Discussion:
Schubert D959 Piano Sonata recommendations?
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Carey
2020-04-05 18:10:38 UTC
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I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and Brendel ca. 1988, but other suggestions would be great.
graham
2020-04-05 18:33:07 UTC
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Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and Brendel ca. 1988, but other suggestions would be great.
Imogen Cooper
v***@protonmail.com
2020-04-05 18:50:27 UTC
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Post by graham
Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and Brendel ca. 1988, but other suggestions would be great.
Imogen Cooper
Thanks very much.
Bozo
2020-04-06 00:00:56 UTC
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Post by graham
Imogen Cooper
You may be interested in this next week on BBC Radio 3,Thursday,April 9, 1930 London time, will also be archived.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000h2zs

From BBC:

"This concert, first broadcast in October last year, took place at London's Wigmore Hall.
Well-loved and internationally acclaimed, pianist Imogen Cooper celebrates her 70th birthday with just three works by one composer: Schubert’s final three sonatas, product of an intense three months towards the end of his short life. By turns comforting and serene, nightmarish and unsettling, these hugely challenging works have become cornerstones of Cooper’s repertoire.
Recorded on 22nd October 2019 at Wigmore Hall and presented by Sarah Walker, including comments on the music from Imogen Cooper."
Schubert:
Piano Sonata in C minor D 958
Piano Sonata in A D 959
Piano Sonata in B flat D 960
Mandryka
2020-04-06 04:36:19 UTC
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I think this sonata, more than 960 and 958, sounds best on a percussive instrument, an old fortepiano.
dk
2020-04-06 06:19:30 UTC
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Post by Mandryka
I think this sonata, more than 960 and 958,
sounds best on a percussive instrument, an
old fortepiano.
Nothing sounds good on fortepiani.

dk
Bozo
2020-04-10 16:24:16 UTC
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Post by Bozo
"This concert, first broadcast in October last year, took place at London's Wigmore Hall.
Well-loved and internationally acclaimed, pianist Imogen Cooper celebrates her 70th birthday with just >three works by one composer: Schubert’s final three sonatas, product of an intense three months towards >the end of his short life.
A review : https://theartsdesk.com/classical-music/imogen-cooper-70th-birthday-concert-wigmore-hall-review-outwardly-austere-lit-within

I was not as enthusiastic.

Apparently,Beethoven's final 3 sonatas were written over a 3 -year period, I assume while working on other pieces as well.
Steve Emerson
2020-04-05 19:03:46 UTC
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Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and Brendel ca. 1988, but other suggestions would be great.
Schnabel (essential) and Elizabeth Leonskaja (several recordings) come to mind. Here's the audio from Leonskaja's performance at Bath not too many years ago:

http://www.mediafire.com/file/kavg0aekqtkmn47/LeonskajaBathD959FLACs.zip/file

FLAC format. Highly recommended.

SE.
v***@protonmail.com
2020-04-05 19:07:53 UTC
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Post by Steve Emerson
Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and Brendel ca. 1988, but other suggestions would be great.
http://www.mediafire.com/file/kavg0aekqtkmn47/LeonskajaBathD959FLACs.zip/file
FLAC format. Highly recommended.
SE.
Thank you!
dk
2020-04-05 20:02:30 UTC
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Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and
Brendel ca. 1988, but other suggestions would
be great.
Schnabel owns it:

There are several versions on YT that differ significantly in
sound quality.

For modern recordings, Valery Afanassiev, Sviatoslav Richter,
Grigory Sokolov and Elisabeth Leonskaja are tops.

Badura-Skoda, Brendull and Kempff are pure unadulterated junk.

Hope this helps. Enjoy.

dk
Frank Berger
2020-04-05 20:25:58 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and
Brendel ca. 1988, but other suggestions would
be great.
Schnabel owns it: http://youtu.be/whkk2Yththg
There are several versions on YT that differ significantly in
sound quality.
For modern recordings, Valery Afanassiev, Sviatoslav Richter,
Grigory Sokolov and Elisabeth Leonskaja are tops.
Badura-Skoda, Brendull and Kempff are pure unadulterated junk.
Hope this helps. Enjoy.
dk
Sofronitsky.


dk
2020-04-05 20:45:52 UTC
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Post by Frank Berger
Post by dk
Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and
Brendel ca. 1988, but other suggestions would
be great.
Schnabel owns it: http://youtu.be/whkk2Yththg
There are several versions on YT that differ significantly in
sound quality.
For modern recordings, Valery Afanassiev, Sviatoslav Richter,
Grigory Sokolov and Elisabeth Leonskaja are tops.
Badura-Skoda, Brendull and Kempff are pure unadulterated junk.
Hope this helps. Enjoy.
Sofronitsky.
http://youtu.be/LYZiADokWQc
?!? The link is to a D.960 performance!
AFAIK Sofronitsky did not perform D.959.

dk
c***@gmail.com
2020-04-05 20:52:25 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and
Brendel ca. 1988, but other suggestions would
be great.
Schnabel owns it: http://youtu.be/whkk2Yththg
There are several versions on YT that differ significantly in
sound quality.
For modern recordings, Valery Afanassiev, Sviatoslav Richter,
Grigory Sokolov and Elisabeth Leonskaja are tops.
Badura-Skoda, Brendull and Kempff are pure unadulterated junk.
Hope this helps. Enjoy.
dk
I'm getting a sense of deja vu (or, a la Yogi, deja vu all over again). I agree with all of SE's and dk's recommendations, including the negatives. It took me several hearings to adjust to Sokolov's pacing but now I find him mesmerizing. I particularly like Leonskaja's 1971 Melodiya recording. In a similar vein but a bit quicker is Alexei Nasedkin (also Melodiya). And definitely worth hearing once, imo, is Pavel Štěpán--fastest of all. Any thoughts on Lupu? Kovacevich? Foldes? I like all three, but not as first recommendations. Just getting to know Aki Takahashi's recording (https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/products/8164539--schubert-piano-sonatas-d-958-d-959) and so far I'm impressed. Her piano sounds gorgeous.

