Discussion:
Gerhardt Classic Film Series reissued
(too old to reply)
pianomaven
2011-03-08 20:50:05 UTC
Permalink
Sony's notice is as follows:


Gerhardt’s Classic Film Scores Series Back & Better Than Ever!

In the 1970s, RCA Red Seal’s acclaimed Classic Film Scores series
introduced a new generation to the sumptuous sound of music in
Hollywood’s “Golden Age.” Using original orchestrations and heard for
the first time in rich stereo sound, conductor Charles Gerhardt and
the National Philharmonic Orchestra recreated the great moments from
the legendary scores of Hollywood’s most memorable films. Remastered
for the first time using the original analog masters and including the
original LP liner notes, the Classic Film Scores are once again
available for both collectors and a new generation of listeners. 13
individual CDs are now available from such classics as Citizen Kane,
Sunset Boulevard, Spellbound and Casablanca, written by such legendary
composers as Bernard Herrman, Franz Waxman, Erich Wolfgang Korngold,
Miklós Rózsa, Max Steiner and Dimitri Tiomkin.

“The performances in this series are all splendid, the engineering
wonderfully sumptuous, and the selections unfailingly intelligent …
Great stuff!” - David Hurwitz, ClassicsToday.com


Sounds interesting.

However, the phrase "Remastered for the first time using the original
analog masters" surprised me, as I own a whole series of these
published by RCA Victor in the 1980s which made the same claim.

Then you look on Classics Today. Hurwitz is writing about the FIRST
reissue, not this new one.

10 to 1 these are simply re-pressings of that entire series. No new
mastering.(It was already very, very, very fine).

The series was issued on March 1, so someone here may have had a
chance to listen?

TD
William Sommerwerck
2011-03-08 21:53:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by pianomaven
10 to 1 these are simply re-pressings of that entire series.
No new mastering. (It was already very, very, very fine).
There's an article about this series in the current Fanfare. It appears this
release is the same as the original CD release, but without Dolby Surround
encoding.

Although there have been plans to release the series with added or extended
selections, this edition merely duplicates the original LPs' contents.
El Klauso
2011-03-08 22:01:28 UTC
Permalink
It was a fine series, but the complete score recordings involving the
restoration and performance talents of John Morgan and William T.
Stromberg - and available variously on Marco Polo, Naxos and most
recently Tribute Film Classics - are quite rewarding as well.
Frank Berger
2011-03-08 22:20:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Sommerwerck
Post by pianomaven
10 to 1 these are simply re-pressings of that entire series.
No new mastering. (It was already very, very, very fine).
There's an article about this series in the current Fanfare. It
appears this release is the same as the original CD release, but
without Dolby Surround encoding.
Although there have been plans to release the series with added or
extended selections, this edition merely duplicates the original LPs'
contents.
Perhaps someone can refresh my memory. Wasn't there a Gerhardt recording
that was released in the U.S. on CD on some kind of fake stereo? Didn't I
have to order a mono version from Japan? What was it?
pianomaven
2011-03-08 23:04:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Sommerwerck
Post by pianomaven
10 to 1 these are simply re-pressings of that entire series.
No new mastering. (It was already very, very, very fine).
There's an article about this series in the current Fanfare. It appears this
release is the same as the original CD release, but without Dolby Surround
encoding.
The originals were most likely recorded using Dolby A, of course. The
surround business probably doesn't affect many people, as I doubt many
held onto their surround-decoders from the analogue era.
Post by William Sommerwerck
Although there have been plans to release the series with added or extended
selections, this edition merely duplicates the original LPs' contents.
That would have added enormously to the costs. There is no question
but that Sony sees this simply as a way to recycle the old transfers
on the Sony label. The coverart is hideous, by the way, unlike the
originals or the first CD issues.

TD
William Sommerwerck
2011-03-09 02:26:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Sommerwerck
There's an article about this series in the current Fanfare.
It appears this release is the same as the original CD release,
but without Dolby Surround encoding.
The surround business probably doesn't affect many people,
as I doubt many held onto their surround-decoders from the
analogue era.
The reviewer felt the Dolby Surround degraded the sound.

