
and how did TB manage to form an impression about yaks.
Obviously, from deep musical study and countless hours interpreting the
score. You don't get to conduct all those famous orchestras without
doing some study time.
Post by dk
In any case, I stand by my assessment of the recordings I
posted -- yaks or no yaks.
As well you should. Myself and my tin ears remain with Beecham and the
livestock on this point. That symphony simply has to have yaks.
I will listen to the yaks again and find out! ;-)
I listened to the yaks
http://youtu.be/F8UbzRXAVL4
but I could not hear the music! BT must have kept
the orchestra on an LSD diet for months! However
if that makes one happy, then it makes one happy.
To my ears this is a perfect example why I hate
Beethoven's music. Crude, loud and vulgar. I
now have to listen to some Debussy.
Executive summary: yaks don't make music,
they can only make smelly butter! ;-)
http://youtu.be/P6g-u6SiO_M
And of course the one I posted earlier.
Are you going to reveal the mystery performance?
The one posted here seems to be different.
Yes indeed, this was just an example of a non-yakky
performance of Beethoven 7th.
The mystery performances come from the RPO's
Japan tour in 2009.
I happened to be in Tokyo at the right time....
So is this Dutoit ..??
NOOOOO !!!
Can you imagine Dan Koren paying to hear Dutoit? ;-)
dk
I must admit it seemed unbelievable for this to be him...
Mackerras and Ashkenazy had close ties with the orchestra, but again....
Or this guy Nishimoto, who I admit I've never heard or heard of, but who recorded Mahler 5 with the RPO Tokyo, 2009...)))
One listen and I knew it was Tomomi Nishimoto. Kidding. I looked it up.

