Discussion:
CD availability
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John Hood
2020-10-29 03:54:34 UTC
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Permalink
Hi, somebody wrote that CDs are passe. I am beginning to think they are
right. I've had a string quartet blog since April 2016 and my
experiences are as follows.

I used to regularly search for string quartets on Amazon US and UK,
sorted by arrival date, so that I could see the new releases. In 2016, a
search for 'string quartets' used to return 400 page of results, and
that 400 was an abitrary programmer limit, not an actual limit.

Now when I search, I get 40 pages, a lot of which are filled with
downloads, that is 10-15 hits for one CD which may or may not still be
available on on CD. It also includes a lot of tired old vinyl from
Amazon resellers.

This tells me that when a CD is unavailable, Amazon is not particularly
interested in keeping download MP3 versions of their catalogue.

Presto Classical does have quite a few downloads, but it is miniscule in
the overall scheme of things.

If 40 pages is the new normal, my question is where or whither CDS?
Where will they be in another four years time?

FWIW the number of new string quartet releases is pitifully small.

JH
weary flake
2020-10-29 05:28:50 UTC
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Permalink
Post by John Hood
Hi, somebody wrote that CDs are passe. I am beginning to think they are
right. I've had a string quartet blog since April 2016 and my
experiences are as follows.
I used to regularly search for string quartets on Amazon US and UK,
sorted by arrival date, so that I could see the new releases. In 2016,
a search for 'string quartets' used to return 400 page of results, and
that 400 was an abitrary programmer limit, not an actual limit.
Now when I search, I get 40 pages, a lot of which are filled with
downloads, that is 10-15 hits for one CD which may or may not still be
available on on CD. It also includes a lot of tired old vinyl from
Amazon resellers.
This tells me that when a CD is unavailable, Amazon is not particularly
interested in keeping download MP3 versions of their catalogue.
Presto Classical does have quite a few downloads, but it is miniscule
in the overall scheme of things.
If 40 pages is the new normal, my question is where or whither CDS?
Where will they be in another four years time?
FWIW the number of new string quartet releases is pitifully small.
The new normal is that searching at amazon is unreliable;
it has low quality engineering. It's bad at searching
for something even that you already know about about, you may
need a UPC number to enter in the search field to
find it at amazon, and amazon prefers to conceal UPC numbers
and catalog numbers. For finding other things, it steers
you away from what things you're looking for. It has removed
most sound samples, eliminated search fields, like for label,
made reviews unseparable when they are multiple products
jammed together, it shows wildly inaccurate results when you
try to sort by product date, deleted millions of forum posts, etc.

I get at amazon.com:

1-16 of over 60,000 results for Digital Music : ""string quartet""
1-16 of over 10,000 results for CDs & Vinyl : ""string quartet""

Of course the results are typically a mess and the sorting
is frequently broken. It has also eliminated easily finding
the end of the list, and requires paging from the beginning.
These are mostly new amazon defiencies that are the new normal.
The state of the CD format, downloads, and String Quartet
recordings cannot be determined by searching at amazon (or
arkivmusic.com, by the way).
John Hood
2020-10-29 07:14:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by weary flake
Post by John Hood
Hi, somebody wrote that CDs are passe. I am beginning to think they
are right. I've had a string quartet blog since April 2016 and my
experiences are as follows.
I used to regularly search for string quartets on Amazon US and UK,
sorted by arrival date, so that I could see the new releases. In 2016,
a search for 'string quartets' used to return 400 page of results, and
that 400 was an abitrary programmer limit, not an actual limit.
Now when I search, I get 40 pages, a lot of which are filled with
downloads, that is 10-15 hits for one CD which may or may not still be
available on on CD. It also includes a lot of tired old vinyl from
Amazon resellers.
This tells me that when a CD is unavailable, Amazon is not
particularly interested in keeping download MP3 versions of their
catalogue.
Presto Classical does have quite a few downloads, but it is miniscule
in the overall scheme of things.
If 40 pages is the new normal, my question is where or whither CDS?
Where will they be in another four years time?
FWIW the number of new string quartet releases is pitifully small.
The new normal is that searching at amazon is unreliable;
it has low quality engineering.  It's bad at searching
for something even that you already know about about, you may
need a UPC number to enter in the search field to
find it at amazon, and amazon prefers to conceal UPC numbers
and catalog numbers.  For finding other things, it steers
you away from what things you're looking for.  It has removed
most sound samples, eliminated search fields, like for label,
made reviews unseparable when they are multiple products
jammed together, it shows wildly inaccurate results when you
try to sort by product date, deleted millions of forum posts, etc.
1-16 of over 60,000 results for Digital Music : ""string quartet""
1-16 of over 10,000 results for CDs & Vinyl : ""string quartet""
Of course the results are typically a mess and the sorting
is frequently broken.  It has also eliminated easily finding
the end of the list, and requires paging from the beginning.
These are mostly new amazon defiencies that are the new normal.
The state of the CD format, downloads, and String Quartet
recordings cannot be determined by searching at amazon (or
arkivmusic.com, by the way).
That's amazing. I have used "" on Google searches before and find that
satisfactory.