I, by the way, still have all my quadraphonic recordings, and decoders to
play them.
pianomaven
2011-03-09 10:58:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Sommerwerck
Post by William Sommerwerck
There's an article about this series in the current Fanfare.
It appears this release is the same as the original CD release,
but without Dolby Surround encoding.
The surround business probably doesn't affect many people,
as I doubt many held onto their surround-decoders from the
analogue era.
The reviewer felt the Dolby Surround degraded the sound.
I, by the way, still have all my quadraphonic recordings, and decoders to
play them.
Of course you do.

TD
William Sommerwerck
2011-03-09 12:19:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by pianomaven
Post by William Sommerwerck
The reviewer felt the Dolby Surround degraded the sound.
I, by the way, still have all my quadraphonic recordings,
and decoders to play them.
Of course you do.
I was 30 years ahead of everyone else. So there. (I wonder when the
audiophile community will rediscover the benefits of the hall synthesizer.
Not likely.)
pianomaven
2011-03-09 13:47:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Sommerwerck
Post by pianomaven
Post by William Sommerwerck
The reviewer felt the Dolby Surround degraded the sound.
I, by the way, still have all my quadraphonic recordings,
and decoders to play them.
Of course you do.
I was 30 years ahead of everyone else. So there.
No, you jumped on a bandwagon that lost its wheels.

TD
William Sommerwerck
2011-03-09 13:55:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by pianomaven
Post by William Sommerwerck
I was 30 years ahead of everyone else. So there.
No, you jumped on a bandwagon that lost its wheels.
I've been enjoying surround sound for 40+ years, while almost everyong else
stuck with POS (plain-old stereo). You're welcome to stop by any time and
hear the difference.
Steve de Mena
2011-03-09 00:06:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Sommerwerck
Post by pianomaven
10 to 1 these are simply re-pressings of that entire series.
No new mastering. (It was already very, very, very fine).
There's an article about this series in the current Fanfare. It appears this
release is the same as the original CD release, but without Dolby Surround
encoding.
If they took the original stereo master tapes and ran them through an
AD converter without Dolby Surround encoding, that would be considered
a new remastering.

Steve
pianomaven
2011-03-09 10:57:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve de Mena
Post by William Sommerwerck
Post by pianomaven
10 to 1 these are simply re-pressings of that entire series.
No new mastering. (It was already very, very, very fine).
There's an article about this series in the current Fanfare. It appears this
release is the same as the original CD release, but without Dolby Surround
encoding.
If they took the original stereo master tapes and ran them through an
AD converter without Dolby Surround encoding, that would be considered
a new remastering.
How about simply playing it on a two-channel system, Steve? Then the
original would have no "surround" sound to listen to.

TD
Steve de Mena
2011-03-09 11:59:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by pianomaven
Post by Steve de Mena
Post by William Sommerwerck
Post by pianomaven
10 to 1 these are simply re-pressings of that entire series.
No new mastering. (It was already very, very, very fine).
There's an article about this series in the current Fanfare. It appears this
release is the same as the original CD release, but without Dolby Surround
encoding.
If they took the original stereo master tapes and ran them through an
AD converter without Dolby Surround encoding, that would be considered
a new remastering.
How about simply playing it on a two-channel system, Steve? Then the
original would have no "surround" sound to listen to.
TD
You would think so, but then why bother removing the Dolby Surround
encoding if it truly didn't impart any change to the stereo channels?

