Discussion:
WAYLTL - July,2020
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Bozo
2020-07-03 19:48:33 UTC
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Piano music of Illmari Hannikainen.

Piano Concerto,Op.7, apparently no commercial recording

Variations Fantasques,Op.19, FC Records cd,Jouni Somero,pianist
O***@aol.com
2020-07-04 08:25:36 UTC
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Happy 4th! Listening now to Maw’s Sonata for Solo Viokin by Harriet Mackenzie on a new Lyrita CD, recorded in 2019. It’s excellent. Read about it in American Record Guide and looked it up on AppleMusic. Worth yr time, and it is the best thing on this disc, which has two orchestral works preceding the Sonata. I will play this piece again for sure.
Lawrence Chalmers
2020-07-04 23:27:42 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Piano music of Illmari Hannikainen.
http://youtu.be/linkvU3wDLw Piano Concerto,Op.7, apparently no commercial recording
http://youtu.be/1kdhluKfJeM Variations Fantasques,Op.19, FC Records cd,Jouni Somero,pianist
I just started the 12cd set of recordings from the Fromm Music Foundation. So far works by Leon Kirchner (immensely appealing) and a Mass by Killmayer and
Lou Harrison. Original jackets with a booklet which gives very general information about the music. Downside is nowhere are there track listings/timings and being unfamiliar with the music it is a very frustrating
experience.
Bozo
2020-07-05 00:46:23 UTC
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Post by Lawrence Chalmers
I just started the 12cd set of recordings from the Fromm Music Foundation. So far works by Leon >Kirchner (immensely appealing) and a Mass by Killmayer and
Lou Harrison.
Thanks, not familiar with that set. Fww,from a pianophile perspective, here are cd's of Harrison's music and Kirchner's music ( pianists I believe all studied with him) in my collection you may find of interest if the works not in the Fromm set.
Bozo
2020-07-06 12:54:06 UTC
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Thanks, not familiar with that set. Fww,from a pianophile perspective, here are cd's of Harrison's music and >Kirchner's music ( pianists I believe all studied with him) in my collection you may find of interest if the >works not in the Fromm set.
Sorry,forgot links:

https://tinyurl.com/y8mnwpvj Harrison

https://tinyurl.com/y7m2xdkx Kirchner
Bozo
2020-07-08 01:41:53 UTC
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Bernstein, “Age of Anxiety",Symphonic Dances from "West Side Story" and "Candide" Overture, perhaps his 3 top works (?), Jean Louis Steuerman, pianist,Florida Philharmonic under James Judd, a 2002 Naxos "American Classics" series cd.Heard "Age recently on radio , discovered I did not have a recording, the pairings here very attractive as well. Performances seem fine, although Naxos' sound, balances, dynamic extremes spotty.Had heard "Age" years ago, made no positive impression, but enjoy it now.
number_six
2020-07-09 00:41:47 UTC
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Khachaturian - Gayane coomplete /Spartacus, Masquerade excerpts
Tjeknavorian, NPO on a 2-CD RCA Japan issue

Kurtz,Fistoulari and Tjeknavorian are the Three Kings of Khachaturian!

The miking of the percussion in Tjek's Lezghinka is a spatial treat.


Switching ballets, maybe it's my imagination, but I can't shake the sense of similarity of (1) the Adagio of Spartacus and Phrygia and (2) Till There was You from The Music Man. Not a much-discussed topic, however.
Gerard
2020-07-09 11:08:22 UTC
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"number_six" wrote in message news:0d6afa5b-65dc-479b-b931-***@googlegroups.com...

Khachaturian - Gayane coomplete /Spartacus, Masquerade excerpts
Tjeknavorian, NPO on a 2-CD RCA Japan issue

Kurtz,Fistoulari and Tjeknavorian are the Three Kings of Khachaturian!
-----------------------------------------------------------

Other "kings" are Khachaturian, Temrikanov, Rozhdestvensky, Karabits,
Svetlanov.

Listened to Khachaturian violin concerto.
With Boris Gutnikov and the USSR Large S.O. conducted by Konstantin Ivanov.
On alto. Also released by Regis.
This is a splendid performance! Very well recorded, but the sound on CD is a
little shrill.
number_six
2020-07-10 18:15:25 UTC
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Post by Gerard
"number_six" wrote in message
..
Khachaturian - Gayane coomplete /Spartacus, Masquerade excerpts
Tjeknavorian, NPO on a 2-CD RCA Japan issue
Kurtz,Fistoulari and Tjeknavorian are the Three Kings of Khachaturian!
-----------------------------------------------------------
Other "kings" are Khachaturian, Temrikanov, Rozhdestvensky, Karabits,
Svetlanov.
In the past we've discussed the seldom-recorded Russian Dance. For me, even a fine Gayane is not fully satisfactory if it excludes that dance -- not even the composer's recording. I can enjoy other recordings, but so far only the Troika named above deliver a great performance AND include that pesky Russian Dance.
Gerard
2020-07-12 10:31:38 UTC
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Post by Gerard
"number_six" wrote in message
..
Khachaturian - Gayane coomplete /Spartacus, Masquerade excerpts
Tjeknavorian, NPO on a 2-CD RCA Japan issue
Kurtz,Fistoulari and Tjeknavorian are the Three Kings of Khachaturian!
-----------------------------------------------------------
Other "kings" are Khachaturian, Temrikanov, Rozhdestvensky, Karabits,
Svetlanov.
In the past we've discussed the seldom-recorded Russian Dance. For me, even
a fine Gayane is not fully satisfactory if it excludes that dance -- not
even the composer's recording. I can enjoy other recordings, but so far
only the Troika named above deliver a great performance AND include that
pesky Russian Dance.

--------------------------------------

Wasn't that discussion about Gayaneh's Adagio?
Anyhow, including the Russian Dance or not does not change the "royal
status" of a conductor. ;-)
BTW Khachaturian did include it on Melodiya.
number_six
2020-07-12 15:50:07 UTC
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Post by Gerard
"number_six" wrote in message
Post by Gerard
"number_six" wrote in message
..
Khachaturian - Gayane coomplete /Spartacus, Masquerade excerpts
Tjeknavorian, NPO on a 2-CD RCA Japan issue
Kurtz,Fistoulari and Tjeknavorian are the Three Kings of Khachaturian!
-----------------------------------------------------------
Other "kings" are Khachaturian, Temrikanov, Rozhdestvensky, Karabits,
Svetlanov.
In the past we've discussed the seldom-recorded Russian Dance. For me, even
a fine Gayane is not fully satisfactory if it excludes that dance -- not
even the composer's recording. I can enjoy other recordings, but so far
only the Troika named above deliver a great performance AND include that
pesky Russian Dance.
--------------------------------------
Wasn't that discussion about Gayaneh's Adagio?
Anyhow, including the Russian Dance or not does not change the "royal
status" of a conductor. ;-)
BTW Khachaturian did include it on Melodiya.
Which Melodiya recording? This one?

https://www.amazon.com/Gayane-Ballet-3-Acts-Khachaturian/dp/B002CAOVNS/ref=sr_1_66?dchild=1&keywords=khachaturian+melodiya&qid=1594567262&rnid=2941120011&s=music&sr=1-66

Thanks for any comments or comparisons of the composer's recording with those of Kurtz, Tjeknavorian or Fistoulari. From the Suites I have heard, I rate AK's conducting of his ballets as very good, but not as convincing as the best recordings that the rest of the field have to offer.

Discussion of Russian Dance was in this thread:

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/rec.music.classical.recordings/Hh-MMmJNDwQ%5B1-25%5D

In that thread you correctly pointed out Tjeknavorian as having included the Russian Dance.
Gerard
2020-07-12 17:41:19 UTC
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Post by Gerard
"number_six" wrote in message
Post by Gerard
"number_six" wrote in message
..
Khachaturian - Gayane coomplete /Spartacus, Masquerade excerpts
Tjeknavorian, NPO on a 2-CD RCA Japan issue
Kurtz,Fistoulari and Tjeknavorian are the Three Kings of Khachaturian!
-----------------------------------------------------------
Other "kings" are Khachaturian, Temrikanov, Rozhdestvensky, Karabits,
Svetlanov.
In the past we've discussed the seldom-recorded Russian Dance. For me, even
a fine Gayane is not fully satisfactory if it excludes that dance -- not
even the composer's recording. I can enjoy other recordings, but so far
only the Troika named above deliver a great performance AND include that
pesky Russian Dance.
--------------------------------------
Wasn't that discussion about Gayaneh's Adagio?
Anyhow, including the Russian Dance or not does not change the "royal
status" of a conductor. ;-)
BTW Khachaturian did include it on Melodiya.
Which Melodiya recording? This one?

https://www.amazon.com/Gayane-Ballet-3-Acts-Khachaturian/dp/B002CAOVNS/ref=sr_1_66?dchild=1&keywords=khachaturian+melodiya&qid=1594567262&rnid=2941120011&s=music&sr=1-66

Thanks for any comments or comparisons of the composer's recording with
those of Kurtz, Tjeknavorian or Fistoulari. From the Suites I have heard, I
rate AK's conducting of his ballets as very good, but not as convincing as
the best recordings that the rest of the field have to offer.

Discussion of Russian Dance was in this thread:

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/rec.music.classical.recordings/Hh-MMmJNDwQ%5B1-25%5D

In that thread you correctly pointed out Tjeknavorian as having included the
Russian Dance.
-----------------------------------------------

The Melodiya recording is this one:
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Khachaturian-Orchestral-Works-Aram-Ilyich/dp/B000023ZS7/

There is also in the same Melodiya series a 'complete' recording of Gayaneh
by Kakhidze. Made under supervision of the composer. No Russian Dance.
The composer had made 3 suites from the ballet. Again no Russian Dance.
So according to the composer the Russian Dance is not an essential part of
this music I suppose.

That former discussion is somewhere in a long thread. But I could find it.
However, I recall another discussion about Gayaneh's Adagio that shomeone
considered an unmissable item or so.

