Discussion:
WAYLTL - January 2021
Add Reply
Oscar
2021-01-03 06:25:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
A new decade! Peace on earth. Good tidings to all. Stay safe, wear a mask.

Now watching:

Mendelssohn: A Midsummer Night's Dream, overture and excerpts, Op.21 & 61
Tchaikovsky: Manfred, Symphony in B minor, Op.58

Lucerne Festival Orchestra / Riccardo Chailly

Recorded LIVE at Lucerne Festival, August 2017. Blu-ray Disc (BD).
Artistic and Executive director: Michael Haefliger.
Produced by Paul Smaczny.
Directed by Michael Beyer.
A Production of Accentus Music in Co-production with Schweizer Radio und Fernsehen, SRG and Arte G.E.I.E. in Association with Arte Concerte and Lucerne Festival © 2018 Accentus Music.

Producers: Maria Stodtmeyer, Markus Wicker, Jean Wittersheim, Sabine Muller.
Audio producer: Sebastian Braun.
Balance engineer: Toine Mertens.
Senior production manager: Oliver Rieger.
Assistant director: Christian Linße.
Director of photography: Nyika Jancso.
Camera: Martin Baer, Jürgen Clemens, Rolf Gihsa, Winfried Herrmann, Manuel Lucentim, Andreas Splett, Peter Steffen, Manuela Wiebach.
Lighting: Hendrik Thomas.
Video engineers: Sascha Bohnstedt, Mirko Szappat.
Vision mixer: Barbara Saxer.
Floor manager: Sabine Koch.
Edited by Steffan Herrmann.
Color grading: Kay Dombrowsky.
Post-production manager: Diana Kallauke.
Assistant editor: Karoline Vielemeyer.
DVD/Blu-ray premastering: Versatil GbR.
Executive producer DVD: Paul Smaczny.
Label manager: Christin Lindße.
Photos: Stefan Deuber/Lucerne Festival.
Design: Heidi Falk.
Artwork & editorial © 2018 Accentus Music.

TRT 99:32.
16:9 NTSC. Full HD.
DTS HD Master Audio. PCM Stereo.

Riccardo Chailly appears courtesy of DECCA Classics.

COMMENT: What is not to like here? Nothing. Chailly is routinely excellent, producing orchestral sound of the highest refinement, lustruous textures, teasing out melodies and coaxing harmonic tension with a natural ease and vivid musicial imagination. Would love to see him conduct in concert one day, the CSO would be a fine choice. The Manfred is not super-Slavic, by any stretch, but it’s colorful, full of wit and character and, most important, “of a piece”. In other words, it hangs together very nicely. Up there with Petrenko’s on Naxos from 14 years ago. As for the Mendelssohn, I never tire of the piece. I love it. Chailly—really, the orchestra—does it justice. Fantastic all-around then. Great way to start 2021.
number_six
2021-01-04 17:45:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Started the year with Randy Greif's Alice in Wonderland, an extended electronic /ambient /sound collage adaptation of the classic tale. On Soleilmoon label, OOP, alas.
Alan Cooper
2021-01-05 18:59:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Started the year with Randy Greif's Alice in Wonderland, an extended electronic /ambient /sound collage adaptation of the classic tale. On Soleilmoon label, OOP, alas.
Made an excursion to the Polish Radio site (https://sklep.polskieradio.pl/pl/c/Plyty-CD/18) in search of the recent recording of Szymanowski's practically unknown opera "Hagith" (https://sklep.polskieradio.pl/pl/p/Karol-Szymanowski-HAGITH-CD-/1100), which turns out to be a fine wallow in the composer's lush mode. Maybe a little too reminiscent of Salome for my taste. There are many other tempting items on offer, but I restricted myself to a couple of Polish Radio Chamber Orchestra offerings conducted by Anieszka Duczmal. A splendid account of the ill-fated Józef Koffler's gorgeous arrangement of the Goldberg Variations for chamber orchestra (for info, see https://rcmusic-kentico-cdn.s3.amazonaws.com/rcm/media/main/documents/jozef-koffler%E2%80%99s-arrangement-of-the-goldberg-variations.pdf). I far prefer Duczmal's performance to Pinnock's on Linn.

