Discussion:
WAYLTL - April, 2020
(too old to reply)
Al Eisner
2020-04-02 01:57:05 UTC
Permalink
This post actually overlaps the month boundary - I hope that's okay.

Yesterday: a two-CD (mostly-) Beethoven set on Harmonia Mundi, with
Andreas Staier (fortepiano), Daniel Sepec (violin) and Jean-Guihen
Queyras (cello). The first CD, for violin and piano, includes Sonatas
4 and 7 and Variations on Se vuol ballare. The gimmick here is that
the violin is said to have bben owned by Beethoven - to me it sounds
thin and sometimes harsh. the fortepiano is by Graf - I find it too
tinkly in the higher regisgters. The second CD has LvB trios 3 and 5,
plus a trio by Hummel. The instruments are different (Staier uses
a 20th century fortepiano "after Graf", and sound more "normal" to me,
although recorded sound seems a bit harsh. #3 is quite good (IMO the
best thing in the set). In #5 the second movement is suitably
ghostly, but the outer movements seem overly aggressive. The
Hummel, a pleasant work, is performed pleasantly.

I don't really understand why the above received special recognition
from BBC magazine and Radio-3. Since I had just downloaded the Big
KLH Trio Box, I listened today to their "Ghost". I found the MP3 sound
preferable to that on the Harmonia Mundi CD above. The perforkance is
excellent; I prefer it in almost all aspects to the Staier et al. The
middle movement takes 3 minutes longer in KLR, not only ghostly, but
also intense - the way I like it. My one regret is that the first
movement is considerably shorter, omitting repeats (I think), The
finale is refreshing.

Also today: my second venture into the daily Met opera showings,
"The Barber of Seville". Great fun, generally good staging (the comic
ensembles were somewhat botched) and a uniformly very good cast.
Joyce di Donato is perfect. (From 2007.) Did anyone else catch this?
--
Al Eisner
Bozo
2020-04-02 14:55:17 UTC
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Dusting off these:

Complete solo piano music of Guy Sacre, Billy Eidi,pianist,Timpani cd 1995, world premiere recording
Korngold's Left-Hand PC, Hamelin,Hyperion 1998 cd
Vierne's Piano Quintet,Muza Rubackyte,pianist with Terpsycordes Quartet,Brilliant Classics cd 2016
Chausson,Concert,Op.21,Harmonia Mundi 1984 cd,Jean-Claude Pennetier, pianist, others
Complete solo piano music of Albert Roussel,Emanuele Torquati,pianist,2012 Brilliant Classics
Korngold's Suite,Op.23,Fleisher,Silverstein,Laredo,Ma, SONY Classical 1998 cd
number_six
2020-04-03 18:57:15 UTC
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Aaron Rosand 2-cd Vox Box
this was recommended here a few years ago and I am just now getting to it

Very nice set, introduced me to three composers I had not heard before --
J Hubay, HW Ernst and B Godard
c***@gmail.com
2020-04-03 19:20:48 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Complete solo piano music of Albert Roussel,Emanuele Torquati,pianist,2012 Brilliant Classics
I bought the Roussel set when it first appeared out of curiosity and because it was cheap, and it far exceeded my expectations.

I'm listening to Saraste's first (RCA) Sibelius cycle, reissued in an ultra-cheap 8-cd box. It cost me about $22 with postage and tax. In addition to the symphonies and various orchestral works, the box includes the works for violin and orchestra with Joseph Swensen as soloist. I've admired these recordings since they were first issued but did not purchase all of them at the time, so it's great to have them now.

AC
Bozo
2020-04-09 22:05:03 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Korngold's Suite,Op.23,Fleisher,Silverstein,Laredo,Ma, SONY Classical 1998 cd
On the same SONY cd, Franz Schmidt's Op.34 Quintet in G major for Piano Left-Hand and Strings, a real over-looked ( by me ) gem.
Bozo
2020-04-09 22:07:17 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Korngold's Suite,Op.23,Fleisher,Silverstein,Laredo,Ma, SONY Classical 1998 cd
On the same SONY cd, Franz Schmidt's Op.34 Quintet in G major for Piano Left-Hand and Strings, a real >over-looked ( by me ) gem.
The Schmidt :

