Discussion:
Gala Concert 1974: International Piano Library
(too old to reply)
Kerrison
2010-04-05 15:20:55 UTC
Permalink
The thread about Jorge Bolet reminded me of a wonderful Gala Concert
organised by the International Piano Library and given at London's
Royal Festival Hall on 9 December 1974. Excerpts from this event were
issued on a Desmar LP (DSM 1005) and the Bolet thread has made me
wonder if it ever came out on CD. Unfortunately, Bolet's own solo
contribution, the Strauss-Godowsky 'Symphonic Metamorphosis on Themes
from Die Fledermaus,' failed to make it to the extracts LP, leaving
his sole contribution on the disc as being one of 8 pianists pounding
out an arrangement of Beethoven's 'Ruins of Athens' Turkish March (the
others being Gina Bachauer, Jeanne-Marie Darre, Alicia de Larrocha,
John Lill, Radu Lupu, Garrick Ohlsson and Balint Vazsonyi).

The whole concert was amusingly introduced by Victor Borge, and the
others involved were Shura Cherkassky, Stephen Bishop, Tamas Vasary
and John Ogdon. There were assorted solos, duets and trios, and out-of-
way arrangements. Curiously, the LP attributed Ohlsson's solo - an
arrangement of the 'Romanza' from Chopin's E minor Piano Concerto - to
Balakirev, while the concert program ascribed it to Glazunov.

The tapes of the concert must surely have survived, so even if the
excerpts LP has been issued on CD (has it?) surely the time for the
release of the entire concert on CD is long overdue (unless it already
has been!).
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-04-05 15:51:50 UTC
Permalink
Kerrison <kerrison126-***@yahoo.co.uk> appears to have caused the
following letters to be typed in news:93645e20-6598-4867-ae58-
Post by Kerrison
The thread about Jorge Bolet reminded me of a wonderful Gala Concert
organised by the International Piano Library and given at London's
Royal Festival Hall on 9 December 1974. Excerpts from this event were
issued on a Desmar LP (DSM 1005) and the Bolet thread has made me
wonder if it ever came out on CD. Unfortunately, Bolet's own solo
contribution, the Strauss-Godowsky 'Symphonic Metamorphosis on Themes
from Die Fledermaus,' failed to make it to the extracts LP, leaving
his sole contribution on the disc as being one of 8 pianists pounding
out an arrangement of Beethoven's 'Ruins of Athens' Turkish March (the
others being Gina Bachauer, Jeanne-Marie Darre, Alicia de Larrocha,
John Lill, Radu Lupu, Garrick Ohlsson and Balint Vazsonyi).
The whole concert was amusingly introduced by Victor Borge, and the
others involved were Shura Cherkassky, Stephen Bishop, Tamas Vasary
and John Ogdon. There were assorted solos, duets and trios, and out-of-
way arrangements. Curiously, the LP attributed Ohlsson's solo - an
arrangement of the 'Romanza' from Chopin's E minor Piano Concerto - to
Balakirev, while the concert program ascribed it to Glazunov.
The tapes of the concert must surely have survived, so even if the
excerpts LP has been issued on CD (has it?) surely the time for the
release of the entire concert on CD is long overdue (unless it already
has been!).
I second your call for a CD release. I believe that outside the US, it was
also issued on LP by Telefunken (had they yet been renamed Teldec?), with no
indication on the cover at least as to its gala concert origins.

Don't forget that there was a reprise of the "Turkish March" in which some of
the pianists went a little nuts. Was it Bolet who interpolated a phrase from
"Ach so fromm" from Flotow's "Martha"?