Amazon have obviously changed the way things worth - now I'm back to
scrolling through 70,000 results for my blog purposes.

Thank you,

JH
John Hood
2020-10-29 07:31:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by weary flake
Post by John Hood
Hi, somebody wrote that CDs are passe. I am beginning to think they
are right. I've had a string quartet blog since April 2016 and my
experiences are as follows.
I used to regularly search for string quartets on Amazon US and UK,
sorted by arrival date, so that I could see the new releases. In 2016,
a search for 'string quartets' used to return 400 page of results, and
that 400 was an abitrary programmer limit, not an actual limit.
Now when I search, I get 40 pages, a lot of which are filled with
downloads, that is 10-15 hits for one CD which may or may not still be
available on on CD. It also includes a lot of tired old vinyl from
Amazon resellers.
This tells me that when a CD is unavailable, Amazon is not
particularly interested in keeping download MP3 versions of their
catalogue.
Presto Classical does have quite a few downloads, but it is miniscule
in the overall scheme of things.
If 40 pages is the new normal, my question is where or whither CDS?
Where will they be in another four years time?
FWIW the number of new string quartet releases is pitifully small.
The new normal is that searching at amazon is unreliable;
it has low quality engineering.  It's bad at searching
for something even that you already know about about, you may
need a UPC number to enter in the search field to
find it at amazon, and amazon prefers to conceal UPC numbers
and catalog numbers.  For finding other things, it steers
you away from what things you're looking for.  It has removed
most sound samples, eliminated search fields, like for label,
made reviews unseparable when they are multiple products
jammed together, it shows wildly inaccurate results when you
try to sort by product date, deleted millions of forum posts, etc.
1-16 of over 60,000 results for Digital Music : ""string quartet""
1-16 of over 10,000 results for CDs & Vinyl : ""string quartet""
Of course the results are typically a mess and the sorting
is frequently broken.  It has also eliminated easily finding
the end of the list, and requires paging from the beginning.
These are mostly new amazon defiencies that are the new normal.
The state of the CD format, downloads, and String Quartet
recordings cannot be determined by searching at amazon (or
arkivmusic.com, by the way).
I just realised that while Amazon records 70,000 results, it only lets
you view 20 pages worth. I wonder who made that decision - 40 lashes are
in order!

JH
Bob Harper
2020-10-29 17:10:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Hood
Post by weary flake
Post by John Hood
Hi, somebody wrote that CDs are passe. I am beginning to think they
are right. I've had a string quartet blog since April 2016 and my
experiences are as follows.
I used to regularly search for string quartets on Amazon US and UK,
sorted by arrival date, so that I could see the new releases. In
2016, a search for 'string quartets' used to return 400 page of
results, and that 400 was an abitrary programmer limit, not an actual
limit.
Now when I search, I get 40 pages, a lot of which are filled with
downloads, that is 10-15 hits for one CD which may or may not still
be available on on CD. It also includes a lot of tired old vinyl from
Amazon resellers.
This tells me that when a CD is unavailable, Amazon is not
particularly interested in keeping download MP3 versions of their
catalogue.
Presto Classical does have quite a few downloads, but it is miniscule
in the overall scheme of things.
If 40 pages is the new normal, my question is where or whither CDS?
Where will they be in another four years time?
FWIW the number of new string quartet releases is pitifully small.
The new normal is that searching at amazon is unreliable;
it has low quality engineering.  It's bad at searching
for something even that you already know about about, you may
need a UPC number to enter in the search field to
find it at amazon, and amazon prefers to conceal UPC numbers
and catalog numbers.  For finding other things, it steers
you away from what things you're looking for.  It has removed
most sound samples, eliminated search fields, like for label,
made reviews unseparable when they are multiple products
jammed together, it shows wildly inaccurate results when you
try to sort by product date, deleted millions of forum posts, etc.
1-16 of over 60,000 results for Digital Music : ""string quartet""
1-16 of over 10,000 results for CDs & Vinyl : ""string quartet""
Of course the results are typically a mess and the sorting
is frequently broken.  It has also eliminated easily finding
the end of the list, and requires paging from the beginning.
These are mostly new amazon defiencies that are the new normal.
The state of the CD format, downloads, and String Quartet
recordings cannot be determined by searching at amazon (or
arkivmusic.com, by the way).
I just realised that while Amazon records 70,000 results, it only lets
you view 20 pages worth. I wonder who made that decision - 40 lashes are
in order!
JH
The notion that Amazon gives a d--n about classical music is risible.
Getting rid of catalog and UPC numbers, eschewing sound samples, and
doing nothing about the mess that is the usually found in the reviews
are the actions of a monopolist that could care less about your
concerns. I don't see a solution.