Oscar
2020-04-09 23:44:43 UTC
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Maryla Jonas 4CD box on Sony Classical (2017). Chopin playing of the highest artistry and beauty. I think everyone in this group who has heard her Chopin agrees, e.g. Nocturne in B major, Op.32 No.1. This is one of those releases that is just a mandatory purchase. Still can’t believe Sony made it available to us.
JohnGavin
2020-04-10 00:01:35 UTC
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It’s on Spotify. It’s very special, particularly the Chopin.
Ricardo Jimenez
2020-04-10 00:52:38 UTC
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It’s on Spotify. It’s very special, particularly the Chopin.
I added it to my Sotify library. I am intersted in what you think of
this review by Christopher Howell.
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2017/Feb/Jonas_forgotten_p.htm
Oscar
2020-04-10 02:46:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ricardo Jimenez
I added it to my Sotify library. I am intersted in what you think of
this review by Christopher Howell.
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2017/Feb/Jonas_forgotten_p.htm
Olin Downes, The New York Times, March 31, 1946:

<< Never exaggerating, she proved that she has the secret, not shared by many, of Chopin's "rubato." She caught with intuition each fluctuation of color, tempo, and mood, so subtly and changefully present in the Polish genius' art.

And Miss Jonas understands Chopin's use of the pedal . . . The shimmer of the harmonies, the haunting song that they half revealed and half concealed, was something to remember. The three Mazurkas, op. 68, No. 4; op. 30, No. 4; op. 30, No. 2; the posthumous Nocturne in C-sharp minor, and the seldom-heard rondo in E-flat major, all were triumphs of feeling and style. >>

Amen.
Lawrence Chalmers
2020-04-03 22:31:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Al Eisner
This post actually overlaps the month boundary - I hope that's okay.
Yesterday: a two-CD (mostly-) Beethoven set on Harmonia Mundi, with
Andreas Staier (fortepiano), Daniel Sepec (violin) and Jean-Guihen
Queyras (cello). The first CD, for violin and piano, includes Sonatas
4 and 7 and Variations on Se vuol ballare. The gimmick here is that
the violin is said to have bben owned by Beethoven - to me it sounds
thin and sometimes harsh. the fortepiano is by Graf - I find it too
tinkly in the higher regisgters. The second CD has LvB trios 3 and 5,
plus a trio by Hummel. The instruments are different (Staier uses
a 20th century fortepiano "after Graf", and sound more "normal" to me,
although recorded sound seems a bit harsh. #3 is quite good (IMO the
best thing in the set). In #5 the second movement is suitably
ghostly, but the outer movements seem overly aggressive. The
Hummel, a pleasant work, is performed pleasantly.
I don't really understand why the above received special recognition
from BBC magazine and Radio-3. Since I had just downloaded the Big
KLH Trio Box, I listened today to their "Ghost". I found the MP3 sound
preferable to that on the Harmonia Mundi CD above. The perforkance is
excellent; I prefer it in almost all aspects to the Staier et al. The
middle movement takes 3 minutes longer in KLR, not only ghostly, but
also intense - the way I like it. My one regret is that the first
movement is considerably shorter, omitting repeats (I think), The
finale is refreshing.
Also today: my second venture into the daily Met opera showings,
"The Barber of Seville". Great fun, generally good staging (the comic
ensembles were somewhat botched) and a uniformly very good cast.
Joyce di Donato is perfect. (From 2007.) Did anyone else catch this?
--
Al Eisner
Three '21st century' cello concertos byJean-Guihen Queyras on harmonia mundi
of Bruno Mantovani, Philippe Schoeller, and Gilbert Amy. I'd been listening to Mantovani's music on yt and have been sort of 'taken' by it. There are very few recordings commercially available except through Amazon.Italy where one was listed. So bought it and wondering if I'll get it given the virus situation. So this set of concertos was easily available. And these three concertos were very modern but accessible and Queyras' playing is very good. I have a set of Bach Cello Suites by him that I like much more than the many available I've heard. The sound is fantastic and performances were recorded live
Oscar
2020-04-04 23:30:27 UTC
Permalink
Speaking of Bach Cello Suites . . .