Steve
Paul Penna
2011-03-09 19:26:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve de Mena
Post by pianomaven
Post by Steve de Mena
Post by William Sommerwerck
Post by pianomaven
10 to 1 these are simply re-pressings of that entire series.
No new mastering. (It was already very, very, very fine).
There's an article about this series in the current Fanfare. It appears this
release is the same as the original CD release, but without Dolby Surround
encoding.
If they took the original stereo master tapes and ran them through an
AD converter without Dolby Surround encoding, that would be considered
a new remastering.
How about simply playing it on a two-channel system, Steve? Then the
original would have no "surround" sound to listen to.
TD
You would think so, but then why bother removing the Dolby Surround
encoding if it truly didn't impart any change to the stereo channels?
Steve
Which, indeed, it does. For example, the piano in the "Casablanca" suite
sounds distinctly out-of-phase when the Dolby Surround version is played
in 2-channel; in surround, that's what causes it to be placed
center-back.
William Sommerwerck
2011-03-09 12:16:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by pianomaven
How about simply playing it on a two-channel system,
Steve? Then the original would have no "surround"
sound to listen to.
The opinion of the Fanfare reviewer was that the additional processing of
the original recording hurt the sound for any listener.
Matthew B. Tepper
2011-03-09 07:42:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Sommerwerck
Post by pianomaven
10 to 1 these are simply re-pressings of that entire series.
No new mastering. (It was already very, very, very fine).
There's an article about this series in the current Fanfare. It appears
this release is the same as the original CD release, but without Dolby
Surround encoding.
Although there have been plans to release the series with added or
extended selections, this edition merely duplicates the original LPs'
contents.
I saw the Korngold "Elizabeth and Essex" CD at Amoeba Music the other day.
I'd like to buy "The Sea Hawk" first, though.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
***** War is Peace **** Freedom is Slavery **** Fox is News *****
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
William Sommerwerck
2011-03-09 12:14:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
I saw the Korngold "Elizabeth and Essex" CD at Amoeba
Music the other day. I'd like to buy "The Sea Hawk" first,
though.
Why doesn't Sony simply reissue the entire series as a boxed set for 4 bucks
a pop?

The first LP in this series I bought was the first Korngold. I'd heard the
"King's Row" theme on TV, and wanted a copy. It sparked an interest in film
music.

By the way, Korngold wrote the theme thinking it was a movie about royalty,
rather than sleazy soap-opera trash.
ivanmaxim
2011-03-09 14:49:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Sommerwerck
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
I saw the Korngold "Elizabeth and Essex" CD at Amoeba
Music the other day. I'd like to buy "The Sea Hawk" first,
though.
Why doesn't Sony simply reissue the entire series as a boxed set for 4 bucks
a pop?
The first LP in this series I bought was the first Korngold. I'd heard the
"King's Row" theme on TV, and wanted a copy. It sparked an interest in film
music.
By the way, Korngold wrote the theme thinking it was a movie about royalty,
rather than sleazy soap-opera trash.
Really - that accounts for the incongruity of the music to the film.
The fanfares hardly bring up small town America, do they??? Wagner
fan
David O.
2011-03-09 15:34:42 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 9 Mar 2011 06:49:28 -0800 (PST), ivanmaxim
Post by ivanmaxim
Post by William Sommerwerck
By the way, Korngold wrote the theme thinking it was a movie about royalty,
rather than sleazy soap-opera trash.
Really - that accounts for the incongruity of the music to the film.
The fanfares hardly bring up small town America, do they??? Wagner
fan
They seem more appropriate when they're used in STAR WARS!
El Klauso
2011-03-09 18:01:32 UTC
Permalink
IM: Really - that accounts for the incongruity of the music to the
film.
The fanfares hardly bring up small town America, do they???  

EK: EWK was evidently inspired by the break-away within the film to
"Alt Wein." Actually, considering the squalid nature of the plot of
this property, Korngold's music does quite a bit to build the drama
into something more noble. He even made it seem that Reagan could act.
Matthew B. Tepper
2011-03-09 21:02:52 UTC
Permalink
El Klauso <***@aol.com> appears to have caused the following letters
to be typed in news:001cdf63-5103-4192-96e2-
Post by El Klauso
IM: Really - that accounts for the incongruity of the music to the
film.
The fanfares hardly bring up small town America, do they???  
EK: EWK was evidently inspired by the break-away within the film to
"Alt Wein." Actually, considering the squalid nature of the plot of
this property, Korngold's music does quite a bit to build the drama
into something more noble. He even made it seem that Reagan could act.
I am no fan of Reagan the politician, but I do think he was a pretty good
second lead, and/or hero's best friend, in some of his movies.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
David O.
2011-03-09 15:33:54 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 9 Mar 2011 04:14:55 -0800, "William Sommerwerck"
Post by William Sommerwerck
The first LP in this series I bought was the first Korngold. I'd heard the
"King's Row" theme on TV, and wanted a copy. It sparked an interest in film
music.
My interest (such as it is) in movie music was sparked by Herbert
Stothart's WIZARD OF OZ score.
Post by William Sommerwerck
By the way, Korngold wrote the theme thinking it was a movie about royalty,
rather than sleazy soap-opera trash.
Not soap opera--melodrama!