Bob Harper
Herman
2020-10-31 09:32:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bob Harper
Post by John Hood
Post by weary flake
Post by John Hood
Hi, somebody wrote that CDs are passe. I am beginning to think they
are right. I've had a string quartet blog since April 2016 and my
experiences are as follows.
I used to regularly search for string quartets on Amazon US and UK,
sorted by arrival date, so that I could see the new releases. In
2016, a search for 'string quartets' used to return 400 page of
results, and that 400 was an abitrary programmer limit, not an actual
limit.
Now when I search, I get 40 pages, a lot of which are filled with
downloads, that is 10-15 hits for one CD which may or may not still
be available on on CD. It also includes a lot of tired old vinyl from
Amazon resellers.
This tells me that when a CD is unavailable, Amazon is not
particularly interested in keeping download MP3 versions of their
catalogue.
Presto Classical does have quite a few downloads, but it is miniscule
in the overall scheme of things.
If 40 pages is the new normal, my question is where or whither CDS?
Where will they be in another four years time?
FWIW the number of new string quartet releases is pitifully small.
The new normal is that searching at amazon is unreliable;
it has low quality engineering. It's bad at searching
for something even that you already know about about, you may
need a UPC number to enter in the search field to
find it at amazon, and amazon prefers to conceal UPC numbers
and catalog numbers. For finding other things, it steers
you away from what things you're looking for. It has removed
most sound samples, eliminated search fields, like for label,
made reviews unseparable when they are multiple products
jammed together, it shows wildly inaccurate results when you
try to sort by product date, deleted millions of forum posts, etc.
1-16 of over 60,000 results for Digital Music : ""string quartet""
1-16 of over 10,000 results for CDs & Vinyl : ""string quartet""
Of course the results are typically a mess and the sorting
is frequently broken. It has also eliminated easily finding
the end of the list, and requires paging from the beginning.
These are mostly new amazon defiencies that are the new normal.
The state of the CD format, downloads, and String Quartet
recordings cannot be determined by searching at amazon (or
arkivmusic.com, by the way).
I just realised that while Amazon records 70,000 results, it only lets
you view 20 pages worth. I wonder who made that decision - 40 lashes are
in order!
JH
The notion that Amazon gives a d--n about classical music is risible.
Getting rid of catalog and UPC numbers, eschewing sound samples, and
doing nothing about the mess that is the usually found in the reviews
are the actions of a monopolist that could care less about your
concerns. I don't see a solution.
Bob Harper
Obviously more frequent use of the word "eschewing" will make Bezos reconsider.
Bob Harper
2020-10-31 14:48:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Herman
Post by Bob Harper
Post by John Hood
Post by weary flake
Post by John Hood
Hi, somebody wrote that CDs are passe. I am beginning to think they
are right. I've had a string quartet blog since April 2016 and my
experiences are as follows.
I used to regularly search for string quartets on Amazon US and UK,
sorted by arrival date, so that I could see the new releases. In
2016, a search for 'string quartets' used to return 400 page of
results, and that 400 was an abitrary programmer limit, not an actual
limit.
Now when I search, I get 40 pages, a lot of which are filled with
downloads, that is 10-15 hits for one CD which may or may not still
be available on on CD. It also includes a lot of tired old vinyl from
Amazon resellers.
This tells me that when a CD is unavailable, Amazon is not
particularly interested in keeping download MP3 versions of their
catalogue.
Presto Classical does have quite a few downloads, but it is miniscule
in the overall scheme of things.
If 40 pages is the new normal, my question is where or whither CDS?
Where will they be in another four years time?
FWIW the number of new string quartet releases is pitifully small.
The new normal is that searching at amazon is unreliable;
it has low quality engineering. It's bad at searching
for something even that you already know about about, you may
need a UPC number to enter in the search field to
find it at amazon, and amazon prefers to conceal UPC numbers
and catalog numbers. For finding other things, it steers
you away from what things you're looking for. It has removed
most sound samples, eliminated search fields, like for label,
made reviews unseparable when they are multiple products
jammed together, it shows wildly inaccurate results when you
try to sort by product date, deleted millions of forum posts, etc.
1-16 of over 60,000 results for Digital Music : ""string quartet""
1-16 of over 10,000 results for CDs & Vinyl : ""string quartet""
Of course the results are typically a mess and the sorting
is frequently broken. It has also eliminated easily finding
the end of the list, and requires paging from the beginning.
These are mostly new amazon defiencies that are the new normal.
The state of the CD format, downloads, and String Quartet
recordings cannot be determined by searching at amazon (or
arkivmusic.com, by the way).
I just realised that while Amazon records 70,000 results, it only lets
you view 20 pages worth. I wonder who made that decision - 40 lashes are
in order!
JH
The notion that Amazon gives a d--n about classical music is risible.
Getting rid of catalog and UPC numbers, eschewing sound samples, and
doing nothing about the mess that is the usually found in the reviews
are the actions of a monopolist that could care less about your
concerns. I don't see a solution.
Bob Harper
Obviously more frequent use of the word "eschewing" will make Bezos reconsider.
I doubt it, but what have you against an appropriate word, other than
tha it is relatively uncommon?

