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Classical music - racist?
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shellackophile
2020-06-25 18:09:25 UTC
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Classical Music Is Being Cancelled

United States: Is classical music a “privilege” for whites and Asians?

TRIBUNE – In decline in the United States, classical music is criticized by many as “too white”, even though it is favoured by young Americans of Asian descent, analyses Paul May, a professor at the Université du Québec à Montréal (Uqam)*.

By PAUL MAY

Le Figaro, 21 June 2020

Classical music today is accused of being unsuited to the growing ethnic diversity of the American population.

Certain phenomena, not very publicized and unspectacular, are nevertheless indicative of profound transformations at work in our societies. This is the case of the decline of classical music in the United States. Confronted for several years with a constant decline in its audience, classical music is now accused of being unsuited to the growing ethnic diversity of the country’s population, to such an extent that its long-term survival is being questioned. Sociologically, the stakes are symbolic: one of the major cultural practices of the country’s elite since its foundation is explicitly called upon to change or disappear.

A study by the National Endowment for the Arts reports that the proportion of adults who attended a classical music concert in the previous year had risen from 13 per cent in 1982 to 8.6 per cent in 2017. Between 1982 and 2002, the share of attendees under 30 dropped from 27% to 9%. This is accompanied by a general decline in the number of amateurs in the population: in 1992, 4.2% of adult Americans reported playing a musical instrument, compared to 2% in 2008. In terms of album sales, although the last two years have seen a slight improvement, they do not mask a sharp decline over the long term. While the country still has some of the world’s most renowned orchestras, such as the Chicago Symphony or the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the question of a decline can hardly be avoided.

There are many reasons for this, according to the specialist press: an economic model based mainly on private funding, a decline in school education, and competition from other forms of music that are more popular with the younger generation.

Classical music is inherently racist

– New Music USA

Faced with this observation, classical music is encouraged to renew itself. However, according to professionals in the sector, one of the major challenges is to change the image of a field perceived as “too white”. According to a report published in 2016 by the League of American Orchestras, blacks represent only 1.8% of orchestra members, and Latin Americans only 2.5%. Moreover, the vast majority of the works performed in the concerts were by composers of European origin, which is considered insufficiently “inclusive” in the United States. For example, the San Francisco Chronicle recently expressed regret that the city’s Symphony Orchestra will present almost exclusively compositions created by white men in the 2017-2018 season.

Too white, too old, the classical music sector is accused of being out of step with the country’s changing demographics. Indeed, projections by the US Census Bureau predict that the share of ethnic minorities in the population will increase to become the majority around the middle of the century, and would already represent 45% of the 18-23 age group. As a result, a number of American newspapers have recently denounced the fact that the classical music scene is considered too ethnically homogenous. The New York Times accuses it of being the “least diverse institution in the country” and of masking “a racist problem”, while the Seattle Magazine proclaims that it is necessary to “attack its whiteness”. The specialized press is not to be outdone: the National Public Radioconstate’s website says that the scene is “extremely white and increasingly marginalized,” echoing New Music USA, which for its part believes that “classical music is inherently racist.

These accusations are based on the following logic: if an institution has too small a proportion of people of non-European descent, it is suspected of masking a discriminatory recruitment process, or even a form of “structural racism”. Recently, this beam of criticism has hit a wide variety of fields, such as cinema (with the hashtag #OscarsSoWhite), ice hockey (#HockeySoWhite), or the Silicon Valley business community (#SiliconValleySoWhite). In the name of economic performance or the principle of non-discrimination, each institution is thus scrutinized and judged on the basis of its degree of openness to “diversity”.

While classical music was banned during the Cultural Revolution, it is estimated today that about 50 million young Chinese are learning the piano.

In the field of classical music, this leads to prioritizing the recruitment of musicians from diverse ethnic backgrounds, modifying the canon of composers deemed essential to include artists of colour, or transforming the current concert format to offer collaborations with singers appreciated by young audiences, as proposed in the League of American Orchestras’ report entitled “How Diversity Can Help Save Classical Music”.

It is to be hoped that this project of ethnic recalibration will succeed in breathing new life into classical music across the Atlantic. Sceptics, however, will prefer to bank on the extraordinary enthusiasm of the younger generation of Asian Americans for this art form. The latter constitute a growing fringe of amateurs and professionals, contradicting the above-mentioned critics who see classical music as an area that is not easily accessible to ethnic minorities. Indeed, the children of immigrants from China, South Korea, Singapore or Taiwan are over-represented in conservatories, and pushed by their parents, who see this apprenticeship as a school of rigour and excellence. It remains to be seen, however, whether their demographic weight in the population will be sufficient to reverse the current declining trend.

In this regard, the situation in the United States contrasts with that of several Asian countries, such as China, for example. While classical music was banned during the Cultural Revolution, it is estimated today that about 50 million young Chinese are learning the piano, inspired by internationally renowned stars such as Li Yundi, Yuja Wang, or Lang Lang. The country is both the leading consumer and the leading manufacturer of pianos, producing 80% of the world’s supply. The average age of concertgoers is considerably younger than in North America, suggesting a more sustainable audience over the long term, both in auditoriums and on the internet. All these factors led Lorin Maazel, former music director of the New York Philharmonic Orchestra, to say: “We need defenders of our classical music tradition, if classical music is to survive … it may very well be that the most important defenders are in China”.

Optimists will be pleased to find a music-loving public in Asia, eager to take over a neglected artistic heritage. Pessimists will see it as yet another symptom of a West that has forgotten its roots and is indifferent to the transmission of its own cultural treasures. A silent phenomenon, rarely in the headlines… but no less significant for the evolution of our civilization.

* Paul May is notably the author of a remarkable work, “Philosophies of Multiculturalism” (Presses de Sciences Po, 2016).

Translated by DeepL from https://www.lefigaro.fr/vox/culture/etats-unis-la-musique-classique-est-elle-un-privilege-des-blancs-et-des-asiatiques-20200621?utm_source=premium&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=%5b20200622_NL_MATINALE%5d&een
Néstor Castiglione
2020-06-25 19:24:59 UTC
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The format of this post is a bit confusing. Was "classical music is inherently racist" a quote from New Music USA? Was that from that op-ed that dweeb wrote some time mid last year? I vaguely recall hearing of that " thinkpiece" making the rounds.

