Discussion:
WAYLTL - October 2020
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Al Eisner
2020-10-05 01:10:30 UTC
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Britten: Violin Concerto;
Double Concerto for Violin and Viola (edited by Colin Matthews);
Lachrymae ("Reflections on a Theme of Dowland") for Viola
Orchestra (first written or viola and piano)
Recorded on Hyperion, 2011, with Anthony Marwood (violin), Lawrence
Power (viola), Ilan Volkov and the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra.

The violin concerto is a terrific work, given an excellent performance.
The other two works were new to me. According to the notes, Britten
was ambivalent about the double concerto, and it was not performed
during his litetime. But it is well worth hearing, and much of it
(when it is not indulging in semi-bombastic fanfares) seems to me
to be quite fine (especially the second-movement "Rhapsody"). Lastly,
the Lachrymae, a set of variations, much of it in Britten's
wonderfully quirky mode, was for me a great find, All recommended.
--
Al Eisner
number_six
2020-10-10 20:33:17 UTC
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Roman Haubenstock-Ramati -- 2 Hat Art cds:
(1) Concerto a Tre and (2) Mobile for Shakespeare

Corelli - Concerti Grossi op 6 -- Pinnock

Gade /Nielsen - #29 in EMI Matrix series
interesting vocal works here
Al Eisner
2020-10-12 04:53:45 UTC
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Again from the Berlin Philharmonic's Digital Concert Hall, where
this weekend's playlist consists of (mostly-contemporary) female composers.
I listened to four of the works, all in fairly accessible styles:

Anna Thorvaldóttir, "Metacosmos", with Alan Gilbert (performed 2019).
Strange but engrossing, often sort of like glaciers slowly moving (but of
course way faster than the real thing). Worth hearing - I'd like to hear
more of her stuff.

Sofia Gubaidulina, "In tempus praesens", a violin concerto, with Gidon Kremer
and Christian Thielemann (2016), I found this spare and pretty tedious. It
opened up with more instruments and more color about 3/4 of the way
through -mwelcome, but too late.

Kaija Saariaho, "Laterna Magica", premiere, with Simon Rattle (2009). My
favorite of the works, a complex impressionist landscape, albeit a loud
one! A winner.

Ursuk Chin, Cello Concerto, with Alban Gerhardt and Myung-Whun Chung (2014).
Gerhardt was excellent in the cello part, and the score had lots of
interesting or startling sonic effects, but overall I'm not sure to what
end.
--
Al Eisner
Lawrence Chalmers
2020-10-11 02:44:01 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
Britten: Violin Concerto;
Double Concerto for Violin and Viola (edited by Colin Matthews);
Lachrymae ("Reflections on a Theme of Dowland") for Viola
Orchestra (first written or viola and piano)
Recorded on Hyperion, 2011, with Anthony Marwood (violin), Lawrence
Power (viola), Ilan Volkov and the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra.
The violin concerto is a terrific work, given an excellent performance.
The other two works were new to me. According to the notes, Britten
was ambivalent about the double concerto, and it was not performed
during his litetime. But it is well worth hearing, and much of it
(when it is not indulging in semi-bombastic fanfares) seems to me
to be quite fine (especially the second-movement "Rhapsody"). Lastly,
the Lachrymae, a set of variations, much of it in Britten's
wonderfully quirky mode, was for me a great find, All recommended.
--
Al Eisner
Nielsen Orchestral works by the Aarhus Symphony conducted by Lance Friedel on MSR Classics. Various short works, some familiar some not. All enjoyable in not so great sound.
dk
2020-10-11 19:12:41 UTC
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Rachmaninov Paganini Rhapsody verticals.
Ravel La Valse verticals.

dk
Ed Presson
2020-10-12 02:13:00 UTC
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Post by dk
Rachmaninov Paganini Rhapsody verticals.
Ravel La Valse verticals.
dk
Sorry, I don't understand "verticals."
Ed
Frank Berger
2020-10-12 02:30:23 UTC
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Post by Ed Presson
Post by dk
Rachmaninov Paganini Rhapsody verticals.
Ravel La Valse verticals.
dk
Sorry, I don't understand "verticals."
Ed
Guessing: harmonics?
Al Eisner
2020-10-12 03:55:09 UTC
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Post by Frank Berger
Post by Ed Presson
Post by dk
Rachmaninov Paganini Rhapsody verticals.
Ravel La Valse verticals.
dk
Sorry, I don't understand "verticals."
Ed
Guessing: harmonics?
Perhaps, for example for the Rach, comparison of many performances of
the same vaiation? But then I don't know what horizontals would be ....