Bob Harper
Al Eisner
2020-11-01 22:53:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by weary flake
Post by John Hood
Hi, somebody wrote that CDs are passe. I am beginning to think they are
right. I've had a string quartet blog since April 2016 and my experiences
are as follows.
I used to regularly search for string quartets on Amazon US and UK, sorted
by arrival date, so that I could see the new releases. In 2016, a search
for 'string quartets' used to return 400 page of results, and that 400 was
an abitrary programmer limit, not an actual limit.
Now when I search, I get 40 pages, a lot of which are filled with
downloads, that is 10-15 hits for one CD which may or may not still be
available on on CD. It also includes a lot of tired old vinyl from Amazon
resellers.
This tells me that when a CD is unavailable, Amazon is not particularly
interested in keeping download MP3 versions of their catalogue.
Presto Classical does have quite a few downloads, but it is miniscule in
the overall scheme of things.
If 40 pages is the new normal, my question is where or whither CDS? Where
will they be in another four years time?
FWIW the number of new string quartet releases is pitifully small.
The new normal is that searching at amazon is unreliable;
it has low quality engineering.  It's bad at searching
for something even that you already know about about, you may
need a UPC number to enter in the search field to
find it at amazon, and amazon prefers to conceal UPC numbers
and catalog numbers.  For finding other things, it steers
you away from what things you're looking for.  It has removed
most sound samples, eliminated search fields, like for label,
made reviews unseparable when they are multiple products
jammed together, it shows wildly inaccurate results when you
try to sort by product date, deleted millions of forum posts, etc.
1-16 of over 60,000 results for Digital Music : ""string quartet""
1-16 of over 10,000 results for CDs & Vinyl : ""string quartet""
Of course the results are typically a mess and the sorting
is frequently broken.  It has also eliminated easily finding
the end of the list, and requires paging from the beginning.
These are mostly new amazon defiencies that are the new normal.
The state of the CD format, downloads, and String Quartet
recordings cannot be determined by searching at amazon (or
arkivmusic.com, by the way).
I just realised that while Amazon records 70,000 results, it only lets you
view 20 pages worth. I wonder who made that decision - 40 lashes are in
order!
JH
When I enter string quartet (with or without "") in category "Classical"
(which refers to CDs and vinyl, not to digital music) I get "over 6000"
hits. One can get to pages beyond 20, but 221 does not appear as an
option until one gets to 20, and so on. Of course stepping by single
pages is very tedious, but one can directly get to any page (if you can
figure out any reason to do so). Once you get to page 2, you will see
a page=2 string in the URL; just edit it to any page you want.

This is of course not to excuse the other search deficiencies.
--
Al Eisner
Mr. Mike
2020-10-30 05:05:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by weary flake
The new normal is that searching at amazon is unreliable;
it has low quality engineering. It's bad at searching
for something even that you already know about about, you may
need a UPC number to enter in the search field to
find it at amazon, and amazon prefers to conceal UPC numbers
and catalog numbers. For finding other things, it steers
you away from what things you're looking for. It has removed
most sound samples, eliminated search fields, like for label,
made reviews unseparable when they are multiple products
jammed together, it shows wildly inaccurate results when you
try to sort by product date, deleted millions of forum posts, etc.
Amazon's search engine is garbage. It often won't find what you are
looking for, instead bringing up things that are related (same
composer, artist or whatever) or not related at all.

A lot of the problems with Amazon searches result from third-party
sellers uploading their inventory which is stored in Excel or similar
files where the way they have things categorized can be totally
different from the way that the default listing for an item has been
created by Amazon itself.

As a result, if the default listing is Symphonie Fantastique by
Berlioz with (Colin Davis) as conductor, you will get other listings
like Berlioz Symphonie Davis, Berlioz Symphony, Symphony Davis --
Berlioz, etc., and each one of these will be a separate product
listing.

Considering Amazon uses an icon for Google Chromecast with their Prime
Video app, for which I'm sure they're paying Google some royalty, I
don't know why they just can't admit defeat and pay Google to use
their search engine, where you can be pretty slack typing things, even
with spelling mistakes, and it will still find what you want.

There is yet more stupidity with Amazon searching and other things
too.

Have you noticed that some items don't have prices, giving the
impression they are not available -- until you click on them, only to
see the price is some absurd amount? Also, feedback on Amazon is
limited to a very small amount of items per page because they don't
want you to see feedback without a lot of hassle going page by page --
unlike with Ebay where you can easily break down the feedback into
positive, neutral or negative numbers and jump immediately to all of
the last.