Listening now to Danil Shafran titles in the Legendary Treasures series on Doremi, of which there are 4 volumes to date. The Bach Six Suites for Cello Solo has since been issued on Melodiya, ostensibly from master tapes, but there does not seem to be a great difference between the two releases based on streaming samples I've auditioned via headphones. The Doremi is a needle-drop from apparently very well-preserved original LPs, with close-miked sound but still a lot of bloom and richness to Shafran's tone production. Beautiful playing. Also, on Legendary Treasures Vol.1 there are stunning renditions of of Tchaikovsky's 6 Morceaux and Souvenir. What a player.
Oscar
2020-04-04 23:58:30 UTC
Permalink
Zhu Xiao-Mei, one of the preeminent Bach players today (I'll take her over Hewitt any day of the week), has released 4 titles on the Accentus label. French Suites, Goldbergs, Inventions & Sinfonias, and my personal favorite, Art of Fugue, which I am auditioning now via AppleMusic. A well-regulated piano (Steinway D-274), recorded at Mendelssohn-Saal Gewandhaus zu Leipzig, February 2014. Total time: 72:48. Zhu's story of her life growing up in the Cultural Revolution was written out in her autobiography and it is a must-read. She is a true survivor, and this music, perhaps Bach's finest for solo keyboard, carries all the more import because of it. In Zhu's hands the voices to emerge clearly, soulfully, everything comes alive, and it is exciting like few other recordings of this work I have heard (and I do think Hewitt's recording is her finest Bach _that I have heard_). Amazing!
Oscar
2020-04-05 00:06:09 UTC
Permalink
P.S. Link to Zhu's autobiography, The Secret Piano: From Mao’s Labor Camps to Bach’s Goldberg Variations, published in paperback in 2012 by AmazonCrossing.

Blurb:

Zhu Xiao-Mei was born to middle-class parents in post-war China, and her musical proficiency became clear at an early age. Taught to play the piano by her mother, she developed quickly into a prodigy, immersing herself in the work of classical masters like Bach and Brahms. She was just ten years old when she began a rigorous course of study at the Beijing Conservatory, laying the groundwork for what was sure to be an extraordinary career. But in 1966, when Xiao-Mei was seventeen, the Cultural Revolution began, and life as she knew it changed forever. One by one, her family members were scattered, sentenced to prison or labor camps. By 1969, the art schools had closed, and Xiao-Mei was on her way to a work camp in Mongolia, where she would spend the next five years. Life in the camp was nearly unbearable, thanks to horrific living conditions and intensive brainwashing campaigns. Yet through it all Xiao-Mei clung to her passion for music and her sense of humor. And when the Revolution ended, it was the piano that helped her to heal. Heartbreaking and heartwarming, The Secret Piano is the incredible true story of one woman’s survival in the face of unbelievable odds—and in pursuit of a powerful dream.

Bio:

Zhu Xiao-Mei was born in Shanghai, China. She began playing the piano when she was a young child, and by the age of eight was performing for Peking radio and television stations. She entered the Beijing Conservatory when she was ten years old, but her education was interrupted by the Cultural Revolution. After five years in a labor camp in Mongolia, she returned to China, before moving on to the United States and finally Paris, France, where she has lived and worked since 1984. She teaches at the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique and has performed for audiences on six continents. She is one of the world’s most celebrated interpreters of Bach’s Goldberg Variations.

https://www.amazon.com/Secret-Piano-Labor-Goldberg-Variations/dp/1611090776/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=zhu+xiao-mei&qid=1586045012&rnid=2941120011&s=books&sr=1-1
Bozo
2020-04-05 15:06:36 UTC
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Ignazy Friedman’s amazing Chopin Polonaise,Op.71,# 2, Danacord cd:



Pollini did not include the work on his 70’s DGG cd I have of all the other polonaises, including Op.61, a 63-min.cd ?
Steve Emerson
2020-04-05 15:48:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bozo
http://youtu.be/DaeT6Z62PaE
Pollini did not include the work on his 70’s DGG cd I have of all the other polonaises, including Op.61, a 63-min.cd ?
That's a really early work -- Op Posth. There's a standard batch of Polonaises (as with the 14 most commonly done waltzes) that omits the early ones; such as the three from Opus 71 (1825-28).

