Discussion:
Samuel Barber Centenary
(too old to reply)
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-03-09 17:07:38 UTC
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Today's the day. How about some recommendations of recordings? Maybe two
lists, one for the you-know-what for you-know-whats, and one for any other
Barber works one esteems?

Y-K-W for Y-K-W
Toscanini/NBCSO

"Vanessa"
Slatkin cond. on Chandos

Symphony #1
Walter/NYP (orig. version, albeit with a huge blooper at the end)

More?
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
William Sommerwerck
2010-03-09 17:14:35 UTC
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"Antony and Cleopatra"?

I still have the New World LP, which I've never listened to.
jrsnfld
2010-03-09 19:59:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Sommerwerck
"Antony and Cleopatra"?
I still have the New World LP, which I've never listened to.
I listened to it fairly often back when it was my first and only
purchase of an opera on CD. It's been probably 10 years since I
listened, but I remember enjoying it a lot.

--Jeff
Edward Cowan
2010-03-09 22:49:15 UTC
Permalink
The Met on Siriuis XM is not neglecting this anniversary: Tonight at
9:00 pm they are broadcasting the WP performance of "Antony and
Cleopatra" from the first opening night of the present Metropolitan
Opera house, Sept. 16, 1966. Repeats occur on Wednesday, March 10, at 12
noon, Friday, March 12 at 6:00 am, and early Monday morning March 15 at
12 am (aka March 14 Sunday night). All times Eastern. The Sunday times
are, of course, EDT. --E.A.C.
Post by William Sommerwerck
"Antony and Cleopatra"?
I still have the New World LP, which I've never listened to.
--
hrabanus
OW
2010-03-10 23:13:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Sommerwerck
"Antony and Cleopatra"?
I still have the New World LP, which I've never listened to
That's funny, I've got that Lp too- bought it about twenty years ago
at a library clearance for about $1. I've never listened to it either.
Wasn't that the work that destroyed Barber's career?
largo_57
2010-03-09 17:47:27 UTC
Permalink
Today's the day.  How about some recommendations of recordings?  Maybe two
lists, one for the you-know-what for you-know-whats, and one for any other
Barber works one esteems?
More?
Medea's Meditation & Dance of Vengeance (otherwise known as "Medea Cha-
cha-cha")
Schippers/NYP

Knoxville, Summer of 1915
Dawn Upshaw on Nonesuch

And for two contrasting Y-K-W for Y-K-W:
Antonio Janigro/Solisti di Zagreb on Vanguard, clocking in at 5:56
Leonard Bernstein/LA Phil on DGG, a tad slower at 10:02

- Bryan
Christopher Webber
2010-03-09 19:06:56 UTC
Permalink
Two indispensable items for me:

(1) "The Lovers" (Chicago SO, Dale Suesing, Sarah Reese, c. Andrew
Schenk, Koch International) is a little-known, but melodically luxuriant
and sensual cantata, one of his most ambitious and satisfying works. A
keeper. Filler is a good "Prayers of Kierkegaard".

(2) Premiere Recordings (1 CD Pearl)
Not the best transfers but a great collection of Barber 1st recordings
of "School for Scandal", "Capricorn Concerto", "Dover Beach" (with
himself as incomparable soloist), Essay No.1 (Ormandy), Cello Sonata and
Symphony No.1 (Bruno Walter) and of course the hors concours 1st
appearance of THAT PIECE with Toscanini. Marvellous!
--
___________________________
Christopher Webber, Blackheath, London, UK.
http://www.zarzuela.net
jrsnfld
2010-03-09 20:05:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Christopher Webber
(1) "The Lovers" (Chicago SO, Dale Suesing
...Dale Duesing...

, Sarah Reese, c. Andrew
Post by Christopher Webber
Schenk, Koch International) is a little-known, but melodically luxuriant
and sensual cantata, one of his most ambitious and satisfying works. A
keeper. Filler is a good "Prayers of Kierkegaard".
A must have for Barber fans, of course, or for anyone interested in
Post by Christopher Webber
(2) Premiere Recordings (1 CD Pearl)
Not the best transfers but a great collection of Barber 1st recordings
of "School for Scandal", "Capricorn Concerto", "Dover Beach" (with
himself as incomparable soloist), Essay No.1 (Ormandy), Cello Sonata and
Symphony No.1 (Bruno Walter) and of course the hors concours 1st
appearance of THAT PIECE with Toscanini. Marvellous!
For Barber 1 it's a tough call for me, with Zinman, Slatkin, and N.
Jarvi all having made excellent recordings in superb sound and
beautifully played. The piece is too luxurious to be heard solely in
that older Walter recording.