Recently I had to ask questions of some US-based seller of classical
CDs because his shipping to Canada was $109.00 on many of his items,
which is absurd. I had to enter responses to questions through some
stupid interface which were then sent to the seller. He replied to me
and there was a link which said "Did this solve your problem?" When I
said "No," I was taken to another page where it suggested I should
leave feedback for himr, even though we had not had any business yet.
In order to follow-up his response to my original question, I had to
do a whole new inquiry.
Vanessa Lann
2020-10-30 11:41:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Hi all,

So what would you suggest to composers like myself who have had cd's made (including recordings of our music), but which can not be found on Amazon.com or other online shops? Five years ago a compilation was made of 7 of my works by various amazing musicians on the Attacca label. "moonshadow sunshadow" is the name of the cd (and of a 9-minute violin duo of mine on the cd). I went to Amazon.com, and they are out of stock. I can't even find it on other sites. Presto, Archiv, etc. Other Cd's with one or two pieces of mine (like my "Inner Piece" recorded by pianist Tomoko Mukaiyama on her cd 'Women Composers') are unavailable for less than $70!

In these unprecedented times, where live performances of our (our = living composers) music are not-frequently-happening, it would be so wonderful to have ease-of-access to recordings on line...

Feeling frustrated...

Thanks for thoughts!

Vanessa Lann
- website: www.lann.dds.nl
Post by Mr. Mike
Post by weary flake
The new normal is that searching at amazon is unreliable;
it has low quality engineering. It's bad at searching
for something even that you already know about about, you may
need a UPC number to enter in the search field to
find it at amazon, and amazon prefers to conceal UPC numbers
and catalog numbers. For finding other things, it steers
you away from what things you're looking for. It has removed
most sound samples, eliminated search fields, like for label,
made reviews unseparable when they are multiple products
jammed together, it shows wildly inaccurate results when you
try to sort by product date, deleted millions of forum posts, etc.
Amazon's search engine is garbage. It often won't find what you are
looking for, instead bringing up things that are related (same
composer, artist or whatever) or not related at all.
A lot of the problems with Amazon searches result from third-party
sellers uploading their inventory which is stored in Excel or similar
files where the way they have things categorized can be totally
different from the way that the default listing for an item has been
created by Amazon itself.
As a result, if the default listing is Symphonie Fantastique by
Berlioz with (Colin Davis) as conductor, you will get other listings
like Berlioz Symphonie Davis, Berlioz Symphony, Symphony Davis --
Berlioz, etc., and each one of these will be a separate product
listing.
Considering Amazon uses an icon for Google Chromecast with their Prime
Video app, for which I'm sure they're paying Google some royalty, I
don't know why they just can't admit defeat and pay Google to use
their search engine, where you can be pretty slack typing things, even
with spelling mistakes, and it will still find what you want.
There is yet more stupidity with Amazon searching and other things
too.
Have you noticed that some items don't have prices, giving the
impression they are not available -- until you click on them, only to
see the price is some absurd amount? Also, feedback on Amazon is
limited to a very small amount of items per page because they don't
want you to see feedback without a lot of hassle going page by page --
unlike with Ebay where you can easily break down the feedback into
positive, neutral or negative numbers and jump immediately to all of
the last.
Recently I had to ask questions of some US-based seller of classical
CDs because his shipping to Canada was $109.00 on many of his items,
which is absurd. I had to enter responses to questions through some
stupid interface which were then sent to the seller. He replied to me
and there was a link which said "Did this solve your problem?" When I
said "No," I was taken to another page where it suggested I should
leave feedback for himr, even though we had not had any business yet.
In order to follow-up his response to my original question, I had to
do a whole new inquiry.
Frank Berger
2020-10-30 12:17:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vanessa Lann
Hi all,
So what would you suggest to composers like myself who have had cd's made (including recordings of our music), but which can not be found on Amazon.com or other online shops? Five years ago a compilation was made of 7 of my works by various amazing musicians on the Attacca label. "moonshadow sunshadow" is the name of the cd (and of a 9-minute violin duo of mine on the cd). I went to Amazon.com, and they are out of stock. I can't even find it on other sites. Presto, Archiv, etc. Other Cd's with one or two pieces of mine (like my "Inner Piece" recorded by pianist Tomoko Mukaiyama on her cd 'Women Composers') are unavailable for less than $70!
In these unprecedented times, where live performances of our (our = living composers) music are not-frequently-happening, it would be so wonderful to have ease-of-access to recordings on line...
Feeling frustrated...
Thanks for thoughts!
Vanessa Lann
- website: www.lann.dds.nl
When I search for "moonshadow sunshadow" it comes up on a
page with Jerry Lee Lewis' Essential Hits. That's pretty
good company.