Telefunken ... now, THERE's a name that truly HAS been "wiped off the map"!
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
Mort
2010-04-06 00:43:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
following letters to be typed in news:93645e20-6598-4867-ae58-
Post by Kerrison
The thread about Jorge Bolet reminded me of a wonderful Gala Concert
organised by the International Piano Library and given at London's
Royal Festival Hall on 9 December 1974. Excerpts from this event were
issued on a Desmar LP (DSM 1005) and the Bolet thread has made me
wonder if it ever came out on CD. Unfortunately, Bolet's own solo
contribution, the Strauss-Godowsky 'Symphonic Metamorphosis on Themes
from Die Fledermaus,' failed to make it to the extracts LP, leaving
his sole contribution on the disc as being one of 8 pianists pounding
out an arrangement of Beethoven's 'Ruins of Athens' Turkish March (the
others being Gina Bachauer, Jeanne-Marie Darre, Alicia de Larrocha,
John Lill, Radu Lupu, Garrick Ohlsson and Balint Vazsonyi).
The whole concert was amusingly introduced by Victor Borge, and the
others involved were Shura Cherkassky, Stephen Bishop, Tamas Vasary
and John Ogdon. There were assorted solos, duets and trios, and out-of-
way arrangements. Curiously, the LP attributed Ohlsson's solo - an
arrangement of the 'Romanza' from Chopin's E minor Piano Concerto - to
Balakirev, while the concert program ascribed it to Glazunov.
The tapes of the concert must surely have survived, so even if the
excerpts LP has been issued on CD (has it?) surely the time for the
release of the entire concert on CD is long overdue (unless it already
has been!).
I second your call for a CD release. I believe that outside the US, it was
also issued on LP by Telefunken (had they yet been renamed Teldec?), with no
indication on the cover at least as to its gala concert origins.
Don't forget that there was a reprise of the "Turkish March" in which some of
the pianists went a little nuts. Was it Bolet who interpolated a phrase from
"Ach so fromm" from Flotow's "Martha"?
Telefunken ... now, THERE's a name that truly HAS been "wiped off the map"!
Telefunken merged with Decca, and was then re-named Teldec.

Mort Linder
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-04-06 04:16:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mort
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
I second your call for a CD release. I believe that outside the US, it
was also issued on LP by Telefunken (had they yet been renamed Teldec?),
with no indication on the cover at least as to its gala concert origins.
Don't forget that there was a reprise of the "Turkish March" in which
some of the pianists went a little nuts. Was it Bolet who interpolated
a phrase from "Ach so fromm" from Flotow's "Martha"?
Telefunken ... now, THERE's a name that truly HAS been "wiped off the map"!
Telefunken merged with Decca, and was then re-named Teldec.
Yes, or rather became a division of Decca. I remember that that happened,
just not when. The funny part was when Teldec was sold by Polygram (I
*think* it was pre-Universal) to Warner, and still kept the name Teldec!
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
td
2010-04-05 17:00:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kerrison
The thread about Jorge Bolet reminded me of a wonderful Gala Concert
organised by the International Piano Library and given at London's
Royal Festival Hall on 9 December 1974. Excerpts from this event were
issued on a Desmar LP (DSM 1005) and the Bolet thread has made me
wonder if it ever came out on CD. Unfortunately, Bolet's own solo
contribution, the Strauss-Godowsky 'Symphonic Metamorphosis on Themes
from Die Fledermaus,' failed to make it to the extracts LP, leaving
his sole contribution on the disc as being one of 8 pianists pounding
out an arrangement of Beethoven's 'Ruins of Athens' Turkish March (the
others being Gina Bachauer, Jeanne-Marie Darre, Alicia de Larrocha,
John Lill, Radu Lupu, Garrick Ohlsson and Balint Vazsonyi).
The whole concert was amusingly introduced by Victor Borge, and the
others involved were Shura Cherkassky, Stephen Bishop, Tamas Vasary
and John Ogdon. There were assorted solos, duets and trios, and out-of-
way arrangements. Curiously, the LP attributed Ohlsson's solo - an
arrangement of the 'Romanza' from Chopin's E minor Piano Concerto - to
Balakirev, while the concert program ascribed it to Glazunov.
The tapes of the concert must surely have survived, so even if the
excerpts LP has been issued on CD (has it?) surely the time for the
release of the entire concert on CD is long overdue (unless it already
has been!).
Maybe that was one of the rare tapes destroyed by a mysterious fire?
Bunko collected insurance and then magically rediscovered many of the
treasures. Why the insurance company didn't get him for fraud, I'll
never know.