I'll just repeat (and slightly modify) my comment made about this same subject in another thread:

Classical music isn't inherently "racist." As a "BIPOC" myself (ugh, dreadful term!), I never felt that understanding of Beethoven, Webern, and Stravinsky was somehow closed off to me because they were "old white men" and I was not, nor that I required being condescended to for the sake of making their music "accessible." Thinking about music in "racial" terms simply never occurred to me. A young friend of mine, another Latino, also loves classical music and is an avid collector, especially of vintage vocal recordings. Both of us came from rough neighborhoods where access to classical music was limited, at best.

Love of classical music can be encouraged, yes, but it's also one of those things for which there is no "formula." But one common sense step to foster interest among groups that traditionally shy away from classical music would be to drastically cut the price of admission for concerts. Even the cheap seats at Disney Hall, for example, cost the equivalent of, say, a bag of groceries or a family dinner at a take-out restaurant. Some chamber concerts are even more expensive. One series offers "student" pricing at $75! Classical music organizations could also widen accessibility to their concerts via streaming, broadcast, commercial recordings, etc. In the middle of the 20th century, most major American orchestras broadcasted their concerts in real time, allowing an audience larger than was possible to fit in at their respective home concert halls to tune in for free.

Now I'm not necessarily advocating for any of these things. I'm fully aware that such steps would also require widespread commensurate pay cuts and so on. But if those bemoaning the lack of diversity in classical music were really serious about expanding their audience, they could put their money with their mouths are. One thing is certain: Implicitly racist condescension and performative activism aren't the solutions.
Post by shellackophile
Classical Music Is Being Cancelled
United States: Is classical music a “privilege” for whites and Asians?
TRIBUNE – In decline in the United States, classical music is criticized by many as “too white”, even though it is favoured by young Americans of Asian descent, analyses Paul May, a professor at the Université du Québec à Montréal (Uqam)*.
By PAUL MAY
Le Figaro, 21 June 2020
Classical music today is accused of being unsuited to the growing ethnic diversity of the American population.
Certain phenomena, not very publicized and unspectacular, are nevertheless indicative of profound transformations at work in our societies. This is the case of the decline of classical music in the United States. Confronted for several years with a constant decline in its audience, classical music is now accused of being unsuited to the growing ethnic diversity of the country’s population, to such an extent that its long-term survival is being questioned. Sociologically, the stakes are symbolic: one of the major cultural practices of the country’s elite since its foundation is explicitly called upon to change or disappear.
A study by the National Endowment for the Arts reports that the proportion of adults who attended a classical music concert in the previous year had risen from 13 per cent in 1982 to 8.6 per cent in 2017. Between 1982 and 2002, the share of attendees under 30 dropped from 27% to 9%. This is accompanied by a general decline in the number of amateurs in the population: in 1992, 4.2% of adult Americans reported playing a musical instrument, compared to 2% in 2008. In terms of album sales, although the last two years have seen a slight improvement, they do not mask a sharp decline over the long term. While the country still has some of the world’s most renowned orchestras, such as the Chicago Symphony or the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the question of a decline can hardly be avoided.
There are many reasons for this, according to the specialist press: an economic model based mainly on private funding, a decline in school education, and competition from other forms of music that are more popular with the younger generation.
Classical music is inherently racist
– New Music USA
Faced with this observation, classical music is encouraged to renew itself. However, according to professionals in the sector, one of the major challenges is to change the image of a field perceived as “too white”. According to a report published in 2016 by the League of American Orchestras, blacks represent only 1.8% of orchestra members, and Latin Americans only 2.5%. Moreover, the vast majority of the works performed in the concerts were by composers of European origin, which is considered insufficiently “inclusive” in the United States. For example, the San Francisco Chronicle recently expressed regret that the city’s Symphony Orchestra will present almost exclusively compositions created by white men in the 2017-2018 season.
Too white, too old, the classical music sector is accused of being out of step with the country’s changing demographics. Indeed, projections by the US Census Bureau predict that the share of ethnic minorities in the population will increase to become the majority around the middle of the century, and would already represent 45% of the 18-23 age group. As a result, a number of American newspapers have recently denounced the fact that the classical music scene is considered too ethnically homogenous. The New York Times accuses it of being the “least diverse institution in the country” and of masking “a racist problem”, while the Seattle Magazine proclaims that it is necessary to “attack its whiteness”. The specialized press is not to be outdone: the National Public Radioconstate’s website says that the scene is “extremely white and increasingly marginalized,” echoing New Music USA, which for its part believes that “classical music is inherently racist.
These accusations are based on the following logic: if an institution has too small a proportion of people of non-European descent, it is suspected of masking a discriminatory recruitment process, or even a form of “structural racism”. Recently, this beam of criticism has hit a wide variety of fields, such as cinema (with the hashtag #OscarsSoWhite), ice hockey (#HockeySoWhite), or the Silicon Valley business community (#SiliconValleySoWhite). In the name of economic performance or the principle of non-discrimination, each institution is thus scrutinized and judged on the basis of its degree of openness to “diversity”.
While classical music was banned during the Cultural Revolution, it is estimated today that about 50 million young Chinese are learning the piano.
In the field of classical music, this leads to prioritizing the recruitment of musicians from diverse ethnic backgrounds, modifying the canon of composers deemed essential to include artists of colour, or transforming the current concert format to offer collaborations with singers appreciated by young audiences, as proposed in the League of American Orchestras’ report entitled “How Diversity Can Help Save Classical Music”.
It is to be hoped that this project of ethnic recalibration will succeed in breathing new life into classical music across the Atlantic. Sceptics, however, will prefer to bank on the extraordinary enthusiasm of the younger generation of Asian Americans for this art form. The latter constitute a growing fringe of amateurs and professionals, contradicting the above-mentioned critics who see classical music as an area that is not easily accessible to ethnic minorities. Indeed, the children of immigrants from China, South Korea, Singapore or Taiwan are over-represented in conservatories, and pushed by their parents, who see this apprenticeship as a school of rigour and excellence. It remains to be seen, however, whether their demographic weight in the population will be sufficient to reverse the current declining trend.
In this regard, the situation in the United States contrasts with that of several Asian countries, such as China, for example. While classical music was banned during the Cultural Revolution, it is estimated today that about 50 million young Chinese are learning the piano, inspired by internationally renowned stars such as Li Yundi, Yuja Wang, or Lang Lang. The country is both the leading consumer and the leading manufacturer of pianos, producing 80% of the world’s supply. The average age of concertgoers is considerably younger than in North America, suggesting a more sustainable audience over the long term, both in auditoriums and on the internet. All these factors led Lorin Maazel, former music director of the New York Philharmonic Orchestra, to say: “We need defenders of our classical music tradition, if classical music is to survive … it may very well be that the most important defenders are in China”.
Optimists will be pleased to find a music-loving public in Asia, eager to take over a neglected artistic heritage. Pessimists will see it as yet another symptom of a West that has forgotten its roots and is indifferent to the transmission of its own cultural treasures. A silent phenomenon, rarely in the headlines… but no less significant for the evolution of our civilization.
* Paul May is notably the author of a remarkable work, “Philosophies of Multiculturalism” (Presses de Sciences Po, 2016).
Translated by DeepL from https://www.lefigaro.fr/vox/culture/etats-unis-la-musique-classique-est-elle-un-privilege-des-blancs-et-des-asiatiques-20200621?utm_source=premium&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=%5b20200622_NL_MATINALE%5d&een
Néstor Castiglione
2020-06-25 19:29:05 UTC
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Permalink
The format of this post is a bit confusing. Was "classical music is inherently racist" a quote from New Music USA? Was that from that op-ed that dweeb wrote some time mid last year? I vaguely recall hearing of that " thinkpiece" making the rounds.