AC
Mandryka
2020-04-05 21:36:23 UTC
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Badura Skoda on Astree for me.
v***@protonmail.com
2020-04-05 21:40:01 UTC
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Post by Mandryka
Badura Skoda on Astree for me.
Thank you.
MCGM
2020-04-06 10:48:59 UTC
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Post by c***@gmail.com
I'm getting a sense of deja vu (or, a la Yogi, deja vu all over again). I agree with all of SE's and dk's recommendations, including the negatives. It took me several hearings to adjust to Sokolov's pacing but now I find him mesmerizing. I particularly like Leonskaja's 1971 Melodiya recording. In a similar vein but a bit quicker is Alexei Nasedkin (also Melodiya). And definitely worth hearing once, imo, is Pavel Štěpán--fastest of all. Any thoughts on Lupu? Kovacevich? Foldes? I like all three, but not as first recommendations. Just getting to know Aki Takahashi's recording (https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/products/8164539--schubert-piano-sonatas-d-958-d-959) and so far I'm impressed. Her piano sounds gorgeous.
AC
Kovacevich’s is the one I always come back to. And then there
are Sokolov, Afanassiev and Volodos …

Miguel
Hank Drake
2020-04-06 11:52:06 UTC
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Another vote here for Artur Schnabel, Rudolf Serkin, and Kempff. For those who insist on fully modern sound, the latter of Perahia's two recordings is quite fine.

Hank
v***@protonmail.com
2020-04-06 13:26:08 UTC
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Post by Hank Drake
Another vote here for Artur Schnabel, Rudolf Serkin, and Kempff. For those who insist on fully modern sound, the latter of Perahia's two recordings is quite fine.
Hank
Thanks for this. Do you happen to know if Serkin's is in stereo, or remember anything about the sound?
Hank Drake
2020-04-06 14:01:14 UTC
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Post by v***@protonmail.com
Post by Hank Drake
Another vote here for Artur Schnabel, Rudolf Serkin, and Kempff. For those who insist on fully modern sound, the latter of Perahia's two recordings is quite fine.
Hank
Thanks for this. Do you happen to know if Serkin's is in stereo, or remember anything about the sound?
The Serkin recording is in stereo, in Columbia's typical sound of the period - meaning close miking that emphasized clarity over ambiance.

Hank
v***@protonmail.com
2020-04-06 14:18:25 UTC
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Post by Hank Drake
Post by v***@protonmail.com
Post by Hank Drake
Another vote here for Artur Schnabel, Rudolf Serkin, and Kempff. For those who insist on fully modern sound, the latter of Perahia's two recordings is quite fine.
Hank
Thanks for this. Do you happen to know if Serkin's is in stereo, or remember anything about the sound?
The Serkin recording is in stereo, in Columbia's typical sound of the period - meaning close miking that emphasized clarity over ambiance.
Hank
Thanks very much for that Serkin info.
Juan I. Cahis
2020-04-06 14:45:43 UTC
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Post by v***@protonmail.com
Post by Hank Drake
Another vote here for Artur Schnabel, Rudolf Serkin, and Kempff. For
those who insist on fully modern sound, the latter of Perahia's two
recordings is quite fine.
Hank
Thanks for this. Do you happen to know if Serkin's is in stereo, or
remember anything about the sound?
For me, it is essential for any performance of this Sonata to be qualified
as “good”, is that the “cataclismic” middle section of the second movement
should sound really (brutally) “cataclismatic”. And many good pianists fail
here.
--
Enviado desde mi iPad usando NewsTap, Juan I. Cahis, Santiago de Chile.
Mandryka
2020-04-07 12:47:17 UTC
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Post by Juan I. Cahis
Post by v***@protonmail.com
Post by Hank Drake
Another vote here for Artur Schnabel, Rudolf Serkin, and Kempff. For
those who insist on fully modern sound, the latter of Perahia's two
recordings is quite fine.
Hank
Thanks for this. Do you happen to know if Serkin's is in stereo, or
remember anything about the sound?
For me, it is essential for any performance of this Sonata to be qualified
as “good”, is that the “cataclismic” middle section of the second movement
should sound really (brutally) “cataclismatic”. And many good pianists fail
here.
--
Enviado desde mi iPad usando NewsTap, Juan I. Cahis, Santiago de Chile.
Maybe try Zimerman in the cataclysm of the Andantino - he's helped by a very good piano.
Steve Emerson
2020-04-07 21:59:58 UTC
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Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by dk
Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and
Brendel ca. 1988, but other suggestions would
be great.
Schnabel owns it: http://youtu.be/whkk2Yththg
There are several versions on YT that differ significantly in
sound quality.
For modern recordings, Valery Afanassiev, Sviatoslav Richter,
Grigory Sokolov and Elisabeth Leonskaja are tops.
Badura-Skoda, Brendull and Kempff are pure unadulterated junk.
Hope this helps. Enjoy.
dk
I'm getting a sense of deja vu (or, a la Yogi, deja vu all over again). I agree with all of SE's and dk's recommendations, including the negatives. It took me several hearings to adjust to Sokolov's pacing but now I find him mesmerizing. I particularly like Leonskaja's 1971 Melodiya recording. In a similar vein but a bit quicker is Alexei Nasedkin (also Melodiya). And definitely worth hearing once, imo, is Pavel Štěpán--fastest of all. Any thoughts on Lupu? Kovacevich? Foldes? I like all three, but not as first recommendations. Just getting to know Aki Takahashi's recording (https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/products/8164539--schubert-piano-sonatas-d-958-d-959) and so far I'm impressed. Her piano sounds gorgeous.
Too early to state an opinion on Takahashi's, though on the whole very impressed with her Schubert and concur on the piano sound -- second to none in Schubert.

I was very taken with Štěpán but haven't heard it in some time. Underwhelmed (sorry) by Kovacevich and Foldes (as well as Pollini, Zimerman, and many more). Lupu's is gorgeous but as I've noted before, his Andantino not only lacks drama but starts building much later than it might (compare with Schnabel). I took this up long ago (cue Yogi), if I may be so obnoxious as to quote myself:

https://tinyurl.com/ta78x44

Eschenbach needs to be cited in this thread; a good companion to Leonskaja Melodiya and also the live at Bath. Does anyone have a link for Sokolov's D959? I can't put my hands on it; the OP should hear it.

Klien is one it turns out I haven't heard; I have and like two of the Schubert two-fers but not that one.

SE.
Steve Emerson
2020-04-05 21:29:42 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and
Brendel ca. 1988, but other suggestions would
be great.
Schnabel owns it: http://youtu.be/whkk2Yththg
There are several versions on YT that differ significantly in
sound quality.
For modern recordings, Valery Afanassiev, Sviatoslav Richter,
Grigory Sokolov and Elisabeth Leonskaja are tops.
Badura-Skoda, Brendull and Kempff are pure unadulterated junk.
Hope this helps. Enjoy.
dk
There's a Richter D959?