Or maybe Dan is performing gymnastics while listening.
--
Al Eisner
dk
2020-10-12 06:17:05 UTC
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Post by Ed Presson
Post by dk
Rachmaninov Paganini Rhapsody verticals.
Ravel La Valse verticals.
Sorry, I don't understand "verticals."
Analyzing many different
performances of the same
work. Term borrowed from
wine tasting lore.

dk
Frank Berger
2020-10-12 14:13:45 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by Ed Presson
Post by dk
Rachmaninov Paganini Rhapsody verticals.
Ravel La Valse verticals.
Sorry, I don't understand "verticals."
Analyzing many different
performances of the same
work. Term borrowed from
wine tasting lore.
dk
I prefer my answer, wrong though it is.
Ed Presson
2020-10-12 18:52:10 UTC
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Post by Ed Presson
Post by dk
Rachmaninov Paganini Rhapsody verticals.
Ravel La Valse verticals.
Sorry, I don't understand "verticals."
Analyzing many different
performances of the same
work. Term borrowed from
wine tasting lore.
dk
Got it; thanks.
Andrew Clarke
2020-10-13 00:09:40 UTC
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Berlioz. Sym Fant. Les Siecles. Francis-Xavier Roth.

I was inspired to make this purchase - otherwise not considered - by You Tube, who decided, correctly, that I would be interested in a period instrument performance of the fifth movement, complete with 2 bass ophicleides and serpent.

Within minutes of hearing this I had downloaded the Les Siecles recording. Ain't technology marvelous?

Andrew Clarke
Canberra
Gerard
2020-10-13 10:32:56 UTC
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Post by Andrew Clarke
Berlioz. Sym Fant. Les Siecles. Francis-Xavier Roth.
I was inspired to make this purchase - otherwise not considered - by You Tube, who decided, correctly, that I would be interested in a period instrument performance of the fifth movement, complete with 2 bass ophicleides and serpent.
Within minutes of hearing this I had downloaded the Les Siecles recording. Ain't technology marvelous?
Andrew Clarke
Canberra
I suppose you mean Roth's second recording of the Symph.Fant., this
time on Harmonia Mundi (very much finer than his first recording on
Musicales Actes Sud).
Andrew Clarke
2020-10-14 06:52:01 UTC
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Post by Gerard
Post by Andrew Clarke
Berlioz. Sym Fant. Les Siecles. Francis-Xavier Roth.
I was inspired to make this purchase - otherwise not considered - by You Tube, who decided, correctly, that I would be interested in a period instrument performance of the fifth movement, complete with 2 bass ophicleides and serpent.
Within minutes of hearing this I had downloaded the Les Siecles recording. Ain't technology marvelous?
Andrew Clarke
Canberra
I suppose you mean Roth's second recording of the Symph.Fant., this
time on Harmonia Mundi (very much finer than his first recording on
Musicales Actes Sud).
It's the recording where Ophicleide 2 has the inscription "HB aime HS VRAIMENT" crudely inscribed about 10 cm below the bell. This is THE original instrument.

Andrew Clarke
Canberra
number_six
2020-10-16 19:41:06 UTC
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Post by Andrew Clarke
Post by Gerard
Post by Andrew Clarke
Berlioz. Sym Fant. Les Siecles. Francis-Xavier Roth.
I was inspired to make this purchase - otherwise not considered - by You Tube, who decided, correctly, that I would be interested in a period instrument performance of the fifth movement, complete with 2 bass ophicleides and serpent.
Within minutes of hearing this I had downloaded the Les Siecles recording. Ain't technology marvelous?
Andrew Clarke
Canberra
I suppose you mean Roth's second recording of the Symph.Fant., this
time on Harmonia Mundi (very much finer than his first recording on
Musicales Actes Sud).
It's the recording where Ophicleide 2 has the inscription "HB aime HS VRAIMENT" crudely inscribed about 10 cm below the bell. This is THE original instrument.
Andrew Clarke
Canberra
I assume the outcome for those parties -- inscriber and dedicatee -- rests somewhere below the threshold of a footnote to history?
Andrew Clarke
2020-10-16 22:02:20 UTC
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Post by number_six
Post by Andrew Clarke
Post by Gerard
I suppose you mean Roth's second recording of the Symph.Fant., this
time on Harmonia Mundi (very much finer than his first recording on
Musicales Actes Sud).
It's the recording where Ophicleide 2 has the inscription "HB aime HS VRAIMENT" crudely inscribed about 10 cm below the bell. This is THE original instrument.
Andrew Clarke
Canberra
I assume the outcome for those parties -- inscriber and dedicatee -- rests somewhere below the threshold of a footnote to history?
Certainly a demonstration that wayward genius and Romantic infatuation do not necessarily lead to a good marriage.