The whole Slatkin series on RCA/BMG is similarly worth having for the
concerti and Essays too.

--Jeff
Christopher Webber
2010-03-09 21:15:31 UTC
Permalink
The piece is too luxurious to be heard solely in that older Walter
recording.
I chose this tonight for my own Barber Moment. I have to say that I grew
up on the David Measham recording (Unicorn, now Regis) and only Zinman
has come close to erasing that passionate imprint - as far as "modern"
recordings go. Marin Alsop didn't cut the mustard for me either. I
haven't heard Slatkin's. Or Sawallisch?

But the Walter just has so much more power and majesty than either
Measham or Zinman, especially at the climax of the slow section, that I
can forgive the limited dynamic range (1945) and even Pearl's mushy
transfer. Is the Sony transfer miles better?
--
___________________________
Christopher Webber, Blackheath, London, UK.
http://www.zarzuela.net
D***@aol.com
2010-03-10 20:28:41 UTC
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Post by Christopher Webber
The piece is too luxurious to be heard solely in that older Walter
recording.
[snip]
Post by Christopher Webber
But the Walter just has so much more power and majesty than either
Measham or Zinman, especially at the climax of the slow section, that I
can forgive the limited dynamic range (1945) and even Pearl's mushy
transfer. Is the Sony transfer miles better?
I haven't heard the Pearl CD, but I own the Sony one, and have a
couple of comments. Since I haven't heard the Pearl I probably can't
answer your question definitively, but here's what I have to say for
what it might be worth:

The Sony CD was made from a playing of the 16" lacquer discs on
which the recording was mastered at the 1945 session. Unless whoever
prepared the Pearl transfer had access to the Columbia (Sony) vaults
containing those masters, which I strongly doubt, the transfer is
likely to have come from a playing of Columbia's commercial 78-rpm
discs.

Bad news. Because those commercial 78s (you probably know this) were
not pressed from copies of masters made at the session(s), like other
companies' records, but were derived from dubbings that had been made
later of the lacquer masters to prepare 78 masters. Sound quality was
lost in the process as a result.

I owned and knew the commercial 78s of Walter's Barber 1 for
decades, and can only say that the Sony CD transfer was and is much,
much superior. The bass is clean, finally. In fact, it can finally be
heard. The overall sound is clean, never "mushy," as the 78s are in
places. If the Pearl transfer has such sound, as was said, I suppose
the 78s were used for it.

Columbia never issued Walter's Barber 1 on LP, so the Sony CD is the
first chance to hear it from the masters. Typically for Columbia in
the '40s there is no tonal color at all to the orchestra's sound --
they managed to do that to the Philadelphia Orchestra too! -- at the
same time that RCA Victor was preserving the subtle and gorgeous tonal
colors of Koussevitzky's Boston Symphony, to be heard in their
recordings.

I hope I've addressed your question about transfers of Walter's
Barber 1! Sorry to have rambled so.

Others have done Barber 1 well too of course, but I have great
affection for Bruno Walter's recording, not least because he conducted
music by a number of American composers and gave (I believe) the world
premiere of Barber's Essay no. 2 and never got to record any of those
works, but because I think his performance of the symphony is an
eloquent one.