With all due respect, a CD that must have had limited sales
(am I wrong?) that was published 5 years ago, I would expect
to be out of print by now. "Out of stock" often means "out
of print." The absence on Presto, etc. probably confirms
that. Why are you surprised? Do you make some money from
the mp3 downloads that are available?

Regarding the $70 Women Composers CD. The two listing are
used copies. Sellers can ask what they want. If they can
sell it at that price is good for you, in that in indicates
an interest in your work!

Keep creating!
Al Eisner
2020-11-01 23:52:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vanessa Lann
Hi all,
So what would you suggest to composers like myself who have had cd's made (including recordings of our music), but which can not be found on Amazon.com or other online shops? Five years ago a compilation was made of 7 of my works by various amazing musicians on the Attacca label. "moonshadow sunshadow" is the name of the cd (and of a 9-minute violin duo of mine on the cd). I went to Amazon.com, and they are out of stock. I can't even find it on other sites. Presto, Archiv, etc. Other Cd's with one or two pieces of mine (like my "Inner Piece" recorded by pianist Tomoko Mukaiyama on her cd 'Women Composers') are unavailable for less than $70!
In these unprecedented times, where live performances of our (our = living composers) music are not-frequently-happening, it would be so wonderful to have ease-of-access to recordings on line...
Feeling frustrated...
Thanks for thoughts!
Vanessa Lann
- website: www.lann.dds.nl
Just enter "moonshadow sunshadow" into Google search. There are a
bunch of places for listening (including youtube and spotify). It can
be bought at the iTunes store for about $10. I didn't slog through
enough of the hits to tellif the actual CD exists anywhere. I haven;t
listened to any of it, but am intrigued, particularly because one
of your performers is Liza Ferschtmannm a terrific violinist.
--
Al Eisner
Vanessa Lann
2020-11-02 14:43:59 UTC
Reply
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Hi Al,

Thanks for your response and positive vibe! I actually wrote the violin duo "moonshadow sunshadow" on commission from Liza Ferschtman, who I agree is an AMAZING musician! (I had also written for her and the pianist Inon Barnatan earlier, but that's not recorded)

I am going to do what you said, and it does make me feel better that it's not so hard to find if you know where to look.

I had been kind of judging everything by Amazon...

