Discussion:
WAYLTL - January 2021
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Oscar
2021-01-03 06:25:33 UTC
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A new decade! Peace on earth. Good tidings to all. Stay safe, wear a mask.

Now watching:

Mendelssohn: A Midsummer Night's Dream, overture and excerpts, Op.21 & 61
Tchaikovsky: Manfred, Symphony in B minor, Op.58

Lucerne Festival Orchestra / Riccardo Chailly

Recorded LIVE at Lucerne Festival, August 2017. Blu-ray Disc (BD).
Artistic and Executive director: Michael Haefliger.
Produced by Paul Smaczny.
Directed by Michael Beyer.
A Production of Accentus Music in Co-production with Schweizer Radio und Fernsehen, SRG and Arte G.E.I.E. in Association with Arte Concerte and Lucerne Festival © 2018 Accentus Music.

Producers: Maria Stodtmeyer, Markus Wicker, Jean Wittersheim, Sabine Muller.
Audio producer: Sebastian Braun.
Balance engineer: Toine Mertens.
Senior production manager: Oliver Rieger.
Assistant director: Christian Linße.
Director of photography: Nyika Jancso.
Camera: Martin Baer, Jürgen Clemens, Rolf Gihsa, Winfried Herrmann, Manuel Lucentim, Andreas Splett, Peter Steffen, Manuela Wiebach.
Lighting: Hendrik Thomas.
Video engineers: Sascha Bohnstedt, Mirko Szappat.
Vision mixer: Barbara Saxer.
Floor manager: Sabine Koch.
Edited by Steffan Herrmann.
Color grading: Kay Dombrowsky.
Post-production manager: Diana Kallauke.
Assistant editor: Karoline Vielemeyer.
DVD/Blu-ray premastering: Versatil GbR.
Executive producer DVD: Paul Smaczny.
Label manager: Christin Lindße.
Photos: Stefan Deuber/Lucerne Festival.
Design: Heidi Falk.
Artwork & editorial © 2018 Accentus Music.

TRT 99:32.
16:9 NTSC. Full HD.
DTS HD Master Audio. PCM Stereo.

Riccardo Chailly appears courtesy of DECCA Classics.

COMMENT: What is not to like here? Nothing. Chailly is routinely excellent, producing orchestral sound of the highest refinement, lustruous textures, teasing out melodies and coaxing harmonic tension with a natural ease and vivid musicial imagination. Would love to see him conduct in concert one day, the CSO would be a fine choice. The Manfred is not super-Slavic, by any stretch, but it’s colorful, full of wit and character and, most important, “of a piece”. In other words, it hangs together very nicely. Up there with Petrenko’s on Naxos from 14 years ago. As for the Mendelssohn, I never tire of the piece. I love it. Chailly—really, the orchestra—does it justice. Fantastic all-around then. Great way to start 2021.
number_six
2021-01-04 17:45:30 UTC
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Started the year with Randy Greif's Alice in Wonderland, an extended electronic /ambient /sound collage adaptation of the classic tale. On Soleilmoon label, OOP, alas.
Alan Cooper
2021-01-05 18:59:53 UTC
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Started the year with Randy Greif's Alice in Wonderland, an extended electronic /ambient /sound collage adaptation of the classic tale. On Soleilmoon label, OOP, alas.
Made an excursion to the Polish Radio site (https://sklep.polskieradio.pl/pl/c/Plyty-CD/18) in search of the recent recording of Szymanowski's practically unknown opera "Hagith" (https://sklep.polskieradio.pl/pl/p/Karol-Szymanowski-HAGITH-CD-/1100), which turns out to be a fine wallow in the composer's lush mode. Maybe a little too reminiscent of Salome for my taste. There are many other tempting items on offer, but I restricted myself to a couple of Polish Radio Chamber Orchestra offerings conducted by Anieszka Duczmal. A splendid account of the ill-fated Józef Koffler's gorgeous arrangement of the Goldberg Variations for chamber orchestra (for info, see https://rcmusic-kentico-cdn.s3.amazonaws.com/rcm/media/main/documents/jozef-koffler%E2%80%99s-arrangement-of-the-goldberg-variations.pdf). I far prefer Duczmal's performance to Pinnock's on Linn.