Don Tait
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-03-10 20:39:20 UTC
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***@aol.com appears to have caused the following letters to be
typed in news:e4ace48f-6a12-424c-a035-bfa1895d4101
Post by D***@aol.com
Post by Christopher Webber
The piece is too luxurious to be heard solely in that older Walter
recording.
[snip]
Post by Christopher Webber
But the Walter just has so much more power and majesty than either
Measham or Zinman, especially at the climax of the slow section, that I
can forgive the limited dynamic range (1945) and even Pearl's mushy
transfer. Is the Sony transfer miles better?
I haven't heard the Pearl CD, but I own the Sony one, and have a
couple of comments. Since I haven't heard the Pearl I probably can't
answer your question definitively, but here's what I have to say for
The Sony CD was made from a playing of the 16" lacquer discs on which
the recording was mastered at the 1945 session. Unless whoever prepared
the Pearl transfer had access to the Columbia (Sony) vaults containing
those masters, which I strongly doubt, the transfer is likely to have
come from a playing of Columbia's commercial 78-rpm discs.
Bad news. Because those commercial 78s (you probably know this) were
not pressed from copies of masters made at the session(s), like other
companies' records, but were derived from dubbings that had been made
later of the lacquer masters to prepare 78 masters. Sound quality was
lost in the process as a result.
I owned and knew the commercial 78s of Walter's Barber 1 for
decades, and can only say that the Sony CD transfer was and is much,
much superior. The bass is clean, finally. In fact, it can finally be
heard. The overall sound is clean, never "mushy," as the 78s are in
places. If the Pearl transfer has such sound, as was said, I suppose
the 78s were used for it.
Columbia never issued Walter's Barber 1 on LP, so the Sony CD is the
first chance to hear it from the masters. Typically for Columbia in the
'40s there is no tonal color at all to the orchestra's sound -- they
managed to do that to the Philadelphia Orchestra too! -- at the same time
that RCA Victor was preserving the subtle and gorgeous tonal colors of
Koussevitzky's Boston Symphony, to be heard in their recordings.
I hope I've addressed your question about transfers of Walter's
Barber 1! Sorry to have rambled so.
Others have done Barber 1 well too of course, but I have great
affection for Bruno Walter's recording, not least because he conducted
music by a number of American composers and gave (I believe) the world
premiere of Barber's Essay no. 2 and never got to record any of those
works, but because I think his performance of the symphony is an
eloquent one.
"Columbia never issued Walter's Barber 1 on LP..." is correct, though there
was a CBS Sony LP in which is was the filler for the 1941 Walter "Eroica."
That transfer of the Beethoven recording had a considerable amount of hum
which has apparently been entirely conquered in various CD issues. The
back cover notes, albeit in Japanese, even included a chart showing the
time differences between that one and Walter's other mono recording.

Last night, as threatened, I listened to Toscanini's broadcast of the world
premieres of the You-Know-What for You-Know-What, and the First Essay.
These were from a UK Toscanini Society LP I bought from Michael G. Thomas
many years ago, and transferred to CD for me by the late John Wilson.

I followed this up with the entire Pearl CD of Barber premieres, which ends
with the Walter 1st; a good transfer with slightly better range than the
Sony issue, and with the gaffe in the final chords somehow edited out.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
D***@aol.com
2010-03-11 19:01:17 UTC
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Post by Matthew B. Tepper
typed in news:e4ace48f-6a12-424c-a035-bfa1895d4101
"Columbia never issued Walter's Barber 1 on LP..." is correct, though there
was a CBS Sony LP in which is was the filler for the 1941 Walter "Eroica." �
That transfer of the Beethoven recording had a considerable amount of hum
which has apparently been entirely conquered in various CD issues. �The
back cover notes, albeit in Japanese, even included a chart showing the
time differences between that one and Walter's other mono recording.
You're correct about that Beethoven/Barber LP. I'd forgotten it --
although I own a copy. Good grief.

Don Tait
Christopher Webber
2010-03-10 21:16:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by D***@aol.com
I hope I've addressed your question about transfers of Walter's
Barber 1! Sorry to have rambled so.
Thank you very much, Don. That's superbly informative. Though alas, I
feel another purchase coming on......
--
___________________________
Christopher Webber, Blackheath, London, UK.
http://www.zarzuela.net
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-03-09 20:35:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Christopher Webber
(1) "The Lovers" (Chicago SO, Dale Suesing, Sarah Reese, c. Andrew
Schenk, Koch International) is a little-known, but melodically luxuriant
and sensual cantata, one of his most ambitious and satisfying works. A
keeper. Filler is a good "Prayers of Kierkegaard".
Yes, an excellent and little-known disc. Imagine how Schenck must have
felt about the opportunity to record these with the Chicago Symphony! If I
remember correctly, he was recording all the Barber orchestral works when
he was stricken with skin cancer and died.
Post by Christopher Webber
(2) Premiere Recordings (1 CD Pearl)
Not the best transfers but a great collection of Barber 1st recordings
of "School for Scandal", "Capricorn Concerto", "Dover Beach" (with
himself as incomparable soloist), Essay No.1 (Ormandy), Cello Sonata and
Symphony No.1 (Bruno Walter) and of course the hors concours 1st
appearance of THAT PIECE with Toscanini. Marvellous!
Yes, a must-have for Barber fans. "Dover Beach" was one take per side!
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
Christopher Webber
2010-03-09 21:17:45 UTC
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Post by Matthew B. Tepper
"Dover Beach" was one take per side!
Yes indeed. I read that Samuel Barber nearly cried when the 2nd
violinist bashed his stand with his bow near the end of side 2:
nonetheless, not bad enough to stop release, or affect the superb
intensity of the music making.
--
___________________________
Christopher Webber, Blackheath, London, UK.
http://www.zarzuela.net
David Royko
2010-03-09 21:41:13 UTC
Permalink
I love many Barber works, but none more than Summer Music for woodwind
quintet. I've never heard a performance I didn't enjoy, but my
favorites are still the old New York WWQ and Philadelphia WWQ
recordings.