SE.
KimDenmark
2020-04-05 21:43:15 UTC
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Calling Kempff´s 959 " pure unadulterated junk " is just...odd. Kempff´s Schubert is a high-point in his recorded output. Ignore the troll and give it a listen.

Otherwise; Schnabel´s very good; Lupu´s also good, but missing a bit of the intensity I associate with 959.

Other really good 959´s: Frierich Wührer and Walter Klien. Both of them recorded Schubert´s complete sonatas in the ´60ies and they make beautiful music.

Lastly; two of my favourites: Eduard Erdmann, an early champion of Schubert´s sonatas and Andreas Staier´s hyper-exiting fortepiano recording of 959.
KimDenmark
2020-04-05 21:44:58 UTC
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Post by KimDenmark
Calling Kempff´s 959 " pure unadulterated junk " is just...odd. Kempff´s Schubert is a high-point in his recorded output. Ignore the troll and give it a listen.
Otherwise; Schnabel´s very good; Lupu´s also good, but missing a bit of the intensity I associate with 959.
Other really good 959´s: Frierich Wührer and Walter Klien. Both of them recorded Schubert´s complete sonatas in the ´60ies and they make beautiful music.
Lastly; two of my favourites: Eduard Erdmann, an early champion of Schubert´s sonatas and Andreas Staier´s hyper-exciting fortepiano recording of 959.
v***@protonmail.com
2020-04-05 21:51:26 UTC
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Post by KimDenmark
Calling Kempff´s 959 " pure unadulterated junk " is just...odd. Kempff´s Schubert is a high-point in his recorded output. Ignore the troll and give it a listen.
Otherwise; Schnabel´s very good; Lupu´s also good, but missing a bit of the intensity I associate with 959.
Other really good 959´s: Frierich Wührer and Walter Klien. Both of them recorded Schubert´s complete sonatas in the ´60ies and they make beautiful music.
Lastly; two of my favourites: Eduard Erdmann, an early champion of Schubert´s sonatas and Andreas Staier´s hyper-exiting fortepiano recording of 959.
Thanks for all this; I do appreciate it. I liked the little of Walter Klien I've heard a lot.
Oscar
2020-04-05 21:53:45 UTC
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Post by v***@protonmail.com
Thanks for all this; I do appreciate it. I liked the little of Walter Klien I've heard a lot.
I have forgotten about Klein. Good recommendation. Will re-audition.
Not a Dentist
2020-04-05 22:32:44 UTC
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Post by Oscar
Post by v***@protonmail.com
Thanks for all this; I do appreciate it. I liked the little of Walter Klien I've heard a lot.
I have forgotten about Klein. Good recommendation. Will re-audition.
Be sure to look for the correct spelling: Klien, NOT Klein.
Oscar
2020-04-05 23:05:19 UTC
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Post by Not a Dentist
Be sure to look for the correct spelling: Klien, NOT Klein.
I knew that was coming. Alas, auto-correct.

Just re-auditioned Klien's D.959 and it was marvelous. Thx to KimDenmark.
Frank Berger
2020-04-05 23:21:22 UTC
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Post by Not a Dentist
Post by Oscar
Post by v***@protonmail.com
Thanks for all this; I do appreciate it. I liked the little of Walter Klien I've heard a lot.
I have forgotten about Klein. Good recommendation. Will re-audition.
Be sure to look for the correct spelling: Klien, NOT Klein.
It's hard to imagine how a person could spell his own name wrong!
dk
2020-04-06 06:17:52 UTC
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Post by KimDenmark
Calling Kempff´s 959 " pure unadulterated junk " is just...odd.
It is my considered professional opinion. I heard
Kempff live quite a few times during the 1970s.
Post by KimDenmark
Kempff´s Schubert is a high-point in his recorded output.
You gotta be kidding!
Post by KimDenmark
Ignore the troll and give it a listen.
Look in the mirror.
Post by KimDenmark
Otherwise; Schnabel´s very good;
Schnabel owns it.
Post by KimDenmark
Lupu´s also good, but missing a bit of the intensity
I associate with 959.
Lupu is a dreamer. Better suited for D.894.
Post by KimDenmark
Other really good 959´s: Frierich Wührer and Walter
Klien. Both of them recorded Schubert´s complete
sonatas in the ´60ies and they make beautiful music.
Unfortunately they cannot play the piano.
Post by KimDenmark
Lastly; two of my favourites: Eduard Erdmann, an early
champion of Schubert´s sonatas and Andreas Staier´s
hyper-exiting fortepiano recording of 959.
If you get excited about fortepiani you forfeit any
voting rights about piano matters! ;-)

dk
Frank Lekens
2020-04-06 15:53:39 UTC
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Post by KimDenmark
Calling Kempff´s 959 " pure unadulterated junk " is just...odd. Kempff´s Schubert is a high-point in his recorded output. Ignore the troll and give it a listen.
Otherwise; Schnabel´s very good; Lupu´s also good, but missing a bit of the intensity I associate with 959.
Other really good 959´s: Frierich Wührer and Walter Klien. Both of them recorded Schubert´s complete sonatas in the ´60ies and they make beautiful music.
Lastly; two of my favourites: Eduard Erdmann, an early champion of Schubert´s sonatas and Andreas Staier´s hyper-exiting fortepiano recording of 959.
Yes to most of them! (Don't know Klien.)
Erdmann is definitely worth seeking out.

Also, actually, Charles Rosen.
--
Frank Lekens

http://fmlekens.home.xs4all.nl/
https://franklekens.blogspot.nl/
Mandryka
2020-04-06 16:04:08 UTC
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Post by Frank Lekens
Post by KimDenmark
Calling Kempff´s 959 " pure unadulterated junk " is just...odd. Kempff´s Schubert is a high-point in his recorded output. Ignore the troll and give it a listen.
Otherwise; Schnabel´s very good; Lupu´s also good, but missing a bit of the intensity I associate with 959.
Other really good 959´s: Frierich Wührer and Walter Klien. Both of them recorded Schubert´s complete sonatas in the ´60ies and they make beautiful music.
Lastly; two of my favourites: Eduard Erdmann, an early champion of Schubert´s sonatas and Andreas Staier´s hyper-exiting fortepiano recording of 959.
Yes to most of them! (Don't know Klien.)
Erdmann is definitely worth seeking out.
Also, actually, Charles Rosen.
--
Frank Lekens
http://fmlekens.home.xs4all.nl/
https://franklekens.blogspot.nl/
There are two Erdman 959s. One does the first movement in 9.37 (I have it on a CD with Beethoven PC3) and the other does the same movement in 10.21 (I have it on a Schubert CD)