https://www.cdjapan.co.jp/product/KICC-90845
Frank Berger
2021-03-31 14:49:24 UTC
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Post by Flowsouth8
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Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
I found the finale completely without yaks, much to my disappointment.
No sense of being on the edge of losing it, being completely and
comfortably in control. I was impressed with the majesty of the 2nd
movement, but the lack of yaks makes it a deal breaker for me.
Thanks for listening. Are these comments about the Beethoven 7
or about the Mahler 5? What are "yaks" and how do they sound?
Could you please provide some yak examples for illustration?
Camels too if you can spare some for Sheherazade! ;-)
http://www.woodsedge.com/tibetan-yak
These yaks take their Beethoven seriously!
Of course, I am referring to the Beethoven 7th, a la Beecham, who
"well, what can you do with it? It's like a bunch of yaks jumping about."
Thanks for the clarification. It is not obvious to me where
and how did TB manage to form an impression about yaks.
Obviously, from deep musical study and countless hours interpreting the
score. You don't get to conduct all those famous orchestras without
doing some study time.
Post by dk
In any case, I stand by my assessment of the recordings I
posted -- yaks or no yaks.
As well you should. Myself and my tin ears remain with Beecham and the
livestock on this point. That symphony simply has to have yaks.
I will listen to the yaks again and find out! ;-)
I listened to the yaks
http://youtu.be/F8UbzRXAVL4
but I could not hear the music! BT must have kept
the orchestra on an LSD diet for months! However
if that makes one happy, then it makes one happy.
To my ears this is a perfect example why I hate
Beethoven's music. Crude, loud and vulgar. I
now have to listen to some Debussy.
Executive summary: yaks don't make music,
they can only make smelly butter! ;-)
http://youtu.be/P6g-u6SiO_M
And of course the one I posted earlier.
Are you going to reveal the mystery performance?
The one posted here seems to be different.
Yes indeed, this was just an example of a non-yakky
performance of Beethoven 7th.
The mystery performances come from the RPO's
Japan tour in 2009.
I happened to be in Tokyo at the right time....
So is this Dutoit ..??
NOOOOO !!!
Can you imagine Dan Koren paying to hear Dutoit? ;-)
dk
I must admit it seemed unbelievable for this to be him...
Mackerras and Ashkenazy had close ties with the orchestra, but again....
Or this guy Nishimoto, who I admit I've never heard or heard of, but who recorded Mahler 5 with the RPO Tokyo, 2009...)))
One listen and I knew it was Tomomi Nishimoto.  Kidding.  I looked it up.
https://www.cdjapan.co.jp/product/KICC-90845
Copies on Ebay and Amazon but $$$.
Frank Berger
2021-03-31 15:11:35 UTC
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Post by Frank Berger
Post by tonyh
Post by tonyh
Post by tonyh
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Flowsouth8
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
I found the finale completely without yaks, much to my disappointment.
No sense of being on the edge of losing it, being completely and
comfortably in control. I was impressed with the majesty of the 2nd
movement, but the lack of yaks makes it a deal breaker for me.
Thanks for listening. Are these comments about the Beethoven 7
or about the Mahler 5? What are "yaks" and how do they sound?
Could you please provide some yak examples for illustration?
Camels too if you can spare some for Sheherazade! ;-)
http://www.woodsedge.com/tibetan-yak
These yaks take their Beethoven seriously!
Of course, I am referring to the Beethoven 7th, a la Beecham, who
"well, what can you do with it? It's like a bunch of yaks jumping about."
Thanks for the clarification. It is not obvious to me where
and how did TB manage to form an impression about yaks.
Obviously, from deep musical study and countless hours interpreting the
score. You don't get to conduct all those famous orchestras without
doing some study time.
Post by dk
In any case, I stand by my assessment of the recordings I
posted -- yaks or no yaks.
As well you should. Myself and my tin ears remain with Beecham and the
livestock on this point. That symphony simply has to have yaks.
I will listen to the yaks again and find out! ;-)
I listened to the yaks
http://youtu.be/F8UbzRXAVL4
but I could not hear the music! BT must have kept
the orchestra on an LSD diet for months! However
if that makes one happy, then it makes one happy.
To my ears this is a perfect example why I hate
Beethoven's music. Crude, loud and vulgar. I
now have to listen to some Debussy.
Executive summary: yaks don't make music,
they can only make smelly butter! ;-)
http://youtu.be/P6g-u6SiO_M
And of course the one I posted earlier.
Are you going to reveal the mystery performance?
The one posted here seems to be different.
Yes indeed, this was just an example of a non-yakky
performance of Beethoven 7th.
The mystery performances come from the RPO's
Japan tour in 2009.
I happened to be in Tokyo at the right time....
So is this Dutoit ..??
NOOOOO !!!
Can you imagine Dan Koren paying to hear Dutoit? ;-)
dk
I must admit it seemed unbelievable for this to be him...
Mackerras and Ashkenazy had close ties with the orchestra, but again....
Or this guy Nishimoto, who I admit I've never heard or heard of, but who recorded Mahler 5 with the RPO Tokyo, 2009...)))
One listen and I knew it was Tomomi Nishimoto.  Kidding.  I looked it up.
https://www.cdjapan.co.jp/product/KICC-90845
Copies on Ebay and Amazon but $$$.
Scored a used copy in Amazon.uk for only $40.
tonyh
2021-03-31 17:50:17 UTC
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Post by tonyh