Dave Royko
http://www.davidroyko.com is Dave Royko's site for info about:
My book "Voices of Children of Divorce" (St. Martin's Press);
Some of my music reviews & features (Chgo Trib and elsewhere);
Our Ben stories (Autism); The CSO "From The Archives" index;
The Mike Royko letters ("Royko In Love"); and plenty of Etc.
Rugby
2010-03-09 20:51:32 UTC
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Today's the day.  How about some recommendations of recordings?
"Pas de Deux" from the "Souvenirs",Op.28:



Rugby
Kip Williams
2010-03-09 20:56:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Today's the day. How about some recommendations of recordings? Maybe two
lists, one for the you-know-what for you-know-whats, and one for any other
Barber works one esteems?
Y-K-W for Y-K-W
Toscanini/NBCSO
Kronos Quartet.


Kip W
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-03-10 05:07:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kip Williams
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Today's the day. How about some recommendations of recordings? Maybe two
lists, one for the you-know-what for you-know-whats, and one for any other
Barber works one esteems?
Y-K-W for Y-K-W
Toscanini/NBCSO
Kronos Quartet.
No!

Listening right now to Toscanini, but not the commercial recording; rather,
the world premiere (of the string orchestra version), 5 November 1938.
[First] Essay for Orchestra to follow.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
Kip Williams
2010-03-10 13:38:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kip Williams
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Today's the day. How about some recommendations of recordings? Maybe two
lists, one for the you-know-what for you-know-whats, and one for any other
Barber works one esteems?
Y-K-W for Y-K-W
Toscanini/NBCSO
Kronos Quartet.
No!
Sorry, but yes. Not a fan of inflation.


Kip W
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-03-10 15:34:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kip Williams
Post by Kip Williams
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Today's the day. How about some recommendations of recordings?
Maybe two lists, one for the you-know-what for you-know-whats, and
one for any other Barber works one esteems?
Y-K-W for Y-K-W
Toscanini/NBCSO
Kronos Quartet.
No!
Sorry, but yes. Not a fan of inflation.
That's not my objection; I love hearing it played by a string quartet,
particularly in the context of the other two movements (which apparently
originally were one movement, which Barber divided in half). I just don't
want to hear the Kronos Quartet apply its dry and objective approach to this
fervent, intense music. (Their Shostakovich SQ #8, for example, is NOT one
of my favorites.)

Give me the Concord Quartet (locked behind the vinyl curtain on Nonesuch,
along with "Dover Beach" and Rochberg SQ #7), or the Borodin Quartet.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
Kip Williams
2010-03-10 16:43:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Kip Williams
Post by Kip Williams
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Today's the day. How about some recommendations of recordings?
Maybe two lists, one for the you-know-what for you-know-whats, and
one for any other Barber works one esteems?
Y-K-W for Y-K-W
Toscanini/NBCSO
Kronos Quartet.
No!
Sorry, but yes. Not a fan of inflation.
That's not my objection; I love hearing it played by a string quartet,
particularly in the context of the other two movements (which apparently
originally were one movement, which Barber divided in half). I just don't
want to hear the Kronos Quartet apply its dry and objective approach to this
fervent, intense music. (Their Shostakovich SQ #8, for example, is NOT one
of my favorites.)
Give me the Concord Quartet (locked behind the vinyl curtain on Nonesuch,
along with "Dover Beach" and Rochberg SQ #7), or the Borodin Quartet.
Thanks, I'll see if emusic has the Borodin.