Best wishes,
Vanessa Lann
Post by Vanessa Lann
Hi all,
So what would you suggest to composers like myself who have had cd's made (including recordings of our music), but which can not be found on Amazon.com or other online shops? Five years ago a compilation was made of 7 of my works by various amazing musicians on the Attacca label. "moonshadow sunshadow" is the name of the cd (and of a 9-minute violin duo of mine on the cd). I went to Amazon.com, and they are out of stock. I can't even find it on other sites. Presto, Archiv, etc. Other Cd's with one or two pieces of mine (like my "Inner Piece" recorded by pianist Tomoko Mukaiyama on her cd 'Women Composers') are unavailable for less than $70!
In these unprecedented times, where live performances of our (our = living composers) music are not-frequently-happening, it would be so wonderful to have ease-of-access to recordings on line...
Feeling frustrated...
Thanks for thoughts!
Vanessa Lann
- website: www.lann.dds.nl
Just enter "moonshadow sunshadow" into Google search. There are a
bunch of places for listening (including youtube and spotify). It can
be bought at the iTunes store for about $10. I didn't slog through
enough of the hits to tellif the actual CD exists anywhere. I haven;t
listened to any of it, but am intrigued, particularly because one
of your performers is Liza Ferschtmannm a terrific violinist.
--
Al Eisner
f***@yahoo.com
2020-10-31 15:53:21 UTC
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Post by Mr. Mike
Post by weary flake
The new normal is that searching at amazon is unreliable;
it has low quality engineering. It's bad at searching
for something even that you already know about about, you may
need a UPC number to enter in the search field to
find it at amazon, and amazon prefers to conceal UPC numbers
and catalog numbers. For finding other things, it steers
you away from what things you're looking for. It has removed
most sound samples, eliminated search fields, like for label,
made reviews unseparable when they are multiple products
jammed together, it shows wildly inaccurate results when you
try to sort by product date, deleted millions of forum posts, etc.
Amazon's search engine is garbage. It often won't find what you are
looking for, instead bringing up things that are related (same
composer, artist or whatever) or not related at all.
A lot of the problems with Amazon searches result from third-party
sellers uploading their inventory which is stored in Excel or similar
files where the way they have things categorized can be totally
different from the way that the default listing for an item has been
created by Amazon itself.
As a result, if the default listing is Symphonie Fantastique by
Berlioz with (Colin Davis) as conductor, you will get other listings
like Berlioz Symphonie Davis, Berlioz Symphony, Symphony Davis --
Berlioz, etc., and each one of these will be a separate product
listing.
Considering Amazon uses an icon for Google Chromecast with their Prime
Video app, for which I'm sure they're paying Google some royalty, I
don't know why they just can't admit defeat and pay Google to use
their search engine, where you can be pretty slack typing things, even
with spelling mistakes, and it will still find what you want.
There is yet more stupidity with Amazon searching and other things
too.
Have you noticed that some items don't have prices, giving the
impression they are not available -- until you click on them, only to
see the price is some absurd amount? Also, feedback on Amazon is
limited to a very small amount of items per page because they don't
want you to see feedback without a lot of hassle going page by page --
unlike with Ebay where you can easily break down the feedback into
positive, neutral or negative numbers and jump immediately to all of
the last.
Recently I had to ask questions of some US-based seller of classical
CDs because his shipping to Canada was $109.00 on many of his items,
which is absurd. I had to enter responses to questions through some
stupid interface which were then sent to the seller. He replied to me
and there was a link which said "Did this solve your problem?" When I
said "No," I was taken to another page where it suggested I should
leave feedback for himr, even though we had not had any business yet.
In order to follow-up his response to my original question, I had to
do a whole new inquiry.
I don't think amazon is going to give up their own search in favor of a 3rd party one. I have several friends working in amazon who tell me that their search has been "improved" over the last few years, and those improvements has led to more revenue for amazon overall. Classical music buyers don't really make a dent in their business.
weary flake
2020-11-12 19:28:35 UTC
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Post by f***@yahoo.com
I have several friends working in amazon who tell me that their search
has been "improved" over the last few years, and those improvements has
led to more revenue for amazon overall. Classical music buyers don't
really make a dent in their business.
Amazon has not only a weak search for classical, but also
other music, books, DVDs, etc. A classic book may have hundreds
of editions with 20 years of hundreds of reviews, and up to a few
months ago you could search all reviews and match the edition
with the reviews for that specific edition; now there's no way
to match positive or negative reviews with a particular edition.
Amazon has degraded. And since people who work for Amazon are
forbidden to criticize the company, their defensive statements
of Amazon are not reliable.
Frank Berger
2020-11-12 20:41:35 UTC
Reply
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Post by weary flake
Post by f***@yahoo.com
I have several friends working in amazon who tell me that
their search has been "improved" over the last few years,
and those improvements has led to more revenue for amazon
overall. Classical music buyers don't really make a dent
in their business.
Amazon has not only a weak search for classical, but also
other music, books, DVDs, etc.  A classic book may have
hundreds
of editions with 20 years of hundreds of reviews, and up to
a few
months ago you could search all reviews and match the edition
with the reviews for that specific edition; now there's no way
to match positive or negative reviews with a particular
edition.
Amazon has degraded.  And since people who work for Amazon are
forbidden to criticize the company, their defensive statements
of Amazon are not reliable.
Probably no more or less reliable than Amazon product reviews.

weary flake
2020-11-06 02:13:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mr. Mike
Post by weary flake
The new normal is that searching at amazon is unreliable;
it has low quality engineering. It's bad at searching
for something even that you already know about about, you may
need a UPC number to enter in the search field to
find it at amazon, and amazon prefers to conceal UPC numbers
and catalog numbers. For finding other things, it steers
you away from what things you're looking for. It has removed
most sound samples, eliminated search fields, like for label,
made reviews unseparable when they are multiple products
jammed together, it shows wildly inaccurate results when you
try to sort by product date, deleted millions of forum posts, etc.
Amazon's search engine is garbage. It often won't find what you are
looking for, instead bringing up things that are related (same
composer, artist or whatever) or not related at all.
A lot of the problems with Amazon searches result from third-party
sellers uploading their inventory which is stored in Excel or similar
files where the way they have things categorized can be totally
different from the way that the default listing for an item has been
created by Amazon itself.
As a result, if the default listing is Symphonie Fantastique by
Berlioz with (Colin Davis) as conductor, you will get other listings
like Berlioz Symphonie Davis, Berlioz Symphony, Symphony Davis --
Berlioz, etc., and each one of these will be a separate product
listing.
Considering Amazon uses an icon for Google Chromecast with their Prime
Video app, for which I'm sure they're paying Google some royalty, I
don't know why they just can't admit defeat and pay Google to use
their search engine, where you can be pretty slack typing things, even
with spelling mistakes, and it will still find what you want.
There is yet more stupidity with Amazon searching and other things
too.
Have you noticed that some items don't have prices, giving the
impression they are not available -- until you click on them, only to
see the price is some absurd amount? Also, feedback on Amazon is
limited to a very small amount of items per page because they don't
want you to see feedback without a lot of hassle going page by page --
unlike with Ebay where you can easily break down the feedback into
positive, neutral or negative numbers and jump immediately to all of
the last.
Recently I had to ask questions of some US-based seller of classical
CDs because his shipping to Canada was $109.00 on many of his items,
which is absurd. I had to enter responses to questions through some
stupid interface which were then sent to the seller. He replied to me
and there was a link which said "Did this solve your problem?" When I
said "No," I was taken to another page where it suggested I should
leave feedback for himr, even though we had not had any business yet.
In order to follow-up his response to my original question, I had to
do a whole new inquiry.
I've just found that amazon.co.jp gives UPC numbers in their
product descriptions, listed as EAN. So to shop other amazons may
require searching at amazon Japan to found out UPC numbers if there's
a better description there. All amazons allow searching by UPC.
Andrew Clarke
2020-10-29 05:33:21 UTC
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Post by John Hood
Presto Classical does have quite a few downloads, but it is miniscule in
the overall scheme of things.
John, I've just been to the Presto Classical website and searched with the phrase "string quartets". This retrieved 243 pages at 10 items per page plus 1 item on the 244th page. The majority of these items had both CDs and downloads available. Others were CD only, and others - of discontinued CDs? - had downloads only.