I'll just repeat (and slightly modify) my comment made about this same subject in another thread:

Classical music isn't inherently "racist." As a "BIPOC" myself (ugh, dreadful term!), I never felt that understanding of Beethoven, Webern, and Stravinsky was somehow closed off to me because they were "old white men" and I was not, or that I required being condescended to for the sake of making their music "accessible." Thinking about music in racial terms simply never occurred to me. A young friend of mine, another Latino, also loves classical music and is an avid collector, especially of vintage vocal recordings. Both of us came from rough neighborhoods where access to classical music was limited, at best.

Love of classical music can be encouraged, yes, but it's also one of those things for which there is no "formula." But one common sense step to foster interest among groups that traditionally shy away from classical music would be to drastically cut the price of admission for concerts. Even the cheap seats at Disney Hall, for example, cost the equivalent of, say, a bag of groceries or a family dinner at a take-out restaurant. Some chamber concerts are even more expensive. One series I attend offers "student" pricing at $75! Classical music organizations could also widen accessibility to their concerts via streaming, broadcast, commercial recordings, etc. In the middle of the 20th century, most major American orchestras broadcasted their concerts in real time, allowing an audience larger than was possible to fit in at their respective home concert halls to tune in for free.

Now I'm not necessarily advocating for any of these things. I'm fully aware that such steps would also require widespread commensurate pay cuts and so on. But if those bemoaning the lack of diversity in classical music were really serious about expanding their audience, they could put their money where their mouths are. One thing is certain: Implicitly racist condescension and performative activism aren't the solutions.
Post by shellackophile
Classical Music Is Being Cancelled
United States: Is classical music a “privilege” for whites and Asians?
TRIBUNE – In decline in the United States, classical music is criticized by many as “too white”, even though it is favoured by young Americans of Asian descent, analyses Paul May, a professor at the Université du Québec à Montréal (Uqam)*.
By PAUL MAY
Le Figaro, 21 June 2020
Classical music today is accused of being unsuited to the growing ethnic diversity of the American population.
Certain phenomena, not very publicized and unspectacular, are nevertheless indicative of profound transformations at work in our societies. This is the case of the decline of classical music in the United States. Confronted for several years with a constant decline in its audience, classical music is now accused of being unsuited to the growing ethnic diversity of the country’s population, to such an extent that its long-term survival is being questioned. Sociologically, the stakes are symbolic: one of the major cultural practices of the country’s elite since its foundation is explicitly called upon to change or disappear.
A study by the National Endowment for the Arts reports that the proportion of adults who attended a classical music concert in the previous year had risen from 13 per cent in 1982 to 8.6 per cent in 2017. Between 1982 and 2002, the share of attendees under 30 dropped from 27% to 9%. This is accompanied by a general decline in the number of amateurs in the population: in 1992, 4.2% of adult Americans reported playing a musical instrument, compared to 2% in 2008. In terms of album sales, although the last two years have seen a slight improvement, they do not mask a sharp decline over the long term. While the country still has some of the world’s most renowned orchestras, such as the Chicago Symphony or the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the question of a decline can hardly be avoided.
There are many reasons for this, according to the specialist press: an economic model based mainly on private funding, a decline in school education, and competition from other forms of music that are more popular with the younger generation.
Classical music is inherently racist
– New Music USA
Faced with this observation, classical music is encouraged to renew itself. However, according to professionals in the sector, one of the major challenges is to change the image of a field perceived as “too white”. According to a report published in 2016 by the League of American Orchestras, blacks represent only 1.8% of orchestra members, and Latin Americans only 2.5%. Moreover, the vast majority of the works performed in the concerts were by composers of European origin, which is considered insufficiently “inclusive” in the United States. For example, the San Francisco Chronicle recently expressed regret that the city’s Symphony Orchestra will present almost exclusively compositions created by white men in the 2017-2018 season.
Too white, too old, the classical music sector is accused of being out of step with the country’s changing demographics. Indeed, projections by the US Census Bureau predict that the share of ethnic minorities in the population will increase to become the majority around the middle of the century, and would already represent 45% of the 18-23 age group. As a result, a number of American newspapers have recently denounced the fact that the classical music scene is considered too ethnically homogenous. The New York Times accuses it of being the “least diverse institution in the country” and of masking “a racist problem”, while the Seattle Magazine proclaims that it is necessary to “attack its whiteness”. The specialized press is not to be outdone: the National Public Radioconstate’s website says that the scene is “extremely white and increasingly marginalized,” echoing New Music USA, which for its part believes that “classical music is inherently racist.
These accusations are based on the following logic: if an institution has too small a proportion of people of non-European descent, it is suspected of masking a discriminatory recruitment process, or even a form of “structural racism”. Recently, this beam of criticism has hit a wide variety of fields, such as cinema (with the hashtag #OscarsSoWhite), ice hockey (#HockeySoWhite), or the Silicon Valley business community (#SiliconValleySoWhite). In the name of economic performance or the principle of non-discrimination, each institution is thus scrutinized and judged on the basis of its degree of openness to “diversity”.
While classical music was banned during the Cultural Revolution, it is estimated today that about 50 million young Chinese are learning the piano.
In the field of classical music, this leads to prioritizing the recruitment of musicians from diverse ethnic backgrounds, modifying the canon of composers deemed essential to include artists of colour, or transforming the current concert format to offer collaborations with singers appreciated by young audiences, as proposed in the League of American Orchestras’ report entitled “How Diversity Can Help Save Classical Music”.
It is to be hoped that this project of ethnic recalibration will succeed in breathing new life into classical music across the Atlantic. Sceptics, however, will prefer to bank on the extraordinary enthusiasm of the younger generation of Asian Americans for this art form. The latter constitute a growing fringe of amateurs and professionals, contradicting the above-mentioned critics who see classical music as an area that is not easily accessible to ethnic minorities. Indeed, the children of immigrants from China, South Korea, Singapore or Taiwan are over-represented in conservatories, and pushed by their parents, who see this apprenticeship as a school of rigour and excellence. It remains to be seen, however, whether their demographic weight in the population will be sufficient to reverse the current declining trend.
In this regard, the situation in the United States contrasts with that of several Asian countries, such as China, for example. While classical music was banned during the Cultural Revolution, it is estimated today that about 50 million young Chinese are learning the piano, inspired by internationally renowned stars such as Li Yundi, Yuja Wang, or Lang Lang. The country is both the leading consumer and the leading manufacturer of pianos, producing 80% of the world’s supply. The average age of concertgoers is considerably younger than in North America, suggesting a more sustainable audience over the long term, both in auditoriums and on the internet. All these factors led Lorin Maazel, former music director of the New York Philharmonic Orchestra, to say: “We need defenders of our classical music tradition, if classical music is to survive … it may very well be that the most important defenders are in China”.
Optimists will be pleased to find a music-loving public in Asia, eager to take over a neglected artistic heritage. Pessimists will see it as yet another symptom of a West that has forgotten its roots and is indifferent to the transmission of its own cultural treasures. A silent phenomenon, rarely in the headlines… but no less significant for the evolution of our civilization.
* Paul May is notably the author of a remarkable work, “Philosophies of Multiculturalism” (Presses de Sciences Po, 2016).
Translated by DeepL from https://www.lefigaro.fr/vox/culture/etats-unis-la-musique-classique-est-elle-un-privilege-des-blancs-et-des-asiatiques-20200621?utm_source=premium&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=%5b20200622_NL_MATINALE%5d&een
j***@gmail.com
2020-06-25 21:32:59 UTC
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...But one common sense step to foster interest among groups that traditionally shy away from classical music would be to drastically cut the price of admission for concerts.
I wish I thought it were that simple. I live near New Haven, which has far more high-quality, entirely free art than even a glutton like myself can consume, including two top-notch art museums that are always free and many good student theater productions that only require a reservation.