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Flowsouth8
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
I found the finale completely without yaks, much to my disappointment.
No sense of being on the edge of losing it, being completely and
comfortably in control. I was impressed with the majesty of the 2nd
movement, but the lack of yaks makes it a deal breaker for me.
Thanks for listening. Are these comments about the Beethoven 7
or about the Mahler 5? What are "yaks" and how do they sound?
Could you please provide some yak examples for illustration?
Camels too if you can spare some for Sheherazade! ;-)
http://www.woodsedge.com/tibetan-yak
These yaks take their Beethoven seriously!
Of course, I am referring to the Beethoven 7th, a la Beecham, who
"well, what can you do with it? It's like a bunch of yaks jumping about."
Thanks for the clarification. It is not obvious to me where
and how did TB manage to form an impression about yaks.
Obviously, from deep musical study and countless hours interpreting the
score. You don't get to conduct all those famous orchestras without
doing some study time.
Post by dk
In any case, I stand by my assessment of the recordings I
posted -- yaks or no yaks.
As well you should. Myself and my tin ears remain with Beecham and the
livestock on this point. That symphony simply has to have yaks.
I will listen to the yaks again and find out! ;-)
I listened to the yaks
http://youtu.be/F8UbzRXAVL4
but I could not hear the music! BT must have kept
the orchestra on an LSD diet for months! However
if that makes one happy, then it makes one happy.
To my ears this is a perfect example why I hate
Beethoven's music. Crude, loud and vulgar. I
now have to listen to some Debussy.
Executive summary: yaks don't make music,
they can only make smelly butter! ;-)
http://youtu.be/P6g-u6SiO_M
And of course the one I posted earlier.
Are you going to reveal the mystery performance?
The one posted here seems to be different.
Yes indeed, this was just an example of a non-yakky
performance of Beethoven 7th.
The mystery performances come from the RPO's
Japan tour in 2009.
I happened to be in Tokyo at the right time....
So is this Dutoit ..??
NOOOOO !!!
Can you imagine Dan Koren paying to hear Dutoit? ;-)
dk
I must admit it seemed unbelievable for this to be him...
Mackerras and Ashkenazy had close ties with the orchestra, but again....
Or this guy Nishimoto, who I admit I've never heard or heard of, but who recorded Mahler 5 with the RPO Tokyo, 2009...)))
One listen and I knew it was Tomomi Nishimoto. Kidding. I looked it up.
https://www.cdjapan.co.jp/product/KICC-90845
Copies on Ebay and Amazon but $$$.
Scored a used copy in Amazon.uk for only $40.
Haha was about to make a flippant remark about androgyny...(should have done my homework) but definitely a good performance!
dk
2021-03-31 19:04:12 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by tonyh
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Flowsouth8
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
I found the finale completely without yaks, much to my disappointment.
No sense of being on the edge of losing it, being completely and
comfortably in control. I was impressed with the majesty of the 2nd
movement, but the lack of yaks makes it a deal breaker for me.
Thanks for listening. Are these comments about the Beethoven 7
or about the Mahler 5? What are "yaks" and how do they sound?
Could you please provide some yak examples for illustration?
Camels too if you can spare some for Sheherazade! ;-)
http://www.woodsedge.com/tibetan-yak
These yaks take their Beethoven seriously!
Of course, I am referring to the Beethoven 7th, a la Beecham, who
"well, what can you do with it? It's like a bunch of yaks jumping about."
Thanks for the clarification. It is not obvious to me where
and how did TB manage to form an impression about yaks.
Obviously, from deep musical study and countless hours interpreting the
score. You don't get to conduct all those famous orchestras without
doing some study time.
Post by dk
In any case, I stand by my assessment of the recordings I
posted -- yaks or no yaks.
As well you should. Myself and my tin ears remain with Beecham and the
livestock on this point. That symphony simply has to have yaks.
I will listen to the yaks again and find out! ;-)
I listened to the yaks
http://youtu.be/F8UbzRXAVL4
but I could not hear the music! BT must have kept
the orchestra on an LSD diet for months! However
if that makes one happy, then it makes one happy.
To my ears this is a perfect example why I hate
Beethoven's music. Crude, loud and vulgar. I
now have to listen to some Debussy.
Executive summary: yaks don't make music,
they can only make smelly butter! ;-)
http://youtu.be/P6g-u6SiO_M
And of course the one I posted earlier.
Are you going to reveal the mystery performance?
The one posted here seems to be different.
Yes indeed, this was just an example of a non-yakky
performance of Beethoven 7th.
The mystery performances come from the RPO's
Japan tour in 2009.
I happened to be in Tokyo at the right time....
So is this Dutoit ..??
NOOOOO !!!
Can you imagine Dan Koren paying to hear Dutoit? ;-)
dk
I must admit it seemed unbelievable for this to be him...
Mackerras and Ashkenazy had close ties with the orchestra, but again....
Or this guy Nishimoto, who I admit I've never heard or heard of, but who recorded Mahler 5 with the RPO Tokyo, 2009...)))
One listen and I knew it was Tomomi Nishimoto. Kidding. I looked it up.
https://www.cdjapan.co.jp/product/KICC-90845
Copies on Ebay and Amazon but $$$.
The 14 CD almost complete set of her recordings to
date is only $168.40 (including shipping to the US) on
Amazon JP. That averages to $12 per disc.