The recordings by Fistoulari and Kurtz are no longer available (on CD)?
Frank Berger
2020-07-12 19:08:39 UTC
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Permalink
"number_six"  wrote in message
"number_six"  wrote in message
..
Khachaturian - Gayane coomplete /Spartacus, Masquerade
excerpts
Tjeknavorian, NPO on a 2-CD RCA Japan issue
Kurtz,Fistoulari and Tjeknavorian are the Three Kings of
Khachaturian!
-----------------------------------------------------------
Other "kings" are Khachaturian, Temrikanov,
Rozhdestvensky, Karabits,
Svetlanov.
In the past we've discussed the seldom-recorded Russian
Dance.  For me, even
a fine Gayane is not fully satisfactory if it excludes
that dance -- not
even the composer's recording.  I can enjoy other
recordings, but so far
only the Troika named above deliver a great performance
AND include that
pesky Russian Dance.
--------------------------------------
Wasn't that discussion about Gayaneh's Adagio?
Anyhow, including the Russian Dance or not does not change
the "royal
status" of a conductor. ;-)
BTW Khachaturian did include it on Melodiya.
Which Melodiya recording?  This one?
https://www.amazon.com/Gayane-Ballet-3-Acts-Khachaturian/dp/B002CAOVNS/ref=sr_1_66?dchild=1&keywords=khachaturian+melodiya&qid=1594567262&rnid=2941120011&s=music&sr=1-66
Thanks for any comments or comparisons of the composer's
recording with those of Kurtz, Tjeknavorian or Fistoulari.
From the Suites I have heard, I rate AK's conducting of his
ballets as very good, but not as convincing as the best
recordings that the rest of the field have to offer.
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/rec.music.classical.recordings/Hh-MMmJNDwQ%5B1-25%5D
In that thread you correctly pointed out Tjeknavorian as
having included the Russian Dance.
-----------------------------------------------
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Khachaturian-Orchestral-Works-Aram-Ilyich/dp/B000023ZS7/
There is also in the same Melodiya series a 'complete'
recording of Gayaneh by Kakhidze. Made under supervision of
the composer. No Russian Dance.
The composer had made 3 suites from the ballet. Again no
Russian Dance.
So according to the composer the Russian Dance is not an
essential part of this music I suppose.
That former discussion is somewhere in a long thread. But I
could find it.
However, I recall another discussion about Gayaneh's Adagio
that shomeone considered an unmissable item or so.
The recordings by Fistoulari and Kurtz are no longer
available (on CD)?
Haydn House has a transfer of the 1946 Kurtz LP of Gayne
Suites 1 and 2 (including the Russian Dance. I doubt it was
otherwise ever on CD:

https://www.haydnhouse.com/HH15.htm

The Fistoulari Geyne Suite was on an Everest CD (also
including the Russian Dance). Used copy here:

https://tinyurl.com/yd7j32dn
number_six
2020-07-12 19:40:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Frank Berger
"number_six"  wrote in message
"number_six"  wrote in message
..
Khachaturian - Gayane coomplete /Spartacus, Masquerade
excerpts
Tjeknavorian, NPO on a 2-CD RCA Japan issue
Kurtz,Fistoulari and Tjeknavorian are the Three Kings of
Khachaturian!
-----------------------------------------------------------
Other "kings" are Khachaturian, Temrikanov,
Rozhdestvensky, Karabits,
Svetlanov.
In the past we've discussed the seldom-recorded Russian
Dance.  For me, even
a fine Gayane is not fully satisfactory if it excludes
that dance -- not
even the composer's recording.  I can enjoy other
recordings, but so far
only the Troika named above deliver a great performance
AND include that
pesky Russian Dance.
--------------------------------------
Wasn't that discussion about Gayaneh's Adagio?
Anyhow, including the Russian Dance or not does not change
the "royal
status" of a conductor. ;-)
BTW Khachaturian did include it on Melodiya.
Which Melodiya recording?  This one?
https://www.amazon.com/Gayane-Ballet-3-Acts-Khachaturian/dp/B002CAOVNS/ref=sr_1_66?dchild=1&keywords=khachaturian+melodiya&qid=1594567262&rnid=2941120011&s=music&sr=1-66
Thanks for any comments or comparisons of the composer's
recording with those of Kurtz, Tjeknavorian or Fistoulari.
From the Suites I have heard, I rate AK's conducting of his
ballets as very good, but not as convincing as the best
recordings that the rest of the field have to offer.
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/rec.music.classical.recordings/Hh-MMmJNDwQ%5B1-25%5D
In that thread you correctly pointed out Tjeknavorian as
having included the Russian Dance.
-----------------------------------------------
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Khachaturian-Orchestral-Works-Aram-Ilyich/dp/B000023ZS7/
There is also in the same Melodiya series a 'complete'
recording of Gayaneh by Kakhidze. Made under supervision of
the composer. No Russian Dance.
The composer had made 3 suites from the ballet. Again no
Russian Dance.
So according to the composer the Russian Dance is not an
essential part of this music I suppose.
That former discussion is somewhere in a long thread. But I
could find it.
However, I recall another discussion about Gayaneh's Adagio
that shomeone considered an unmissable item or so.
The recordings by Fistoulari and Kurtz are no longer
available (on CD)?
Haydn House has a transfer of the 1946 Kurtz LP of Gayne
Suites 1 and 2 (including the Russian Dance. I doubt it was
https://www.haydnhouse.com/HH15.htm
The Fistoulari Geyne Suite was on an Everest CD (also
https://tinyurl.com/yd7j32dn
Frank, I think that's right about Kurtz.

For a long time I subsisted on vinyl.

Eventually got Haydn House transfer.

Otherwise no CD, that I'm aware of.
Frank Berger
2020-07-12 19:53:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by number_six
Post by Frank Berger
"number_six"  wrote in message
"number_six"  wrote in message
..
Khachaturian - Gayane coomplete /Spartacus, Masquerade
excerpts
Tjeknavorian, NPO on a 2-CD RCA Japan issue
Kurtz,Fistoulari and Tjeknavorian are the Three Kings of
Khachaturian!
-----------------------------------------------------------
Other "kings" are Khachaturian, Temrikanov,
Rozhdestvensky, Karabits,
Svetlanov.
In the past we've discussed the seldom-recorded Russian
Dance.  For me, even
a fine Gayane is not fully satisfactory if it excludes
that dance -- not
even the composer's recording.  I can enjoy other
recordings, but so far
only the Troika named above deliver a great performance
AND include that
pesky Russian Dance.
--------------------------------------
Wasn't that discussion about Gayaneh's Adagio?
Anyhow, including the Russian Dance or not does not change
the "royal
status" of a conductor. ;-)
BTW Khachaturian did include it on Melodiya.
Which Melodiya recording?  This one?
https://www.amazon.com/Gayane-Ballet-3-Acts-Khachaturian/dp/B002CAOVNS/ref=sr_1_66?dchild=1&keywords=khachaturian+melodiya&qid=1594567262&rnid=2941120011&s=music&sr=1-66
Thanks for any comments or comparisons of the composer's
recording with those of Kurtz, Tjeknavorian or Fistoulari.
From the Suites I have heard, I rate AK's conducting of his
ballets as very good, but not as convincing as the best
recordings that the rest of the field have to offer.
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/rec.music.classical.recordings/Hh-MMmJNDwQ%5B1-25%5D
In that thread you correctly pointed out Tjeknavorian as
having included the Russian Dance.
-----------------------------------------------
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Khachaturian-Orchestral-Works-Aram-Ilyich/dp/B000023ZS7/
There is also in the same Melodiya series a 'complete'
recording of Gayaneh by Kakhidze. Made under supervision of
the composer. No Russian Dance.
The composer had made 3 suites from the ballet. Again no
Russian Dance.
So according to the composer the Russian Dance is not an
essential part of this music I suppose.
That former discussion is somewhere in a long thread. But I
could find it.
However, I recall another discussion about Gayaneh's Adagio
that shomeone considered an unmissable item or so.
The recordings by Fistoulari and Kurtz are no longer
available (on CD)?
Haydn House has a transfer of the 1946 Kurtz LP of Gayne
Suites 1 and 2 (including the Russian Dance. I doubt it was
https://www.haydnhouse.com/HH15.htm
The Fistoulari Geyne Suite was on an Everest CD (also
https://tinyurl.com/yd7j32dn
Frank, I think that's right about Kurtz.
For a long time I subsisted on vinyl.
Eventually got Haydn House transfer.
Otherwise no CD, that I'm aware of.
There is 3 volume Melodiya set titled "Khachaturian Conducts
Khachaturian" published around 10 years ago. You can find
volume 1 everywhere, volumes 2 and 3 nowhere. Strange.
Maybe volume 1 didn't sell and they never produced volumes 2
and 3.
Gerard
2020-07-12 21:51:52 UTC
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Post by number_six
Post by Gerard
"number_six" wrote in message
Post by Gerard
"number_six" wrote in message
..
Khachaturian - Gayane coomplete /Spartacus, Masquerade
excerpts
Post by Gerard
Tjeknavorian, NPO on a 2-CD RCA Japan issue
Kurtz,Fistoulari and Tjeknavorian are the Three Kings of
Khachaturian!
Post by Gerard
-----------------------------------------------------------
Other "kings" are Khachaturian, Temrikanov,
Rozhdestvensky, Karabits,
Post by Gerard
Svetlanov.
In the past we've discussed the seldom-recorded Russian Dance. For me, even
a fine Gayane is not fully satisfactory if it excludes that dance -- not
even the composer's recording. I can enjoy other recordings, but so far
only the Troika named above deliver a great performance AND include that
pesky Russian Dance.
--------------------------------------
Wasn't that discussion about Gayaneh's Adagio?
Anyhow, including the Russian Dance or not does not change the "royal
status" of a conductor. ;-)
BTW Khachaturian did include it on Melodiya.
Which Melodiya recording? This one?
https://www.amazon.com/Gayane-Ballet-3-Acts-Khachaturian/dp/B002CAOVNS/ref=sr_1_66?dchild=1&keywords=khachaturian+melodiya&qid=1594567262&rnid=2941120011&s=music&sr=1-66
Thanks for any comments or comparisons of the composer's recording with
those of Kurtz, Tjeknavorian or Fistoulari. From the Suites I have heard,
I rate AK's conducting of his ballets as very good, but not as convincing
as the best recordings that the rest of the field have to offer.
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/rec.music.classical.recordings/Hh-MMmJNDwQ%5B1-25%5D
In that thread you correctly pointed out Tjeknavorian as having included the Russian Dance.
-----------------------------------------------
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Khachaturian-Orchestral-Works-Aram-Ilyich/dp/B000023ZS7/
There is also in the same Melodiya series a 'complete' recording of
Gayaneh by Kakhidze. Made under supervision of the composer. No Russian
Dance.
The composer had made 3 suites from the ballet. Again no Russian Dance.
So according to the composer the Russian Dance is not an essential part of
this music I suppose.
That former discussion is somewhere in a long thread. But I could find it.
However, I recall another discussion about Gayaneh's Adagio that shomeone
considered an unmissable item or so.
The recordings by Fistoulari and Kurtz are no longer available (on CD)?
Haydn House has a transfer of the 1946 Kurtz LP of Gayne
Suites 1 and 2 (including the Russian Dance. I doubt it was
otherwise ever on CD:

https://www.haydnhouse.com/HH15.htm

The Fistoulari Geyne Suite was on an Everest CD (also
including the Russian Dance). Used copy here:

https://tinyurl.com/yd7j32dn
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A new copy here:
https://www.amazon.de/dp/B0000023GS/
for 286,10 Euros !!!
That's not what I'ld like to spend on a Russian Dance ;-)
Frank Berger
2020-07-12 22:16:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Frank Berger
"number_six"  wrote in message
"number_six"  wrote in message
..
Khachaturian - Gayane coomplete /Spartacus, Masquerade
excerpts
Tjeknavorian, NPO on a 2-CD RCA Japan issue
Kurtz,Fistoulari and Tjeknavorian are the Three Kings of
Khachaturian!
-----------------------------------------------------------
Other "kings" are Khachaturian, Temrikanov,
Rozhdestvensky, Karabits,
Svetlanov.
In the past we've discussed the seldom-recorded Russian
Dance.  For me, even
a fine Gayane is not fully satisfactory if it excludes
that dance -- not
even the composer's recording.  I can enjoy other
recordings, but so far
only the Troika named above deliver a great performance
AND include that
pesky Russian Dance.
--------------------------------------
Wasn't that discussion about Gayaneh's Adagio?
Anyhow, including the Russian Dance or not does not
change the "royal
status" of a conductor. ;-)
BTW Khachaturian did include it on Melodiya.
Which Melodiya recording?  This one?
https://www.amazon.com/Gayane-Ballet-3-Acts-Khachaturian/dp/B002CAOVNS/ref=sr_1_66?dchild=1&keywords=khachaturian+melodiya&qid=1594567262&rnid=2941120011&s=music&sr=1-66
Thanks for any comments or comparisons of the composer's
recording with those of Kurtz, Tjeknavorian or
Fistoulari.  From the Suites I have heard, I rate AK's
conducting of his ballets as very good, but not as
convincing as the best recordings that the rest of the
field have to offer.
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/rec.music.classical.recordings/Hh-MMmJNDwQ%5B1-25%5D
In that thread you correctly pointed out Tjeknavorian as
having included the Russian Dance.
-----------------------------------------------
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Khachaturian-Orchestral-Works-Aram-Ilyich/dp/B000023ZS7/
There is also in the same Melodiya series a 'complete'
recording of Gayaneh by Kakhidze. Made under supervision
of the composer. No Russian Dance.
The composer had made 3 suites from the ballet. Again no
Russian Dance.
So according to the composer the Russian Dance is not an
essential part of this music I suppose.
That former discussion is somewhere in a long thread. But
I could find it.
However, I recall another discussion about Gayaneh's
Adagio that shomeone considered an unmissable item or so.
The recordings by Fistoulari and Kurtz are no longer
available (on CD)?
Haydn House has a transfer of the 1946 Kurtz LP of Gayne
Suites 1 and 2 (including the Russian Dance. I doubt it was
https://www.haydnhouse.com/HH15.htm
The Fistoulari Geyne Suite was on an Everest CD (also
https://tinyurl.com/yd7j32dn
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
https://www.amazon.de/dp/B0000023GS/
for 286,10 Euros !!!
That's not what I'ld like to spend on a Russian Dance ;-)
Geez. I have one. Don't tell my wife.
O***@aol.com
2020-07-13 10:56:55 UTC
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Lars Vogt’s Handel Variations on his new Ondine CD. It’s the coupling to the B-flat Piano Concerto (No.2), and it is outstanding. Not really a fan of this musician—I saw him in concert approx. 10 years ago w/ Dudamel & LA Phil in an ordinary, ho-hum Grieg Concerto, a favorite of mine. Let-down. So this is a pleasant surprise. May even merit a CD purchase. None too excited to hear the B-flat Concerto, however: no conductor and chamber-sized orchestra and -performance style. Not my cuppa, but will listen with attentiveness. I owe it to the great Johannes Brahms.
Bozo
2020-07-13 12:43:33 UTC
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...chamber-sized orchestra and ->performance style...
Perhaps for the "tiny,tiny scherzo" .
Bob Harper
2020-07-13 16:16:48 UTC
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Sold the earlier Kubelik/Mahler box and got the reissue with BluRay. So
far I've heard the 1st on regular and BluRay. Can't comment on the CD
comparison except to say that the CD is fine, but the BluyRay is a step
up. Cleaner, clearer, and dead quiet. Looking forward to further
explorations.

Bob Harper
c***@gmail.com
2020-07-13 19:15:50 UTC
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Excellent lossless freebie from Supraphon's "Classics 4 Free" feature:

https://www.supraphonline.cz/album/310858-janacek-foerster-haas-hudba-pro-dechove-nastroje/flac

The Foerster piece was new to me and it's delightful.

AC
JohnGavin
2020-07-14 00:32:22 UTC
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Durufle - Organ Works - Hans Fagius (BIS)

Masterpieces all. Organs can be notoriously difficult to record. Of all the complete Duruflé recordings I’ve heard, this is the best engineered.
Al Eisner
2020-07-16 04:42:56 UTC
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From the Bach Guild Big KLR box, the Brahms Sextet #1 arranged for
piano trio by Theodore Kirchner. My first hearing of this arrangement,
authorized (and approved) by Brahms. On its own terms, a fine work,
well worth hearing, and so far as I can tell very well played. But
it does pale in comparison to the original, one of whose chief
glories is the interwoven 6-part texture, especially in the outer
movements.
--
Al Eisner
O***@aol.com
2020-07-16 08:11:03 UTC
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Now playing Mahler Symphony No. 8 by Gabriel Feltz and the Dortmund Phil, streaming via AppleMusic. Received 4 or 5 unanimous declarations of success in Fanfare 43:4 (March/April 2020), and in this most difficult of Mahler Symphonies to recreate (IMHO, anyway). Soloists are Michaela Kaune, Emily Newton, Ashley Thouret (S); Mihoko Fujimura, Iris Vermillion (C); Brenden Patrick Gunnell (T); Markus Eiche (Bar); Karl-Heinz Lehner (B), and they are joined by Children’s Chorus of Dortmund Chorakademie; Czech Phil Chorus Brno; Slovak Phil Chorus Bratislava.

Recorded LIVE at Konzethaus Dortmund, July 3 & 4, 2018. Dreyer Gaido 21118 (2 SACDs: 82:09).

This is a much more artistically satisfying conception than Nezet-Seguin’s recent release, which I praised upon release but have tempered my high opinion of such somewhat after 10 or so auditions. The balances here are magnificently judges by Feltz and brought out with what seems to me to be a great affinity with the work. And where this release really separates itself from the aforementioned DG title is in the contributions of soloists and choristers. A triumph. This is a must-hear...from Dortmund!?! I must go revisit Feltz’s nearly-complete Mahler cycle now, the earlier discs recorded with Stuttgart PO. I bought a couple of those 9-10 years ago, and frankly, did not okay them but one or two times. This new 2SACD in same label makes me excited to hear more from Feltz.
O***@aol.com
2020-07-16 08:34:05 UTC
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To wit, sample the “Dir, der Unberührbaren” from the Faust part II (section VIII). _Sublime_ chorus singing here and accompanied with the most glorious accompaniment by first desk violins. Leader’s name not listed on AppleMusic. Must buy the 2SACD. This is a great version!
JohnGavin
2020-07-16 11:09:50 UTC
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Piano Quintets and String Quartet #2 by Dohnanyi (Hyperion) - Takacs Quartet with Marc-Andre Hamelin. Engaging music, an extension of late Brahms. Wonderful performances. Hamelin is a very fine chamber music pianist. Of his many gifts as an interpreter, his ability to give a strong sense of cohesiveness to large works might be the greatest.
c***@gmail.com
2020-07-16 14:20:50 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
From the Bach Guild Big KLR box, the Brahms Sextet #1 arranged for
piano trio by Theodore Kirchner. My first hearing of this arrangement,
authorized (and approved) by Brahms. On its own terms, a fine work,
well worth hearing, and so far as I can tell very well played. But
it does pale in comparison to the original, one of whose chief
glories is the interwoven 6-part texture, especially in the outer
movements.
--
Al Eisner
I agree with respect to the Kirchner arrangement. What do you think of the the solo piano version of the Theme & Variations? I have a recording of the Sextet #1 performed by the Kocian et al. c/w performance of the solo piano version of the second movement. It's fun to listen to them in sequence.

AC
Al Eisner
2020-07-16 16:43:40 UTC
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Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Al Eisner
From the Bach Guild Big KLR box, the Brahms Sextet #1 arranged for
piano trio by Theodore Kirchner. My first hearing of this arrangement,
authorized (and approved) by Brahms. On its own terms, a fine work,
well worth hearing, and so far as I can tell very well played. But
it does pale in comparison to the original, one of whose chief
glories is the interwoven 6-part texture, especially in the outer
movements.
--
Al Eisner
I agree with respect to the Kirchner arrangement. What do you think of the the solo piano version of the Theme & Variations? I have a recording of the Sextet #1 performed by the Kocian et al. c/w performance of the solo piano version of the second movement. It's fun to listen to them in sequence.
AC
I was unaware of it, but I'll seek it outwhen I have a chance.
I think the two middle movements are more susceptible to faithful
arrangement than are the outer two.