TD
number_six
2010-04-06 15:15:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kerrison
The thread about Jorge Bolet reminded me of a wonderful Gala Concert
organised by the International Piano Library and given at London's
Royal Festival Hall on 9 December 1974. Excerpts from this event were
issued on a Desmar LP (DSM 1005) and the Bolet thread has made me
wonder if it ever came out on CD. Unfortunately, Bolet's own solo
contribution, the Strauss-Godowsky 'Symphonic Metamorphosis on Themes
from Die Fledermaus,' failed to make it to the extracts LP, leaving
his sole contribution on the disc as being one of 8 pianists pounding
out an arrangement of Beethoven's 'Ruins of Athens' Turkish March (the
others being Gina Bachauer, Jeanne-Marie Darre, Alicia de Larrocha,
John Lill, Radu Lupu, Garrick Ohlsson and Balint Vazsonyi).
The whole concert was amusingly introduced by Victor Borge, and the
others involved were Shura Cherkassky, Stephen Bishop, Tamas Vasary
and John Ogdon. There were assorted solos, duets and trios, and out-of-
way arrangements. Curiously, the LP attributed Ohlsson's solo - an
arrangement of the 'Romanza' from Chopin's E minor Piano Concerto - to
Balakirev, while the concert program ascribed it to Glazunov.
The tapes of the concert must surely have survived, so even if the
excerpts LP has been issued on CD (has it?) surely the time for the
release of the entire concert on CD is long overdue (unless it already
has been!).
This is a very fun record. Never on CD to my knowledge. I had heard
a track on the radio and looked for it for a long time without
success. Finally found a copy of the LP after I mentioned it here and
Matthew helped me with the name of the LP and the label. In order to
enjoy it to the fullest, a DVD release would be terrific, because
there is so much interaction between the performers; nonetheless, I
was very happy to find this one.
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-04-06 15:41:58 UTC
Permalink
number_six <***@hotmail.com> appears to have caused the following
letters to be typed in news:e408456c-7816-4aba-8623-
This is a very fun record. Never on CD to my knowledge. I had heard a
track on the radio and looked for it for a long time without success.
Finally found a copy of the LP after I mentioned it here and Matthew helped
me with the name of the LP and the label. In order to enjoy it to the
fullest, a DVD release would be terrific, because there is so much
interaction between the performers; nonetheless, I was very happy to find
this one.
Glad to have helped. The photos in the Desmar release (and, I believe, more
that ran in the classical music press at the time of the concert) show some
of the fun that must have been had by all. I think particularly of the piece
for six hands with Garrick Ohlsson putting his arms around Gina Bachauer and
Alicia de Larrocha.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
Kip Williams
2010-04-06 16:09:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kerrison
The whole concert was amusingly introduced by Victor Borge, and the
others involved were Shura Cherkassky, Stephen Bishop, Tamas Vasary
and John Ogdon. There were assorted solos, duets and trios, and out-of-
way arrangements. Curiously, the LP attributed Ohlsson's solo - an
arrangement of the 'Romanza' from Chopin's E minor Piano Concerto - to
Balakirev, while the concert program ascribed it to Glazunov.
For what it's worth, I do know that Balakirev has arranged that
movement. I couldn't tell you offhand whether Glazunov ever had a go at
it. (IMSLP has the Balakirev and no mention of Glazunov.)


Kip W
Kerrison
2010-04-06 17:07:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kip Williams
Post by Kerrison
The whole concert was amusingly introduced by Victor Borge, and the
others involved were Shura Cherkassky, Stephen Bishop, Tamas Vasary
and John Ogdon. There were assorted solos, duets and trios, and out-of-
way arrangements. Curiously, the LP attributed Ohlsson's solo - an
arrangement of the 'Romanza' from Chopin's E minor Piano Concerto - to
Balakirev, while the concert program ascribed it to Glazunov.
For what it's worth, I do know that Balakirev has arranged that
movement. I couldn't tell you offhand whether Glazunov ever had a go at
it. (IMSLP has the Balakirev and no mention of Glazunov.)
Kip W
As the concert program is tucked inside my copy of the LP, here are
the full details from it, with the numbers that made it to the LP
marked with an asterisk(*).

The concert started with John Lill playing 'God Save the Queen'*

Beethoven arr. Blackford: Turkish March* - Bachauer, Bolet, Darre, de
Larrocha, Lill, Lupu, Ohlsson, Vazsonyi

Albeniz-Godowsky: Tango* and Hofmann: Kaleidoskop - Cherkassky

Saint-Saens: Toccata* - Darre

Schubert: Andantino varie - Bishop and Lupu

Milhaud: Brazileira from Scaramouche - Bachauer and de Larrocha

Bartok: 4 Bulgarian Dances from Mikrokosmos* - Bishop

Liszt-Borge: 2nd Hungarian Rhapsody - Borge and Martin Goldstein

Debussy-Ravel: Fetes from Three Nocturnes* - Vasary and Vazsonyi

Dohnanyi: Capriccio in B minor - Vazsonyi

Medek: Battaglia alla Turca* - Lill and Ogdon

Chopin-Glazunov: Romanza from Piano Concerto in E minor* - Ohlsson
(see note below)

Shchedrin: Humoresque* - Lupu

W.F.E. Bach: Das Dreyblatt* - Bachauer, de Larrocha and Ohlsson

Friedman-Gaertner: Viennese Dance No. 1* - Borge

Strauss-Godowsky: Symphonic Metamorphosis on Die Fledermaus - Bolet

Apropos the Chopin arrangement: the program note (by Gregor Benko)
states "Glazunov's transcription of the Romanza was published in
1905 ... Backhaus during the first part of his career often performed
this singularly successful adaptation ..." However, it became arr.
Balakirev on the LP, so presumably the program note attributed the
arrangement to the wrong Russian.