Andrew Clarke
Canberra
Henk vT
2020-10-17 11:45:06 UTC
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Post by number_six
Post by Andrew Clarke
Post by Gerard
Post by Andrew Clarke
Berlioz. Sym Fant. Les Siecles. Francis-Xavier Roth.
I was inspired to make this purchase - otherwise not considered - by You Tube, who decided, correctly, that I would be interested in a period instrument performance of the fifth movement, complete with 2 bass ophicleides and serpent.
Within minutes of hearing this I had downloaded the Les Siecles recording. Ain't technology marvelous?
Andrew Clarke
Canberra
I suppose you mean Roth's second recording of the Symph.Fant., this
time on Harmonia Mundi (very much finer than his first recording on
Musicales Actes Sud).
It's the recording where Ophicleide 2 has the inscription "HB aime HS VRAIMENT" crudely inscribed about 10 cm below the bell. This is THE original instrument.
Andrew Clarke
Canberra
I assume the outcome for those parties -- inscriber and dedicatee -- rests somewhere below the threshold of a footnote to history?
Harriet Smithson. Berlioz' first wife.

Henk
Andrew Clarke
2020-10-17 12:43:45 UTC
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Post by Henk vT
Post by number_six
Post by Andrew Clarke
Post by Gerard
Post by Andrew Clarke
Berlioz. Sym Fant. Les Siecles. Francis-Xavier Roth.
I was inspired to make this purchase - otherwise not considered - by You Tube, who decided, correctly, that I would be interested in a period instrument performance of the fifth movement, complete with 2 bass ophicleides and serpent.
Within minutes of hearing this I had downloaded the Les Siecles recording. Ain't technology marvelous?
Andrew Clarke
Canberra
I suppose you mean Roth's second recording of the Symph.Fant., this
time on Harmonia Mundi (very much finer than his first recording on
Musicales Actes Sud).
It's the recording where Ophicleide 2 has the inscription "HB aime HS VRAIMENT" crudely inscribed about 10 cm below the bell. This is THE original instrument.
Andrew Clarke
Canberra
I assume the outcome for those parties -- inscriber and dedicatee -- rests somewhere below the threshold of a footnote to history?
Harriet Smithson. Berlioz' first wife.
Henk
And if you want to see the actual instrument, it's in the Smithsonian ...

Andrew Clarke
Canberra
number_six
2020-10-18 17:03:30 UTC
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Post by Andrew Clarke
Post by Henk vT
Post by number_six
Post by Andrew Clarke
Post by Gerard
Post by Andrew Clarke
Berlioz. Sym Fant. Les Siecles. Francis-Xavier Roth.
I was inspired to make this purchase - otherwise not considered - by You Tube, who decided, correctly, that I would be interested in a period instrument performance of the fifth movement, complete with 2 bass ophicleides and serpent.
Within minutes of hearing this I had downloaded the Les Siecles recording. Ain't technology marvelous?
Andrew Clarke
Canberra
I suppose you mean Roth's second recording of the Symph.Fant., this
time on Harmonia Mundi (very much finer than his first recording on
Musicales Actes Sud).
It's the recording where Ophicleide 2 has the inscription "HB aime HS VRAIMENT" crudely inscribed about 10 cm below the bell. This is THE original instrument.
Andrew Clarke
Canberra
I assume the outcome for those parties -- inscriber and dedicatee -- rests somewhere below the threshold of a footnote to history?
Harriet Smithson. Berlioz' first wife.
Henk
And if you want to see the actual instrument, it's in the Smithsonian ...
Andrew Clarke
Canberra
Andrew and Henk, thanks to both of you for explaining this.

Suffice to say, though I'm familiar of course with his major works, not so with the life of Berlioz -- and the wife of Berlioz!
Andrew Clarke
2020-10-18 23:20:59 UTC
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Post by number_six
Post by Andrew Clarke
Post by Henk vT
Post by number_six
I assume the outcome for those parties -- inscriber and dedicatee -- rests somewhere below the threshold of a footnote to history?
Harriet Smithson. Berlioz' first wife.
Henk
And if you want to see the actual instrument, it's in the Smithsonian ...
Andrew Clarke
Canberra
Andrew and Henk, thanks to both of you for explaining this.
Suffice to say, though I'm familiar of course with his major works, not so with the life of Berlioz -- and the wife of Berlioz!
No worries! Here's the You Tube clip I mentioned:


What a difference those historic instruments make - French system bassoons, small bore trombones, 2 (natural) trumpets + 2 cornets and what might be "Vienna" horns. As usual, there's a large number of young musicians in the band, which I find encouraging.

