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Whitney Museum NYC, 1968: Jefferson Airplane + Raymond Lewenthal share a bill
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Oscar
2019-08-26 07:06:27 UTC
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Wow!

Check this out:

<< Original 1st printing 7 x 10" bi-fold invitation and accompanying information sheet for a "Friends of the Whitney Museum" benefit featuring Jefferson Airplane appearing with classical pianist Raymond Lewenthal and projections by Glen McKay's Head Lights, held at the Whitney Museum in New York City on 10/3/1968,

Designer unknown/not credited, medium-thick textured vellum card stock invite and textured vellum stock info sheet are both in FANTASTIC near mint (A-) condition; aside from the (as issued) horizontal machine crease going through the center of the invite and a stray soft handling ding/corner-tip bump or two on the info sheet, this set is just about as sharp as they come.

ULTRA-COOL and MEGA-OBSCURE late-'68 Jefferson Airplane item from a fairly small (and exclusive) NYC party where the music more or less served as accompaniment to the actual "headliner"- the light show. >>

https://concertposterauction.com/Listing/Details/251100/Jefferson-Airplane-Glenn-McKays-Headlights-Whitney-Museum-NYC-1968-Invitation

What the heck was this all about? Glenn McKay was the father of the liquid light show, touring as a full-fledged seventh member of Jefferson Airplane during their heyday 1966-70. This 1968 exhibition was the same year of Julius Katchen's famous (non-)appearance* in The Rolling Stones Rock n' Roll Circus, alongside John & Yoko, Eric Clapton, Jethro Tull, The Who, and others. But I have never heard of this. As a '60s/early '70s poster collector, I find this very interesting and exciting to think about. I love the Airplane...and Raymond Lewenthal. Wonder what pieces Lewenthal played during his spot with McKay's famous light show swirling next to him?

*Stones business manager Allen Klein put the kibosh on the theatrical release of the Circus because of the Stones lackluster performance. The special was released at long last on VHS and CD in 1996, and again a couple months ago in definitive remastered sound and picture.

https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/rolling-stones-rock-and-roll-circus-reissue-box-set-829240/

Glenn McKay:

<< Glenn McKay, a painter, began performing light shows after attending one of Ken Kesey's Acid Tests at the Fillmore Auditorium in January of 1966, where Martin had provided the visuals. The Acid Tests featured bathtubs full of LSD, a light show by Tony Martin, and performances by the Grateful Dead. McKay did hundreds of shows with the Jefferson Airplane and the Dead, mostly at the Winterland Ballroom. In 1968, his group staged "An Evening with Glenn McKay's Headlights" at the Whitney Museum of American Art. The San Francisco Museum of Art held a retrospective of his work in 1999. Using slides, 16mm film, and overhead projectors, McKay and his cohort combined photographic and liquid media so that, according to McKay, "it was like painting with three or four hands." Describing the aims of his project, McKay has said, "I'm providing a new door to the consciousness of sound and color--to be so in touch with the emotion and the rhythm of the experience losing any sense of separation between the color, moving images, and the sound." In other words, McKay hopes to elicit a synaesthetic response in his beholder in which the elements of his light play, combined with sound, result in a Huxley-like movement that invigorates or transcends quotidian perception. >>

http://handmadecinema.com/mobileview.php?id=40
Bozo
2019-08-26 14:10:48 UTC
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Wonder what pieces Lewenthal played during his spot with McKay's famous light show swirling next to >him?
Possibly Scriabin (?), a Lewenthal speciality.
JohnGavin
2019-08-26 14:44:38 UTC
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Wonder what pieces Lewenthal played during his spot with McKay's famous light show swirling next to >him?
Possibly Scriabin (?), a Lewenthal speciality.

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I remember attending an all-Scriabin recital around the same time at Carnegie with a pianist named Hilde Somer accompanied be a light show. The composer has synesthesia, a powerful association between pitch and color.
Bozo
2019-08-26 15:56:30 UTC
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I remember attending an all-Scriabin recital around the same time at Carnegie with a pianist named Hilde >Somer accompanied be a light show. The composer has synesthesia, a powerful association between pitch >and color.
In the early 2000's I attended 2 recitals on successive nights given by Scriabin specialist Arthur Greene,a professor then at Univ.of Michigan,who played all the Scriabin sonatas and " Vers la flamme". First evening were sonatas 1-5 , no encores ; second night the rest , with the Op.8,# 12 Etude as encore.Geene used a light show only for Sonatas Nos. 6-10,"Vers", all of which he played attaca.
number_six
2019-08-27 23:07:24 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Wonder what pieces Lewenthal played during his spot with McKay's famous light show swirling next to >him?
Possibly Scriabin (?), a Lewenthal speciality.
Speaking of Lewenthal, I hope that planned box set goes ahead...in another thread, its release was discussed, said to be to be delayed -- not because of the light show, however!
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