Also a mixed recital including a fine performance of Panufnik's Violin Concerto with Konstanty Kulka as soloist (https://sklep.polskieradio.pl/pl/p/Agnieszka-Duczmal-Amadeus-vol.-2Tansman%2C-Meyer/392). The concerto has been fortunate on record, and I'm convinced that it is one of the finest 20th-century works in the genre. The rarities by other composers on the CD that accompany the concerto are worthwhile as well.

Speaking of the Panufnik VC, the 7-CD set devoted to performances Kaja Danczowska is available again for the equivalent of about US$16 (https://sklep.polskieradio.pl/pl/p/Kaja-Danczowska-Skrzypce-Violin/562). It's a fantastic collection (including the Panufnik), mostly available only in this set. Just don't blanch at the postal charge.

Many other tempting items, including a Hesse-Bukowska retrospective, live Malcuzynski, Bacewicz's comic opera (sic!) based on tales of King Arthur, lots of contemporary Polish music, etc. Probably will be making a return visit soon.

With good wishes to all for a better year in 2021,

AC
number_six
2021-01-07 20:36:14 UTC
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Also a mixed recital including a fine performance of Panufnik's Violin Concerto with Konstanty Kulka as soloist (https://sklep.polskieradio.pl/pl/p/Agnieszka-Duczmal-Amadeus-vol.-2Tansman%2C-Meyer/392). The concerto has been fortunate on record, and I'm convinced that it is one of the finest 20th-century works in the genre. The rarities by other composers on the CD that accompany the concerto are worthwhile as well.
Listened to Panufnik clips, thanks. Adagio sounds especially good,
Henk vT
2021-01-10 10:21:12 UTC
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Magaloff, the Philips Chopin set. In many ways an interesting approach to Chopin: elegant, fluent, with an important role for the left hand.

Henk
Dirge
2021-01-09 01:44:48 UTC
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Old favorites save for Arrau’s account of the Schumann Fantasie, which is a relatively new favorite …

Robert PARSONS: Ave Maria (1550s?)
:: Carwood/Cardinall’s Musick [ASV/Gaudeamus ’99]

J. S. BACH: Suites for cello solo (c. 1720)
:: Bylsma [RCA Seon ’79]

F. J. HAYDN: Symphonies No. 49 in F minor “La passione” (1768) & No. 44 in E minor “Trauer” (1772)
:: Scherchen/VSOO [Westminster ’53] DG

Robert SCHUMANN: Fantasie in C major, Op. 17 (1839)
:: Arrau [BBC, live ’60]

Franz LISZT: St. François de Paule marchant sur les flots from «Deux légendes» (1863)
:: Kempff [Decca ’50]

Béla BARTÓK: String Quartets (1909–39)
:: Végh Quartet [Columbia/Angel ’54] Praga
Praga claims that theses transfers derive from the “initial stereo tapes,” but the “stereo” sounds like artificial stereo to me. Be that as it may, these transfers sound far better than the opaque, woolly/ill-focused, and fulsome Music & Arts transfers, and I’m willing to believe that they do indeed derive from studio tapes (whatever else may have been done to them).

John ADAMS: Chamber Symphony (1992)
:: Edwards/Ensemble Modern [RCA ’96]
Al Eisner
2021-01-10 03:45:37 UTC
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Peter Maxwell Davies, "Miss Donnithornes's Maggot" and "Eight Songs for
a Mad King", on a Unicorn CD. My first encounter with Davies' work
was a live performance of this program, by the same forces, over 40
years ago. This is presumably the definitive recording. The second
(earlier) piece is more eclectic, but the instrumental work in both
(for a Pierrot ensemble plus percussion) is wonderful, I love the
first piece, with its rather wild vocal performance (mezzo Mary Thomas);
the vocal work in the second (baritone Julius Eastman) is sometimes
too extreme for me, but still effective.
--
Al Eisner
Al Eisner
2021-01-10 20:14:23 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
Peter Maxwell Davies, "Miss Donnithornes's Maggot" and "Eight Songs for
a Mad King", on a Unicorn CD. My first encounter with Davies' work
was a live performance of this program, by the same forces, over 40
years ago. This is presumably the definitive recording. The second
(earlier) piece is more eclectic, but the instrumental work in both (for a
Pierrot ensemble plus percussion) is wonderful, I love the
first piece, with its rather wild vocal performance (mezzo Mary Thomas); the
vocal work in the second (baritone Julius Eastman) is sometimes
too extreme for me, but still effective.
"same forces": I somehow managed to leave out that this was
Davies and The Fires of London".
--
Al Eisner
Todd Michel McComb
2021-01-11 00:28:08 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
"same forces": I somehow managed to leave out that this was
Davies and The Fires of London".
Funny, I remember that album from when it was new....