I vaguely remember that Rosen was good. And also I remember Perahia did an excellent one for CBS, I have it on a CD with Schumann sonata 2, this one

https://www.discogs.com/Schubert-Schumann-Murray-Perahia-Sonata-Op-Posth-D-959-Sonata-Op-22/release/10260264
JohnGavin
2020-04-07 00:43:09 UTC
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My vote goes to Pollini. In his prime, always plays with a beautiful objectivity free of distortion. This is not an easy conclusion, because of the elusive quality of the music. Schnabel is great in this music, but found his phrasing in the last movement not to my liking. Gave Serkin an open minded try - and every time he reaffirms the various reasons why I strongly dislike his playing. Sorry Rudolf.
v***@protonmail.com
2020-04-07 02:25:07 UTC
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Post by JohnGavin
My vote goes to Pollini. In his prime, always plays with a beautiful objectivity free of distortion. This is not an easy conclusion, because of the elusive quality of the music. Schnabel is great in this music, but found his phrasing in the last movement not to my liking. Gave Serkin an open minded try - and every time he reaffirms the various reasons why I strongly dislike his playing. Sorry Rudolf.
Thanks for this post. I'm curious, though: it it possible to play this kind of music "objectively"?
Maybe it is, and I'm interested in Pollini's take, too, but it seems like personal music to me.
Maybe that's simplistic..
dk
2020-04-10 07:25:14 UTC
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Post by JohnGavin
My vote goes to Pollini. In his prime, always plays with a beautiful objectivity free of distortion.
"Beautiful objectivity"?
"Military intelligence"?

dk
dk
2020-04-06 06:12:40 UTC
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Post by Steve Emerson
Post by dk
Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and
Brendel ca. 1988, but other suggestions would
be great.
Schnabel owns it: http://youtu.be/whkk2Yththg
There are several versions on YT that differ significantly in
sound quality.
For modern recordings, Valery Afanassiev, Sviatoslav Richter,
Grigory Sokolov and Elisabeth Leonskaja are tops.
Badura-Skoda, Brendull and Kempff are pure unadulterated junk.
Hope this helps. Enjoy.
dk
There's a Richter D959?
SE.
Sorry, no. My mistake. I
was probably thinking of
D.958.

dk
r***@gmail.com
2020-04-08 01:48:32 UTC
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Post by Steve Emerson
Post by dk
Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and
Brendel ca. 1988, but other suggestions would
be great.
Schnabel owns it: http://youtu.be/whkk2Yththg
There are several versions on YT that differ significantly in
sound quality.
For modern recordings, Valery Afanassiev, Sviatoslav Richter,
Grigory Sokolov and Elisabeth Leonskaja are tops.
Badura-Skoda, Brendull and Kempff are pure unadulterated junk.
Hope this helps. Enjoy.
dk
There's a Richter D959?
SE.
In DK's imagination perhaps. If it's real I've never come across it. I have looked!
Ricardo Jimenez
2020-04-08 02:01:27 UTC
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Post by r***@gmail.com
Post by Steve Emerson
Post by dk
Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and
Brendel ca. 1988, but other suggestions would
be great.
Schnabel owns it: http://youtu.be/whkk2Yththg
There are several versions on YT that differ significantly in
sound quality.
For modern recordings, Valery Afanassiev, Sviatoslav Richter,
Grigory Sokolov and Elisabeth Leonskaja are tops.
Badura-Skoda, Brendull and Kempff are pure unadulterated junk.
Hope this helps. Enjoy.
dk
There's a Richter D959?
SE.
In DK's imagination perhaps. If it's real I've never come across it. I have looked!
To my surprise I just found out there is a Bolet D.959 on an EloQuence
disc with D.784. It's on Spotify. In previous incarnations of this
thread I have expressed enthusiasm for both of Volodos' versions, live
on Youtube and studio. Also Anthony Goldstone's. I still like them.
dk
2020-04-10 07:27:46 UTC
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Post by r***@gmail.com
Post by Steve Emerson
Post by dk
Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and
Brendel ca. 1988, but other suggestions would
be great.
Schnabel owns it: http://youtu.be/whkk2Yththg
There are several versions on YT that differ significantly in
sound quality.
For modern recordings, Valery Afanassiev, Sviatoslav Richter,
Grigory Sokolov and Elisabeth Leonskaja are tops.
Badura-Skoda, Brendull and Kempff are pure unadulterated junk.
Hope this helps. Enjoy.
dk
There's a Richter D959?
SE.
In DK's imagination perhaps. If
it's real I've never come across
it. I have looked!
I did say I was wrong -- didn't I?
Was probably thinking of D.958.

dk
Alex Brown
2020-04-07 08:06:42 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and
Brendel ca. 1988, but other suggestions would
be great.
Schnabel owns it: http://youtu.be/whkk2Yththg
There are several versions on YT that differ significantly in
sound quality.
For modern recordings, Valery Afanassiev, Sviatoslav Richter,
Grigory Sokolov and Elisabeth Leonskaja are tops.
Badura-Skoda, Brendull and Kempff are pure unadulterated junk.
Hope this helps. Enjoy.
dk
Typically forthright views from dk!

I have the Pearl transfers of Schnabel's recording, which seem good -
especially since over the 20+ years I've had the discs, the background
noise which troubled me at first has magically diminished :-)

I really don't know about Afanassiev's recording (on Denon; are there
others?) At times listening to I was half convinced, but at others it
seemed he was jumping the shark, in the same manner as the Fonz's
legendary stunt - in slow motion. I'm sure this is not the impression he
wanted to convey.
--
- Alex Brown
drh8h
2020-04-07 13:35:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Alex Brown
Post by dk
Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and
Brendel ca. 1988, but other suggestions would
be great.
Schnabel owns it: http://youtu.be/whkk2Yththg
There are several versions on YT that differ significantly in
sound quality.
For modern recordings, Valery Afanassiev, Sviatoslav Richter,
Grigory Sokolov and Elisabeth Leonskaja are tops.
Badura-Skoda, Brendull and Kempff are pure unadulterated junk.
Hope this helps. Enjoy.
dk
Typically forthright views from dk!
I have the Pearl transfers of Schnabel's recording, which seem good -
especially since over the 20+ years I've had the discs, the background
noise which troubled me at first has magically diminished :-)
I really don't know about Afanassiev's recording (on Denon; are there
others?) At times listening to I was half convinced, but at others it
seemed he was jumping the shark, in the same manner as the Fonz's
legendary stunt - in slow motion. I'm sure this is not the impression he
wanted to convey.
--
- Alex Brown
The recent Warner Schnabel/Schubert box set has a superb transfer of 959. Sounds a good twenty years ahead of its time.