Also a mixed recital including a fine performance of Panufnik's Violin Concerto with Konstanty Kulka as soloist (https://sklep.polskieradio.pl/pl/p/Agnieszka-Duczmal-Amadeus-vol.-2Tansman%2C-Meyer/392). The concerto has been fortunate on record, and I'm convinced that it is one of the finest 20th-century works in the genre. The rarities by other composers on the CD that accompany the concerto are worthwhile as well.

Speaking of the Panufnik VC, the 7-CD set devoted to performances Kaja Danczowska is available again for the equivalent of about US$16 (https://sklep.polskieradio.pl/pl/p/Kaja-Danczowska-Skrzypce-Violin/562). It's a fantastic collection (including the Panufnik), mostly available only in this set. Just don't blanch at the postal charge.

Many other tempting items, including a Hesse-Bukowska retrospective, live Malcuzynski, Bacewicz's comic opera (sic!) based on tales of King Arthur, lots of contemporary Polish music, etc. Probably will be making a return visit soon.

With good wishes to all for a better year in 2021,

AC
number_six
2021-01-07 20:36:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Also a mixed recital including a fine performance of Panufnik's Violin Concerto with Konstanty Kulka as soloist (https://sklep.polskieradio.pl/pl/p/Agnieszka-Duczmal-Amadeus-vol.-2Tansman%2C-Meyer/392). The concerto has been fortunate on record, and I'm convinced that it is one of the finest 20th-century works in the genre. The rarities by other composers on the CD that accompany the concerto are worthwhile as well.
Listened to Panufnik clips, thanks. Adagio sounds especially good,
Henk vT
2021-01-10 10:21:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Magaloff, the Philips Chopin set. In many ways an interesting approach to Chopin: elegant, fluent, with an important role for the left hand.

Henk
Dirge
2021-01-09 01:44:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Old favorites save for Arrau’s account of the Schumann Fantasie, which is a relatively new favorite …

Robert PARSONS: Ave Maria (1550s?)
:: Carwood/Cardinall’s Musick [ASV/Gaudeamus ’99]

J. S. BACH: Suites for cello solo (c. 1720)
:: Bylsma [RCA Seon ’79]

F. J. HAYDN: Symphonies No. 49 in F minor “La passione” (1768) & No. 44 in E minor “Trauer” (1772)
:: Scherchen/VSOO [Westminster ’53] DG

Robert SCHUMANN: Fantasie in C major, Op. 17 (1839)
:: Arrau [BBC, live ’60]

Franz LISZT: St. François de Paule marchant sur les flots from «Deux légendes» (1863)
:: Kempff [Decca ’50]

Béla BARTÓK: String Quartets (1909–39)
:: Végh Quartet [Columbia/Angel ’54] Praga
Praga claims that theses transfers derive from the “initial stereo tapes,” but the “stereo” sounds like artificial stereo to me. Be that as it may, these transfers sound far better than the opaque, woolly/ill-focused, and fulsome Music & Arts transfers, and I’m willing to believe that they do indeed derive from studio tapes (whatever else may have been done to them).

John ADAMS: Chamber Symphony (1992)
:: Edwards/Ensemble Modern [RCA ’96]
Al Eisner
2021-01-10 03:45:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Peter Maxwell Davies, "Miss Donnithornes's Maggot" and "Eight Songs for
a Mad King", on a Unicorn CD. My first encounter with Davies' work
was a live performance of this program, by the same forces, over 40
years ago. This is presumably the definitive recording. The second
(earlier) piece is more eclectic, but the instrumental work in both
(for a Pierrot ensemble plus percussion) is wonderful, I love the
first piece, with its rather wild vocal performance (mezzo Mary Thomas);
the vocal work in the second (baritone Julius Eastman) is sometimes
too extreme for me, but still effective.
--
Al Eisner
Al Eisner
2021-01-10 20:14:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Al Eisner
Peter Maxwell Davies, "Miss Donnithornes's Maggot" and "Eight Songs for
a Mad King", on a Unicorn CD. My first encounter with Davies' work
was a live performance of this program, by the same forces, over 40
years ago. This is presumably the definitive recording. The second
(earlier) piece is more eclectic, but the instrumental work in both (for a
Pierrot ensemble plus percussion) is wonderful, I love the
first piece, with its rather wild vocal performance (mezzo Mary Thomas); the
vocal work in the second (baritone Julius Eastman) is sometimes
too extreme for me, but still effective.
"same forces": I somehow managed to leave out that this was
Davies and The Fires of London".
--
Al Eisner
Todd Michel McComb
2021-01-11 00:28:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Al Eisner
"same forces": I somehow managed to leave out that this was
Davies and The Fires of London".
Funny, I remember that album from when it was new....