In view of all that array of talent, it seems astonishing that the
entire concert has never yet made it to CD.
AGrey
2010-04-08 16:18:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kerrison
Post by Kip Williams
Post by Kerrison
The whole concert was amusingly introduced by Victor Borge, and the
others involved were Shura Cherkassky, Stephen Bishop, Tamas Vasary
and John Ogdon. There were assorted solos, duets and trios, and out-of-
way arrangements. Curiously, the LP attributed Ohlsson's solo - an
arrangement of the 'Romanza' from Chopin's E minor Piano Concerto - to
Balakirev, while the concert program ascribed it to Glazunov.
For what it's worth, I do know that Balakirev has arranged that
movement. I couldn't tell you offhand whether Glazunov ever had a go at
it. (IMSLP has the Balakirev and no mention of Glazunov.)
Kip W
As the concert program is tucked inside my copy of the LP, here are
the full details from it, with the numbers that made it to the LP
marked with an asterisk(*).
The concert started with John Lill playing 'God Save the Queen'*
Beethoven arr. Blackford: Turkish March* - Bachauer, Bolet, Darre, de
Larrocha, Lill, Lupu, Ohlsson, Vazsonyi
Albeniz-Godowsky: Tango* and Hofmann: Kaleidoskop - Cherkassky
Saint-Saens: Toccata* - Darre
Schubert: Andantino varie - Bishop and Lupu
Milhaud: Brazileira from Scaramouche - Bachauer and de Larrocha
Bartok: 4 Bulgarian Dances from Mikrokosmos* - Bishop
Liszt-Borge: 2nd Hungarian Rhapsody - Borge and Martin Goldstein
Debussy-Ravel: Fetes from Three Nocturnes* - Vasary and Vazsonyi
Dohnanyi: Capriccio in B minor - Vazsonyi
Medek: Battaglia alla Turca* - Lill and Ogdon
Chopin-Glazunov: Romanza from Piano Concerto in E minor* - Ohlsson
(see note below)
Shchedrin: Humoresque* - Lupu
W.F.E. Bach: Das Dreyblatt* - Bachauer, de Larrocha and Ohlsson
Friedman-Gaertner: Viennese Dance No. 1* - Borge
Strauss-Godowsky: Symphonic Metamorphosis on Die Fledermaus - Bolet
Apropos the Chopin arrangement: the program note (by Gregor Benko)
states "Glazunov's transcription of the Romanza was published in
1905 ... Backhaus during the first part of his career often performed
this singularly successful adaptation ..."  However, it became arr.
Balakirev on the LP, so presumably the program note attributed the
arrangement to the wrong Russian.
In view of all that array of talent, it seems astonishing that the
entire concert has never yet made it to CD.
Unless I'm confusing this with another occasion, and it sounds unique
so probably I'm on firm ground, this concert was shown on television
at the time. So we should be calling for a DVD release!