DH
t***@gmail.com
2020-04-18 19:58:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and
Brendel ca. 1988, but other suggestions would
be great.
Schnabel owns it: http://youtu.be/whkk2Yththg
There are several versions on YT that differ significantly in
sound quality.
For modern recordings, Valery Afanassiev, Sviatoslav Richter,
Grigory Sokolov and Elisabeth Leonskaja are tops.
Badura-Skoda, Brendull and Kempff are pure unadulterated junk.
Hope this helps. Enjoy.
dk
Richter didn't record D 959! He played D 958 and 960, but definitely not D 959.

TH
v***@protonmail.com
2020-04-18 20:16:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I got the Pollini recommended above today, and it's pretty much what I was looking for, a minor complaint
being that the sound is a little more filtered (or distant) than I'd like; not a big issue, and I understand that
there's a remastered edition that might sound better (I got a used, 2 cd set).

Thanks for that recommendation, and all the other ones.

C.
dk
2020-04-19 08:20:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by dk
Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and
Brendel ca. 1988, but other suggestions would
be great.
Schnabel owns it: http://youtu.be/whkk2Yththg
There are several versions on YT that differ significantly in
sound quality.
For modern recordings, Valery Afanassiev, Sviatoslav Richter,
Grigory Sokolov and Elisabeth Leonskaja are tops.
Badura-Skoda, Brendull and Kempff are pure unadulterated junk.
Hope this helps. Enjoy.
Richter didn't record D 959!
He played D 958 and 960, but
definitely not D 959.
Yes I know, and I corrected
myself a few days ago. I was
probably thinking of D.958.

dk
CSX
2020-04-05 21:28:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and Brendel ca. 1988, but other suggestions would be great.
Lonquich on EMI, hard to find, but a real gem!
C
weary flake
2020-04-05 23:48:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by CSX
Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and Brendel ca. 1988, but
other suggestions would be great.
Lonquich on EMI, hard to find, but a real gem!
C
Have you compared the Lonquich Schubert on EMI
with his Schubert on Alpha?
CSX
2020-04-06 10:45:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by weary flake
Post by CSX
Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and Brendel ca. 1988, but
other suggestions would be great.
Lonquich on EMI, hard to find, but a real gem!
C
Have you compared the Lonquich Schubert on EMI
with his Schubert on Alpha?
Yes, the EMI is more inspired, "magic" and intimate on the other hand I would describe the alpha as more pianistic, but the basics remain the same: lyricism almost sensual, tones and colors very smooth and a very tragic Schubert (of course in the II mvmt.

C
Frank Lekens
2020-04-07 09:36:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by CSX
Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and Brendel ca. 1988, but other suggestions would be great.
Lonquich on EMI, hard to find, but a real gem!
C
Read "impossible" for "hard".
--
Frank Lekens

http://fmlekens.home.xs4all.nl/
https://franklekens.blogspot.nl/
Mandryka
2020-04-07 09:52:50 UTC
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Lonquich says this about the first movement of 959, and I think it helps to make sense of his performance - both EMI and Alpha

“ the formal logic of what follows it defies immediate understanding. It proceeds by interruptions and harmonic digressions, including the second theme, which begins in gentle, questioning fashion, but whose concluding section, after various unexpected vicissitudes, has something stagnant about it. ”

That groping, that proceeding by interruptions and digressions, is very much part of Lonquich’s highly distinctive vision of late Schubert. We’re beyond like and dislike, beyond good and bad, with performances like this. Lonquich is not interested in entertaining us, thrilling us, seducing us. He’s expressing a vision of of the human condition through Schubert’s music.
JohnGavin
2020-04-07 12:57:51 UTC
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Post by JohnGavin
My vote goes to Pollini. In his prime, always plays with a beautiful objectivity free of distortion. This is not an easy conclusion, because of the elusive quality of the music. Schnabel is great in this music, but found his phrasing in the last movement not to my liking. Gave Serkin an open minded try - and every time he reaffirms the various reasons why I strongly dislike his playing. Sorry Rudolf.
Thanks for this post. I'm curious, though: it it possible to play this kind of music "objectively"?
Maybe it is, and I'm interested in Pollini's take, too, but it seems like personal music to me.
Maybe that's simplistic..

———————————————————————-/—
Of course each listener will have their own preferences - and that is as it should be.

But rather than using words to describe what a more objective interpretation means for me, I would give an example instead. Listen to a Schubert Lied sung first by Elizabeth Schwarzkopf and then by Elly Ameling. ES inflects, bends and highlights certain words according to their meaning and context in the lyrics. Ameling sings directly, as if the beauty of the melody is of foremost importance.

The Schwarzkopf way leaves little to the listener’s imagination, delivering it on a silver platter (but in her very personalized view) whereas Ameling let’s the listener fill in the spaces with their own feeling and imagination) and yes - it certainly helps to know German.