Does the Unicorn Kanchana label even exist anymore?
Al Eisner
2021-01-11 00:59:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Todd Michel McComb
Post by Al Eisner
"same forces": I somehow managed to leave out that this was
Davies and The Fires of London".
Funny, I remember that album from when it was new....
Does the Unicorn Kanchana label even exist anymore?
A history can be found in https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unicorn-Kanchana .
So their CD's afre bing produced again for the past three or four years.
Presto currently lists 6 Davies releases (on what it just calls Unicorn)
with release dates since 2016. I got my copy at MDT a few years ago,
shortly before *their* denmise. I had been looking for a recording
for years.

Presto currently lists 32 CDs on Unicorn, mostly more conventional
classical (plus Bernard Herrmann film music) - I doubt if any of it
is in your wheelhouse unless you go for Davies or Messiaen, but that's
just speculation on my part.
.,
--
Al Eisner
Todd Michel McComb
2021-01-11 02:35:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I doubt if any of it is in your wheelhouse unless you go for Davies
or Messiaen, but that's just speculation on my part.
I really got into Messiaen in the 1980s.... I still think highly
of some of his work. E.g. _Catalog of Birds_

Davies seems very formally conservative, extended vocal technique
aside.... There's a sort of starkness to his concerti that isn't
all bad....

But thanks for the update on the label. There was a time I listened
to a lot of their releases.
dk
2021-01-10 04:43:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
https://www.amazon.com/Miaskovsky-Symphonies-complete-Nikolai/dp/B000XCTD5S
dk
2021-01-10 04:48:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
https://www.amazon.com/Miaskovsky-Symphonies-complete-Nikolai/dp/B000XCTD5S

dk
2021-01-11 05:38:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Continuing my Chopin project with the Ballades,
the Barcarolle and the Impromptus.

dk
MELMOTH
2021-01-11 09:32:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
Continuing my Chopin project with the Ballades,
the Barcarolle and the Impromptus.
I am in advance appalled...
dk
2021-01-12 02:02:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MELMOTH
Post by dk
Continuing my Chopin project with the Ballades,
the Barcarolle and the Impromptus.
I am in advance appalled...
Take some meclizine.

dk
Henk vT
2021-01-14 17:28:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
BIS has kept its word. The Sorabji etudes are complete. Ullen has done a tremendous job. This last instalment of 2 cds is remarkable: a few pieces would even have been easy to listen to but for their length.

The Eileen Joyce set has arrived. I should have bought it as soon as it came out. Not a boring moment, also thanks to unknowns (to me) like Harry Farjeon.

Henk
Andrew Clarke
2021-01-15 17:25:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Henk vT
BIS has kept its word. The Sorabji etudes are complete. Ullen has done a tremendous job. This last instalment of 2 cds is remarkable: a few pieces would even have been easy to listen to but for their length.
The Eileen Joyce set has arrived. I should have bought it as soon as it came out. Not a boring moment, also thanks to unknowns (to me) like Harry Farjeon.
Henk
Much better known is his sister, the writer of children's books, Eleanor "Morning Has Broken" Farjeon.

Andrew Clarke
Canberra
Andrew Clarke
2021-01-11 06:54:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Buxtehude. Complete Chamber Music. John Holloway, Jaap ter Linden, Lars Ulrik Mortensen et al., 3 CDs worth, Naxos, formerly available on Da Capo. The more I listen to Buxtehude the more he grows in stature, in my estimation.