See "James the Melodramatist" by Jacques Barzun.
ivanmaxim
2011-03-09 17:37:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by David O.
On Wed, 9 Mar 2011 04:14:55 -0800, "William Sommerwerck"
Post by William Sommerwerck
The first LP in this series I bought was the first Korngold. I'd heard the
"King's Row" theme on TV, and wanted a copy. It sparked an interest in film
music.
My interest (such as it is) in movie music was sparked by Herbert
Stothart's WIZARD OF OZ score.
Post by William Sommerwerck
By the way, Korngold wrote the theme thinking it was a movie about royalty,
rather than sleazy soap-opera trash.
Not soap opera--melodrama!
See "James the Melodramatist" by Jacques Barzun.
Yes the story line always struck me as fairly preposterous from the
sadistic doctor who likes to perform operations without anesthesia to
the mad daughter hiding in the shadows. Of course the film is best
known for one line "Where is the rest of me???" Wagner fan
ivanmaxim
2011-03-09 17:40:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by David O.
On Wed, 9 Mar 2011 04:14:55 -0800, "William Sommerwerck"
Post by William Sommerwerck
The first LP in this series I bought was the first Korngold. I'd heard the
"King's Row" theme on TV, and wanted a copy. It sparked an interest in film
music.
My interest (such as it is) in movie music was sparked by Herbert
Stothart's WIZARD OF OZ score.
Post by William Sommerwerck
By the way, Korngold wrote the theme thinking it was a movie about royalty,
rather than sleazy soap-opera trash.
Not soap opera--melodrama!
See "James the Melodramatist" by Jacques Barzun.
But isn't the score by Harold Arlen, adapted by Stothart for the
film??? Wagner fan
Kip Williams
2011-03-09 19:07:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by ivanmaxim
Post by David O.
My interest (such as it is) in movie music was sparked by Herbert
Stothart's WIZARD OF OZ score.
But isn't the score by Harold Arlen, adapted by Stothart for the
film???
And Murray Cutter, too. The numbers (some fairly extensive) were by
Arlen & Harburg. I believe the score, as such, can refer either to the
incidental music that surrounds the songs or to all the music. So you're
both right. Pie for everybody!


Kip W
Matthew B. Tepper
2011-03-09 21:02:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kip Williams
Post by ivanmaxim
Post by David O.
My interest (such as it is) in movie music was sparked by Herbert
Stothart's WIZARD OF OZ score.
But isn't the score by Harold Arlen, adapted by Stothart for the
film???
And Murray Cutter, too. The numbers (some fairly extensive) were by
Arlen & Harburg. I believe the score, as such, can refer either to the
incidental music that surrounds the songs or to all the music. So you're
both right. Pie for everybody!
Plus the little bits of Mussorgsky and Schumann (and a traditional song
about an apple tree?) that show up here and there.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
Kip Williams
2011-03-09 23:26:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Kip Williams
Post by ivanmaxim
Post by David O.
My interest (such as it is) in movie music was sparked by Herbert
Stothart's WIZARD OF OZ score.
But isn't the score by Harold Arlen, adapted by Stothart for the
film???
And Murray Cutter, too. The numbers (some fairly extensive) were by
Arlen& Harburg. I believe the score, as such, can refer either to the
incidental music that surrounds the songs or to all the music. So you're
both right. Pie for everybody!
Plus the little bits of Mussorgsky and Schumann (and a traditional song
about an apple tree?) that show up here and there.
That's by Van Alstyne, and dates back to [quick lookup] 1925 or so. I
wonder if you thought "Mendelssohn" and typed "Mussorgsky" just then. I
can think of a Mendelssohn tune in there, but not one by the Russian.
(Kodaly is mentioned elsewhere. I mention this for those tuning in late.)