Alan
Kerrison
2010-04-08 17:50:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by AGrey
Post by Kerrison
Post by Kip Williams
Post by Kerrison
The whole concert was amusingly introduced by Victor Borge, and the
others involved were Shura Cherkassky, Stephen Bishop, Tamas Vasary
and John Ogdon. There were assorted solos, duets and trios, and out-of-
way arrangements. Curiously, the LP attributed Ohlsson's solo - an
arrangement of the 'Romanza' from Chopin's E minor Piano Concerto - to
Balakirev, while the concert program ascribed it to Glazunov.
For what it's worth, I do know that Balakirev has arranged that
movement. I couldn't tell you offhand whether Glazunov ever had a go at
it. (IMSLP has the Balakirev and no mention of Glazunov.)
Kip W
As the concert program is tucked inside my copy of the LP, here are
the full details from it, with the numbers that made it to the LP
marked with an asterisk(*).
The concert started with John Lill playing 'God Save the Queen'*
Beethoven arr. Blackford: Turkish March* - Bachauer, Bolet, Darre, de
Larrocha, Lill, Lupu, Ohlsson, Vazsonyi
Albeniz-Godowsky: Tango* and Hofmann: Kaleidoskop - Cherkassky
Saint-Saens: Toccata* - Darre
Schubert: Andantino varie - Bishop and Lupu
Milhaud: Brazileira from Scaramouche - Bachauer and de Larrocha
Bartok: 4 Bulgarian Dances from Mikrokosmos* - Bishop
Liszt-Borge: 2nd Hungarian Rhapsody - Borge and Martin Goldstein
Debussy-Ravel: Fetes from Three Nocturnes* - Vasary and Vazsonyi
Dohnanyi: Capriccio in B minor - Vazsonyi
Medek: Battaglia alla Turca* - Lill and Ogdon
Chopin-Glazunov: Romanza from Piano Concerto in E minor* - Ohlsson
(see note below)
Shchedrin: Humoresque* - Lupu
W.F.E. Bach: Das Dreyblatt* - Bachauer, de Larrocha and Ohlsson
Friedman-Gaertner: Viennese Dance No. 1* - Borge
Strauss-Godowsky: Symphonic Metamorphosis on Die Fledermaus - Bolet
Apropos the Chopin arrangement: the program note (by Gregor Benko)
states "Glazunov's transcription of the Romanza was published in
1905 ... Backhaus during the first part of his career often performed
this singularly successful adaptation ..."  However, it became arr.
Balakirev on the LP, so presumably the program note attributed the
arrangement to the wrong Russian.
In view of all that array of talent, it seems astonishing that the
entire concert has never yet made it to CD.
Unless I'm confusing this with another occasion, and it sounds unique
so probably I'm on firm ground, this concert was shown on television
at the time.  So we should be calling for a DVD release!
Alan- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
The London program book does ask the audience not to cough as the
concert was being recorded. There's no mention of any TV equipment
being present. However, the Desmar LP notes state that there'd been an
earlier Gala Benefit Concert in New York in 1970, so maybe that was
televised. Does anyone know if the program for that was more or less
the same as for London four years later, or did it feature different
pianists and repertoire ?
Vertizontal
2010-04-09 04:46:07 UTC
Permalink
The London concert was videotaped. There is a YouTube video of Shura
Cherkassky playing Godowsky's transcription of Albeniz's "Tango" that
was made at the concert. Cherkassky enters an pauses to shake Victor
Borge's hand. As he takes his bow following the performance, a
multitude of pianos are visible on the Festival Hall stage. At least
three cameras were used, all fading expertly into different angles
throughout the performance. It seems to have been taken from a TV
broadcast. Go to
or just
enter "Cherkassky" and "Albeniz" in the YouTube search field.

Rob McAlear
Kerrison
2010-04-09 08:10:01 UTC
Permalink
The London concert was videotaped.  There is a YouTube video of Shura
Cherkassky playing Godowsky's transcription of Albeniz's "Tango" that
was made at the concert.  Cherkassky enters an pauses to shake Victor
Borge's hand.  As he takes his bow following the performance, a
multitude of pianos are visible on the Festival Hall stage.  At least
three cameras were used, all fading expertly into different angles
throughout the performance.  It seems to have been taken from a TV
broadcast.  Go
just
enter "Cherkassky" and "Albeniz" in the YouTube search field.
Rob McAlear
Thanks for the link. Isn't it amazing what pops up on You Tube. So
this presumably means the complete concert is floating around and
could be made available on DVD. I checked this site ... www.classicalvideorarities.com
... as they have lots of pianists on DVD, including Cherkassky, though
not this particular concert. Let's hope they get hold of it somehow.
Kerrison
2010-04-09 08:19:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kerrison
The London concert was videotaped.  There is a YouTube video of Shura
Cherkassky playing Godowsky's transcription of Albeniz's "Tango" that
was made at the concert.  Cherkassky enters an pauses to shake Victor
Borge's hand.  As he takes his bow following the performance, a
multitude of pianos are visible on the Festival Hall stage.  At least
three cameras were used, all fading expertly into different angles
throughout the performance.  It seems to have been taken from a TV
broadcast.  Go

enter "Cherkassky" and "Albeniz" in the YouTube search field.
Rob McAlear
Thanks for the link. Isn't it amazing what pops up on You Tube. So
this presumably means the complete concert is floating around and
could be made available on DVD. I checked this site ...www.classicalvideorarities.com
... as they have lots of pianists on DVD, including Cherkassky, though
not this particular concert. Let's hope they get hold of it somehow.
That Classical Video Rarities link didn't work for some reason, so try
this one ...