Andrew Clarke
Canberra
Andy
2020-11-03 21:11:56 UTC
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Post by John Hood
Hi, somebody wrote that CDs are passe. I am beginning to think they are
right. I've had a string quartet blog since April 2016 and my
experiences are as follows.
I used to regularly search for string quartets on Amazon US and UK,
sorted by arrival date, so that I could see the new releases. In 2016, a
search for 'string quartets' used to return 400 page of results, and
that 400 was an abitrary programmer limit, not an actual limit.
Now when I search, I get 40 pages, a lot of which are filled with
downloads, that is 10-15 hits for one CD which may or may not still be
available on on CD. It also includes a lot of tired old vinyl from
Amazon resellers.
This tells me that when a CD is unavailable, Amazon is not particularly
interested in keeping download MP3 versions of their catalogue.
Presto Classical does have quite a few downloads, but it is miniscule in
the overall scheme of things.
If 40 pages is the new normal, my question is where or whither CDS?
Where will they be in another four years time?
FWIW the number of new string quartet releases is pitifully small.
JH
Regarding the CD question, yes, I'm afraid they are passé. I still have hundreds of them (as well as LPs) that I've collected over decades. Music companies today really want listeners to stream their product, or download it (which itself is on the verge of becoming outdated). May new releases on Deutsche Grammophon or Warner are not available as CDs at all, and some not even as downloads. I generally buy older CD releases from eBay and an occasional new one from Amazon. Otherwise I downloaded a release via iTunes. Organizations like ArchivMusic keep things in print that otherwise would be out of the catalog. Berkshire Record Outlet is a good source of less known CDs. I usually conduct a known item search and can typically find it, if its exists at all, on Amazon without much problem. One does have to carefully craft the right search arguments, which may not be the first terms one thinks of.

Andrew
Frank Berger
2020-11-03 23:03:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Andy
Post by John Hood
Hi, somebody wrote that CDs are passe. I am beginning to think they are
right. I've had a string quartet blog since April 2016 and my
experiences are as follows.
I used to regularly search for string quartets on Amazon US and UK,
sorted by arrival date, so that I could see the new releases. In 2016, a
search for 'string quartets' used to return 400 page of results, and
that 400 was an abitrary programmer limit, not an actual limit.
Now when I search, I get 40 pages, a lot of which are filled with
downloads, that is 10-15 hits for one CD which may or may not still be
available on on CD. It also includes a lot of tired old vinyl from
Amazon resellers.
This tells me that when a CD is unavailable, Amazon is not particularly
interested in keeping download MP3 versions of their catalogue.
Presto Classical does have quite a few downloads, but it is miniscule in
the overall scheme of things.
If 40 pages is the new normal, my question is where or whither CDS?
Where will they be in another four years time?
FWIW the number of new string quartet releases is pitifully small.
JH
Regarding the CD question, yes, I'm afraid they are passé. I still have hundreds of them (as well as LPs) that I've collected over decades. Music companies today really want listeners to stream their product, or download it (which itself is on the verge of becoming outdated). May new releases on Deutsche Grammophon or Warner are not available as CDs at all, and some not even as downloads. I generally buy older CD releases from eBay and an occasional new one from Amazon. Otherwise I downloaded a release via iTunes. Organizations like ArchivMusic keep things in print that otherwise would be out of the catalog. Berkshire Record Outlet is a good source of less known CDs. I usually conduct a known item search and can typically find it, if its exists at all, on Amazon without much problem. One does have to carefully craft the right search arguments, which may not be the first terms one thinks of.
Andrew
I would turn around your first sentence to read that many
consumers today prefer to download or stream their music,
making it less profitable for manufacturer to sell CDs.
This may be less true (or may have been anyway) for
classical afficionados, but it was easy to predict years and
years ago that as bandwidth became virtually free hardcopy
would eventually disappear.
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