SE.
Bozo
2020-04-06 00:26:33 UTC
Permalink
That's a really early work -- Op Posth. There's a standard batch of Polonaises (as with the 14 most >commonly done waltzes) that omits the early ones; such as the three from Opus 71 (1825-28).
Thanks, was not aware of the history of Op.71. Op.71,# 2, and Op.44 are the only 2 of the Polonaises I listen to intentionally.

Pollini should have learned, and/or recorded Op,.71,# 2, to "fill in" after the first 63 minutes.
Bozo
2020-04-07 01:01:42 UTC
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Post by Bozo
http://youtu.be/DaeT6Z62PaE
I have high regard for pianist Evgenyi Bozanhov ever since the 2009 Cliburn.Here he is at the 2010 Chopin playing the Op.71,# 2 in fine manner.But, without my blabbing on specifics you can hear yourself , the comparison to Friedman's above illustrates the difference, ie gulf, between " Golden Age " playing and much today :


JohnGavin
2020-04-07 01:18:53 UTC
Permalink
I have high regard for pianist Evgenyi Bozanhov ever since the 2009 Cliburn.Here he is at the 2010 Chopin playing the Op.71,# 2 in fine manner.But, without my blabbing on specifics you can hear yourself , the comparison to Friedman's above illustrates the difference, ie gulf, between " Golden Age " playing and much today.

Try to hear Maryla Jonas in the op. 71 #2 Polonaise. It’s an exceptional performance.
Bozo
2020-04-07 15:47:12 UTC
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Post by JohnGavin
Try to hear Maryla Jonas in the op. 71 #2 Polonaise. It’s an exceptional performance.
Thanks.Her conception, and execution,is very similar to Friedman. Both treat the work as polonaise rhythmically , with drama , structure and continuity, whereas Bozhanov's reading, to my ear,is rather episodic without much pulse, a piece d'salon.

Jonas (1948) to compare to earlier links for Bozhanov,Friedberg :

Oscar
2020-04-07 19:47:10 UTC
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Schumann: Piano music

Leon McCawley (pf)

Somm 'Céleste Series' SOMMCD 0134 ℗ © 2013. CD.
DDD.
Recorded at Champs Hills, Pulborough, West Sussex, May 20 & 21, 2012.
Recording producer: Siva Oke.
Recording engineer: Ben Connellan.
Front cover photo of Leon McCawley by Ben Ealovega.
Design & layout: Andrew Giles.
Booklet note © Malcolm MacDonald [R.I.P., the late reviewer in BBC Music Magazine and author of many fine books, viz. Brahms entry in The Master Musician Series]
Total duration: 74:27.
℗ & © 2013 SOMM RECORDINGS • THAMES DITTON • SURREY • ENGLAND.
Made in the E.U.

COMMENT: McCawley is one of our erstwhile colleagues, herman's favorites of the current piano circuit. Found new used sealed in the bins a few years ago, finally unwrapped on this rainy day. I find little to fault here. A very pleasing and worthwhile listen.

-Faschingsschwank aus Wien, Op.26
-Kinderszenen, Op.15
-Études symphoniques, Op.13
dk
2020-04-10 06:59:38 UTC
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Jazz
c***@gmail.com
2020-04-10 15:52:52 UTC
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Jazz
Aside from settings of Lamentations verses, this year highlighting Morales: a Caprice CD of Gunnar de Frumerie comprising concerti for cello and violin, respectively, and his Orchestral Variations. I had forgotten about the variations. While I was cleaning out some boxes (partly pre-Passover cleaning, and partly what the hell else is there to do when confined to quarters :-) I came upon the old Louisville recording and listened to it for the first time in at least a decade. It's a fantastic piece, in contrast to most de Frumerie that I know, which tends to be charming but forgettable (so also the two concerti, albeit well performed). Another really good piece is his Pastoral Suite for Flute and Orchestra op. 13b, which is included in this great collection: https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/products/7985936--swedish-orchestral-favourites-vol-2. That collection is a fixture on my ipod (as is vol. 1).