More serpent fun here:



Andrew Clarke
Canberra
Dirge
2020-10-22 19:27:04 UTC
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Luigi CHERUBINI (1760–1842): String Quartets No. 3 in D minor (1834) & No. 6 in A minor (1837)
:: Quartetto Savinio [Stradivarius ’07]

Quartetto Savinio offers likable, well-rounded, naturally phrased accounts that strike a very satisfying Classical-Romantic interpretive balance, falling somewhere between the decidedly Classical Melos Quartett [DG ’70s] and the relatively Romantic Quartetto David [BIS ’90s]. I especially like the group’s elegant “less is more” approach to vibrato, employing fairly light/minimal vibrato as a rule but deftly increasing it or paring it down even more for expressive purposes, the brief solo opening of 3/iv (Allegro risoluto) being a sublime little example of the latter. Tempos are mostly moderate and unremarkable save for that of 6/ii (Andantino grazioso), which is conspicuously slower than usual and sounds a bit lyrically protracted and rhythmically smoothed over. The playing in general isn’t as lucid and internally well-balanced as that of the Melos Quartett or as ripe and singing as that of Quartetto David, but neither is it as cool and abstract/formal (not that those are necessarily bad things) as the former or as indulgently phrased and primary-voice-biased as the latter (to brutally overstate my reservations about those recordings). A few movements are less energetic than they might be, and the playing’s edge is dulled to a degree by the somewhat woolly, opaque, and constricted recording (which no doubt contributes to the perceived energy deficiency of some movements), but I tend to gravitate toward Quartetto Savinio anyhow.

[I quickly dismissed Hausmusik London [cpo ’90s] on account of its all too relaxed/low-tension/mellow and genteel general approach, which strikes me as being at odds with the spirit of the music; in any event, its performances fail to engage me despite the poise and intricacy/subtlety of the playing. Quartetto di Venezia [Decca ’09?] got the ax because of the extreme stereo separation and poor instrumental balances of the very closely observed recording—there’s virtually no integration or blending of the four voices, and the first violin tends to be far too prominent/dominant, the second violin and viola far too reticent. The performances end up sounding too much like concertos for first violin with string trio accompaniment for me to embrace despite the intriguing quality of the highly inflected, deliberately articulated, tense & dramatic playing itself.]
Henk vT
2020-10-22 21:24:19 UTC
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Tellefsen - one of Chopin's pupils - on YT. Several piano pieces and the concertos.
Walker just mentions Tellefsen's name in his Chopin biography. That's almost too little.

Henk
Dirge
2020-10-25 23:27:54 UTC
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Franz SCHMIDT: Symphony No. 4 (1933)
:: Moralt/VSO [Epic ’55] Naxos Classical Archives (download only)

This highly wrought, grittily intense, architecturally savvy performance is poignantly expressive and affecting in a somewhat raw and unprettified way—there’s no mistaking it for Mehta/VPO [Decca ’71], with its rhetorical eloquence and Old World beauty. Moralt takes a sort of mid-century modern approach that, while not understating the influence of Bruckner and Mahler, places the work very much in its own time. The episodes featuring “lonely” trumpet solos sound especially modern here and presage (to my ears, at least) similar episodes in the unlikely Gotham triumvirate of Copland’s Quiet City (1940), Bernstein’s On the Waterfront (1954), and Carter’s A Symphony of Three Orchestras (1976). Tempos are slower than usual in the first two movements (though not quite so slow as in Mehta/VPO), faster than usual in the last, but they sound right in context, as tempo relationships and proportions are all well judged. All in all, this is my favorite alternative to Mehta/VPO, and I’m not sure that I don’t favor it.

The 1955 Epic mono recording is pretty good on the whole, though the otherwise good Naxos Classical Archives transfer is a bit overfiltered and that much less atmospheric than the LP I’ve heard.
Gerard
2020-10-26 16:20:49 UTC
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Schubert: Symphony 9 (these days 8 - "the great" anyway),
Kammerorchester Basel, conducted by Heinz Holliger (Sony)

A splendid performance, and first class recording. A very transparent
sounding orchestra, everything can be heard. All repeats.
Very much recommended.
BTW Holliger is recording all Schubert symphonies for Sony. 1, 4, 5 and
6 have been released already.
number_six
2020-10-26 20:59:16 UTC
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Copland - El Salon Mexico, Clarinet cto, Music for the Theatre, Connotations
Bernstein, NYP -- DG

El Salon Mexico sounded like so-so danzon Cubana to me

But Stanley Drucker is impeccable in the Concerto

Overall a very enjoyable disk

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