I also still need to listen to the Kirchner of the second Septet.
--
Al Eisner
Al Eisner
2020-07-19 02:34:47 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Al Eisner
From the Bach Guild Big KLR box, the Brahms Sextet #1 arranged for
piano trio by Theodore Kirchner. My first hearing of this arrangement,
authorized (and approved) by Brahms. On its own terms, a fine work,
well worth hearing, and so far as I can tell very well played. But
it does pale in comparison to the original, one of whose chief
glories is the interwoven 6-part texture, especially in the outer
movements.
--
Al Eisner
I agree with respect to the Kirchner arrangement. What do you think of the
the solo piano version of the Theme & Variations? I have a recording of
the Sextet #1 performed by the Kocian et al. c/w performance of the solo
piano version of the second movement. It's fun to listen to them in
sequence.
AC
I was unaware of it, but I'll seek it outwhen I have a chance.
I think the two middle movements are more susceptible to faithful
arrangement than are the outer two.
I also still need to listen to the Kirchner of the second Septet.
It turns out that that piano arrangement is also in the Big KLR Trio
Box,and very successful. And I've also listened to the Kirchner of the
second sextet: also well-worth hearing, although I'm a bit less
taken with it than with #1. There's some beautiful violin playing
in the adagio, and the finale is especially successful (again, on its
own terms).
--
Al Eisner
Ricardo Jimenez
2020-07-16 18:10:53 UTC
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Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Al Eisner
From the Bach Guild Big KLR box, the Brahms Sextet #1 arranged for
piano trio by Theodore Kirchner. My first hearing of this arrangement,
authorized (and approved) by Brahms. On its own terms, a fine work,
well worth hearing, and so far as I can tell very well played. But
it does pale in comparison to the original, one of whose chief
glories is the interwoven 6-part texture, especially in the outer
movements.
--
Al Eisner
I agree with respect to the Kirchner arrangement. What do you think of the the solo piano version of the Theme & Variations? I have a recording of the Sextet #1 performed by the Kocian et al. c/w performance of the solo piano version of the second movement. It's fun to listen to them in sequence.
AC
From Tchaikovsky's review of the sextet: "Of the four movements into
which it is divided I particularly liked the Andante with its
sweeping, vigorous theme and its beautiful development through a set
of variations. The last of these variations (on a d–a fifth) left a
charming impression on me, thanks mainly to the instrumentation. The
Scherzo is also not lacking in verve and brilliance, but the
first-movement Allegro and the Finale are no different from what we
find in works of this kind by such contemporary German composers as
Bargiel [7], Raff [8], Rheinberger[9], Volkmann [10], and a whole
phalanx of other artists who deserve respect for their splendid
technique and earnestness of style, but who lack that spark of
inspiration which would infuse their works with life and strength".

This is the nicest thing that Tchaikovsky said about Brahms' music
that I have seen, as if you needed any more proof that the sextet is a
great piece.
http://en.tchaikovsky-research.net/pages/The_Second_and_Third_Quartet_Matin%C3%A9es._The_First_Symphony_Concert_of_the_Russian_Musical_Society._The_Italian_Opera
c***@gmail.com
2020-07-16 18:47:27 UTC
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Post by Ricardo Jimenez
From Tchaikovsky's review of the sextet: "Of the four movements into
which it is divided I particularly liked the Andante with its
sweeping, vigorous theme and its beautiful development through a set
of variations. The last of these variations (on a d–a fifth) left a
charming impression on me, thanks mainly to the instrumentation. The
Scherzo is also not lacking in verve and brilliance, but the
first-movement Allegro and the Finale are no different from what we
find in works of this kind by such contemporary German composers as
Bargiel [7], Raff [8], Rheinberger[9], Volkmann [10], and a whole
phalanx of other artists who deserve respect for their splendid
technique and earnestness of style, but who lack that spark of
inspiration which would infuse their works with life and strength".
This is the nicest thing that Tchaikovsky said about Brahms' music
that I have seen, as if you needed any more proof that the sextet is a
great piece.
http://en.tchaikovsky-research.net/pages/The_Second_and_Third_Quartet_Matin%C3%A9es._The_First_Symphony_Concert_of_the_Russian_Musical_Society._The_Italian_Opera
Thanks very much for sharing that fascinating document, which was new to me. I enjoy the works of those lesser composer without suggesting for a moment that they're up to Brahms's level. An exception to the rule of charming mediocrity, imo, is Rheinberger's magnificent Nonet, op. 139. Here's a nice live performance on youtube:


AC
number_six
2020-07-13 16:16:14 UTC
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Post by Frank Berger
Post by number_six
Post by Gerard
"number_six" wrote in message
Post by Gerard
"number_six" wrote in message
..
Khachaturian - Gayane coomplete /Spartacus, Masquerade
excerpts
Post by Gerard
Tjeknavorian, NPO on a 2-CD RCA Japan issue
Kurtz,Fistoulari and Tjeknavorian are the Three Kings of
Khachaturian!
Post by Gerard
-----------------------------------------------------------
Other "kings" are Khachaturian, Temrikanov,
Rozhdestvensky, Karabits,
Post by Gerard
Svetlanov.
In the past we've discussed the seldom-recorded Russian Dance. For me, even
a fine Gayane is not fully satisfactory if it excludes that dance -- not
even the composer's recording. I can enjoy other recordings, but so far
only the Troika named above deliver a great performance AND include that
pesky Russian Dance.
--------------------------------------
Wasn't that discussion about Gayaneh's Adagio?
Anyhow, including the Russian Dance or not does not change the "royal
status" of a conductor. ;-)
BTW Khachaturian did include it on Melodiya.
Which Melodiya recording? This one?
https://www.amazon.com/Gayane-Ballet-3-Acts-Khachaturian/dp/B002CAOVNS/ref=sr_1_66?dchild=1&keywords=khachaturian+melodiya&qid=1594567262&rnid=2941120011&s=music&sr=1-66
Thanks for any comments or comparisons of the composer's recording with
those of Kurtz, Tjeknavorian or Fistoulari. From the Suites I have heard,
I rate AK's conducting of his ballets as very good, but not as convincing
as the best recordings that the rest of the field have to offer.
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/rec.music.classical.recordings/Hh-MMmJNDwQ%5B1-25%5D
In that thread you correctly pointed out Tjeknavorian as having included
the Russian Dance.
-----------------------------------------------
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Khachaturian-Orchestral-Works-Aram-Ilyich/dp/B000023ZS7/
There is also in the same Melodiya series a 'complete' recording of
Gayaneh by Kakhidze. Made under supervision of the composer. No Russian
Dance.
The composer had made 3 suites from the ballet. Again no Russian Dance.
So according to the composer the Russian Dance is not an essential part of
this music I suppose.
That former discussion is somewhere in a long thread. But I could find it.
However, I recall another discussion about Gayaneh's Adagio that shomeone
considered an unmissable item or so.
The recordings by Fistoulari and Kurtz are no longer available (on CD)?
Haydn House has a transfer of the 1946 Kurtz LP of Gayne
Suites 1 and 2 (including the Russian Dance. I doubt it was
https://www.haydnhouse.com/HH15.htm
The Fistoulari Geyne Suite was on an Everest CD (also
https://tinyurl.com/yd7j32dn
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
https://www.amazon.de/dp/B0000023GS/
for 286,10 Euros !!!
That's not what I'ld like to spend on a Russian Dance ;-)
No need to shell out so much!

Buy Kurtz or listen to Tjeknavorian, which I think you already have.

Either way you get a great Lezghinka also.

Whoever said the Adagio was unmissable was right, of course.
Oscar
2020-07-05 03:19:51 UTC
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Post by Lawrence Chalmers
I just started the 12cd set of recordings from the Fromm Music Foundation. So far works by Leon Kirchner
(immensely appealing) and a Mass by Killmayer and Lou Harrison. Original jackets with a booklet which
gives very general information about the music. Downside is nowhere are there track listings/timings and
being unfamiliar with the music it is a very frustrating experience.
Look forward to reading more about this set, Mr. Chalmers. Interesting about the lack of track list and timings. Perhaps yr booklet was scored/collated incorrectly?? Weird, and regrettable.
number_six
2020-07-05 15:32:44 UTC
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Post by Oscar
Post by Lawrence Chalmers
I just started the 12cd set of recordings from the Fromm Music Foundation. So far works by Leon Kirchner
(immensely appealing) and a Mass by Killmayer and Lou Harrison. Original jackets with a booklet which
gives very general information about the music. Downside is nowhere are there track listings/timings and
being unfamiliar with the music it is a very frustrating experience.
Look forward to reading more about this set, Mr. Chalmers. Interesting about the lack of track list and timings. Perhaps yr booklet was scored/collated incorrectly?? Weird, and regrettable.
I opened up my Fromm Foundation box. Track listings are on pages 14-26 of the booklet.

Whew!
c***@gmail.com
2020-07-05 15:45:06 UTC
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Post by number_six
Post by Oscar
Post by Lawrence Chalmers
I just started the 12cd set of recordings from the Fromm Music Foundation. So far works by Leon Kirchner
(immensely appealing) and a Mass by Killmayer and Lou Harrison. Original jackets with a booklet which
gives very general information about the music. Downside is nowhere are there track listings/timings and
being unfamiliar with the music it is a very frustrating experience.
Look forward to reading more about this set, Mr. Chalmers. Interesting about the lack of track list and timings. Perhaps yr booklet was scored/collated incorrectly?? Weird, and regrettable.
I opened up my Fromm Foundation box. Track listings are on pages 14-26 of the booklet.
Whew!
I haven't purchased the box--a combination of duplication and lack of interest in some of the repertoire. I did, however, d/l a lossless copy of the Ben Weber disc from Presto. Short measure, but so what. Another fascinating composer worth recalling (or discovering). Other valuable recordings of his music (esp. the Piano Concerto and the "Blake" Symphony), formerly CRI or New World, also are available in lossless format from the same source.