https://www.amazon.co.jp/%E8%A5%BF%E6%9C%AC%E6%99%BA%E5%AE%9F-%E3%83%97%E3%83%AC%E3%83%9F%E3%82%A2%E3%83%A0-CDBOX%EF%BC%88%E4%BB%AE%EF%BC%89-%E8%A5%BF%E6%9C%AC%E6%99%BA%E5%AE%9F/dp/B00XWH7RD6/

While the RPO recordings are top drawer, the
performances with the Bolshoi Orchestra are
even better. They include what my ears think
is the finest Pathetique on record which I
uploaded earlier.

dk
Frank Berger
2021-03-31 21:45:28 UTC
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Post by Frank Berger
Tomomi Nishimoto
Does the 14-cd set include the Bolshoi recordings?
dk
2021-03-31 22:34:43 UTC
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Post by Frank Berger
Post by Frank Berger
Tomomi Nishimoto
Does the 14-cd set include the Bolshoi recordings?
Yes, and practically everything she recorded. As far as
one can tell, she has not made any studio recordings
(yet?) -- or I haven't found them.

You can hear the Pathetique here:

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/fw5amxxnc0cfl2m/AAAZHejBy5RBo9Sxuu0T-dT8a?dl=0

To my ears, this is the finest Pathetique on record --
bar none. It also illustrates perfectly what I describe
as the "Russian orchestra sound". Notwithstanding
being born in Japan, Tomomi Nishimoto is a Russian
conductor -- as Russian as one could possibly imagine.
She studied in St. Petersburg, and was the principal
conductor of the Bolshoi orchestra for a few years.

What I find fascinating about her conducting is a
combination of Mravinsky like relentless drive and
momentum with natural fluidity and phrase shaping
one has not heard since Celibidache. I believe she is
the rightly heir to both!