Kip W
Beaver Lad
2011-03-10 01:38:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kip Williams
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Kip Williams
Post by ivanmaxim
Post by David O.
My interest (such as it is) in movie music was sparked by Herbert
Stothart's WIZARD OF OZ score.
But isn't the score by Harold Arlen, adapted by Stothart for the
film???
And Murray Cutter, too. The numbers (some fairly extensive) were by
Arlen& Harburg. I believe the score, as such, can refer either to the
incidental music that surrounds the songs or to all the music. So you're
both right. Pie for everybody!
Plus the little bits of Mussorgsky and Schumann (and a traditional song
about an apple tree?) that show up here and there.
That's by Van Alstyne, and dates back to [quick lookup] 1925 or so. I
wonder if you thought "Mendelssohn" and typed "Mussorgsky" just then. I
can think of a Mendelssohn tune in there, but not one by the Russian.
(Kodaly is mentioned elsewhere. I mention this for those tuning in late.)
Kip W
====================

Matt's right.

NIGHT ON BARE MOUNTAIN -- 83 minutes and a few seconds in.
Kip Williams
2011-03-10 02:30:08 UTC
Permalink
[re Wizard of Oz score]
Post by Beaver Lad
Post by Kip Williams
I
wonder if you thought "Mendelssohn" and typed "Mussorgsky" just then. I
can think of a Mendelssohn tune in there, but not one by the Russian.
(Kodaly is mentioned elsewhere. I mention this for those tuning in late.)
Matt's right.
NIGHT ON BARE MOUNTAIN -- 83 minutes and a few seconds in.
Ah, of course! Now that you've said it, it's obvious. Maybe I was
thinking of it as a Rimsky-Korsakov piece. (Heh heh.) Thanks.


Kip W
Dan ONeill
2011-03-10 04:27:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kip Williams
That's by Van Alstyne, and dates back to [quick lookup] 1925 or so. I
wonder if you thought "Mendelssohn" and typed "Mussorgsky" just then.
I can think of a Mendelssohn tune in there, but not one by the
Russian. (Kodaly is mentioned elsewhere. I mention this for those
tuning in late.)
Kip W
Yes, there's an orchestrated version of a Mendelssohn piano Scherzo used
for Toto's escape from the Witch's castle.

--- d.o.
David O.
2011-03-10 05:04:58 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 09 Mar 2011 15:02:52 -0600, "Matthew B. Tepper"
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Plus the little bits of Mussorgsky and Schumann (and a traditional song
about an apple tree?) that show up here and there.
And what about the march that heralds the travelers' entrance into
Emerald City? Don't you think that has a Victor Herbertish atmosphere?
Kip Williams
2011-03-09 19:05:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by David O.
On Wed, 9 Mar 2011 04:14:55 -0800, "William Sommerwerck"
Post by William Sommerwerck
The first LP in this series I bought was the first Korngold. I'd heard the
"King's Row" theme on TV, and wanted a copy. It sparked an interest in film
music.
My interest (such as it is) in movie music was sparked by Herbert
Stothart's WIZARD OF OZ score.
Indeed, and I think my interest in Kodaly goes back to that as well,
indirectly. (To make a long story short, I'll leave out the long story.)


Kip W
Steve de Mena
2011-03-10 06:56:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Sommerwerck
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
I saw the Korngold "Elizabeth and Essex" CD at Amoeba
Music the other day. I'd like to buy "The Sea Hawk" first,
though.
Why doesn't Sony simply reissue the entire series as a boxed set for 4 bucks
a pop?
They'll do that in 18 months, after suckers like me buy virtually the
whole series again.
Post by William Sommerwerck
The first LP in this series I bought was the first Korngold. I'd heard the
"King's Row" theme on TV, and wanted a copy. It sparked an interest in film
music.
By the way, Korngold wrote the theme thinking it was a movie about royalty,
rather than sleazy soap-opera trash.
Yes, I heard that story. A great story. I think Gerhardt recorded
the whole score for "Kings Row" on a Varese Sarabande early digital LP.