AC
Oscar
2020-07-06 05:26:00 UTC
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Post by c***@gmail.com
I haven't purchased the box--a combination of duplication and lack of interest in some of the repertoire. I
did, however, d/l a lossless copy of the Ben Weber disc from Presto. Short measure, but so what. Another
fascinating composer worth recalling (or discovering). Other valuable recordings of his music (esp. the
Piano Concerto and the "Blake" Symphony), formerly CRI or New World, also are available in lossless format
from the same source.
Thx, will stream the Piano Concerto later tonight. Couplng from C.R.I. disc is Wuorinen's Piano Concerto. William Masselos (pf, Weber only); Royal Philharmonic Orchestra/Gerhard Samuel.
Lawrence Chalmers
2020-07-05 04:25:24 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Piano music of Illmari Hannikainen.
http://youtu.be/linkvU3wDLw Piano Concerto,Op.7, apparently no commercial recording
http://youtu.be/1kdhluKfJeM Variations Fantasques,Op.19, FC Records cd,Jouni Somero,pianist
Dirge
2020-07-09 19:20:49 UTC
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J. S. BACH: Goldberg Variations BWV 988 (1741)
:: Ignacio Prego [Glossa ’15]


I can generally tolerate the harpsichord for no more than a few variations at a time in this work, but I confess to finding the newish Ignacio Prego recording [Glossa ’15] compelling, as much for the clarity and the complex iridescent tone colors of the harpsichord used [Andrea Restelli, Milan 2004, after Christian Vater, 1738] as for Prego’s imaginative and intriguing playing. Prego has a knack for taking things (ornamentation, temporal liberties, etc.) close to but not beyond the pale, generating a sense that he’s skating away on the thin ice of the new day. I especially like that he differentiates between the opening and closing Arias, bringing a satisfying sense of “opening out” and “drawing to a close,” respectively. A bit more bass extension and fewer repeats would have been welcome, but this has fairly quickly become my harpsichord reference in the Goldberg Variations. (Although the Red Book CD sounds fine, the higher-quality audiophile formats really allow the sound to bloom into something special.)
number_six
2020-07-12 16:04:38 UTC
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George Dyson - Canterbury Pilgrims - Hickox on Chandos

starting into Villa-Lobos box "par lui-meme" on EMI
number_six
2020-07-17 00:38:03 UTC
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Post by number_six
starting into Villa-Lobos box "par lui-meme" on EMI
Reviewers were not kidding.

Sound in some of these recordings is on the sludgy side.

Still, as an HVL fan, I found this box a very enjoyable listen.
Dirge
2020-07-19 00:15:48 UTC
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Arnold SCHOENBERG: Drei Klavierstücke, Op. 11 (1909)
:: Arrau [BBC, live ’59] ICA


For a single disc featuring all of Schoenberg’s solo piano music, I favor Pollini [DG ’74], but my favorite recording of a single work is this unexpected and unexpectedly compelling one-off account of Drei Klavierstücke by Arrau. Like Pollini, Arrau takes the music at a fairly good clip, but Arrau conveys the music with a stronger sense of narrative, generating much tension, suspense, and drama while craftily building climaxes. Pollini’s more abstract and analytical approach brings more pointillistic clarity, but the music still has an avant-garde air about it in his hands, whereas it comes across as established repertoire in Arrau’s hands—no atonal experimentation, just music-making. The third piece is especially exciting here, exploding out of the blocks and continuing with a sense of sweep and momentum that makes Pollini’s account sound overthunk and deliberate by comparison. Arrau has the great advantage of being recording live in recital—which always brings out the best in him—during his absolute prime (from the early/mid 1950s to the early 1960s in my estimation).
Ed Presson
2020-07-19 22:13:44 UTC
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Mahler: Des Knaben Wunderhorn. Michael Gielen, Conductor, Christiane Iven,
Hanno Muller-Brachmann, soloists.
SWR Symphony Orchestra Baden-Baden & Freiburg. Hanssler Classic 93.274

This a new favorite. The sound is spectacular. I was put off by the
American Record Guide description of this CD
in their Mahler overview as being almost "grand opera". Now that I've heard
it, it goes in my top favorites of this work.
These are:

Szell/Schwarzkopf/Fischer-Dieskau (EMI)
Prohaska/Forrester/Rehfuss (Vanguard)
Mackerras/Murray/Allen (Virgin) An wonderful surprise!

Other CDs, whatever their merit, that I like less than those listed above:

Morris/Baker/Evans (Nimbus)
Bernstein/Popp/Schmidt (DG)
Abbado/von Otter/Quasthoff (DG)

Your favorites?
number_six
2020-07-22 23:50:14 UTC
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Post by Dirge
Arnold SCHOENBERG: Drei Klavierstücke, Op. 11 (1909)
:: Arrau [BBC, live ’59] ICA
http://youtu.be/irIA42YTnX0
For a single disc featuring all of Schoenberg’s solo piano music, I favor Pollini [DG ’74], but my favorite recording of a single work is this unexpected and unexpectedly compelling one-off account of Drei Klavierstücke by Arrau.
I'll check out Arrau link next weekend.

Agree Pollini disc is excellent -- I heard it in my (ongoing) traversal of the DG 20th century classics series.
c***@gmail.com
2020-07-23 14:04:30 UTC
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Post by number_six
Post by Dirge
Arnold SCHOENBERG: Drei Klavierstücke, Op. 11 (1909)
:: Arrau [BBC, live ’59] ICA
http://youtu.be/irIA42YTnX0
For a single disc featuring all of Schoenberg’s solo piano music, I favor Pollini [DG ’74], but my favorite recording of a single work is this unexpected and unexpectedly compelling one-off account of Drei Klavierstücke by Arrau.
I'll check out Arrau link next weekend.
Agree Pollini disc is excellent -- I heard it in my (ongoing) traversal of the DG 20th century classics series.
Do yourselves a favor and try Boffard's set on Mirare (e.g., https://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/schoenberg-works-for-piano), imo superior to both of the above in terms of both performance and recorded sound, and accompanied by a fascinating video about the composer.

AC
Dirge
2020-07-23 17:14:35 UTC
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Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by number_six
Post by Dirge
Arnold SCHOENBERG: Drei Klavierstücke, Op. 11 (1909)
:: Arrau [BBC, live ’59] ICA
http://youtu.be/irIA42YTnX0
For a single disc featuring all of Schoenberg’s solo piano music, I favor Pollini [DG ’74], but my favorite recording of a single work is this unexpected and unexpectedly compelling one-off account of Drei Klavierstücke by Arrau.
I'll check out Arrau link next weekend.
Agree Pollini disc is excellent -- I heard it in my (ongoing) traversal of the DG 20th century classics series.
Do yourselves a favor and try Boffard's set on Mirare (e.g., https://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/schoenberg-works-for-piano), imo superior to both of the above in terms of both performance and recorded sound, and accompanied by a fascinating video about the composer.
AC
I can understand the appeal of Boffard’s Drei Klavierstücke [Mirare ’12], as it’s beautifully executed and balanced without a hint of banging, but I hear in it a conspicuous concern for generating a sense of “timelessness” and for suavely negotiating the score that comes at too great an expense to impetus/sweep and drama. He also tends to sustain notes a smidgeon longer and take a slightly more legato approach to things than I might prefer—though his playing remains impressively articulate even so. I get much the same impression of every Boffard recording I hear, especially his recent Bartók release [Mirare ’18], so it’s safe to say that I’m simply out of synch with Boffard and his ways. The disc received nothing but rave reviews when it was released, so I’m clearly in the minority on this one.
c***@gmail.com
2020-07-23 17:40:29 UTC
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Post by Dirge
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by number_six
Post by Dirge
Arnold SCHOENBERG: Drei Klavierstücke, Op. 11 (1909)
:: Arrau [BBC, live ’59] ICA
http://youtu.be/irIA42YTnX0
For a single disc featuring all of Schoenberg’s solo piano music, I favor Pollini [DG ’74], but my favorite recording of a single work is this unexpected and unexpectedly compelling one-off account of Drei Klavierstücke by Arrau.
I'll check out Arrau link next weekend.
Agree Pollini disc is excellent -- I heard it in my (ongoing) traversal of the DG 20th century classics series.
Do yourselves a favor and try Boffard's set on Mirare (e.g., https://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/schoenberg-works-for-piano), imo superior to both of the above in terms of both performance and recorded sound, and accompanied by a fascinating video about the composer.
AC
I can understand the appeal of Boffard’s Drei Klavierstücke [Mirare ’12], as it’s beautifully executed and balanced without a hint of banging, but I hear in it a conspicuous concern for generating a sense of “timelessness” and for suavely negotiating the score that comes at too great an expense to impetus/sweep and drama. He also tends to sustain notes a smidgeon longer and take a slightly more legato approach to things than I might prefer—though his playing remains impressively articulate even so. I get much the same impression of every Boffard recording I hear, especially his recent Bartók release [Mirare ’18], so it’s safe to say that I’m simply out of synch with Boffard and his ways. The disc received nothing but rave reviews when it was released, so I’m clearly in the minority on this one.
Nice characterization of Boffard's playing. It sets forth exactly what I *like* about him, not only in Schoenberg but also in his splendid Debussy Etudes. (I haven't heard the Bartok.) Clearly influenced by his teacher Loriod, but even more fluid without any sacrifice of precision. I think you're right in saying that it's a matter of attunement.

AC
Dirge
2020-07-24 00:49:24 UTC
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Post by Dirge
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by number_six
Post by Dirge
Arnold SCHOENBERG: Drei Klavierstücke, Op. 11 (1909)
:: Arrau [BBC, live ’59] ICA
http://youtu.be/irIA42YTnX0
For a single disc featuring all of Schoenberg’s solo piano music, I favor Pollini [DG ’74], but my favorite recording of a single work is this unexpected and unexpectedly compelling one-off account of Drei Klavierstücke by Arrau.
I'll check out Arrau link next weekend.
Agree Pollini disc is excellent -- I heard it in my (ongoing) traversal of the DG 20th century classics series.
Do yourselves a favor and try Boffard's set on Mirare (e.g., https://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/schoenberg-works-for-piano), imo superior to both of the above in terms of both performance and recorded sound, and accompanied by a fascinating video about the composer.
AC
I can understand the appeal of Boffard’s Drei Klavierstücke [Mirare ’12], as it’s beautifully executed and balanced without a hint of banging, but I hear in it a conspicuous concern for generating a sense of “timelessness” and for suavely negotiating the score that comes at too great an expense to impetus/sweep and drama. He also tends to sustain notes a smidgeon longer and take a slightly more legato approach to things than I might prefer—though his playing remains impressively articulate even so. I get much the same impression of every Boffard recording I hear, especially his recent Bartók release [Mirare ’18], so it’s safe to say that I’m simply out of synch with Boffard and his ways. The disc received nothing but rave reviews when it was released, so I’m clearly in the minority on this one.
Nice characterization of Boffard's playing. It sets forth exactly what I *like* about him, not only in Schoenberg but also in his splendid Debussy Etudes. (I haven't heard the Bartok.) Clearly influenced by his teacher Loriod, but even more fluid without any sacrifice of precision. I think you're right in saying that it's a matter of attunement.
AC
His recording of Debussy’s Etudes is my favorite of his releases, but recorded competition in the Etudes is particularly fierce and I favor a couple of others, namely Rosen [Epic] and Bavouzet [Chandos]—a pair of performances that could hardly be less alike.
number_six
2020-07-24 15:43:55 UTC
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Post by number_six
Post by Dirge
Arnold SCHOENBERG: Drei Klavierstücke, Op. 11 (1909)
:: Arrau [BBC, live ’59] ICA
http://youtu.be/irIA42YTnX0
For a single disc featuring all of Schoenberg’s solo piano music, I favor Pollini [DG ’74], but my favorite recording of a single work is this unexpected and unexpectedly compelling one-off account of Drei Klavierstücke by Arrau.
I'll check out Arrau link next weekend.
Agree Pollini disc is excellent -- I heard it in my (ongoing) traversal of the DG 20th century classics series.
Do yourselves a favor and try Boffard's set on Mirare (e.g., https://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/schoenberg-works-for-piano), imo superior to both of the above in terms of both performance and recorded sound, and accompanied by a fascinating video about the composer.
AC
The bonus dvd is a significant inducement here...
JohnGavin
2020-07-24 23:17:50 UTC
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The Durufle complete Choral Music on BIS. One can’t praise the BIS label enough. Magnificent catalog, audiophile level recorded sound. I think I could devote the next few months to just BIS recordings.
Todd Michel McComb
2020-07-24 23:21:35 UTC
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Post by JohnGavin
I think I could devote the next few months to just BIS recordings.
One of my BIS favorites (from years ago) is the Dorothy Dorrow
_Harawi_ cycle by Messiaen....
JohnGavin
2020-07-24 23:41:24 UTC
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Todd Michel McComb
Post by JohnGavin
I think I could devote the next few months to just BIS recordings.
One of my BIS favorites (from years ago) is the Dorothy Dorrow
_Harawi_ cycle by Messiaen....