dk
Frank Berger
2021-03-31 14:59:06 UTC
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Post by Flowsouth8
Post by dk
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Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
I found the finale completely without yaks, much to my disappointment.
No sense of being on the edge of losing it, being completely and
comfortably in control. I was impressed with the majesty of the 2nd
movement, but the lack of yaks makes it a deal breaker for me.
Thanks for listening. Are these comments about the Beethoven 7
or about the Mahler 5? What are "yaks" and how do they sound?
Could you please provide some yak examples for illustration?
Camels too if you can spare some for Sheherazade! ;-)
http://www.woodsedge.com/tibetan-yak
These yaks take their Beethoven seriously!
Of course, I am referring to the Beethoven 7th, a la Beecham, who
"well, what can you do with it? It's like a bunch of yaks jumping about."
Thanks for the clarification. It is not obvious to me where
and how did TB manage to form an impression about yaks.
Obviously, from deep musical study and countless hours interpreting the
score. You don't get to conduct all those famous orchestras without
doing some study time.
Post by dk
In any case, I stand by my assessment of the recordings I
posted -- yaks or no yaks.
As well you should. Myself and my tin ears remain with Beecham and the
livestock on this point. That symphony simply has to have yaks.
I will listen to the yaks again and find out! ;-)
I listened to the yaks
http://youtu.be/F8UbzRXAVL4
but I could not hear the music! BT must have kept
the orchestra on an LSD diet for months! However
if that makes one happy, then it makes one happy.
To my ears this is a perfect example why I hate
Beethoven's music. Crude, loud and vulgar. I
now have to listen to some Debussy.
Executive summary: yaks don't make music,
they can only make smelly butter! ;-)
http://youtu.be/P6g-u6SiO_M
And of course the one I posted earlier.
Are you going to reveal the mystery performance?
The one posted here seems to be different.
Yes indeed, this was just an example of a non-yakky
performance of Beethoven 7th.
The mystery performances come from the RPO's
Japan tour in 2009.
I happened to be in Tokyo at the right time....
So is this Dutoit ..??
NOOOOO !!!
Can you imagine Dan Koren paying to hear Dutoit? ;-)
dk
I must admit it seemed unbelievable for this to be him...
Mackerras and Ashkenazy had close ties with the orchestra, but again....
Or this guy Nishimoto, who I admit I've never heard or heard of, but who recorded Mahler 5 with the RPO Tokyo, 2009...)))
Gal, not guy. Wikipedia uses pronoun "her."
Owen
2021-03-31 18:02:45 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Of course, I am referring to the Beethoven 7th, a la Beecham, who
"well, what can you do with it? It's like a bunch of yaks jumping about."
Thanks for the clarification. It is not obvious to me where
and how did TB manage to form an impression about yaks.
Obviously, from deep musical study and countless hours interpreting the
score. You don't get to conduct all those famous orchestras without
doing some study time.
Post by dk
In any case, I stand by my assessment of the recordings I
posted -- yaks or no yaks.
As well you should. Myself and my tin ears remain with Beecham and the
livestock on this point. That symphony simply has to have yaks.
I will listen to the yaks again and find out! ;-)
I listened to the yaks
http://youtu.be/F8UbzRXAVL4
but I could not hear the music! BT must have kept
the orchestra on an LSD diet for months! However
if that makes one happy, then it makes one happy.
To my ears this is a perfect example why I hate
Beethoven's music. Crude, loud and vulgar. I
now have to listen to some Debussy.
Executive summary: yaks don't make music,
they can only make smelly butter! ;-)
http://youtu.be/P6g-u6SiO_M
And of course the one I posted earlier.
It's not just the presence or absence of yaks which make the symphony,
it's their er...yaktivity.

Beecham makes them jumping about. Toscanini lines them up four abreast
and marches them perfectly on tempo to the point of stampeding.
Furtwangler captures the meditative intensity of Nepalese yak. Carlos
Kleiber probed the score and correctly articulated, not too loud nor too
soft, the horn on each and every one of the yaks.

You might consider my musical criticism abysmal, but it is no worse than
others I have read, and in some instances, preferable.

-Owen
dk
2021-03-31 18:51:14 UTC
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Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Of course, I am referring to the Beethoven 7th, a la Beecham, who
"well, what can you do with it? It's like a bunch of yaks jumping about."
Thanks for the clarification. It is not obvious to me where
and how did TB manage to form an impression about yaks.
Obviously, from deep musical study and countless hours interpreting the
score. You don't get to conduct all those famous orchestras without
doing some study time.
Post by dk
In any case, I stand by my assessment of the recordings I
posted -- yaks or no yaks.
As well you should. Myself and my tin ears remain with Beecham and the
livestock on this point. That symphony simply has to have yaks.
I will listen to the yaks again and find out! ;-)
I listened to the yaks
http://youtu.be/F8UbzRXAVL4
but I could not hear the music! BT must have kept
the orchestra on an LSD diet for months! However
if that makes one happy, then it makes one happy.
To my ears this is a perfect example why I hate
Beethoven's music. Crude, loud and vulgar. I
now have to listen to some Debussy.
Executive summary: yaks don't make music,
they can only make smelly butter! ;-)
http://youtu.be/P6g-u6SiO_M
And of course the one I posted earlier.
It's not just the presence or absence of yaks which make the symphony,
it's their er...yaktivity.
Beecham makes them jumping about. Toscanini lines them up four abreast
and marches them perfectly on tempo to the point of stampeding.
Furtwangler captures the meditative intensity of Nepalese yak. Carlos
Kleiber probed the score and correctly articulated, not too loud nor too
soft, the horn on each and every one of the yaks.
You might consider my musical criticism abysmal, but it is no worse than
others I have read, and in some instances, preferable.
Beecham's yaks sound too hyper-yaktive to my ears! ;-)