NB: The CD of the Trio Sonatas Op 2 has been published twice by Naxos, one as a "separate" and the other as part of the set. Don't get muddled, as I did, and buy the same recording twice. The Naxos catalogue numbers are 8557249 and 8224004.

Andrew Clarke
Canberra
raymond....@gmail.com
2021-01-11 09:47:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Andrew Clarke
Buxtehude. Complete Chamber Music. John Holloway, Jaap ter Linden, Lars Ulrik Mortensen et al., 3 CDs worth, Naxos, formerly available on Da Capo. The more I listen to Buxtehude the more he grows in stature, in my estimation.
NB: The CD of the Trio Sonatas Op 2 has been published twice by Naxos, one as a "separate" and the other as part of the set. Don't get muddled, as I did, and buy the same recording twice. The Naxos catalogue numbers are 8557249 and 8224004.
Andrew Clarke
Canberra
I have read that J S Bach walked over 400km to hear and absorb himself in Buxtehude's music, and also hear his playing as an organist. I have those Naxos Buxtehude cds and they are excellent.

The 3 cds of the trios for violin, viola da gamba and (cembalo for Vol I, with harpsichord for Vol II, with harpsichord or organ for Vol III), are not consistently labeled by Naxos, so below is what I have :-

Vol I ( 7 trio sonatas, Op.1, Bux WV 252-258) -- 8.557248
Vol II (7 trio sonatas, Op.2, Bux WV 259-265) -- 8.557249
Vol III (6 sonatas Without Opus Numbers, Bux WV 266,267,269,271,272,273) -- 8.557250

A bit of a mess, but the music is well worth it for the "Danish Bach".

Ray Hall, Taree
Andrew Clarke
2021-01-11 23:10:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by Andrew Clarke
Buxtehude. Complete Chamber Music. John Holloway, Jaap ter Linden, Lars Ulrik Mortensen et al., 3 CDs worth, Naxos, formerly available on Da Capo. The more I listen to Buxtehude the more he grows in stature, in my estimation.
NB: The CD of the Trio Sonatas Op 2 has been published twice by Naxos, one as a "separate" and the other as part of the set. Don't get muddled, as I did, and buy the same recording twice. The Naxos catalogue numbers are 8557249 and 8224004.
Andrew Clarke
Canberra
I have read that J S Bach walked over 400km to hear and absorb himself in Buxtehude's music, and also hear his playing as an organist. I have those Naxos Buxtehude cds and they are excellent.
The 3 cds of the trios for violin, viola da gamba and (cembalo for Vol I, with harpsichord for Vol II, with harpsichord or organ for Vol III), are not consistently labeled by Naxos, so below is what I have :-
Vol I ( 7 trio sonatas, Op.1, Bux WV 252-258) -- 8.557248
Vol II (7 trio sonatas, Op.2, Bux WV 259-265) -- 8.557249
Vol III (6 sonatas Without Opus Numbers, Bux WV 266,267,269,271,272,273) -- 8.557250
A bit of a mess, but the music is well worth it for the "Danish Bach".
There's also "Cantatas volume 1" with ter Linden and Mortensen plus the very lovely Emma Kirkby, but no sign of subsequent volumes. Strangely, the original Da Capo discs are still available from Presto Classical. It looks as if Da Capo was planning a whole series of Buxtehude and suddenly gave up, subsequently selling the masters to Naxos, which is odd, given that Da Capo is a Danish label and Bux one of their most famous composers. Were there copyright problems? Did somebody die?

Naxos have also given us a fine recording of Bux cantatas from Kevin Mallon in Toronto, and there's more from Cantus Coelln. I also have 'Membra Jesu nostri' from the Ricecar Consort under Philippe Pierlot, another Belgian baroque specialist although, unusually, he's from Wallonia and not Flanders. Born in Liege, like Arcadelt, Cesar Franck, Ysaye, Pousseur and Georges Simenon.