But classical music is what there's most of, thanks to the Yale School of Music, and the great majority of it is entirely free. During the school year, there are recitals more days than not, and the level of performance is outstanding. Whatever the discomfort inherent in being a newcomer to any sort of event, the people attending could hardly be more inclined to embrace youth and diversity. Yet the audience remains overwhelmingly old and white--I've been going for over forty years, and I'm still younger than the median age at most concerts.

What if you created paradise and no one wanted it? The appeal of classical music--and of great art generally--reaches remarkably across time and space, but you still have to come to it, and give yourself over to it. The more the music is dismissed as irrelevant to the experience of a culture or a generation, and the less the works of the past are esteemed and taught, the fewer the chances that an individual will have for the conversion experience that brings the love of an art.

Not quite what I want to say or how I wish I could put it, but windy enough already that I'd better leave it at that!

Joe Markley
Plantsville, Connecticut
Frank Berger
2020-06-25 21:46:18 UTC
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Post by j***@gmail.com
...But one common sense step to foster interest among groups that traditionally shy away from classical music would be to drastically cut the price of admission for concerts.
I wish I thought it were that simple. I live near New Haven, which has far more high-quality, entirely free art than even a glutton like myself can consume, including two top-notch art museums that are always free and many good student theater productions that only require a reservation.
But classical music is what there's most of, thanks to the Yale School of Music, and the great majority of it is entirely free. During the school year, there are recitals more days than not, and the level of performance is outstanding. Whatever the discomfort inherent in being a newcomer to any sort of event, the people attending could hardly be more inclined to embrace youth and diversity. Yet the audience remains overwhelmingly old and white--I've been going for over forty years, and I'm still younger than the median age at most concerts.
What if you created paradise and no one wanted it? The appeal of classical music--and of great art generally--reaches remarkably across time and space, but you still have to come to it, and give yourself over to it. The more the music is dismissed as irrelevant to the experience of a culture or a generation, and the less the works of the past are esteemed and taught, the fewer the chances that an individual will have for the conversion experience that brings the love of an art.
Not quite what I want to say or how I wish I could put it, but windy enough already that I'd better leave it at that!
Joe Markley
Plantsville, Connecticut
I thought you expressed your thoughts very well. I agree
that the explanation is not simple. Even if we could
guarantee exposure to and/or education about CM to all
youth, it's not clear whether that would solve the
"problem." The masses of each generation invent their own
music and only a declining minority clings to early forms.
It's the natural order.
Néstor Castiglione
2020-06-25 21:58:37 UTC
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Permalink
Over here in my area we have a number of excellent chamber concerts series that are free to the public. Few people show up. I recall that last year one of the local colleges had a terrific free recital of music by 20th century Latin American composers. Altogether only about a dozen people filled out this rather large hall⁠—and no "folx of color" (aside from myself) in sight! Where were the "BIPOC" to rep their own?
Post by j***@gmail.com
What if you created paradise and no one wanted it? The appeal of classical music--and of great art generally--reaches remarkably across time and space, but you still have to come to it, and give yourself over to it. The more the music is dismissed as irrelevant to the experience of a culture or a generation, and the less the works of the past are esteemed and taught, the fewer the chances that an individual will have for the conversion experience that brings the love of an art.
Spot on.
Post by j***@gmail.com
...But one common sense step to foster interest among groups that traditionally shy away from classical music would be to drastically cut the price of admission for concerts.
I wish I thought it were that simple. I live near New Haven, which has far more high-quality, entirely free art than even a glutton like myself can consume, including two top-notch art museums that are always free and many good student theater productions that only require a reservation.
But classical music is what there's most of, thanks to the Yale School of Music, and the great majority of it is entirely free. During the school year, there are recitals more days than not, and the level of performance is outstanding. Whatever the discomfort inherent in being a newcomer to any sort of event, the people attending could hardly be more inclined to embrace youth and diversity. Yet the audience remains overwhelmingly old and white--I've been going for over forty years, and I'm still younger than the median age at most concerts.
What if you created paradise and no one wanted it? The appeal of classical music--and of great art generally--reaches remarkably across time and space, but you still have to come to it, and give yourself over to it. The more the music is dismissed as irrelevant to the experience of a culture or a generation, and the less the works of the past are esteemed and taught, the fewer the chances that an individual will have for the conversion experience that brings the love of an art.
Not quite what I want to say or how I wish I could put it, but windy enough already that I'd better leave it at that!
Joe Markley
Plantsville, Connecticut
g***@gmail.com
2020-06-30 03:17:44 UTC
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Post by Néstor Castiglione
Over here in my area we have a number of excellent chamber concerts series that are free to the public. Few people show up. I recall that last year one of the local colleges had a terrific free recital of music by 20th century Latin American composers. Altogether only about a dozen people filled out this rather large hall⁠—and no "folx of color" (aside from myself) in sight! Where were the "BIPOC" to rep their own?
Post by j***@gmail.com
What if you created paradise and no one wanted it? The appeal of classical music--and of great art generally--reaches remarkably across time and space, but you still have to come to it, and give yourself over to it. The more the music is dismissed as irrelevant to the experience of a culture or a generation, and the less the works of the past are esteemed and taught, the fewer the chances that an individual will have for the conversion experience that brings the love of an art.
Spot on...
According to the recent article, "Did You Say High Culture Was Dead?":