Kip W
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-03-10 17:05:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kip Williams
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Kip Williams
Post by Kip Williams
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Today's the day. How about some recommendations of recordings?
Maybe two lists, one for the you-know-what for you-know-whats, and
one for any other Barber works one esteems?
Y-K-W for Y-K-W
Toscanini/NBCSO
Kronos Quartet.
No!
Sorry, but yes. Not a fan of inflation.
That's not my objection; I love hearing it played by a string quartet,
particularly in the context of the other two movements (which apparently
originally were one movement, which Barber divided in half). I just
don't want to hear the Kronos Quartet apply its dry and objective
approach to this fervent, intense music. (Their Shostakovich SQ #8, for
example, is NOT one of my favorites.)
Give me the Concord Quartet (locked behind the vinyl curtain on
Nonesuch, along with "Dover Beach" and Rochberg SQ #7), or the Borodin
Quartet.
Thanks, I'll see if emusic has the Borodin.
Let me know if you find anything, but I'm only aware of the original MK
(pre-Melodiya) LP, you know, with the generic red cover; the coupling was
one of the Weinberg/Vainberg quartets. I mentioned this LP to Dubinsky
when I met him after a concert, and he immediately lifted his violin and
played the beginning of each work for me. Memories are made of this!
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
Kip Williams
2010-03-10 19:17:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Kip Williams
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Give me the Concord Quartet (locked behind the vinyl curtain on
Nonesuch, along with "Dover Beach" and Rochberg SQ #7), or the Borodin
Quartet.
I just listened to it by the Kronos, and it sounded emotional to me, but
not in a drippy way. When I hear someone else, I'll compare.
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Kip Williams
Thanks, I'll see if emusic has the Borodin.
Let me know if you find anything, but I'm only aware of the original MK
(pre-Melodiya) LP, you know, with the generic red cover; the coupling was
one of the Weinberg/Vainberg quartets. I mentioned this LP to Dubinsky
when I met him after a concert, and he immediately lifted his violin and
played the beginning of each work for me. Memories are made of this!
I'm not finding any quartet versions at emusic. There's a pipe organ
version that's nine and a half minutes long. I already had one that was
just under six. The sheer length of this one is kind of intriguing, like
the performer is really... well, I wanted to say wallowing in it, but
that seems misleading. Maybe he just likes to hear all the notes die
away at the pauses.

I might end up paying a buck for a track at Amazon, if there's anything
over there.


Kip W
jrsnfld
2010-03-10 19:30:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kip Williams
I'm not finding any quartet versions at emusic.
Many (most?) of the quartet versions would probably be recorded as
part of the complete String Quartet op 11. Recordings by the Emerson,
Tokyo, Duke, Chester, Endellion, and Borodin quartets, among others,
are on CD.

There is also a clarinet quartet arrangement...

--Jeff
Kip Williams
2010-03-10 19:43:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by jrsnfld
Post by Kip Williams
I'm not finding any quartet versions at emusic.
Many (most?) of the quartet versions would probably be recorded as
part of the complete String Quartet op 11. Recordings by the Emerson,
Tokyo, Duke, Chester, Endellion, and Borodin quartets, among others,
are on CD.
There is also a clarinet quartet arrangement...
Indeed.


Kip W
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-03-10 20:39:19 UTC
Permalink
jrsnfld <***@aol.com> appears to have caused the following letters to be
typed in news:2e6d5d4f-f17a-48a2-9bf3-bae6de1c9358
Many (most?) of the quartet versions would probably be recorded as part
of the complete String Quartet op 11. Recordings by the Emerson, Tokyo,
Duke, Chester, Endellion, and Borodin quartets, among others, are on CD.
Where have you seen the Borodin Quartet recording on CD?
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
Kip Williams
2010-03-10 19:42:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kip Williams
I might end up paying a buck for a track at Amazon, if there's anything
over there.
I can find quartet recordings of the Barber Adagio by the Beaux Arts,
the Emerson, the Endellion, the Chester, and the Münchner
Posaunenquartett -- but that last one's a trombone quartet.

Any of these good? I don't want to just get the least objectionable one.


Kip W
jrsnfld
2010-03-10 20:52:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kip Williams
Post by Kip Williams
I might end up paying a buck for a track at Amazon, if there's anything
over there.
I can find quartet recordings of the Barber Adagio by the Beaux Arts,
the Emerson, the Endellion, the Chester, and the M nchner
Posaunenquartett -- but that last one's a trombone quartet.
Any of these good? I don't want to just get the least objectionable one.
Kip W
Don't forget the beautiful choral arrangement.

I'm speaking from ignorance here (having heard some performances on
the radio, and having lived happily with the recordings by the Chester
and Concord quartets, and I'm not sure who else, but otherwise none of
the listed recordings except maybe the Emerson). I don't actually
think of the Adagio as a piece that's highly susceptible to
interpretational wrongdoing. Go with a group whose tone appeals to
you: hence, the Borodins would be my choice on that grounds, and the
Endellions strong contenders.