Steve
ivanmaxim
2011-03-10 11:34:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve de Mena
Post by William Sommerwerck
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
I saw the Korngold "Elizabeth and Essex" CD at Amoeba
Music the other day. I'd like to buy "The Sea Hawk" first,
though.
Why doesn't Sony simply reissue the entire series as a boxed set for 4 bucks
a pop?
They'll do that in 18 months, after suckers like me buy virtually the
whole series again.
Post by William Sommerwerck
The first LP in this series I bought was the first Korngold. I'd heard the
"King's Row" theme on TV, and wanted a copy. It sparked an interest in film
music.
By the way, Korngold wrote the theme thinking it was a movie about royalty,
rather than sleazy soap-opera trash.
Yes, I heard that story.  A great story.   I think Gerhardt recorded
the whole score for "Kings Row" on a Varese Sarabande early digital LP.
Steve
Another great LP that should come out on CD is the spectacular Thief
of Bagdad score by Rosza. Wagner fan
El Klauso
2011-03-10 17:14:06 UTC
Permalink
But who would sing "I want to be a sailor?"
El Klauso
2011-03-10 17:30:57 UTC
Permalink
BTW, there was a Varese/Sarabande re-issue on CD of an older anaologue
recording of the score for "Thief of Bagdad" - Not quite a 'CD
Spectacular,' and missing some of the key musical sequences, but a
stop gap until someone does the producing job a bit better. (Somewhat
like the "Bride of Frankenstein" project...)
Matthew B. Tepper
2011-03-10 20:46:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve de Mena
Post by William Sommerwerck
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
I saw the Korngold "Elizabeth and Essex" CD at Amoeba Music the other
day. I'd like to buy "The Sea Hawk" first, though.
Why doesn't Sony simply reissue the entire series as a boxed set for 4
bucks a pop?
They'll do that in 18 months, after suckers like me buy virtually the
whole series again.
Post by William Sommerwerck
The first LP in this series I bought was the first Korngold. I'd heard
the "King's Row" theme on TV, and wanted a copy. It sparked an interest
in film music.
By the way, Korngold wrote the theme thinking it was a movie about
royalty, rather than sleazy soap-opera trash.
Yes, I heard that story. A great story. I think Gerhardt recorded
the whole score for "Kings Row" on a Varese Sarabande early digital LP.
I think you are right. I remember a full-page color ad somewhere, maybe in
Fanfare. I could perhaps look for it in my complete run of the magazine,
which has just now completely filled the bookcase reserved for it.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
William Sommerwerck
2011-03-10 21:11:04 UTC
Permalink
I remember a full-page color ad somewhere, maybe in Fanfare.
I could perhaps look for it in my complete run of the magazine,
which has just now completely filled the bookcase reserved for it.
My complete set is about to completely bend out of shape a metal shelf in
the garage.
Matthew B. Tepper
2011-03-11 17:09:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Sommerwerck
I remember a full-page color ad somewhere, maybe in Fanfare.
I could perhaps look for it in my complete run of the magazine,
which has just now completely filled the bookcase reserved for it.
My complete set is about to completely bend out of shape a metal shelf in
the garage.
A couple of years ago I finally ditched some metal bookcases I had had
since the 1970s. Now all I have are wood (including two built by my
grandfather) and sturdy particleboard, except for two heavy-duty metal
ones. By taking those apart and rebuilding them with the bent struts
straightened and/or reassembled in the opposite direction, I was able to
"renew" them.

Now if I could just find somebody willing to take a 20-plus run of American
Record Guide off my hands....
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
Allen
2011-03-11 18:32:45 UTC
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Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by William Sommerwerck
I remember a full-page color ad somewhere, maybe in Fanfare.
I could perhaps look for it in my complete run of the magazine,
which has just now completely filled the bookcase reserved for it.
My complete set is about to completely bend out of shape a metal shelf in
the garage.
A couple of years ago I finally ditched some metal bookcases I had had
since the 1970s. Now all I have are wood (including two built by my
grandfather) and sturdy particleboard, except for two heavy-duty metal
ones. By taking those apart and rebuilding them with the bent struts
straightened and/or reassembled in the opposite direction, I was able to
"renew" them.
Now if I could just find somebody willing to take a 20-plus run of American
Record Guide off my hands....
If you don't want to make money from them, how about giving them to a
local library? All libraries in Austin accept post-read magazines for
borrowers to pick up; that's what I do with our old mags, and they seem
very happy to get them, to the extent of telling me to call the desk and
they will come out to the car and pick them up. I got rid of several
years of Fanfare that way. And who knows--you might create a new reader
of rcmr. I also sold a few Fanfares to Half Price Books, but I don't
think it would pay for the gasoline to get there nowadays.