- Times have changed, and radically so. Today it is blatantly obvious that popular culture has won the war over cultural hegemony — hands down...Today, audiences want to be entertained rather than intellectually stunned and disturbed, want to escape from their ordinary and, more often than not, mind-numbing, if not depressing, everyday working lives.

https://www.fairobserver.com/culture/high-culture-pop-culture-opera-literature-film-netflix-news-15514/
g***@gmail.com
2020-06-30 21:52:34 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by Néstor Castiglione
Over here in my area we have a number of excellent chamber concerts series that are free to the public. Few people show up. I recall that last year one of the local colleges had a terrific free recital of music by 20th century Latin American composers. Altogether only about a dozen people filled out this rather large hall⁠—and no "folx of color" (aside from myself) in sight! Where were the "BIPOC" to rep their own?
Post by j***@gmail.com
What if you created paradise and no one wanted it? The appeal of classical music--and of great art generally--reaches remarkably across time and space, but you still have to come to it, and give yourself over to it. The more the music is dismissed as irrelevant to the experience of a culture or a generation, and the less the works of the past are esteemed and taught, the fewer the chances that an individual will have for the conversion experience that brings the love of an art.
Spot on...
- Times have changed, and radically so. Today it is blatantly obvious that popular culture has won the war over cultural hegemony — hands down...Today, audiences want to be entertained rather than intellectually stunned and disturbed, want to escape from their ordinary and, more often than not, mind-numbing, if not depressing, everyday working lives.
https://www.fairobserver.com/culture/high-culture-pop-culture-opera-literature-film-netflix-news-15514/
- Freedom is not an ideal, it is not even a protection, if it means nothing more than freedom to stagnate, to live without dreams, to have no greater aim than a second car and another television set.

Adlai Stevenson II
Rebuild Queens Hall London
2020-07-01 08:05:19 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by Néstor Castiglione
Over here in my area we have a number of excellent chamber concerts series that are free to the public. Few people show up. I recall that last year one of the local colleges had a terrific free recital of music by 20th century Latin American composers. Altogether only about a dozen people filled out this rather large hall⁠—and no "folx of color" (aside from myself) in sight! Where were the "BIPOC" to rep their own?
Post by j***@gmail.com
What if you created paradise and no one wanted it? The appeal of classical music--and of great art generally--reaches remarkably across time and space, but you still have to come to it, and give yourself over to it. The more the music is dismissed as irrelevant to the experience of a culture or a generation, and the less the works of the past are esteemed and taught, the fewer the chances that an individual will have for the conversion experience that brings the love of an art.
Spot on...
- Times have changed, and radically so. Today it is blatantly obvious that popular culture has won the war over cultural hegemony — hands down...Today, audiences want to be entertained rather than intellectually stunned and disturbed, want to escape from their ordinary and, more often than not, mind-numbing, if not depressing, everyday working lives.
https://www.fairobserver.com/culture/high-culture-pop-culture-opera-literature-film-netflix-news-15514/
- Freedom is not an ideal, it is not even a protection, if it means nothing more than freedom to stagnate, to live without dreams, to have no greater aim than a second car and another television set.
Adlai Stevenson II
Does censoring everything that may be hateful to minorities will make people live longer and benefit their health ?. Of course not so why insist on Communist / Fascist doctrine ?.
g***@gmail.com
2020-06-30 03:21:31 UTC
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Over here in my area we have a number of excellent chamber concerts series that are free to the public. Few people show up. I recall that last year one of the local colleges had a terrific free recital of music by 20th century Latin American composers. Altogether only about a dozen people filled out this rather large hall⁠—and no "folx of color" (aside from myself) in sight! Where were the "BIPOC" to rep their own?...
- Some people see things that are and ask, Why? Some people dream of things that never were and ask, Why not? Some people have to go to work and don't have time for all that.