Thanks. I will check that out.
Steve Emerson
2020-07-23 23:00:53 UTC
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Post by Dirge
Arnold SCHOENBERG: Drei Klavierstücke, Op. 11 (1909)
:: Arrau [BBC, live ’59] ICA
http://youtu.be/irIA42YTnX0
For a single disc featuring all of Schoenberg’s solo piano music, I favor Pollini [DG ’74], but my favorite recording of a single work is this unexpected and unexpectedly compelling one-off account of Drei Klavierstücke by Arrau. Like Pollini, Arrau takes the music at a fairly good clip, but Arrau conveys the music with a stronger sense of narrative, generating much tension, suspense, and drama while craftily building climaxes. Pollini’s more abstract and analytical approach brings more pointillistic clarity, but the music still has an avant-garde air about it in his hands, whereas it comes across as established repertoire in Arrau’s hands—no atonal experimentation, just music-making. The third piece is especially exciting here, exploding out of the blocks and continuing with a sense of sweep and momentum that makes Pollini’s account sound overthunk and deliberate by comparison. Arrau has the great advantage of being recording live in recital—which always brings out the best in him—during his absolute prime (from the early/mid 1950s to the early 1960s in my estimation).
Thanks, Dirge. Will look into the Arrau. I do like Pollini's whole set, which may be analytical but is perhaps less so than most of his work. Have you heard Claude Helffer's? He's very comfortable with the music and strikes me as remote from your description of Pollini; despite his avant-garde credentials. I haven't heard Boffard's. Charles Rosen is at his best in the smallish subset that he recorded; no Opus 11.

SE.
Dirge
2020-07-24 01:18:38 UTC
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Post by Steve Emerson
Post by Dirge
Arnold SCHOENBERG: Drei Klavierstücke, Op. 11 (1909)
:: Arrau [BBC, live ’59] ICA
http://youtu.be/irIA42YTnX0
For a single disc featuring all of Schoenberg’s solo piano music, I favor Pollini [DG ’74], but my favorite recording of a single work is this unexpected and unexpectedly compelling one-off account of Drei Klavierstücke by Arrau. Like Pollini, Arrau takes the music at a fairly good clip, but Arrau conveys the music with a stronger sense of narrative, generating much tension, suspense, and drama while craftily building climaxes. Pollini’s more abstract and analytical approach brings more pointillistic clarity, but the music still has an avant-garde air about it in his hands, whereas it comes across as established repertoire in Arrau’s hands—no atonal experimentation, just music-making. The third piece is especially exciting here, exploding out of the blocks and continuing with a sense of sweep and momentum that makes Pollini’s account sound overthunk and deliberate by comparison. Arrau has the great advantage of being recording live in recital—which always brings out the best in him—during his absolute prime (from the early/mid 1950s to the early 1960s in my estimation).
Thanks, Dirge. Will look into the Arrau. I do like Pollini's whole set, which may be analytical but is perhaps less so than most of his work. Have you heard Claude Helffer's? He's very comfortable with the music and strikes me as remote from your description of Pollini; despite his avant-garde credentials. I haven't heard Boffard's. Charles Rosen is at his best in the smallish subset that he recorded; no Opus 11.
SE.
I have heard Helffer’s Schoenberg, but it was so long ago that I don't recall any specifics. Helffer is one of those pianists that I always seem to like even if he isn't quite my favorite in any particular work or composer—though he might be my favorite in Xenakis, an he has a refreshing way with Bartók. His playing certainly has a modern/avant-garde vibe about it, but there’s no sense that he has an avant-garde ax to grind (as there often is with Pollini and, among conductors, Boulez) … he is, as you say, “very comfortable with the music.”
number_six
2020-07-24 15:32:07 UTC
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Maderna - Quadrivium, Aura, and Biogramma
Sinopoli, North German Radio SO on DG

My first hearing of these impressive, sometimes forbidding soundscapes.
This is a disc to come back to.
number_six
2020-07-26 17:33:49 UTC
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I watched on dvd a 1980 Gayne with Viljumanis conducting Latvian Opera and Ballet at the Bolshoi. Muddy sound, no Russian Dance, meh.

However, the dvd extras included Act 3 from a 1964 Bolshoi perf conducted by the composer. Here's an 8 minute excerpt on youtube:



This 1964 clip includes Russ Dance, Lezghinka, Ayesha.

While I was thrilled to see this, there's no getting around the fact that in Russian Dance the tempo change from very slow to very fast is awkward compared to the best available recordings, and Lezghinka has a cut I can't abide.

A valuable document, but not the best way to experience this music.
Gerard
2020-07-26 20:27:16 UTC
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Rota: pianoconcertos in e minor and in C major
played by Janne Mertanen and the Tampere Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by
Hannu Lintu (ALBA - hybrid SACD).
Nice, well played, well recorded. But rather unmemorable music. Although the
first one (in C, 1960) has some freshness comparable to Poulenc's concerto,
specially so in the last movement.
Al Eisner
2020-07-27 19:30:22 UTC
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1) Completed Brahms portion of Kalichstein-Laredo-Robinson box (Bach
Guild "Big KLR Box" download): Conssistently high level of
performance. One thing worth highlighting is how well they bring
out the subleties and complex harmonies in the second Piano Trio.

2) Mahler, DLvdE, Baker/Kmentt/Kubelik (Audite): Ewig.
--
Al Eisner
Dirge
2020-07-28 02:57:29 UTC
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Over the past couple of weeks, I’ve been making my way through my favorite and near-favorite Beethoven piano sonatas via my favorite recording of each …

Sonata No. 7 in D major, Op. 10/3
· Claudio Arrau [EMI ’59]

Sonata No. 8 in C minor, Op. 13 “Pathétique”
· Rudolf Serkin [Columbia ’45]

Sonata quasi una fantasia No. 13 in E-flat major, Op. 27/1
· Claudio Arrau [BBC ’60] ICA/BBC Legends

Sonata quasi una fantasia No. 14 in C-sharp minor, Op. 27/2 “Moonlight”
· Rudolf Serkin [Columbia ’41]

Sonata No. 15 in D major, Op. 28 “Pastoral”
· Wilhelm Kempff [DG ’65]

Sonata No. 17 in D minor, Op. 31/2 “Tempest”
· Sviatoslav Richter [live in Prague ’65] Praga

Sonata No. 18 in E-flat major, Op. 31/3 “Hunt”
· Wilhelm Kempff [Grammophon ’43] APR

Sonata No. 21 in C major, Op. 53 “Waldstein”
· Rudolf Serkin [Columbia ’52]

Sonata No. 23 in F minor, Op. 57 “Appassionata”
· Sviatoslav Richter [live in Moscow ’60] Melodiya

Sonata No. 29 in B-flat major, Op. 106 “Hammerklavier”
· Charles Rosen [Epic ’64]
Not to be confused with Rosen’s later recording included in his set of the late sonatas.

Sonata No. 30 in E major, Op. 109
· Sviatoslav Richter [live in Leipzig ’63] Music & Arts

Sonata No. 31 in A-flat major, Op. 110
· Claudio Arrau [live in Stockholm ’60] ICA

Sonata No. 32 in C minor, Op. 111
· Claudio Arrau [live in Stockholm ’60] ICA

I seem to have come down with an acute case of samirgolescuitis, as there’s not a living pianist to be found on my list (and my favorite living pianists are almost dead).
dk
2020-07-28 05:01:49 UTC
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Post by Dirge
Over the past couple of weeks, I’ve been making my way through my favorite and near-favorite Beethoven piano sonatas via my favorite recording of each …
Sonata No. 7 in D major, Op. 10/3
· Claudio Arrau [EMI ’59]
Sonata No. 8 in C minor, Op. 13 “Pathétique”
· Rudolf Serkin [Columbia ’45]
Sonata quasi una fantasia No. 13 in E-flat major, Op. 27/1
· Claudio Arrau [BBC ’60] ICA/BBC Legends
Sonata quasi una fantasia No. 14 in C-sharp minor, Op. 27/2 “Moonlight”
· Rudolf Serkin [Columbia ’41]
Sonata No. 15 in D major, Op. 28 “Pastoral”
· Wilhelm Kempff [DG ’65]
Sonata No. 17 in D minor, Op. 31/2 “Tempest”
· Sviatoslav Richter [live in Prague ’65] Praga
Sonata No. 18 in E-flat major, Op. 31/3 “Hunt”
· Wilhelm Kempff [Grammophon ’43] APR
Sonata No. 21 in C major, Op. 53 “Waldstein”
· Rudolf Serkin [Columbia ’52]
Sonata No. 23 in F minor, Op. 57 “Appassionata”
· Sviatoslav Richter [live in Moscow ’60] Melodiya
Sonata No. 29 in B-flat major, Op. 106 “Hammerklavier”
· Charles Rosen [Epic ’64]
Not to be confused with Rosen’s later recording included in his set of the late sonatas.
Sonata No. 30 in E major, Op. 109
· Sviatoslav Richter [live in Leipzig ’63] Music & Arts
Sonata No. 31 in A-flat major, Op. 110
· Claudio Arrau [live in Stockholm ’60] ICA
Sonata No. 32 in C minor, Op. 111
· Claudio Arrau [live in Stockholm ’60] ICA
I seem to have come down with an acute case
of samirgolescuitis, as there’s not a living
pianist to be found on my list (and my favorite
living pianists are almost dead).
How strange! After listening to HJ Lim
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLeTs0o_DlnIsPAMXjDjk7NN-UYa4Oh_li