AC
Bozo
2020-04-11 16:26:32 UTC
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After re-reading the Sachs bio of Arthur Rubinstein, revisited my recording of his live,1962,at age 75, Brahms PC # 2 with RAI Orchestra Turin,under Andre Cluytens. Amazing :

(Sound not the best, but ... )
number_six
2020-04-11 16:49:58 UTC
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For some 1930s humor, I listened to Flotsam & Jetsam, on Vocalion,
volume 1 - Must it Always Be So
volume 2 - Bats in the Belfry

It's not even entirely OT, as the boys deal with topics like Mrs Peer Gynt and What was the matter with Rachmaninoff...
Oscar
2020-04-11 20:36:55 UTC
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New Purcell Fairy Queen (1692) by Paul McCreesh and Gabrieli. Released this week via Signum Classics and named Presto's Recording of the Week. Instant purchase.

Carolyn Sampson (S)
Anna Dennis (S)
Mhairi Lawson (S)
Roderick Williams (Bar)
Ashley Riches (B-Bar)
Gabrieli
Paul McCreesh

https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/articles/3223--recording-of-the-week-purcells-fairy-queen-from-paul-mccreesh-and-gabrieli
Oscar
2020-04-11 21:32:47 UTC
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Gerald Finley's 2015 Winterreise w/ Julius Drake on Hyperion. Very meh. Not vibing with this at all. Finley is too cool, too scrupulous in his delivery, Drake is a workhorse and nothing Moore (geddit?). Many other superior recordings of this immortal work. Was considering a purchase from BRO, but hard pass after listening to the samples on official Hyperion YouTube channel.
Bozo
2020-04-12 00:19:25 UTC
Permalink
Josef Lhevinne, 1935, Naxos cd, 4 Chopin Etudes, Op.10,#11, Op.25,#6,Op.25,#10,Op.25,#11:



Op.25,# 6 and # 10 amazing.
Oscar
2020-04-12 00:53:53 UTC
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Brahms Symphony No.1 in C minor, Op.68 in a magnificent 1958 stereo recording made by Philips of the Concertgebouw Orchestra, Amsterdam w/ Beinum at the podium. This is an Australian Eloquence reissue, coupled with Symphony No.3. In my humble opinion, this goes down as one of the all-time finest Firsts, and probably my favorite overall. Streaming via AppleMusic.
Oscar
2020-04-12 01:43:10 UTC
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^^ Brahms Symphony is mono and 1951. Wrote that before listening. Had not heard 1951 version before. Still excellent.
Oscar
2020-04-12 02:55:26 UTC
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Misha Dichter's Brahms Piano Concerto No.1 in D minor, Op.15 w/ the Gewandhausers and Kurt Masur. Recorded for Philips in 1977, and issued previously on PentaTone SACD (2009) in original (unreleased?) quad mix. Can't say this is a recording I've played more than once before, but it's better than I recall. First movement is exciting in its bold characterizations by both soloist and conductor and sharp rhythms and often-angular phrasing. An underrated one, yes. Streaming the Brahms Masur orchestral box on Australian Eloquence via AppleMusic.
Ed Presson
2020-04-12 22:42:48 UTC
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Stravinsky: The Soldier's Tale-Suite, Octet, Les Noces. Soloists,
ensemble, and Virginia Chorus
and Virginia Arts Festival Chamber Players; JoAnn Falletta conductor.
Naxos 8.533538

In a March/April 2017 Fanfare review, Jim Svejda described the Les Noces in
these words:
"...this is a singularly lovely performance that also gives the work's
driving rhythms their due."

I think that's a nice summary of all the performances. Les Noces is blessed
with a fine quartet
of vocalists. Denis Sedov, the bass is especially noteworthy.
Frank Berger
2020-04-12 23:54:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ed Presson
Stravinsky: The Soldier's Tale-Suite, Octet, Les Noces. Soloists,
ensemble, and Virginia Chorus
and Virginia Arts Festival Chamber Players; JoAnn Falletta conductor.
Naxos 8.533538
In a March/April 2017 Fanfare review, Jim Svejda described the Les Noces in
"...this is a singularly lovely performance that also gives the work's
driving rhythms their due."
I think that's a nice summary of all the performances. Les Noces is blessed
with a fine quartet
of vocalists. Denis Sedov, the bass is especially noteworthy.
I have been impressed by Ms. Fallettas's work.
Oscar
2020-04-13 00:02:06 UTC
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Post by Frank Berger
I have been impressed by Ms. Fallettas's work.
Excellent conductor.
Frank Berger
2020-04-13 00:42:25 UTC
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Post by Oscar
Post by Frank Berger
I have been impressed by Ms. Fallettas's work.
Excellent conductor.
Too many esses.
Bob Harper
2020-04-13 17:56:31 UTC
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Post by Oscar
^^ Brahms Symphony is mono and 1951. Wrote that before listening. Had not heard 1951 version before. Still excellent.
Hm. The one I have on Dutch Masters is from 6/7 October 1958 and is in
stereo. It was briefly available here on Philips Legendary Classics.
Tremendous performance.