George Carlin
g***@gmail.com
2020-06-25 19:51:09 UTC
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Post by shellackophile
Classical Music Is Being Cancelled
United States: Is classical music a “privilege” for whites and Asians?
TRIBUNE – In decline in the United States, classical music is criticized by many as “too white”, even though it is favoured by young Americans of Asian descent, analyses Paul May, a professor at the Université du Québec à Montréal (Uqam)*.
By PAUL MAY
Le Figaro, 21 June 2020
Classical music today is accused of being unsuited to the growing ethnic diversity of the American population.
Certain phenomena, not very publicized and unspectacular, are nevertheless indicative of profound transformations at work in our societies. This is the case of the decline of classical music in the United States. Confronted for several years with a constant decline in its audience, classical music is now accused of being unsuited to the growing ethnic diversity of the country’s population, to such an extent that its long-term survival is being questioned. Sociologically, the stakes are symbolic: one of the major cultural practices of the country’s elite since its foundation is explicitly called upon to change or disappear.
A study by the National Endowment for the Arts reports that the proportion of adults who attended a classical music concert in the previous year had risen from 13 per cent in 1982 to 8.6 per cent in 2017. Between 1982 and 2002, the share of attendees under 30 dropped from 27% to 9%. This is accompanied by a general decline in the number of amateurs in the population: in 1992, 4.2% of adult Americans reported playing a musical instrument, compared to 2% in 2008. In terms of album sales, although the last two years have seen a slight improvement, they do not mask a sharp decline over the long term. While the country still has some of the world’s most renowned orchestras, such as the Chicago Symphony or the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the question of a decline can hardly be avoided.
There are many reasons for this, according to the specialist press: an economic model based mainly on private funding, a decline in school education, and competition from other forms of music that are more popular with the younger generation.
Classical music is inherently racist
– New Music USA
Faced with this observation, classical music is encouraged to renew itself. However, according to professionals in the sector, one of the major challenges is to change the image of a field perceived as “too white”. According to a report published in 2016 by the League of American Orchestras, blacks represent only 1.8% of orchestra members, and Latin Americans only 2.5%. Moreover, the vast majority of the works performed in the concerts were by composers of European origin, which is considered insufficiently “inclusive” in the United States. For example, the San Francisco Chronicle recently expressed regret that the city’s Symphony Orchestra will present almost exclusively compositions created by white men in the 2017-2018 season.
Too white, too old, the classical music sector is accused of being out of step with the country’s changing demographics. Indeed, projections by the US Census Bureau predict that the share of ethnic minorities in the population will increase to become the majority around the middle of the century, and would already represent 45% of the 18-23 age group. As a result, a number of American newspapers have recently denounced the fact that the classical music scene is considered too ethnically homogenous. The New York Times accuses it of being the “least diverse institution in the country” and of masking “a racist problem”, while the Seattle Magazine proclaims that it is necessary to “attack its whiteness”. The specialized press is not to be outdone: the National Public Radioconstate’s website says that the scene is “extremely white and increasingly marginalized,” echoing New Music USA, which for its part believes that “classical music is inherently racist.
These accusations are based on the following logic: if an institution has too small a proportion of people of non-European descent, it is suspected of masking a discriminatory recruitment process, or even a form of “structural racism”. Recently, this beam of criticism has hit a wide variety of fields, such as cinema (with the hashtag #OscarsSoWhite), ice hockey (#HockeySoWhite), or the Silicon Valley business community (#SiliconValleySoWhite). In the name of economic performance or the principle of non-discrimination, each institution is thus scrutinized and judged on the basis of its degree of openness to “diversity”.
While classical music was banned during the Cultural Revolution, it is estimated today that about 50 million young Chinese are learning the piano.
In the field of classical music, this leads to prioritizing the recruitment of musicians from diverse ethnic backgrounds, modifying the canon of composers deemed essential to include artists of colour, or transforming the current concert format to offer collaborations with singers appreciated by young audiences, as proposed in the League of American Orchestras’ report entitled “How Diversity Can Help Save Classical Music”.
It is to be hoped that this project of ethnic recalibration will succeed in breathing new life into classical music across the Atlantic. Sceptics, however, will prefer to bank on the extraordinary enthusiasm of the younger generation of Asian Americans for this art form. The latter constitute a growing fringe of amateurs and professionals, contradicting the above-mentioned critics who see classical music as an area that is not easily accessible to ethnic minorities. Indeed, the children of immigrants from China, South Korea, Singapore or Taiwan are over-represented in conservatories, and pushed by their parents, who see this apprenticeship as a school of rigour and excellence. It remains to be seen, however, whether their demographic weight in the population will be sufficient to reverse the current declining trend.
In this regard, the situation in the United States contrasts with that of several Asian countries, such as China, for example. While classical music was banned during the Cultural Revolution, it is estimated today that about 50 million young Chinese are learning the piano, inspired by internationally renowned stars such as Li Yundi, Yuja Wang, or Lang Lang. The country is both the leading consumer and the leading manufacturer of pianos, producing 80% of the world’s supply. The average age of concertgoers is considerably younger than in North America, suggesting a more sustainable audience over the long term, both in auditoriums and on the internet. All these factors led Lorin Maazel, former music director of the New York Philharmonic Orchestra, to say: “We need defenders of our classical music tradition, if classical music is to survive … it may very well be that the most important defenders are in China”.
Optimists will be pleased to find a music-loving public in Asia, eager to take over a neglected artistic heritage. Pessimists will see it as yet another symptom of a West that has forgotten its roots and is indifferent to the transmission of its own cultural treasures. A silent phenomenon, rarely in the headlines… but no less significant for the evolution of our civilization.
* Paul May is notably the author of a remarkable work, “Philosophies of Multiculturalism” (Presses de Sciences Po, 2016).
Translated by DeepL from https://www.lefigaro.fr/vox/culture/etats-unis-la-musique-classique-est-elle-un-privilege-des-blancs-et-des-asiatiques-20200621?utm_source=premium&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=%5b20200622_NL_MATINALE%5d&een
Today hibernating bears; tomorrow classical music lovers:

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/rec.music.classical.recordings/XL0BLcnWXNM
Tassilo
2020-06-26 11:12:42 UTC
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THIS IS NOTHING BUT THE WOKE MENTALITY DETERMINED TO DESTROY THE WHOLE OF WESTERN CULTURE. On the non-destructive side of reality we have this:

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/08/arts/music/baltimore-symphony-orchkids.html?fbclid=IwAR1OIr_5iG98U-pDR9KaH36D67-uIHIrTBHyaU9uF-EVSIVaAkKtUEXL3_k
Andy Evans
2020-06-26 11:27:26 UTC
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Most of classical music was written well before multi-ethnic societies, so I don't think the composers are to blame (with some exceptions). In fact a number introduced elements from other countries and societies into their work.

But I can easily see the perception of the current CM scene as older, white and monied. Given that a love of CM has to come from somewhere - usually family or school - I imagine that the early exposure to CM that fires up a child is gradually dying. This has all been discussed so often we know the narrative.

It's just one of those facts that brilliant pieces of art may end up as very minority interests. How many people have actually read James Joyce's Ulysses, or the works of Kafka, for instance, not to mention any book on philosophy one can think of?
Frank Berger
2020-06-26 13:00:11 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
Most of classical music was written well before multi-ethnic societies, so I don't think the composers are to blame (with some exceptions).
Then perhaps people who grew up in an environment that
accepted slavery, even those who owned slaves or traded in
slaves were blameness as well.