I see no reason to sneeze at the Kronos simply because of their
general sound nor because they have shown less distinction in romantic
or well-known repertoire. I might feel differently if we were talking
about Brahms or Bartok.

--Jeff
Kip Williams
2010-03-10 21:09:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by jrsnfld
Post by Kip Williams
I can find quartet recordings of the Barber Adagio by the Beaux Arts,
the Emerson, the Endellion, the Chester, and the M nchner
Posaunenquartett -- but that last one's a trombone quartet.
Don't forget the beautiful choral arrangement.
And who do you recommend in that? I can find all sorts of recordings of
that one, and even more of the 'strings' version, but would be happy to
know if some are better than others.

Are they all for the same number of voices?


Kip W
jrsnfld
2010-03-10 21:39:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kip Williams
Post by Kip Williams
I might end up paying a buck for a track at Amazon, if there's anything
over there.
I can find quartet recordings of the Barber Adagio by the Beaux Arts,
the Emerson, the Endellion, the Chester, and the M nchner
Posaunenquartett -- but that last one's a trombone quartet.
Any of these good? I don't want to just get the least objectionable one.
By the way, a quartet performance I like very much is from a Steans
Institute concert last summer--that's the young musicians' program
affiliated with Ravinia in Chicago. You can hear it on
instantencore.com. I realize that's not as expensive as purchasing a
$1 download, but maybe it will give you a point of comparison for a
relatively romantic performance (they really nail the first movement,
too IMHO).

--Jeff
Roland van Gaalen
2010-03-11 23:27:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kip Williams
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Today's the day. How about some recommendations of recordings? Maybe two
lists, one for the you-know-what for you-know-whats, and one for any other
Barber works one esteems?
Y-K-W for Y-K-W
Toscanini/NBCSO
Kronos Quartet.
Today I listened to this CD (*) a few times.

Not my favorite music, but the performance and the recording are quite good,
I think.

Very digital!

Time flies -- I remember seeing piles of Kronos CDs at Tower Records when
they were trendy (it seemed to me).

(*) "Winter was hard"
Music by Webern, Schnittke, Barber and others
Elektra/Nonesuch 9 79181-2 (1988)
--
Roland van Gaalen
Amsterdam
R.P.vanGaalenATchello.nl
jrsnfld
2010-03-12 06:33:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roland van Gaalen
Post by Kip Williams
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Y-K-W for Y-K-W
Kronos Quartet.
Today I listened to this CD (*) a few times.
Today I listened to the CSO/Dudamel broadcast in the full strings
version. Very sensitive performance, appropriately luminous but not
overly effusive--in fact, somewhat dour and depressed. I liked it.

--Jeff

Starobin
2010-03-09 21:17:48 UTC
Permalink
For those who are curious about Barber's early days, I recommend
BRIDGE 9156: Barber accompanying himself (on Christmas morning of
1938 in Philadelphia) in a dozen songs, both folk and classical. Also
included on that disc is the 1953 Library of Congress recital with
Barber accompanying the very young Leontyne Price.

I haven't heard it in many years, but I always loved the Browning/
Cleveland/Szell Piano Concerto on CBS. Browning played the piece a
lot, and I remember a fine reading with the Baltimore Symphony ca.
1971.