I enjoy listening to both singers, but ultimately I admit to preferring Ameling. I find the Pollini / Ameling approach more deeply fulfilling- but it only adds up to one listener’s taste. By the way, it takes great skill, and masterful technique to succeed in delivering this sort of performance.
v***@protonmail.com
2020-04-07 13:48:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by v***@protonmail.com
Post by JohnGavin
My vote goes to Pollini. In his prime, always plays with a beautiful objectivity free of distortion. This is not an easy conclusion, because of the elusive quality of the music. Schnabel is great in this music, but found his phrasing in the last movement not to my liking. Gave Serkin an open minded try - and every time he reaffirms the various reasons why I strongly dislike his playing. Sorry Rudolf.
Thanks for this post. I'm curious, though: it it possible to play this kind of music "objectively"?
Maybe it is, and I'm interested in Pollini's take, too, but it seems like personal music to me.
Maybe that's simplistic..
———————————————————————-/—
Of course each listener will have their own preferences - and that is as it should be.
But rather than using words to describe what a more objective interpretation means for me, I would give an example instead. Listen to a Schubert Lied sung first by Elizabeth Schwarzkopf and then by Elly Ameling. ES inflects, bends and highlights certain words according to their meaning and context in the lyrics. Ameling sings directly, as if the beauty of the melody is of foremost importance.
The Schwarzkopf way leaves little to the listener’s imagination, delivering it on a silver platter (but in her very personalized view) whereas Ameling let’s the listener fill in the spaces with their own feeling and imagination) and yes - it certainly helps to know German.
I enjoy listening to both singers, but ultimately I admit to preferring Ameling. I find the Pollini / Ameling approach more deeply fulfilling- but it only adds up to one listener’s taste. By the way, it takes great skill, and masterful technique to succeed in delivering this sort of performance.
Thank you for this- I have a better understanding now, and will include Pollini's 959 in my search.
Raymond Hall
2020-04-07 23:56:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by v***@protonmail.com
Post by JohnGavin
My vote goes to Pollini. In his prime, always plays with a beautiful objectivity free of distortion. This is not an easy conclusion, because of the elusive quality of the music. Schnabel is great in this music, but found his phrasing in the last movement not to my liking. Gave Serkin an open minded try - and every time he reaffirms the various reasons why I strongly dislike his playing. Sorry Rudolf.
Thanks for this post. I'm curious, though: it it possible to play this kind of music "objectively"?
Maybe it is, and I'm interested in Pollini's take, too, but it seems like personal music to me.
Maybe that's simplistic..
———————————————————————-/—
Of course each listener will have their own preferences - and that is as it should be.
But rather than using words to describe what a more objective interpretation means for me, I would give an example instead. Listen to a Schubert Lied sung first by Elizabeth Schwarzkopf and then by Elly Ameling. ES inflects, bends and highlights certain words according to their meaning and context in the lyrics. Ameling sings directly, as if the beauty of the melody is of foremost importance.
The Schwarzkopf way leaves little to the listener’s imagination, delivering it on a silver platter (but in her very personalized view) whereas Ameling let’s the listener fill in the spaces with their own feeling and imagination) and yes - it certainly helps to know German.
I enjoy listening to both singers, but ultimately I admit to preferring Ameling. I find the Pollini / Ameling approach more deeply fulfilling- but it only adds up to one listener’s taste. By the way, it takes great skill, and masterful technique to succeed in delivering this sort of performance.
Good explanation. The Schwarzkopf way, as with any solo artist and other types of music where unique and highly personal interpretation comes into play, can wear off after time because it can become irritating.

Ray Hall, Taree
g***@gmail.com
2020-04-10 20:38:57 UTC
Reply
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Post by Raymond Hall
Post by v***@protonmail.com
Post by JohnGavin
My vote goes to Pollini. In his prime, always plays with a beautiful objectivity free of distortion. This is not an easy conclusion, because of the elusive quality of the music. Schnabel is great in this music, but found his phrasing in the last movement not to my liking. Gave Serkin an open minded try - and every time he reaffirms the various reasons why I strongly dislike his playing. Sorry Rudolf.
Thanks for this post. I'm curious, though: it it possible to play this kind of music "objectively"?
Maybe it is, and I'm interested in Pollini's take, too, but it seems like personal music to me.
Maybe that's simplistic..
———————————————————————-/—
Of course each listener will have their own preferences - and that is as it should be.
But rather than using words to describe what a more objective interpretation means for me, I would give an example instead. Listen to a Schubert Lied sung first by Elizabeth Schwarzkopf and then by Elly Ameling. ES inflects, bends and highlights certain words according to their meaning and context in the lyrics. Ameling sings directly, as if the beauty of the melody is of foremost importance.
The Schwarzkopf way leaves little to the listener’s imagination, delivering it on a silver platter (but in her very personalized view) whereas Ameling let’s the listener fill in the spaces with their own feeling and imagination) and yes - it certainly helps to know German.
I enjoy listening to both singers, but ultimately I admit to preferring Ameling. I find the Pollini / Ameling approach more deeply fulfilling- but it only adds up to one listener’s taste. By the way, it takes great skill, and masterful technique to succeed in delivering this sort of performance.
Good explanation. The Schwarzkopf way, as with any solo artist and other types of music where unique and highly personal interpretation comes into play, can wear off after time because it can become irritating.
Ray Hall, Taree
- Where the Mind is biggest, the Heart, the Senses, Magnanimity, Charity, Tolerance, Kindliness, and the rest of them scarcely have room to breathe.

Virginia Woolf
JohnGavin
2020-04-10 20:43:31 UTC
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- Where the Mind is biggest, the Heart, the Senses, Magnanimity, Charity, Tolerance, Kindliness, and the rest of them scarcely have room to breathe.

Virginia Woolf

Excellent observation!
g***@gmail.com
2020-04-10 20:53:15 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
- Where the Mind is biggest, the Heart, the Senses, Magnanimity, Charity, Tolerance, Kindliness, and the rest of them scarcely have room to breathe.
Virginia Woolf
Excellent observation!
Thank you.

Concerning the difference between Schwarzkopf's and Ameling's approach to Schubert's lieder could that difference also apply to S.'s and Della Casa's approach to THE FOUR LAST SONGS?

Couldn't S. be accused of over-intellectualizing aesthetic expression such that its enjoyment is diminished?:

- If you never want to laugh again, analyze comedy.

Me
JohnGavin
2020-04-10 22:47:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Concerning the difference between Schwarzkopf's and Ameling's approach to Schubert's lieder could that difference also apply to S.'s and Della Casa's approach to THE FOUR LAST SONGS?

Couldn't S. be accused of over-intellectualizing aesthetic expression such that its enjoyment is diminished?:

- If you never want to laugh again, analyze comedy.

Me


There’s no absolute conclusion. My personal credo regarding art is that the heart should lead and the mind should follow. Otherwise the end product will be either calculated or clever. The heart is the place of spontaneity and intuition.