In fact a number introduced elements from other countries
and societies into their work.
Cultural misappropriation.
Post by Andy Evans
But I can easily see the perception of the current CM scene as older, white and monied. Given that a love of CM has to come from somewhere - usually family or school - I imagine that the early exposure to CM that fires up a child is gradually dying. This has all been discussed so often we know the narrative.
It's just one of those facts that brilliant pieces of art may end up as very minority interests. How many people have actually read James Joyce's Ulysses, or the works of Kafka, for instance, not to mention any book on philosophy one can think of?
There is a difference between racism and statistical
differences that arise between racial groups as a result of
socal and economic differences (albeit these are due to past
racism).
Rebuild Queens Hall London
2020-06-30 09:14:03 UTC
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Post by shellackophile
Classical Music Is Being Cancelled
United States: Is classical music a “privilege” for whites and Asians?
TRIBUNE – In decline in the United States, classical music is criticized by many as “too white”, even though it is favoured by young Americans of Asian descent, analyses Paul May, a professor at the Université du Québec à Montréal (Uqam)*.
By PAUL MAY
Le Figaro, 21 June 2020
Classical music today is accused of being unsuited to the growing ethnic diversity of the American population.
Certain phenomena, not very publicized and unspectacular, are nevertheless indicative of profound transformations at work in our societies. This is the case of the decline of classical music in the United States. Confronted for several years with a constant decline in its audience, classical music is now accused of being unsuited to the growing ethnic diversity of the country’s population, to such an extent that its long-term survival is being questioned. Sociologically, the stakes are symbolic: one of the major cultural practices of the country’s elite since its foundation is explicitly called upon to change or disappear.
A study by the National Endowment for the Arts reports that the proportion of adults who attended a classical music concert in the previous year had risen from 13 per cent in 1982 to 8.6 per cent in 2017. Between 1982 and 2002, the share of attendees under 30 dropped from 27% to 9%. This is accompanied by a general decline in the number of amateurs in the population: in 1992, 4.2% of adult Americans reported playing a musical instrument, compared to 2% in 2008. In terms of album sales, although the last two years have seen a slight improvement, they do not mask a sharp decline over the long term. While the country still has some of the world’s most renowned orchestras, such as the Chicago Symphony or the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the question of a decline can hardly be avoided.
There are many reasons for this, according to the specialist press: an economic model based mainly on private funding, a decline in school education, and competition from other forms of music that are more popular with the younger generation.
Classical music is inherently racist
– New Music USA
Faced with this observation, classical music is encouraged to renew itself. However, according to professionals in the sector, one of the major challenges is to change the image of a field perceived as “too white”. According to a report published in 2016 by the League of American Orchestras, blacks represent only 1.8% of orchestra members, and Latin Americans only 2.5%. Moreover, the vast majority of the works performed in the concerts were by composers of European origin, which is considered insufficiently “inclusive” in the United States. For example, the San Francisco Chronicle recently expressed regret that the city’s Symphony Orchestra will present almost exclusively compositions created by white men in the 2017-2018 season.
Too white, too old, the classical music sector is accused of being out of step with the country’s changing demographics. Indeed, projections by the US Census Bureau predict that the share of ethnic minorities in the population will increase to become the majority around the middle of the century, and would already represent 45% of the 18-23 age group. As a result, a number of American newspapers have recently denounced the fact that the classical music scene is considered too ethnically homogenous. The New York Times accuses it of being the “least diverse institution in the country” and of masking “a racist problem”, while the Seattle Magazine proclaims that it is necessary to “attack its whiteness”. The specialized press is not to be outdone: the National Public Radioconstate’s website says that the scene is “extremely white and increasingly marginalized,” echoing New Music USA, which for its part believes that “classical music is inherently racist.
These accusations are based on the following logic: if an institution has too small a proportion of people of non-European descent, it is suspected of masking a discriminatory recruitment process, or even a form of “structural racism”. Recently, this beam of criticism has hit a wide variety of fields, such as cinema (with the hashtag #OscarsSoWhite), ice hockey (#HockeySoWhite), or the Silicon Valley business community (#SiliconValleySoWhite). In the name of economic performance or the principle of non-discrimination, each institution is thus scrutinized and judged on the basis of its degree of openness to “diversity”.
While classical music was banned during the Cultural Revolution, it is estimated today that about 50 million young Chinese are learning the piano.
In the field of classical music, this leads to prioritizing the recruitment of musicians from diverse ethnic backgrounds, modifying the canon of composers deemed essential to include artists of colour, or transforming the current concert format to offer collaborations with singers appreciated by young audiences, as proposed in the League of American Orchestras’ report entitled “How Diversity Can Help Save Classical Music”.
It is to be hoped that this project of ethnic recalibration will succeed in breathing new life into classical music across the Atlantic. Sceptics, however, will prefer to bank on the extraordinary enthusiasm of the younger generation of Asian Americans for this art form. The latter constitute a growing fringe of amateurs and professionals, contradicting the above-mentioned critics who see classical music as an area that is not easily accessible to ethnic minorities. Indeed, the children of immigrants from China, South Korea, Singapore or Taiwan are over-represented in conservatories, and pushed by their parents, who see this apprenticeship as a school of rigour and excellence. It remains to be seen, however, whether their demographic weight in the population will be sufficient to reverse the current declining trend.
In this regard, the situation in the United States contrasts with that of several Asian countries, such as China, for example. While classical music was banned during the Cultural Revolution, it is estimated today that about 50 million young Chinese are learning the piano, inspired by internationally renowned stars such as Li Yundi, Yuja Wang, or Lang Lang. The country is both the leading consumer and the leading manufacturer of pianos, producing 80% of the world’s supply. The average age of concertgoers is considerably younger than in North America, suggesting a more sustainable audience over the long term, both in auditoriums and on the internet. All these factors led Lorin Maazel, former music director of the New York Philharmonic Orchestra, to say: “We need defenders of our classical music tradition, if classical music is to survive … it may very well be that the most important defenders are in China”.
Optimists will be pleased to find a music-loving public in Asia, eager to take over a neglected artistic heritage. Pessimists will see it as yet another symptom of a West that has forgotten its roots and is indifferent to the transmission of its own cultural treasures. A silent phenomenon, rarely in the headlines… but no less significant for the evolution of our civilization.
* Paul May is notably the author of a remarkable work, “Philosophies of Multiculturalism” (Presses de Sciences Po, 2016).
Translated by DeepL from https://www.lefigaro.fr/vox/culture/etats-unis-la-musique-classique-est-elle-un-privilege-des-blancs-et-des-asiatiques-20200621?utm_source=premium&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=%5b20200622_NL_MATINALE%5d&een
Are the first casualties of racial performing censoring going to be Mozart's Seraglio and Gershwin's Porgy ?.
Damian R
2020-06-30 10:31:55 UTC
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Post by Rebuild Queens Hall London
Post by shellackophile