I reached the conclusion none of Samir's
sacred mummies could come close to HJ's
interpretations. I was imprinted on
Sviatoslav Richter's Appassionata,
Tempest and Hammerklavier, and I
now find them crude and square
compared to HJ Lim. Ditto Rosen.
Listen for yourself.

dk

PS. I will not comment on Arrau,
Kempff or Serkin.
O***@aol.com
2020-07-28 08:27:19 UTC
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Fassbaender’s luminescent Liszt & Strauss (R.) recital w/ Irwin Gage piano accompaniment (DG 1987). Quite enchanting, and reissued last year as part of the Brigitte Fassbaender Edition on DG/Universal Music Enterprises.
JohnGavin
2020-07-28 14:55:49 UTC
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I reached the conclusion none of Samir's
sacred mummies could come close to HJ's
interpretations. I was imprinted on
Sviatoslav Richter's Appassionata,
Tempest and Hammerklavier, and I
now find them crude and square
compared to HJ Lim. Ditto Rosen.
Listen for yourself.

dk

PS. I will not comment on Arrau,
Kempff or Serkin.

———————————————————
For the sake of open-mindedness, I decided to try Serkin’s DG recording of op. 110. I sincerely wanted to find something that would provide an insight into his reputation. I forced myself to listen and despite good intentions, I found it to appallingly awful. For one thing his approach to the instrument produced an awful sound and obvious technical shortcomings on a pretty much continual basis - keep in mind that DG is one of the best sound engineered labels. So I’ll conclude he was better in his younger years. But why would such a “great musician” risk their reputation and dishonor Beethoven with such a performance?
Dirge
2020-07-28 17:15:03 UTC
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Post by dk
I reached the conclusion none of Samir's
sacred mummies could come close to HJ's
interpretations. I was imprinted on
Sviatoslav Richter's Appassionata,
Tempest and Hammerklavier, and I
now find them crude and square
compared to HJ Lim. Ditto Rosen.
Listen for yourself.
dk
PS. I will not comment on Arrau,
Kempff or Serkin.
———————————————————
For the sake of open-mindedness, I decided to try Serkin’s DG recording of op. 110. I sincerely wanted to find something that would provide an insight into his reputation. I forced myself to listen and despite good intentions, I found it to appallingly awful. For one thing his approach to the instrument produced an awful sound and obvious technical shortcomings on a pretty much continual basis - keep in mind that DG is one of the best sound engineered labels. So I’ll conclude he was better in his younger years. But why would such a “great musician” risk their reputation and dishonor Beethoven with such a performance?
I generally avoid Serkin’s recordings from much past 1960, as his technique diminished and his interpretations became self-consciously Serkinesque. That said, Serkin was always a severe, unsentimental, unprettified bastard who never produced a “lovely” tone in his life, so there’s a fair chance that you’ll dislike him even in his prime.
dk
2020-07-28 20:38:06 UTC
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Post by Dirge
I generally avoid Serkin’s recordings from much past 1960,
as his technique diminished and his interpretations became
self-consciously Serkinesque. That said, Serkin was always
a severe, unsentimental, unprettified bastard who never
produced a “lovely” tone in his life, so there’s a fair
chance that you’ll dislike him even in his prime.
?!? You may not realize that I heard most of Serkin's
recordings, including pre-WWII ones. Once upon a time
when I was a student I held a part time job as a record
reviewer/buyer for the music department of a small nation.
Without exception all of Serkin's performance stank!

Severe == mechanical and dull
Unsentimenatal == insensitive
Unprettified == no expression

Serkin was the most horrible example of
the German piano tradition at its worst,
even more so than Backhaus!

Jeez....

dk
Dirge
2020-07-28 20:50:43 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by Dirge
I generally avoid Serkin’s recordings from much past 1960,
as his technique diminished and his interpretations became
self-consciously Serkinesque. That said, Serkin was always
a severe, unsentimental, unprettified bastard who never
produced a “lovely” tone in his life, so there’s a fair
chance that you’ll dislike him even in his prime.
?!? You may not realize that I heard most of Serkin's
recordings, including pre-WWII ones. Once upon a time
when I was a student I held a part time job as a record
reviewer/buyer for the music department of a small nation.
Without exception all of Serkin's performance stank!
Severe == mechanical and dull
Unsentimenatal == insensitive
Unprettified == no expression
Serkin was the most horrible example of
the German piano tradition at its worst,
even more so than Backhaus!
Jeez....
dk
If you’re using reverse-psychology on me to make me like Serkin even more, it’s working. Thank you.
dk
2020-07-28 21:52:42 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Dirge
Post by dk
Post by Dirge
I generally avoid Serkin’s recordings from much past 1960,
as his technique diminished and his interpretations became
self-consciously Serkinesque. That said, Serkin was always
a severe, unsentimental, unprettified bastard who never
produced a “lovely” tone in his life, so there’s a fair
chance that you’ll dislike him even in his prime.
?!? You may not realize that I heard most of Serkin's
recordings, including pre-WWII ones. Once upon a time
when I was a student I held a part time job as a record
reviewer/buyer for the music department of a small nation.
Without exception all of Serkin's performance stank!
Severe == mechanical and dull
Unsentimenatal == insensitive
Unprettified == no expression
Serkin was the most horrible example of
the German piano tradition at its worst,
even more so than Backhaus!
Jeez....
If you’re using reverse-psychology on me
to make me like Serkin even more, it’s
working. Thank you.
Not using anything on anyone, just stating
what my ears hear. Whatever makes one happy
makes one happy -- even if it is Serkin.

dk
Dirge
2020-07-28 16:05:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
Post by Dirge
Over the past couple of weeks, I’ve been making my way through my favorite and near-favorite Beethoven piano sonatas via my favorite recording of each …
Sonata No. 7 in D major, Op. 10/3
· Claudio Arrau [EMI ’59]
Sonata No. 8 in C minor, Op. 13 “Pathétique”
· Rudolf Serkin [Columbia ’45]
Sonata quasi una fantasia No. 13 in E-flat major, Op. 27/1
· Claudio Arrau [BBC ’60] ICA/BBC Legends
Sonata quasi una fantasia No. 14 in C-sharp minor, Op. 27/2 “Moonlight”
· Rudolf Serkin [Columbia ’41]
Sonata No. 15 in D major, Op. 28 “Pastoral”
· Wilhelm Kempff [DG ’65]
Sonata No. 17 in D minor, Op. 31/2 “Tempest”
· Sviatoslav Richter [live in Prague ’65] Praga
Sonata No. 18 in E-flat major, Op. 31/3 “Hunt”
· Wilhelm Kempff [Grammophon ’43] APR
Sonata No. 21 in C major, Op. 53 “Waldstein”
· Rudolf Serkin [Columbia ’52]
Sonata No. 23 in F minor, Op. 57 “Appassionata”
· Sviatoslav Richter [live in Moscow ’60] Melodiya
Sonata No. 29 in B-flat major, Op. 106 “Hammerklavier”
· Charles Rosen [Epic ’64]
Not to be confused with Rosen’s later recording included in his set of the late sonatas.
Sonata No. 30 in E major, Op. 109
· Sviatoslav Richter [live in Leipzig ’63] Music & Arts
Sonata No. 31 in A-flat major, Op. 110
· Claudio Arrau [live in Stockholm ’60] ICA
Sonata No. 32 in C minor, Op. 111
· Claudio Arrau [live in Stockholm ’60] ICA
I seem to have come down with an acute case
of samirgolescuitis, as there’s not a living
pianist to be found on my list (and my favorite
living pianists are almost dead).
How strange! After listening to HJ Lim
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLeTs0o_DlnIsPAMXjDjk7NN-UYa4Oh_li
I reached the conclusion none of Samir's
sacred mummies could come close to HJ's
interpretations. I was imprinted on
Sviatoslav Richter's Appassionata,
Tempest and Hammerklavier, and I
now find them crude and square
compared to HJ Lim. Ditto Rosen.
Listen for yourself.
dk
PS. I will not comment on Arrau,
Kempff or Serkin.
I doubt that even Samir would like the recordings on my list, dead though the pianists are.

I will give HJ Lim a try, but something tells me that her performances won't be anywheres near crude and square enough for my taste.
Henk vT
2020-07-28 18:00:44 UTC
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Post by Dirge
I will give HJ Lim a try, but something tells me that her performances won't be anywheres near crude and square enough for my taste.
With the exception of Serkin and Rosen, none of the performances you mentioned are crude and square, if they are intended to be performances of Beethoven.

HJLim plays herself in the guise of someone who plays Beethoven. Pianistically it is highly interesting. Musically I prefer the natural approach of Tirimo:



Henk
Dirge
2020-07-28 19:39:37 UTC
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Post by Henk vT
Post by Dirge
I will give HJ Lim a try, but something tells me that her performances won't be anywheres near crude and square enough for my taste.
With the exception of Serkin and Rosen, none of the performances you mentioned are crude and square, if they are intended to be performances of Beethoven.
http://youtu.be/eSDsxujuGxE
Henk
I've just listened to the final movements of Lim's "Appassionata" and Op. 110 and tend to agree with you: her playing is very proficient and interesting in its way, but it does nothing for me from an interpretive/characterization standpoint.

I should listen to Tirimo now, I suppose, but I'm getting a bit burnt out on Beethoven (if that's even possible) and may have to put it on the back burner for the time being. (I suspect that if 100 others were to chime in with their opinions on the matter, I'd get 98 different recommendations as to which pianist to listen to.)
JohnGavin
2020-07-28 19:50:08 UTC
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Permalink
. (I suspect that if 100 others were to chime in with their opinions on the matter, I'd get 98 different recommendations as to which pianist to listen to.)