Bob Harper
Bob Harper
2020-04-13 17:58:05 UTC
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Post by Bob Harper
Post by Oscar
^^ Brahms Symphony is mono and 1951. Wrote that before listening. Had
not heard 1951 version before. Still excellent.
Hm. The one I have on Dutch Masters is from 6/7 October 1958 and is in
stereo. It was briefly available here on Philips Legendary Classics.
Tremendous performance.
Bob Harper
I should have read your other post more carefully, as you already said
what I said.

Bob Harper
Bozo
2020-04-14 15:07:49 UTC
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Daniel-Ben Pienaar's Deux Elles 2-cd set of mine of solo keyboard works of Orlando Gibbons (Glenn Gould's fav composer reportedly ) , quite soothing at this time :



At the YT "Show More" you can click and scroll down to individual works.Might want to start with 19 and 20 if not familiar with these works.
Al Eisner
2020-04-14 17:55:47 UTC
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Eliszabeth Leonskaja's 6-CD schubert set on warner (from Teldec). In
the past few days I'[ve listened to it all except for D960. (About a
decade ago I engaged in comparative listening to 8 preformances of D960,
keeping modest notes, and I'd like to treat EL's, plus one or two others
I've since acquired, to that group.)

The set features particularly strong perforfmances of D850, D958, D959
and the Wanderer Fantasy. I've not heard many D850's, but hers is
terrific, surely the best I've encountered. (The outer movements, at
least, suggest to me that it may belong among the great Schubert sonatas.)
On the other side, I've already noted (in the thread on Hamelin's live
D664) that I find her D664 too "fancy", especially as compared to the
simplicity and poetry of my benchmark (Richter on EMI). I am least
happy with EL's D894. I'm not sure I even like the work (at least the first
three movements), and EL does nothing to persuade me - she needs more
poetry, more expressiveness, more something. If I recall correctly,
Lupu does a much better job with all of this.

A special word for her wonderful set of the Impromptus. It won't quite
displace Lupu's as my benchmark set, but her different take (in some of
them) succeeds (always under control, yet different), and the music
is rich enough for different takes to still enchant.
--
Al Eisner
Oscar
2020-04-14 20:02:00 UTC
Permalink
Toscanini's legendary 1937 Salzburg Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg on Richard Caniell's Immortal Performances label (4CD + bonus CD with surviving excerpts from Toscanini's 1936 Salzburg Meistersinger, which were destroyed by Nazis after the Anchluss). This is a 2016 issue, which came approx. 12 years after the revelatory restoration on Andante. As you many know, this was recorded onto film, not shellac discs, but regrettably was poorly miked, creating some unnatural balances which the Producer has sought to ameliorate in the digital workstation. This is truly extraordinary singing and conducting here. I could listen to it every day. Includes a 60 pps. booklet with a multitude of essays, synopsis, recording notes, cast list and timings, including one by Toscanini biographer Harvey Sachs. Caniell's Recording Notes and Personal Reflections alone is 9 well-detailed pages. A labor of love. We are in his debt for it.
number_six
2020-04-25 19:53:13 UTC
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Soon I'll be starting on the Morton Gould CSO box.
number_six
2020-04-26 22:14:58 UTC
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Post by number_six
Soon I'll be starting on the Morton Gould CSO box.
Wow, Gould offers a searching, ethereal reading of Ives' Unanswered Question, maybe the best I've heard. Adolph Herseth's trumpet part is beautifully played and to me seems very effectively placed in the spatial soundscape of the recording.
Bozo
2020-04-28 14:32:13 UTC
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On of the great piano sonatas ever, Clementi's Op.25,# 5, in F# minor, here from my Maria Tipo EMI cd:

https://tinyurl.com/yct6r4c3
c***@gmail.com
2020-04-28 16:04:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bozo
https://tinyurl.com/yct6r4c3
It really is a great piece, and I guess you know Horowitz's wonderful recording: https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/products/8083621--horowitz-plays-clementi.