Classical Music Is Being Cancelled
United States: Is classical music a “privilege” for whites and Asians?
TRIBUNE – In decline in the United States, classical music is criticized by many as “too white”, even though it is favoured by young Americans of Asian descent, analyses Paul May, a professor at the Université du Québec à Montréal (Uqam)*.
By PAUL MAY
Le Figaro, 21 June 2020
Classical music today is accused of being unsuited to the growing ethnic diversity of the American population.
Certain phenomena, not very publicized and unspectacular, are nevertheless indicative of profound transformations at work in our societies. This is the case of the decline of classical music in the United States. Confronted for several years with a constant decline in its audience, classical music is now accused of being unsuited to the growing ethnic diversity of the country’s population, to such an extent that its long-term survival is being questioned. Sociologically, the stakes are symbolic: one of the major cultural practices of the country’s elite since its foundation is explicitly called upon to change or disappear.
A study by the National Endowment for the Arts reports that the proportion of adults who attended a classical music concert in the previous year had risen from 13 per cent in 1982 to 8.6 per cent in 2017. Between 1982 and 2002, the share of attendees under 30 dropped from 27% to 9%. This is accompanied by a general decline in the number of amateurs in the population: in 1992, 4.2% of adult Americans reported playing a musical instrument, compared to 2% in 2008. In terms of album sales, although the last two years have seen a slight improvement, they do not mask a sharp decline over the long term. While the country still has some of the world’s most renowned orchestras, such as the Chicago Symphony or the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the question of a decline can hardly be avoided.
There are many reasons for this, according to the specialist press: an economic model based mainly on private funding, a decline in school education, and competition from other forms of music that are more popular with the younger generation.
Classical music is inherently racist
– New Music USA
Faced with this observation, classical music is encouraged to renew itself. However, according to professionals in the sector, one of the major challenges is to change the image of a field perceived as “too white”. According to a report published in 2016 by the League of American Orchestras, blacks represent only 1.8% of orchestra members, and Latin Americans only 2.5%. Moreover, the vast majority of the works performed in the concerts were by composers of European origin, which is considered insufficiently “inclusive” in the United States. For example, the San Francisco Chronicle recently expressed regret that the city’s Symphony Orchestra will present almost exclusively compositions created by white men in the 2017-2018 season.
Too white, too old, the classical music sector is accused of being out of step with the country’s changing demographics. Indeed, projections by the US Census Bureau predict that the share of ethnic minorities in the population will increase to become the majority around the middle of the century, and would already represent 45% of the 18-23 age group. As a result, a number of American newspapers have recently denounced the fact that the classical music scene is considered too ethnically homogenous. The New York Times accuses it of being the “least diverse institution in the country” and of masking “a racist problem”, while the Seattle Magazine proclaims that it is necessary to “attack its whiteness”. The specialized press is not to be outdone: the National Public Radioconstate’s website says that the scene is “extremely white and increasingly marginalized,” echoing New Music USA, which for its part believes that “classical music is inherently racist.
These accusations are based on the following logic: if an institution has too small a proportion of people of non-European descent, it is suspected of masking a discriminatory recruitment process, or even a form of “structural racism”. Recently, this beam of criticism has hit a wide variety of fields, such as cinema (with the hashtag #OscarsSoWhite), ice hockey (#HockeySoWhite), or the Silicon Valley business community (#SiliconValleySoWhite). In the name of economic performance or the principle of non-discrimination, each institution is thus scrutinized and judged on the basis of its degree of openness to “diversity”.
While classical music was banned during the Cultural Revolution, it is estimated today that about 50 million young Chinese are learning the piano.
In the field of classical music, this leads to prioritizing the recruitment of musicians from diverse ethnic backgrounds, modifying the canon of composers deemed essential to include artists of colour, or transforming the current concert format to offer collaborations with singers appreciated by young audiences, as proposed in the League of American Orchestras’ report entitled “How Diversity Can Help Save Classical Music”.
It is to be hoped that this project of ethnic recalibration will succeed in breathing new life into classical music across the Atlantic. Sceptics, however, will prefer to bank on the extraordinary enthusiasm of the younger generation of Asian Americans for this art form. The latter constitute a growing fringe of amateurs and professionals, contradicting the above-mentioned critics who see classical music as an area that is not easily accessible to ethnic minorities. Indeed, the children of immigrants from China, South Korea, Singapore or Taiwan are over-represented in conservatories, and pushed by their parents, who see this apprenticeship as a school of rigour and excellence. It remains to be seen, however, whether their demographic weight in the population will be sufficient to reverse the current declining trend.
In this regard, the situation in the United States contrasts with that of several Asian countries, such as China, for example. While classical music was banned during the Cultural Revolution, it is estimated today that about 50 million young Chinese are learning the piano, inspired by internationally renowned stars such as Li Yundi, Yuja Wang, or Lang Lang. The country is both the leading consumer and the leading manufacturer of pianos, producing 80% of the world’s supply. The average age of concertgoers is considerably younger than in North America, suggesting a more sustainable audience over the long term, both in auditoriums and on the internet. All these factors led Lorin Maazel, former music director of the New York Philharmonic Orchestra, to say: “We need defenders of our classical music tradition, if classical music is to survive … it may very well be that the most important defenders are in China”.
Optimists will be pleased to find a music-loving public in Asia, eager to take over a neglected artistic heritage. Pessimists will see it as yet another symptom of a West that has forgotten its roots and is indifferent to the transmission of its own cultural treasures. A silent phenomenon, rarely in the headlines… but no less significant for the evolution of our civilization.
* Paul May is notably the author of a remarkable work, “Philosophies of Multiculturalism” (Presses de Sciences Po, 2016).
Translated by DeepL from https://www.lefigaro.fr/vox/culture/etats-unis-la-musique-classique-est-elle-un-privilege-des-blancs-et-des-asiatiques-20200621?utm_source=premium&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=%5b20200622_NL_MATINALE%5d&een
Are the first casualties of racial performing censoring going to be Mozart's Seraglio and Gershwin's Porgy ?.
Well if we could get rid of the blackface portrayals of Monostatos in the Magic Flute (still happening at the Romanian Comic Opera for Children in 2017 - https://www.instagram.com/p/BRg8Ey9gQdo/) it would be a start. (It'd also be good of course if the singers there didn't need microphones, but that's a different issue!)
Andrew Clarke
2020-07-04 15:00:03 UTC
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Post by shellackophile
Classical Music Is Being Cancelled
United States: Is classical music a “privilege” for whites and Asians?
TRIBUNE – In decline in the United States, classical music is criticized by many as “too white”, even though it is favoured by young Americans of Asian descent, analyses Paul May, a professor at the Université du Québec à Montréal (Uqam)*.
By the same "logic", the Great American Songbook is too white also. Down with the Gershwins, Hoagy Carmichael, Cole Porter, Rogers and Hart, Irving Berlin.

We could have more jazz, blues and R&B except young black Americans don't listen to this any more.

That leaves ... what, exactly?

Andrew Clarke
Canberra

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