Yes, Isn’t it true. Interpretation is such a personal issue. Instinctively I can understand why many want to hear rawness and driven energy in Beethoven. I found myself enjoying the heck out of Igor Levit’s 32. It’s youthful, propulsive energy was exhilarating to these ears. Ma. Lim is also energetic, but it struck me as virtuosic is a less grounded way. A little too much skimming on the surface kind of playing.
dk
2020-07-28 20:19:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dirge
. (I suspect that if 100 others were to chime in with their opinions on the matter, I'd get 98 different recommendations as to which pianist to listen to.)
Yes, Isn’t it true. Interpretation is such a personal issue. Instinctively I can understand why many want to hear rawness and driven energy in Beethoven. I found myself enjoying the heck out of Igor Levit’s 32. It’s youthful, propulsive energy was exhilarating to these ears. Ma. Lim is also energetic, but it struck me as virtuosic is a less grounded way. A little too much skimming on the surface kind of playing.
Rx: pair of new ears.

dk
dk
2020-07-28 20:18:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Henk vT
Post by Dirge
I will give HJ Lim a try, but something tells me that her performances won't be anywheres near crude and square enough for my taste.
With the exception of Serkin and Rosen, none of the performances you mentioned are crude and square, if they are intended to be performances of Beethoven.
http://youtu.be/eSDsxujuGxE
Thanks for reminding us your preference
for blandissimo sewing machines.

dk
Ricardo Jimenez
2020-07-28 21:53:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
Post by Henk vT
Post by Dirge
I will give HJ Lim a try, but something tells me that her performances won't be anywheres near crude and square enough for my taste.
With the exception of Serkin and Rosen, none of the performances you mentioned are crude and square, if they are intended to be performances of Beethoven.
http://youtu.be/eSDsxujuGxE
Thanks for reminding us your preference
for blandissimo sewing machines.
dk
Dan, do any of the numerous sets that have come out after the HJ Lim
in 2012 appeal to you? When I heard Fazil Say's I was sort of
reminded of Lim and the recorded sound is better.
Henk vT
2020-07-28 22:03:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
Thanks for reminding us your preference
for blandissimo sewing machines.
How much difference does one need to hear to notice a difference? IIRC Yudina once said that a penchant for extremes was amateurish. It's true in all other contexts, why wouldn't it apply to music?

Henk
dk
2020-07-29 00:48:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Henk vT
Post by dk
Thanks for reminding us your preference
for blandissimo sewing machines.
Yudina once said that a penchant for
extremes was amateurish.
Classic example of a kettle calling the
teapot black. Was she looking in the
mirror? I couldn't care less about
what Yudina said about any subject,
and least of all about music.
Post by Henk vT
It's true in all other contexts,
Sez who?
Post by Henk vT
why wouldn't it apply to music?
And why would it? Even if it were
true.

dk
Tatonik
2020-07-29 16:34:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dirge
Post by dk
How strange! After listening to HJ Lim
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLeTs0o_DlnIsPAMXjDjk7NN-UYa4Oh_li
I reached the conclusion none of Samir's
sacred mummies could come close to HJ's
interpretations. I was imprinted on
Sviatoslav Richter's Appassionata,
Tempest and Hammerklavier, and I
now find them crude and square
compared to HJ Lim. Ditto Rosen.
Listen for yourself.
dk
PS. I will not comment on Arrau,
Kempff or Serkin.
I doubt that even Samir would like the recordings on my list, dead though the pianists are.
I will give HJ Lim a try, but something tells me that her
performances won't be anywheres near crude and square enough for my
taste.
To recommend HJ you really have to go out on a Lim.
JohnGavin
2020-07-31 10:55:31 UTC
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Riemuitkaamme- A Finnish Christmas - Helsinki Chamber Choir. BIS

Having a great time streaming from 2 labels which produce phenominally engineered recordings. BIS and Reference recordings.

Beautiful program - never heard choral sound quite this beautiful. They know exactly where to place the mikes.
Ricardo Jimenez
2020-07-31 16:31:09 UTC
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Permalink
On Fri, 31 Jul 2020 03:55:31 -0700 (PDT), JohnGavin
Post by JohnGavin
Riemuitkaamme- A Finnish Christmas - Helsinki Chamber Choir. BIS
Having a great time streaming from 2 labels which produce phenominally engineered recordings. BIS and Reference recordings.
Beautiful program - never heard choral sound quite this beautiful. They know exactly where to place the mikes.
Thanks. Just added it to my Spotify list.
number_six
2020-07-31 17:48:18 UTC
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Closing out the month with

Casella - Sym 2 and Scarlattiana - Noseda /BBC on Chandos
enjoyed both quite a bit

Duke Ellington - Ellington '55 on Capitol
number_six
2020-08-01 19:17:43 UTC
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Post by number_six
Closing out the month with
Casella - Sym 2 and Scarlattiana - Noseda /BBC on Chandos
enjoyed both quite a bit
Duke Ellington - Ellington '55 on Capitol
More I think of the Casella disk, the more I like it.

Scarlatti themes, so familiar in the crisp articulation of a harpsichord, fare quite well in the somewhat diffuse, impressionist orchestral palette Casella employs here.

The Symphony, OTOH, shows a bolder, more dramatic aspect of thus composer's style and capabilities.

Noseda and his players are equal to the task in each of these two works.
Frank Berger
2020-08-02 02:06:05 UTC
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Post by number_six
Closing out the month with
Casella - Sym 2 and Scarlattiana - Noseda /BBC on Chandos
enjoyed both quite a bit
Duke Ellington - Ellington '55 on Capitol
Wondering how Roscoe's Scarlattiana compares with
Fiorentino's (which I like a lot).
number_six
2020-08-02 15:41:42 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Frank Berger
Post by number_six
Closing out the month with
Casella - Sym 2 and Scarlattiana - Noseda /BBC on Chandos
enjoyed both quite a bit
Duke Ellington - Ellington '55 on Capitol
Wondering how Roscoe's Scarlattiana compares with
Fiorentino's (which I like a lot).
I have not heard Fioentino in this.

Martin Roscoe's contribution to the Noseda recording is solid, not flashy.

That's as it should be. The work itself is not the virtuoso display piece that I expected it might be. Casella took a different tack -- and to good effect.
Lawrence Chalmers
2020-07-28 16:05:18 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Piano music of Illmari Hannikainen.
http://youtu.be/linkvU3wDLw Piano Concerto,Op.7, apparently no commercial recording
http://youtu.be/1kdhluKfJeM Variations Fantasques,Op.19, FC Records cd,Jouni Somero,pianist
Lukas Foss 4 symphonies by BMOP conducted by Gil Rose. Enjoyable and worth repeated listenings. This group is a godsend for recorded performances by American composers outside the Bernstein, Copland, and Ives canon. Such composers Antheil and Kirchner and even Irving Fine have been a part of the series of recordings.
Dirge
2020-07-28 23:40:52 UTC
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Antonio VIVALDI: Stabat Mater in F minor for solo alto and strings w/basso continuo, RV 621 (1712)
:: Mingardo, Alessandrini/Concerto Italiano [Opus 111 ’99]


While sifting through available recordings of this unusually economical/sparing/austere/simple and uncharacteristically solemn Vivaldi work, I found myself gravitating toward this one … Sara Mingardo has a devilishly complex and decidedly contraltoish contralto voice—she’s not some over-the-hill mezzo posing as a contralto, she’s the real deal—and she gives a stately, almost majestic, yet expressive and dramatic (and more than a little bit haunting) performance that is supported to the hilt by the sometimes mad and always dramatic Rinaldo Alessandrini and his usual band of cohorts. From an abstract musical perspective, this is certainly the most compelling performance that I’ve heard, but when the meaning and spirit of the text is considered, it seems a wee bit overwrought. Even so, it’s my favorite recording of Vivaldi’s Stabat Mater … I simply cannot *not* listen to it when it’s playing.
s***@gmail.com
2020-07-29 02:00:36 UTC
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Smetana- Má Vlast Bamberger Symphoniker Jacob Hruša Tudor SACD 7196 2016

Very nice recording in SACD audio, although the triangle is somewhat dim. The performance could use a little more spice to me. Kubelik/CPO or BSO with a mention of the mono CSO, Ancerl/CPO are still my faves...

Stan Punzel
Henk vT
2020-08-02 16:53:58 UTC
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Scherbakov Chopin/Godowsky etudes. Naxos Vol. I

After several hearings (with the score) this is the version I like best. The playing is as effortless as Hamelin's. What stands out is Scherbakov's attempt to present these pieces as miniatures: light, elegant, and great fun to listen to. Rubinstein somewhere in his autobiographies says that Godowsky used to play his own work with a complete disregard of their pianistic difficulties. So does Scherbakov.

Henk
JohnGavin
2020-08-02 17:20:15 UTC
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Scherbakov Chopin/Godowsky etudes. Naxos Vol. I

After several hearings (with the score) this is the version I like best. The playing is as effortless as Hamelin's. What stands out is Scherbakov's attempt to present these pieces as miniatures: light, elegant, and great fun to listen to. Rubinstein somewhere in his autobiographies says that Godowsky used to play his own work with a complete disregard of their pianistic difficulties. So does Scherbakov.

Henk

I was wondering when these would come out. Thanks for pointing them out! One or 2 more CDs of these Etudes probably draws Scherbakov’s Complete Godowsky project to a close. It must have begun about 15 years ago.
Henk vT
2020-08-02 20:28:02 UTC
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Post by JohnGavin
I was wondering when these would come out. Thanks for pointing them out! One or 2 more CDs of these Etudes probably draws Scherbakov’s Complete Godowsky project to a close. It must have begun about 15 years ago.
The CD has 25/53 part of the complete set. So I expect one other CD. The first one is from 1996, that is 15 years ago as you said. It took Naxos/Marco Polo 1 year p/CD.

The quality of engineering and performances has improved considerably over the years.

Henk
JohnGavin
2020-08-02 22:08:22 UTC
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ago.

The CD has 25/53 part of the complete set. So I expect one other CD. The first one is from 1996, that is 15 years ago as you said. It took Naxos/Marco Polo 1 year p/CD.

The quality of engineering and performances has improved considerably over the years.

Henk

Being somewhat of a Godowskyphile, here’s my order of excellence for recorded performance:

1. Hamelin
2. Berezovsky (Selections)
3. Grante 1st recording on Altarus
4. Scherbakov

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