Additional note: When I was a child I developed interests in many
different areas thanks to public libraries--history of archery, deep-sea
diving (though I couldn't swim), woodwork, the Mayas,and on and on. I
also honed my interest in classical music in the same place. I LOVE
LIBRARIES, he shouted.
Allen
William Sommerwerck
2011-03-11 19:37:45 UTC
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Post by Allen
If you don't want to make money from them, how about giving them to
a local library? All libraries in Austin accept post-read magazines for
borrowers to pick up; that's what I do with our old mags, and they seem
very happy to get them, to the extent of telling me to call the desk and
they will come out to the car and pick them up. I got rid of several
years of Fanfare that way. And who knows--you might create a new
reader of rcmr. I also sold a few Fanfares to Half Price Books, but I
don't
Post by Allen
think it would pay for the gasoline to get there nowadays.
These are references, unfortunately limited by the lack of a free (or cheap)
index.
Allen
2011-03-11 20:21:20 UTC
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On 3/11/2011 1:37 PM, William Sommerwerck wrote:
<snip>
Post by William Sommerwerck
These are references, unfortunately limited by the lack of a free (or cheap)
index.
So?
Allen
William Sommerwerck
2011-03-11 21:18:15 UTC
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Post by William Sommerwerck
These are references, unfortunately limited by
the lack of a free (or cheap) index.
So?
So why should I give them away? I refer to back issues once in a while.
Heck, I even read from the 11th Britannica occasionally.

Steve de Mena
2011-03-08 23:46:16 UTC
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Gerhardt’s Classic Film Scores Series Back& Better Than Ever!
In the 1970s, RCA Red Seal’s acclaimed Classic Film Scores series
introduced a new generation to the sumptuous sound of music in
Hollywood’s “Golden Age.” Using original orchestrations and heard for
the first time in rich stereo sound, conductor Charles Gerhardt and
the National Philharmonic Orchestra recreated the great moments from
the legendary scores of Hollywood’s most memorable films. Remastered
for the first time using the original analog masters and including the
original LP liner notes, the Classic Film Scores are once again
available for both collectors and a new generation of listeners. 13
individual CDs are now available from such classics as Citizen Kane,
Sunset Boulevard, Spellbound and Casablanca, written by such legendary
composers as Bernard Herrman, Franz Waxman, Erich Wolfgang Korngold,
Miklós Rózsa, Max Steiner and Dimitri Tiomkin.
“The performances in this series are all splendid, the engineering
wonderfully sumptuous, and the selections unfailingly intelligent …
Great stuff!” - David Hurwitz, ClassicsToday.com
Sounds interesting.
However, the phrase "Remastered for the first time using the original
analog masters" surprised me, as I own a whole series of these
published by RCA Victor in the 1980s which made the same claim.
Then you look on Classics Today. Hurwitz is writing about the FIRST
reissue, not this new one.
10 to 1 these are simply re-pressings of that entire series. No new
mastering.(It was already very, very, very fine).
The series was issued on March 1, so someone here may have had a
chance to listen?
TD
I have the new issue of the Korngold "Elizabeth & Essex" CD, just
played Track 1 about 1 week ago and it sounded very fresh, my initial
impression was, yes, they had remastered it. I need to dig up the
original 1 or 2 issues (I have them all) and do an actual comparison
of the two.

Steve
Steve de Mena
2011-03-08 23:57:58 UTC
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Post by Steve de Mena
I have the new issue of the Korngold "Elizabeth & Essex" CD, just
played Track 1 about 1 week ago and it sounded very fresh, my initial
impression was, yes, they had remastered it. I need to dig up the
original 1 or 2 issues (I have them all) and do an actual comparison
of the two.
Steve
I dug out the old CD (0185-2-RG, "Dolby Suorround") and I feel the new
CD is noticeably better. I think it's remastered.