dk
number_six
2021-03-31 20:59:08 UTC
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This is about the time in an LvB 7 thread when I might mention David Munrow's arrangement for ZARDOZ

Whoops, there it is.
dk
2021-03-31 21:11:57 UTC
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Post by number_six
This is about the time in an LvB 7 thread when I might
mention David Munrow's arrangement for ZARDOZ
Whoops, there it is.
?!?
number_six
2021-03-31 23:57:05 UTC
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Post by number_six
This is about the time in an LvB 7 thread when I might
mention David Munrow's arrangement for ZARDOZ
Whoops, there it is.
?!?
Two minute video excerpt --


dk
2021-04-01 00:24:37 UTC
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Post by number_six
Post by number_six
This is about the time in an LvB 7 thread when I might
mention David Munrow's arrangement for ZARDOZ
Whoops, there it is.
?!?
Two minute video excerpt --
http://youtu.be/vrJiXuQwM8w


dk
dk
2021-04-01 00:25:55 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by number_six
Post by number_six
This is about the time in an LvB 7 thread when I might
mention David Munrow's arrangement for ZARDOZ
Whoops, there it is.
?!?
Two minute video excerpt --
http://youtu.be/vrJiXuQwM8w
http://youtu.be/dRRyTNBYyYM

dk
2021-04-01 00:27:55 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by number_six
Post by number_six
This is about the time in an LvB 7 thread when I might
mention David Munrow's arrangement for ZARDOZ
Whoops, there it is.
?!?
Two minute video excerpt --
http://youtu.be/vrJiXuQwM8w
http://youtu.be/dRRyTNBYyYM
http://youtu.be/c9tKLagaroA

number_six
2021-04-01 02:52:32 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by number_six
Post by number_six
This is about the time in an LvB 7 thread when I might
mention David Munrow's arrangement for ZARDOZ
Whoops, there it is.
?!?
Two minute video excerpt --
http://youtu.be/vrJiXuQwM8w
http://youtu.be/dRRyTNBYyYM
http://youtu.be/c9tKLagaroA
http://youtu.be/8YIw2ZQjamA
For me, of the three links you provided, the second (Hungarian church organ) best conveys the "seele" of the music.

The third (X-Men) is a misfire. Music to accompany nuclear war should be elegiac, not bombastic.

But Kubrick, by using Vera Lynn, showed that an apparently incongruous selection could also succeed brilliantly.
Herman
2021-04-01 08:34:21 UTC
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All these "What's the Best this or that recording" have two severe downsides: eventually every single recording ever made will be mentioned, because people tend to mention the recording they have and like.

People tend to view the recording they happened to listen to at some peak moment in their life as the Best. Other people will feel the exact same way about a totally different recording.

And people will rationalize this by weird notions about what Beethoven wanted, or, another egregrious delusion, in the case of Tchaikovsky and DSCH, the "Russian sound", which really is synonymous with, "the way Stalin liked it, loud and stupid" (ergo, complete counter to what Tchaikovsky wanted). And in the case of DK they will talk about their superior ears (at age 80+ that's a hoot) to bully people into agreeing.