My morning listening: Carter Oboe Concerto etc., formerly Erato and now Apex: http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/album.jsp?album_id=136098. Although I'm selective when it comes to Carter--especially later works--I love all the music on this CD and the performances sound great to me.

AC
JohnGavin
2020-04-28 17:24:48 UTC
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Bozo
On of the great piano sonatas ever, Clementi's Op.25,# 5, in F# minor, here from my Maria Tipo EMI cd:

https://tinyurl.com/yct6r4c3

This Sonata is also included on Demidenko’s excellent Clementi CD. One of his best recordings.
Oscar
2020-04-28 21:47:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by JohnGavin
This Sonata is also included on Demidenko’s excellent Clementi CD. One of his best recordings.
Whatever happened to Demidenko? He was Hyperion's house paints in the '90s and early '00s, then made some for Onyx (IIRC) in the earlier days of that label.
JohnGavin
2020-04-28 22:55:47 UTC
Permalink
Oscar
Post by JohnGavin
This Sonata is also included on Demidenko’s excellent Clementi CD. One of his best recordings.
Whatever happened to Demidenko? He was Hyperion's house paints in the '90s and early '00s, then made some for Onyx (IIRC) in the earlier days of that label.

————————————————
The last recordings that I’m aware of has the Hammerklavier Sonata. I remember reading good reviews- there’s a copy of this singe CD listed on Amazon for $898. No Op. 106 is that good.
Frank Berger
2020-04-29 02:10:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Oscar
Oscar
Post by JohnGavin
This Sonata is also included on Demidenko’s excellent Clementi CD. One of his best recordings.
Whatever happened to Demidenko? He was Hyperion's house paints in the '90s and early '00s, then made some for Onyx (IIRC) in the earlier days of that label.
————————————————
The last recordings that I’m aware of has the Hammerklavier Sonata. I remember reading good reviews- there’s a copy of this singe CD listed on Amazon for $898. No Op. 106 is that good.
Presto lists 16 Demidenko CDs as available. All or almost all are
re-releases of early 90's recordings, mostly on the Helios label.
Bozo
2020-04-29 01:44:05 UTC
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Post by Oscar
Whatever happened to Demidenko?
https://www.demidenko.net/events/
Oscar
2020-04-29 02:27:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bozo
Post by Oscar
Whatever happened to Demidenko?
https://www.demidenko.net/events/
He's going to CHI-NAH!

Donald Trump Says "China"

Al Eisner
2020-04-29 00:53:48 UTC
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I recently subscribed for the first time to Medici TV. I don't know how many
here have access to it, so I mayh mostly refrain from
mentioing performances there, but at lesat this once....

Pollini and Abbado at the 2004 Lucerne festival, LvB PC #4:
https://www.medici.tv/en/concerts/maurizio-pollini-beethoven-piano-concerto-no4/
I've not much followed Pollini, but this seems like a first-rate performance,
very much in a style I admire.

--
Al Eisner
dk
2020-04-25 21:29:24 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
Eliszabeth Leonskaja's 6-CD schubert set on warner (from Teldec). In
the past few days I'[ve listened to it all except for D960. (About a
decade ago I engaged in comparative listening to 8 preformances of D960,
keeping modest notes, and I'd like to treat EL's, plus one or two others
I've since acquired, to that group.)
The set features particularly strong perforfmances of D850, D958, D959
and the Wanderer Fantasy. I've not heard many D850's, but hers is
terrific, surely the best I've encountered. (The outer movements, at
least, suggest to me that it may belong among the great Schubert sonatas.)
On the other side, I've already noted (in the thread on Hamelin's live
D664) that I find her D664 too "fancy", especially as compared to the
simplicity and poetry of my benchmark (Richter on EMI). I am least
happy with EL's D894. I'm not sure I even like the work (at least the first
three movements), and EL does nothing to persuade me - she needs more
poetry, more expressiveness, more something. If I recall correctly,
Lupu does a much better job with all of this.
A special word for her wonderful set of the Impromptus. It won't quite
displace Lupu's as my benchmark set, but her different take (in some of
them) succeeds (always under control, yet different), and the music
is rich enough for different takes to still enchant.
--
Al Eisner
Listen to Ekaterina Derzhavina's D.850.
Also listen to Schnabel's Impromptus.
Lupu isn't qualified to polish his
shoes!