ds
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-03-10 05:07:06 UTC
Permalink
Starobin <***@aol.com> appears to have caused the following letters to
be typed in news:83a8fd6a-e12e-4e10-83a2-
Post by Starobin
For those who are curious about Barber's early days, I recommend
BRIDGE 9156: Barber accompanying himself (on Christmas morning of
1938 in Philadelphia) in a dozen songs, both folk and classical. Also
included on that disc is the 1953 Library of Congress recital with
Barber accompanying the very young Leontyne Price.
Indeed, interesting to hear him sing music other than his own. The Price
recital overlaps some with a BMG issue, but I guess that can't be helped.
Post by Starobin
I haven't heard it in many years, but I always loved the Browning/
Cleveland/Szell Piano Concerto on CBS.
If you want it on CD, better order from Japan or the UK; Sony has never,
ever issued it that way in the home country of composer and solist and
orchestra. They have, of course, issued the Stern/Bernstein recording of
the Violin Concerto, over and over and over and over.
Post by Starobin
Browning played the piece a lot,
and I remember a fine reading with the Baltimore Symphony ca. 1971.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
operafan
2010-03-10 16:27:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
If you want it on CD, better order from Japan or the UK; Sony has never,
ever issued it that way in the home country of composer and solist and
orchestra.  They have, of course, issued the Stern/Bernstein recording of
the Violin Concerto, over and over and over and over.
Thankfully, you're wrong:
http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/album.jsp?album_id=226443
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-03-10 17:05:17 UTC
Permalink
operafan <***@gmail.com> appears to have caused the following
letters to be typed in news:3feb69d6-9969-4852-8c19-
Post by operafan
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
If you want it on CD, better order from Japan or the UK; Sony has never,
ever issued it that way in the home country of composer and solist and
orchestra.  They have, of course, issued the Stern/Bernstein recording
of the Violin Concerto, over and over and over and over.
http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/album.jsp?album_id=226443
And I'm glad to be wrong! I had not known of this issue. And according to
Amazon.com, it also contains Schipper's recording of the Second Essay, which
of course was on Masterworks Heritage at one time.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
Gustav Bruckner
2010-03-11 05:57:00 UTC
Permalink
 And according to
Amazon.com, it also contains Schipper's recording of the Second Essay, which
of course was on Masterworks Heritage at one time.
If I'm not mistaken, that Masterworks Heritage LP also contains the
"School for Scandal Overture", the "Adagio for Strings", and "Medea's
Dance of Vengeance", all by Schippers and the NYPhil. I don't think
there's ever been a better Barber album. Another great Barber piece
that deserves mention is the youthful "Music for a Scene From
Shelley".
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-03-11 15:38:27 UTC
Permalink
Gustav Bruckner <***@netscape.com> appears to have caused the following
letters to be typed in news:b2fef9f6-fa6c-47f9-b993-
 And according to Amazon.com, it also contains Schipper's recording of the
Second Essay, which of course was on Masterworks Heritage at one time.
If I'm not mistaken, that Masterworks Heritage LP also contains the "School
for Scandal Overture", the "Adagio for Strings", and "Medea's Dance of
Vengeance", all by Schippers and the NYPhil. I don't think there's ever
been a better Barber album. Another great Barber piece that deserves
mention is the youthful "Music for a Scene From Shelley".
That's the one. As I have already noted, Andrew Schenck recorded several
Barber works before his unexpected death. David Measham did a few LPs for
Unicorn (some of which material has been issued on Regis CD), Leonard Slatkin
did a few for BMG back when they cared, and Naxos has a continuing series by
Marin Alsop. But I agree, for a one-disc selection, best to get Schippers.
And don't forget, Schippers conducted some "Antony and Cleopatra" excerpts
for Leontyne Price on RCA.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
Starobin
2010-03-11 10:23:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Starobin
For those who are curious about Barber's early days, I recommend
BRIDGE 9156: �Barber accompanying himself (on Christmas morning of
1938 in Philadelphia) in a dozen songs, both folk and classical. �Also
included on that disc is the 1953 Library of Congress recital with
Barber accompanying the very young Leontyne Price.
Indeed, interesting to hear him sing music other than his own. �The Price
recital overlaps some with a BMG issue, but I guess that can't be helped.
And some music it is. Barber's 1938 vocal & piano performances of
songs by Brahms, Schumann, Mendelssohn, Schubert, and CPE Bach give an
idea of what was to become an exquisite marriage of text and music in
Barber's own songs. Regarding the 1953 LOC concert with Price, the
release differs from the BMG in that the Bridge includes the entire
recital, including Henri Sauguet's wonderful "La Voyante".

ds
Stan Punzel
2010-03-09 23:09:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Today's the day. How about some recommendations of recordings? Maybe two
lists, one for the you-know-what for you-know-whats, and one for any other
Barber works one esteems?
Y-K-W for Y-K-W
Toscanini/NBCSO
"Vanessa"
Slatkin cond. on Chandos
Symphony #1
Walter/NYP (orig. version, albeit with a huge blooper at the end)
More?
Y-K-W for Y-K-W

Two thoughts:
Munch/BSO
Marrier/ASMF
Josquin
2010-03-10 00:53:46 UTC
Permalink
Last year I listened a lot to the complete song collection on DG with
Thomas Hampson and, uh... Cheryl Studer. I hadn't been familiar with
any of the songs except obviously Knoxville, and I was happy to find
how distinctive and enjoyable they all are. I was though a bit
disappointed with the singing on this set, which is generally somewhat
bland - I'm always puzzled by singers who don't treat the words as if
they mean anything since it sort of misses the point - I'd rather they
err toward F-D than rattle through the songs as is so common today.
Actually, John Browning inflects the accompaniment perfectly, so the
contrast is more striking with the vocal parts.