Andrew Clarke
Canberra
Peter
2021-01-11 23:32:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Buxtehude wrote a lot of fine music. I recommend the complete organ works played by Vogel (MDG 314 1438-2).

But right now I'm on a Zelenka kick. The masses, psalms etc. on the Nibiru label (conducted by Viktora) are superb, and of course his trio sonatas are also wonderful. At his best he is almost the equal of Bach, just not as memorable a tunesmith. Bach supposedly held him in high esteem, although Z never got the career opportunities he sought.
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by Andrew Clarke
Buxtehude. Complete Chamber Music. John Holloway, Jaap ter Linden, Lars Ulrik Mortensen et al., 3 CDs worth, Naxos, formerly available on Da Capo. The more I listen to Buxtehude the more he grows in stature, in my estimation.
NB: The CD of the Trio Sonatas Op 2 has been published twice by Naxos, one as a "separate" and the other as part of the set. Don't get muddled, as I did, and buy the same recording twice. The Naxos catalogue numbers are 8557249 and 8224004.
Andrew Clarke
Canberra
I have read that J S Bach walked over 400km to hear and absorb himself in Buxtehude's music, and also hear his playing as an organist. I have those Naxos Buxtehude cds and they are excellent.
The 3 cds of the trios for violin, viola da gamba and (cembalo for Vol I, with harpsichord for Vol II, with harpsichord or organ for Vol III), are not consistently labeled by Naxos, so below is what I have :-
Vol I ( 7 trio sonatas, Op.1, Bux WV 252-258) -- 8.557248
Vol II (7 trio sonatas, Op.2, Bux WV 259-265) -- 8.557249
Vol III (6 sonatas Without Opus Numbers, Bux WV 266,267,269,271,272,273) -- 8.557250
A bit of a mess, but the music is well worth it for the "Danish Bach".
Ray Hall, Taree
dk
2021-01-17 04:47:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Myaskovsky symphonies.

dk
Alan Cooper
2021-01-17 14:19:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
Myaskovsky symphonies.
dk
Mining the dross for the occasional nugget? Been there done that (with the string quartets too). Let us know what you come up with. I'm still a big fan of the respective concerti for violin and 'cello though.

AC
Ricardo Jimenez
2021-01-17 16:34:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 17 Jan 2021 06:19:45 -0800 (PST), Alan Cooper
Post by Alan Cooper
Post by dk
Myaskovsky symphonies.
dk
Mining the dross for the occasional nugget? Been there done that (with the string quartets too). Let us know what you come up with. I'm still a big fan of the respective concerti for violin and 'cello though.
AC
Anybody ever undertake a similar project to find the gem(s) among the
32 of Havergal Brian or the 342 (as of Sept 2020) of Leif Segerstam?
dk
2021-01-17 20:07:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ricardo Jimenez
On Sun, 17 Jan 2021 06:19:45 -0800 (PST), Alan Cooper
Post by dk
Myaskovsky symphonies.
Mining the dross for the occasional nugget? Been there done that
(with the string quartets too). Let us know what you come up with.
I'm still a big fan of the respective concerti for violin and 'cello though.
Anybody ever undertake a similar project to find the gem(s) among the
32 of Havergal Brian or the 342 (as of Sept 2020) of Leif Segerstam?
I don't listen to music that is so long as to prevent one from using the
bathroom! ;-)

dk
Al Eisner
2021-01-18 01:19:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
For those who subscribe to medici.tv: a 2015 performance of Sibelius's
Symphony #7 by Hannu Lintu with the Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra
before a live audience:
https://www.medici.tv/en/concerts/sibelius-symphonies-n7-hannu-lintu-finnish-radio-symphony-orchestra/

The preformance is a fine one (the strings may be a bit underpowered, or,
more likely, this could be an issue of the recorded sound). But the
best thing is that the video, which starts with historical background,
includes a fascinating and illuminating analysis of the work by Lintu,
integrated fully with rehearsal footage. It is a wonderfully well-
produced video overall. There are corresponding videos at medici
for all of the Sibelius symphonies (I think all from 2015). I will
certainly view more of them.
--
Al Eisner
Loading...