dk

dk
Al Eisner
2020-04-26 06:49:22 UTC
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Post by dk
Listen to Ekaterina Derzhavina's D.850.
Also listen to Schnabel's Impromptus.
Lupu isn't qualified to polish his
shoes!
I wonder what condtion Schnabel's shoes ae in these days. They
might just fall apart if anyone tries to polish them. If so, you
are setting a very high bar.
--
Al Eisner
Bozo
2020-04-26 15:41:21 UTC
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George Lloyd’s PC # 3, Kathryn Stott,pinaist,with BBC Phil. under the composer, 1989 Albany Records Cd, first mov. here, all 3 movs. are at YT:



Took me a couple listenings over a couple years, but I now enjoy the 50-minute work, even if the last mov. does over-stay its welcome a bit.Cinematic at times , but Lloyd keeps my interest despite the length. His 4th PC also great.

Poulenc’s Nocturnes for solo piano, Alexander Tharaud here, mine an Ivory Classics cd with pianist Ralph Votapek.Here is the jewel of the set, the remarkable Nocturne # 3:


c***@gmail.com
2020-04-26 18:04:01 UTC
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Frank Bridge chamber music: http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2009/June09/Bridge_p5tet_sommcd087.htm. Excellent performances of fascinating music. I have long been an admirer of the Piano Quintet, slursh and all, but I was especially curious to hear the Rhapsody Trio. As Rob Barnett writes, "This is Bridge the avant-gardiste: the Bridge of the two last string quartets and the Piano Trio No. 2. It’s a surreal twilit blend with Bergian tendrils of melody and a chittering and twittering interplay that make it a memorable presence in the catalogue." The comparison with the other three late chamber works is apt, and all of them are very strong works, imo. My first encounters with Bridge's music were via recordings of his early tone poems. I didn't enjoy them at all, and it took me a while to "discover" by means of his later works what a great composer he was.

AC
Bozo
2020-04-26 20:42:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@gmail.com
Frank Bridge chamber music: http://www.musicweb-
Thank for this. Will try to hear those works. Agree, great composer. Have only a couple cd's of his solo piano works ( Peter Jacobs , Ashley Wass ) and Cello Sonata, the Sonata a must hear.His Piano Sonata is a tough nut to crack , but I keep trying.
Oscar
2020-04-26 21:51:54 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Thank for this. Will try to hear those works. Agree, great composer.
Yes, a very good composer. Haven't heard much by him I do not enjoy. Will audition AC's recs this afternoon. SOMM is an excellent label. Just received last week Donohoe's Mozart Sonatas for solo keyboard (3 volumes to date), which is a lovely integrale set in-the-making, and also a neat-o disc called Elgar In America, Vol.1 (2019) with a heretofore-unreleased Enigma Variations by Arturo Toscanini and the NBC SO, a seldom-heard Piatagorsky Cello Concerto with Barbirolli, and another unreleased performance: Falstaff by Rodziński and the NYP-SO. Restorations by Lani Spahr.
Bob Harper
2020-04-13 17:41:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Oscar
Brahms Symphony No.1 in C minor, Op.68 in a magnificent 1958 stereo recording made by Philips of the Concertgebouw Orchestra, Amsterdam w/ Beinum at the podium. This is an Australian Eloquence reissue, coupled with Symphony No.3. In my humble opinion, this goes down as one of the all-time finest Firsts, and probably my favorite overall. Streaming via AppleMusic.
I have this on Philips Dutch Masters (I was lucky enough to get a number
of these when they were being discontinued) and agree completely. A
great performance.

Bob Harper
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