But I would stop comparing after the Schwarzkopf/ Ameling example- it was a generalization- I know that Schwarzkopf was capable of very heart felt interpretations at times.
v***@protonmail.com
2020-04-11 00:40:20 UTC
Reply
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Post by g***@gmail.com
Concerning the difference between Schwarzkopf's and Ameling's approach to Schubert's lieder could that difference also apply to S.'s and Della Casa's approach to THE FOUR LAST SONGS?
- If you never want to laugh again, analyze comedy.
Me
There’s no absolute conclusion. My personal credo regarding art is that the heart should lead and the mind should follow. Otherwise the end product will be either calculated or clever. The heart is the place of spontaneity and intuition.
But I would stop comparing after the Schwarzkopf/ Ameling example- it was a generalization- I know that Schwarzkopf was capable of very heart felt interpretations at times.
It was a helpful illustration to this reader and listener.
Bozo
2020-04-11 01:23:20 UTC
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There’s no absolute conclusion. My personal credo regarding art is that the heart should lead and the mind >should follow. Otherwise the end product will be either calculated or clever. The heart is the place of >spontaneity and intuition.
Well said ! When I decide to listen to a piece new to me , that I often may never have read anything about, or even had a recommendation, I listen to it first, read about it after. Harvey Sachs, in his bio of Arthur Rubinstein, quotes James Levine that "modern" pianists are too often either " eccentric or anonymous."
g***@gmail.com
2020-04-11 07:22:43 UTC
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Post by v***@protonmail.com
Post by g***@gmail.com
- Where the Mind is biggest, the Heart, the Senses, Magnanimity, Charity, Tolerance, Kindliness, and the rest of them scarcely have room to breathe.
Virginia Woolf
Excellent observation!
Thank you.
Concerning the difference between Schwarzkopf's and Ameling's approach to Schubert's lieder could that difference also apply to S.'s and Della Casa's approach to THE FOUR LAST SONGS?
- If you never want to laugh again, analyze comedy.
Me
Wouldn't Ameling agree with this?:

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!searchin/rec.music.classical.recordings/%22janet$20baker%22%7Csort:relevance/rec.music.classical.recordings/oho0XvwLWpg/b-Lm6H5XbwMJ
g***@gmail.com
2020-04-12 09:59:07 UTC
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Post by v***@protonmail.com
Post by g***@gmail.com
- Where the Mind is biggest, the Heart, the Senses, Magnanimity, Charity, Tolerance, Kindliness, and the rest of them scarcely have room to breathe.
Virginia Woolf
Excellent observation!
Thank you.
Concerning the difference between Schwarzkopf's and Ameling's approach to Schubert's lieder could that difference also apply to S.'s and Della Casa's approach to THE FOUR LAST SONGS?
- If you never want to laugh again, analyze comedy.
Me
- Analyzing humor is like dissecting a frog. Few people are interested and the frog dies of it.

E. B. White
i***@gmail.com
2020-04-11 07:18:24 UTC
Reply
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Post by v***@protonmail.com
Post by JohnGavin
My vote goes to Pollini. In his prime, always plays with a beautiful objectivity free of distortion. This is not an easy conclusion, because of the elusive quality of the music. Schnabel is great in this music, but found his phrasing in the last movement not to my liking. Gave Serkin an open minded try - and every time he reaffirms the various reasons why I strongly dislike his playing. Sorry Rudolf.
Thanks for this post. I'm curious, though: it it possible to play this kind of music "objectively"?
Maybe it is, and I'm interested in Pollini's take, too, but it seems like personal music to me.
Maybe that's simplistic..
———————————————————————-/—
Of course each listener will have their own preferences - and that is as it should be.
But rather than using words to describe what a more objective interpretation means for me, I would give an example instead. Listen to a Schubert Lied sung first by Elizabeth Schwarzkopf and then by Elly Ameling. ES inflects, bends and highlights certain words according to their meaning and context in the lyrics. Ameling sings directly, as if the beauty of the melody is of foremost importance.
The Schwarzkopf way leaves little to the listener’s imagination, delivering it on a silver platter (but in her very personalized view) whereas Ameling let’s the listener fill in the spaces with their own feeling and imagination) and yes - it certainly helps to know German.
I enjoy listening to both singers, but ultimately I admit to preferring Ameling. I find the Pollini / Ameling approach more deeply fulfilling- but it only adds up to one listener’s taste. By the way, it takes great skill, and masterful technique to succeed in delivering this sort of performance.
Wouldn't Ameling agree with this?:

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!searchin/rec.music.classical.recordings/%22janet$20baker%22%7Csort:relevance/rec.music.classical.recordings/oho0XvwLWpg/b-Lm6H5XbwMJ
g***@gmail.com
2020-07-03 22:21:13 UTC
Reply
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Post by v***@protonmail.com
Post by JohnGavin
My vote goes to Pollini. In his prime, always plays with a beautiful objectivity free of distortion. This is not an easy conclusion, because of the elusive quality of the music. Schnabel is great in this music, but found his phrasing in the last movement not to my liking. Gave Serkin an open minded try - and every time he reaffirms the various reasons why I strongly dislike his playing. Sorry Rudolf.
Thanks for this post. I'm curious, though: it it possible to play this kind of music "objectively"?
Maybe it is, and I'm interested in Pollini's take, too, but it seems like personal music to me.
Maybe that's simplistic..
———————————————————————-/—
Of course each listener will have their own preferences - and that is as it should be.
But rather than using words to describe what a more objective interpretation means for me, I would give an example instead. Listen to a Schubert Lied sung first by Elizabeth Schwarzkopf and then by Elly Ameling. ES inflects, bends and highlights certain words according to their meaning and context in the lyrics. Ameling sings directly, as if the beauty of the melody is of foremost importance.
The Schwarzkopf way leaves little to the listener’s imagination, delivering it on a silver platter (but in her very personalized view) whereas Ameling let’s the listener fill in the spaces with their own feeling and imagination) and yes - it certainly helps to know German.
I enjoy listening to both singers, but ultimately I admit to preferring Ameling. I find the Pollini / Ameling approach more deeply fulfilling- but it only adds up to one listener’s taste. By the way, it takes great skill, and masterful technique to succeed in delivering this sort of performance.
The following recent Youtube upload touches on the difference between Ameling and Schwarzkopf:

Review: Elly Ameling Sings Haydn Songs
dk
2020-07-04 06:20:23 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
The following recent Youtube upload touches on
Review: Elly Ameling Sings Haydn Songs
One looked better than the other, and one sang
better than the other. Neither performed nor
recorded Schubert's D.959.

dk
Rebuild Queens Hall London
2020-04-05 22:10:15 UTC
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Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and Brendel ca. 1988, but other suggestions would be great.
Friedrich Wuhrer on VOX. A very fine performance despite poor sound.
Bozo
2020-04-05 23:54:30 UTC
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Post by Rebuild Queens Hall London
Friedrich Wuhrer on VOX. A very fine performance despite poor sound.
Agree on Wuhrer. The Badura-Skoda grand piano,not fortepiano, 50's I believe not released until the 70's on RCA,and the Schnabel great.
Me
2020-04-05 22:46:56 UTC
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Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and Brendel ca. 1988, but other suggestions would be great.
Rudolf Serkin is the best I have heard.