There's no telling what "yaks" are in LvB 7, but one can rest assured that Beethoven wasn't thinking of whatever the hell musical yaks are. Yes, LvB 7 is an exciting piece of music, but it's no Rite of Spring, to mention another piece that's oft misunderstood.
dk
2021-04-01 09:01:04 UTC
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Post by Herman
All these "What's the Best this or that recording" have two
severe downsides: eventually every single recording ever
made will be mentioned, because people tend to mention
the recording they have and like.
People tend to view the recording they happened to listen to
at some peak moment in their life as the Best. Other people
will feel the exact same way about a totally different recording.
And people will rationalize this by weird notions about what
Beethoven wanted, or, another egregrious delusion, in the
case of Tchaikovsky and DSCH, the "Russian sound", which
really is synonymous with, "the way Stalin liked it, loud and
stupid" (ergo, complete counter to what Tchaikovsky wanted).
And in the case of DK they will talk about their superior ears
(at age 80+ that's a hoot) to bully people into agreeing.
There's no telling what "yaks" are in LvB 7, but one can rest
assured that Beethoven wasn't thinking of whatever the hell
musical yaks are. Yes, LvB 7 is an exciting piece of music,
but it's no Rite of Spring, to mention another piece that's
oft misunderstood.
We all know all of the above. So what's your point?

dk
tonyh
2021-04-01 10:54:43 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by Herman
All these "What's the Best this or that recording" have two
severe downsides: eventually every single recording ever
made will be mentioned, because people tend to mention
the recording they have and like.
People tend to view the recording they happened to listen to
at some peak moment in their life as the Best. Other people
will feel the exact same way about a totally different recording.
And people will rationalize this by weird notions about what
Beethoven wanted, or, another egregrious delusion, in the
case of Tchaikovsky and DSCH, the "Russian sound", which
really is synonymous with, "the way Stalin liked it, loud and
stupid" (ergo, complete counter to what Tchaikovsky wanted).
And in the case of DK they will talk about their superior ears
(at age 80+ that's a hoot) to bully people into agreeing.
There's no telling what "yaks" are in LvB 7, but one can rest
assured that Beethoven wasn't thinking of whatever the hell
musical yaks are. Yes, LvB 7 is an exciting piece of music,
but it's no Rite of Spring, to mention another piece that's
oft misunderstood.
We all know all of the above. So what's your point?
dk
At best all this is a bit of harmless fun, at worst it can lead to bloodshed.
Owen
2021-04-01 14:29:36 UTC
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Post by tonyh
Post by dk
Post by Herman
All these "What's the Best this or that recording" have two
severe downsides: eventually every single recording ever
made will be mentioned, because people tend to mention
the recording they have and like.
People tend to view the recording they happened to listen to
at some peak moment in their life as the Best. Other people
will feel the exact same way about a totally different recording.
And people will rationalize this by weird notions about what
Beethoven wanted, or, another egregrious delusion, in the
case of Tchaikovsky and DSCH, the "Russian sound", which
really is synonymous with, "the way Stalin liked it, loud and
stupid" (ergo, complete counter to what Tchaikovsky wanted).
And in the case of DK they will talk about their superior ears
(at age 80+ that's a hoot) to bully people into agreeing.
There's no telling what "yaks" are in LvB 7, but one can rest
assured that Beethoven wasn't thinking of whatever the hell
musical yaks are. Yes, LvB 7 is an exciting piece of music,
but it's no Rite of Spring, to mention another piece that's
oft misunderstood.
We all know all of the above. So what's your point?
dk
At best all this is a bit of harmless fun, at worst it can lead to bloodshed.
Uh oh! Tony portends the slaying of the yaks.