Even so, I greatly recommend this set!
Josquin
2010-03-10 01:27:22 UTC
Permalink
After I did the last post, I became consumed by guilt - this is RMCR!!
I know how much thought and consideration everyone puts into their
contributions here, so I was wondering if I was being somewhat unfair
about the singer's interpretations.

So I listened to Hampson's Dover Beach --- again, although he clearly
enunciated every word, he didn't say any word like they really meant
anything --- so I cranked this up:


Sam Barber himself singing - what a contrast, with each word
enunciated to communicate. The whole point of the song is expressed
now, and the effect is so different.

And no, I don't have the F-D version...

But, in any case, the DG set is still well worth getting, even though
it isn't as good as it could be.
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-03-10 05:07:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Josquin
After I did the last post, I became consumed by guilt - this is RMCR!!
I know how much thought and consideration everyone puts into their
contributions here, so I was wondering if I was being somewhat unfair
about the singer's interpretations.
So I listened to Hampson's Dover Beach --- again, although he clearly
enunciated every word, he didn't say any word like they really meant
http://youtu.be/SjPtPmshqIA
Sam Barber himself singing - what a contrast, with each word enunciated
to communicate. The whole point of the song is expressed now, and the
effect is so different.
And no, I don't have the F-D version...
It was issued in Sony SM2K 62709, an odd grab-bag called "Juilliard String
Quartet: Great Collaborations"
Post by Josquin
But, in any case, the DG set is still well worth getting, even though
it isn't as good as it could be.
Quite frankly, I think the top two reasons for having this DGG set are 1)
completeness; and 2) Browning.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
Matthew B. Tepper
2010-03-10 05:07:12 UTC
Permalink
Josquin <***@aol.com> appears to have caused the following letters to
be typed in news:7275c18e-758f-4257-a2dc-
Post by Josquin
Last year I listened a lot to the complete song collection on DG with
Thomas Hampson and [other performers]. I hadn't been familiar with any
of the songs except obviously Knoxville, and I was happy to find how
distinctive and enjoyable they all are. I was though a bit disappointed
with the singing on this set, which is generally somewhat bland - I'm
always puzzled by singers who don't treat the words as if they mean
anything since it sort of misses the point - I'd rather they err toward
F-D than rattle through the songs as is so common today. Actually, John
Browning inflects the accompaniment perfectly, so the contrast is more
striking with the vocal parts.
Even so, I greatly recommend this set!
As do I, despite, you know (which isn't that performer's fault, really).
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
Read about "Proty" here: http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/proty.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
D***@aol.com
2010-03-10 20:54:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Y-K-W for Y-K-W
Munch/BSO
Marrier/ASMF- Hide quoted text -
I love Munch's; don't know Marriner's; but I'd also nominate
Stokowski/"his" orchestra, recorded for Capitol in 1957. Stokowski
does it in 6:35, but it not only doesn't sound rushed, it breathes,
sings, and seems perfectly "right." It demonstrates Stokowski's
mastery of a vocal style in performance. The use of tonal color as
part of the expression, but never used for its own sake or indulgence,
is classic Stokowski too. The recording has been out on EMI CDs
recently.

Among admirable recordings of Symphony 1, Hanson's version for
Mercury was exceptional.

Don Tait
wanwan
2010-03-10 05:37:30 UTC
Permalink
Today's the day.  How about some recommendations of recordings?  Maybe two
lists, one for the you-know-what for you-know-whats, and one for any other
Barber works one esteems?
Y-K-W for Y-K-W
Toscanini/NBCSO
"Vanessa"
Slatkin cond. on Chandos
Symphony #1
Walter/NYP (orig. version, albeit with a huge blooper at the end)
More?
The Schippers/NYP Barber Collection including my favorite YKW for YKW.

The now defunct Honolulu Symphony O had a broadcast of Medea's
Meditation & Dance of Vengence that was just as great as Schippers.

Eileen Farrell/Bernard Herrman/CBS SO Knoxville

The Shaham/Previn/LSO Violin Concerto

------------
Eric Nagamine
Thornhill
2010-03-10 15:56:06 UTC
Permalink
Today's the day.  How about some recommendations of recordings?  Maybe two
lists, one for the you-know-what for you-know-whats, and one for any other
Barber works one esteems?
Toccata Festiva - Eschenbach/Latry/Philadelphia on Ondine.
I don't get why this piece isn't performed more often. The sound
quality of the recording is demo, especially in surround sound.

Piano Concerto - Browning/Szell/Cleveland on Sony (available again in
the UK)
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