George
t***@hotmail.com
2020-04-05 22:47:27 UTC
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Pollini based on Schubert's autograph.
s***@nycap.rr.com
2020-04-07 01:12:27 UTC
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Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and Brendel ca. 1988, but other suggestions would be great.
Radu Lupu is terrific, IMHO.

https://www.amazon.com/Schubert-Piano-Sonatas-Moments-Musicaux/dp/B000BVEKKE

MIFrost
Frank Lekens
2020-04-07 09:36:15 UTC
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Post by s***@nycap.rr.com
Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and Brendel ca. 1988, but other suggestions would be great.
Radu Lupu is terrific, IMHO.
https://www.amazon.com/Schubert-Piano-Sonatas-Moments-Musicaux/dp/B000BVEKKE
MIFrost
I agree.

When last I listened, I actually also rather liked Uchida's Schubert
recordings. Though I'd have to relisten to know how I like her D959.
--
Frank Lekens

http://fmlekens.home.xs4all.nl/
https://franklekens.blogspot.nl/
p***@gmail.com
2020-04-07 19:39:07 UTC
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Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and Brendel ca. 1988, but other suggestions would be great.
I still have not heard Charles Rosen on EPIC from the early 1960s is it good ?.
Steve Emerson
2020-04-07 21:44:26 UTC
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Post by p***@gmail.com
Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and Brendel ca. 1988, but other suggestions would be great.
I still have not heard Charles Rosen on EPIC from the early 1960s is it good ?.
It's novel. Rather severe and short of Schubertian warmth & charm. Interpretively of interest.

SE.
MELMOTH13
2020-04-08 09:07:37 UTC
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Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and Brendel ca. 1988, but other suggestions would be great.
Lupu...
Leonskaia...
Dalberto...
MELMOTH13
2020-04-10 08:11:11 UTC
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Post by MELMOTH13
Lupu...
Leonskaia...
Dalberto...
And Endres...Klien...Zimerman...Arrau...
MELMOTH13
2020-04-10 09:08:15 UTC
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Post by MELMOTH13
Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and Brendel ca. 1988, but
other suggestions would be great.
Lupu...
Leonskaia...
Dalberto...
And Endres (Cappricio)...Arrau (Universal)...Zimerman (EMI)...Klien
(Vox)...Lee (Valois)...
t***@hotmail.com
2020-04-10 10:53:40 UTC
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Post by MELMOTH13
Zimerman (EMI)
Zacharias (EMI) ?
MELMOTH13
2020-04-10 11:56:21 UTC
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Post by t***@hotmail.com
Zacharias (EMI) ?
Yes !...
v***@protonmail.com
2020-04-10 16:24:53 UTC
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Thanks for all the recommendations. I've decided to start with Pollini; who knows where I'll end up.
Tatonik
2020-04-10 19:06:24 UTC
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I don't have a recommendation, but these are the D.959 recordings I own:

Alfred Brendel (1980s)
Richard Goode
Charles Rosen
András Schiff (fortepiano)
Melvyn Tan (fortepiano)

Most recently I've been listening to Schiff and Goode, probably because
those are the ones I acquired most recently.

The only one I didn't like much is Tan. Were I to revisit it, perhaps I
would change my mind. Rosen's rather clipped approach takes some
getting used to. I would have liked to hear how his interpretation
changed in later years, but he didn't record it again to my knowledge.
Not a Dentist
2020-04-10 20:12:23 UTC
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Post by MELMOTH13
Post by t***@hotmail.com
Zacharias (EMI) ?
Yes !...
Please clarify this reply...
You first listed Zimerman without a label, then added EMI, but his recording is on DG, no? Yes!
When asked if you meant Zacharias instead of Zimerman, did you CHANGE the artist to Zacharias, who IS on EMI?? Does that REMOVE Zimerman from your list?
MELMOTH13
2020-04-11 12:41:37 UTC
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Post by Not a Dentist
When asked if you meant Zacharias instead of Zimerman, did you CHANGE the artist to Zacharias, who IS on EMI??
Zacharias/EMI...
Sol L. Siegel
2020-04-12 15:15:44 UTC
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Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and Brendel ca. 1988, but
other suggestions would be great.
Lupu, and either version by Zacharias. Plus another vote for Schnabel.


- Sol L. Siegel, Philadelphia, PA USA
--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
dk
2020-04-18 09:48:30 UTC
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Post by Sol L. Siegel
Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and Brendel ca. 1988, but
other suggestions would be great.
Lupu, and either version by Zacharias. Plus another vote for Schnabel.
Sokolov:


dk
dk
2020-04-18 09:49:31 UTC
Reply
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Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum,
and Brendel ca. 1988, but other suggestions
would be great.
Sokolov: http://youtu.be/wWVyj9IFCB4

dk
Alex Brown
2020-07-04 10:08:49 UTC
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Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and Brendel ca. 1988, but other suggestions would be great.
There was a thread on this recently. Consensus (so much as that's
possible among pianophiles) was the Schnabel is pretty much essential.

Beyond that, add modern recordings to your taste. Perahia/Brendel for
central & unflashy (to a fault?); Uchida for exquisite & dreamy;
Afanassiev for weird ... and so on.

I have Volodos on my wishlist after liking his D 894 a lot.
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- Alex Brown
Frank Lekens
2020-09-10 07:21:31 UTC
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Post by Alex Brown
Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and Brendel ca. 1988, but
other suggestions would be great.
There was a thread on this recently. Consensus (so much as that's
possible among pianophiles) was the Schnabel is pretty much essential.
Beyond that, add modern recordings to your taste. Perahia/Brendel for
central & unflashy (to a fault?); Uchida for exquisite & dreamy;
Afanassiev for weird ... and so on.
I have Volodos on my wishlist after liking his D 894 a lot.
There's a nice live recording of the sonata (and other things) by Claire
Huangci towards the start of this programme:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/m000mcrq
--
Frank Lekens

http://fmlekens.home.xs4all.nl/
https://franklekens.blogspot.nl/
George
2020-09-15 01:00:31 UTC
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Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and Brendel ca. 1988, but other suggestions would be great.
If that's the live Philips recording by Brendel, I agree, though Rudolf Serkin is even better.

George
francis
2020-09-16 01:48:47 UTC
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Radu Lupu. For any Schubert, really.
Post by George
Post by Carey
I'm thinking of Badura-Skoda, Rosenbaum, and Brendel ca. 1988, but other suggestions would be great.
If that's the live Philips recording by Brendel, I agree, though Rudolf Serkin is even better.
George
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