-Owen

Herman
2021-04-01 10:56:52 UTC
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Post by dk
We all know all of the above. So what's your point?
dk
Keep it in one effing topic
Herman
2021-04-01 10:59:11 UTC
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Post by dk
We all know all of the above. So what's your point?
dk
And stop yapping this nonsense about "The Russian Sound" to impressionable youths, which in RCMR terms means folks between 60 and 75.
raymond....@gmail.com
2021-03-31 07:39:05 UTC
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Post by dk
Executive summary: yaks don't make music,
they can only make smelly butter! ;-)
dk
https://www.yakmeat.us/yakmeat.html

Yak meat is about the healthiest and tastiest red meat you can buy.
Try some sometime ;)

Ray Hall, Taree
dk
2021-03-31 07:48:09 UTC
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Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by dk
Executive summary: yaks don't make music,
they can only make smelly butter! ;-)
https://www.yakmeat.us/yakmeat.html
Yak meat is about the healthiest and tastiest
red meat you can buy. Try some sometime ;)
I appreciate your advice, however I do not eat
red meat -- or in fact any meat. Otherwise, I
suspect yak meat is not easily available in
Silicon Valley.

dk
raymond....@gmail.com
2021-03-30 04:17:31 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
I found the finale completely without yaks, much to my disappointment.
No sense of being on the edge of losing it, being completely and
comfortably in control. I was impressed with the majesty of the 2nd
movement, but the lack of yaks makes it a deal breaker for me.
Thanks for listening. Are these comments about the Beethoven 7
or about the Mahler 5? What are "yaks" and how do they sound?
dk
Sir Thomas Beecham might help you with yaks.
Apparently they are high altitude oxen, distantly related to North American bison, and live in places like Nepal. And they can jump about 4 feet, especially when hungry, as Sir TB well knew.

Ray Hall, Taree
dk
2021-03-30 04:37:11 UTC
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Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
I found the finale completely without yaks, much to my disappointment.
No sense of being on the edge of losing it, being completely and
comfortably in control. I was impressed with the majesty of the 2nd
movement, but the lack of yaks makes it a deal breaker for me.
Thanks for listening. Are these comments about the Beethoven 7
or about the Mahler 5? What are "yaks" and how do they sound?
Sir Thomas Beecham might help you with yaks.
?!?
Post by ***@gmail.com
Apparently they are high altitude oxen, distantly related to North
American bison, and live in places like Nepal. And they can jump
about 4 feet, especially when hungry, as Sir TB well knew.
Is there a part for yaks in Mahler's 5th?

dk
raymond....@gmail.com
2021-03-30 06:11:25 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by dk
Post by Owen
Post by dk
Post by tonyh
The finale is very exciting and probably as fast as most others these
days, so the symphonic momentum is properly maintained to where
it should be - the ending !!
Interesting. I do not find the finale particularly fast, especially when
compared with other performances. I find the tempo "just right" --
plenty of flow and forward momentum, without feeling rushed.
I found the finale completely without yaks, much to my disappointment.
No sense of being on the edge of losing it, being completely and
comfortably in control. I was impressed with the majesty of the 2nd
movement, but the lack of yaks makes it a deal breaker for me.
Thanks for listening. Are these comments about the Beethoven 7
or about the Mahler 5? What are "yaks" and how do they sound?
Sir Thomas Beecham might help you with yaks.
?!?
Post by ***@gmail.com
Apparently they are high altitude oxen, distantly related to North
American bison, and live in places like Nepal. And they can jump
about 4 feet, especially when hungry, as Sir TB well knew.
Is there a part for yaks in Mahler's 5th?
dk
Only when wearing yak bells.

Ray Hall, Taree
gggg gggg
2021-03-26 22:14:12 UTC
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On Saturday, I took my wife to see the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra
perform Beethoven's seventh symphony. Needless to say she enjoyed the
evening thouroughly.
As the orchestra hit the final note of the piece, the audience
immediately roared with approval. The performance was excellent.
Beethoven's 7th is only one of two of his symphonies I do not have on
CD and I'd like to purchase a copy for us. I'd like the opinion of
the group as to what the best recorded performance is.
So lend me your opinion. Which recording do you feel is the
quintessential 7th? Which one diplays the raw energy and power
without overdoing it and losing the subtle nuances of the piece?
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