http://www.classicalvideorarities.com/store/
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-04-09 14:32:35 UTC
Permalink
Vertizontal <***@shaw.ca> appears to have caused the following letters
to be typed in news:4fd7c426-d199-43e2-be0e-
Post by Vertizontal
The London concert was videotaped. There is a YouTube video of Shura
Cherkassky playing Godowsky's transcription of Albeniz's "Tango" that
was made at the concert. Cherkassky enters an pauses to shake Victor
Borge's hand. As he takes his bow following the performance, a
multitude of pianos are visible on the Festival Hall stage. At least
three cameras were used, all fading expertly into different angles
throughout the performance. It seems to have been taken from a TV
broadcast. Go to http://youtu.be/NFvte8WCqYE or just
enter "Cherkassky" and "Albeniz" in the YouTube search field.
Rob McAlear
Thanks for this reference. And by the way, long time no see!
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
francis
2010-04-10 21:42:24 UTC
Permalink
The entire IPA London Benefit, as noted, was telecast--including the
concluding forgettable Bolet Godowsky Fledermaus. Everyone was
disappointed, Jorge most of all, and it was decided to leave it off
the original Desmar LP. The unforgettable aspects of the concert
include Radu Lupu's hilarious performance of Schedrin's Humoresque--
which he performed in the character of a drunk--staggering onstage
from the wings and playing the first note as he landed, hard; on the
bench and the almost as hilarious six-hands performance of of W.F.E.
Bach's piece by DeLarrocha, Bachauer, and reaching, mostly
unsuccessfully, around, through and over the ladies, Garrick Ohlsson.
The most musically distinguished performances, I think, were
Cherkassky's, Ohlsson's of the Chopin arrangement and Borge of the
Viennese Dance--which he played straight and with a tone as beautiful
as any heard that evening.

FC
r***@gmail.com
2012-08-13 03:31:33 UTC
Permalink
Reviving an old thread ...

Three more YouTube videos featuring excerpts from this concert have been posted:

Gina Bachauer and Alicia de Larrocha playing "Brazilera" from Milhaud's "Scaramouche"


WFE Bach's "Das Dreyblatt" for 6 hands, played by Alicia de Larrocha, Gina Bachauer and Garrick Ohlsson (very much worth a peek)


2 performances of Beethoven's "Turkish March" from "The Ruins of Athens", arranged by Richard Blackford for 8 pianos, played by Gina Bachauer, Jorge Bolet, Jeanne-Marie Darré, Alicia De Larrocha, John Lill, Radu Lupu, Garrick Ohlsson and Bálint Vázsonyi.


Rob McAlear
Kerrison
2012-08-13 18:31:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by r***@gmail.com
Reviving an old thread ...
Gina Bachauer and Alicia de Larrocha playing "Brazilera" from Milhaud's http://youtu.be/0s7oPaNk0oI
WFE Bach's "Das Dreyblatt" for 6 hands, played by Alicia de Larrocha, Gina Bachauer and Garrick Ohlsson (very much worth a http://youtu.be/HNjJYxsPrXU
2 performances of Beethoven's "Turkish March" from "The Ruins of Athens", arranged by Richard Blackford for 8 pianos, played by Gina Bachauer, Jorge Bolet, Jeanne-Marie Darré, Alicia De Larrocha, John Lill, Radu Lupu, Garrick Ohlsson and Bálint http://youtu.be/NeUovGDZoj0
Rob McAlear
Thanks for the up-date. One of the clips was introduced by John Amis,
a long-time BBC broadcaster who recently celebrated his 90th birthday,
so that makes You Tube's source a BBC Television relay of the concert.
Arthur Shapiro
2012-08-13 20:49:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kerrison
Thanks for the up-date. One of the clips was introduced by John Amis,
a long-time BBC broadcaster who recently celebrated his 90th birthday,
How nice! I wasn't aware that any of the panelists from "My Music" were still
alive.

Art
Kerrison
2012-08-13 21:13:37 UTC
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Post by Kerrison
Thanks for the up-date. One of the clips was introduced by John Amis,
a long-time BBC broadcaster who recently celebrated his 90th birthday,
How nice!  I wasn't aware that any of the panelists from "My Music" were still
alive.
Art
Not only alive at 90 but busy blogging ! ...

http://johnamismusic.blogspot.co.uk/

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