Steve
ivanmaxim
2011-03-09 00:56:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve de Mena
Post by Steve de Mena
I have the new issue of the Korngold "Elizabeth & Essex" CD, just
played Track 1 about 1 week ago and it sounded very fresh, my initial
impression was, yes, they had remastered it. I need to dig up the
original 1 or 2 issues (I have them all) and do an actual comparison
of the two.
Steve
I dug out the old CD (0185-2-RG, "Dolby Suorround") and I feel the new
CD is noticeably better.  I think it's remastered.
Steve
I have some of them and will get the others - sumptously recorded and
idiomatically played. One of my favorites is the Waxman and the Bride
of Frankenstein suite is better played than the whole score available
another label. Wagner fan
El Klauso
2011-03-09 17:56:28 UTC
Permalink
IM: I have some of them and will get the others - sumptously recorded
and
idiomatically played. One of my favorites is the Waxman and the Bride
of Frankenstein suite is better played than the whole score available
another label.

EK: You're probably refering to the Silva issue with the "Westminster
Philharmonic Orchestra" - a worthy but amatuer enesemble - conducted
by Kenneth Alwyn.
Although one might wish that the performing group involved was a bit
more top notch, it is important to have more of this score readily
available.
"The Creation of the Female Monster" sequence - recorded by the
National Phil and Gearhardt - is justly praised, but this sequence is
just one of many highlights of Franz Waxman's inventive score for the
1935 James Whale-directed film, pobably the best ever crafted for a
Universal fantasy film and one of the greatest Hollywood scores.
ivanmaxim
2011-03-09 18:25:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by El Klauso
IM: I have some of them and will get the others - sumptously recorded
and
idiomatically played. One of my favorites is the Waxman and the Bride
of Frankenstein suite is better played than the whole score available
another label.
EK: You're probably refering to the Silva issue with the "Westminster
Philharmonic Orchestra" - a worthy but amatuer enesemble -  conducted
by Kenneth Alwyn.
Although one might wish that the performing group involved was a bit
more top notch, it is important to have more of this score readily
available.
"The Creation of the Female Monster" sequence - recorded by the
National Phil and Gearhardt - is justly praised, but this sequence is
just one of many highlights of Franz Waxman's inventive score for the
1935 James Whale-directed film, pobably the best ever crafted for a
Universal fantasy film and one of the greatest Hollywood scores.
Yes I was really disappointed by that complete set - it just sits
there. The Gerhardt sequence is much better.
Two of the "complete" score sets that really hit home runs are the
Adventures of Robin Hood and La Belle et la Bete - both wonderfully
recorded and played. Wagner fan
Paul Penna
2011-03-09 03:02:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve de Mena
Post by Steve de Mena
I have the new issue of the Korngold "Elizabeth & Essex" CD, just
played Track 1 about 1 week ago and it sounded very fresh, my initial
impression was, yes, they had remastered it. I need to dig up the
original 1 or 2 issues (I have them all) and do an actual comparison
of the two.
Steve
I dug out the old CD (0185-2-RG, "Dolby Suorround") and I feel the new
CD is noticeably better. I think it's remastered.
Steve
Ah, good news; thanks! Another interesting comparison would be with the
original non-Dolby Franz Waxman "Sunset Boulevard" set (RCA RCD1-7017)
vs. the new Sony.
Steve de Mena
2011-03-09 07:42:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Penna
Post by Steve de Mena
I have the new issue of the Korngold "Elizabeth& Essex" CD, just
played Track 1 about 1 week ago and it sounded very fresh, my initial
impression was, yes, they had remastered it. I need to dig up the
original 1 or 2 issues (I have them all) and do an actual comparison
of the two.
Steve
I dug out the old CD (0185-2-RG, "Dolby Suorround") and I feel the new
CD is noticeably better. I think it's remastered.
Steve
Ah, good news; thanks! Another interesting comparison would be with the
original non-Dolby Franz Waxman "Sunset Boulevard" set (RCA RCD1-7017)
vs. the new Sony.
I can do that in a few days. Ordered many more of the series today
from Amazon. :)

Steve
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