Does the Unicorn Kanchana label even exist anymore?
Al Eisner
2021-01-11 00:59:59 UTC
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Post by Todd Michel McComb
Post by Al Eisner
"same forces": I somehow managed to leave out that this was
Davies and The Fires of London".
Funny, I remember that album from when it was new....
Does the Unicorn Kanchana label even exist anymore?
A history can be found in https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unicorn-Kanchana .
So their CD's afre bing produced again for the past three or four years.
Presto currently lists 6 Davies releases (on what it just calls Unicorn)
with release dates since 2016. I got my copy at MDT a few years ago,
shortly before *their* denmise. I had been looking for a recording
for years.

Presto currently lists 32 CDs on Unicorn, mostly more conventional
classical (plus Bernard Herrmann film music) - I doubt if any of it
is in your wheelhouse unless you go for Davies or Messiaen, but that's
just speculation on my part.
.,
--
Al Eisner
Todd Michel McComb
2021-01-11 02:35:40 UTC
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I doubt if any of it is in your wheelhouse unless you go for Davies
or Messiaen, but that's just speculation on my part.
I really got into Messiaen in the 1980s.... I still think highly
of some of his work. E.g. _Catalog of Birds_

Davies seems very formally conservative, extended vocal technique
aside.... There's a sort of starkness to his concerti that isn't
all bad....

But thanks for the update on the label. There was a time I listened
to a lot of their releases.
dk
2021-01-10 04:43:50 UTC
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https://www.amazon.com/Miaskovsky-Symphonies-complete-Nikolai/dp/B000XCTD5S
dk
2021-01-10 04:48:00 UTC
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Post by dk
https://www.amazon.com/Miaskovsky-Symphonies-complete-Nikolai/dp/B000XCTD5S

dk
2021-01-11 05:38:14 UTC
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Continuing my Chopin project with the Ballades,
the Barcarolle and the Impromptus.

dk
MELMOTH
2021-01-11 09:32:47 UTC
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Post by dk
Continuing my Chopin project with the Ballades,
the Barcarolle and the Impromptus.
I am in advance appalled...
dk
2021-01-12 02:02:36 UTC
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Post by MELMOTH
Post by dk
Continuing my Chopin project with the Ballades,
the Barcarolle and the Impromptus.
I am in advance appalled...
Take some meclizine.

dk
Henk vT
2021-01-14 17:28:16 UTC
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BIS has kept its word. The Sorabji etudes are complete. Ullen has done a tremendous job. This last instalment of 2 cds is remarkable: a few pieces would even have been easy to listen to but for their length.

The Eileen Joyce set has arrived. I should have bought it as soon as it came out. Not a boring moment, also thanks to unknowns (to me) like Harry Farjeon.

Henk
Andrew Clarke
2021-01-15 17:25:34 UTC
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Post by Henk vT
BIS has kept its word. The Sorabji etudes are complete. Ullen has done a tremendous job. This last instalment of 2 cds is remarkable: a few pieces would even have been easy to listen to but for their length.
The Eileen Joyce set has arrived. I should have bought it as soon as it came out. Not a boring moment, also thanks to unknowns (to me) like Harry Farjeon.
Henk
Much better known is his sister, the writer of children's books, Eleanor "Morning Has Broken" Farjeon.

Andrew Clarke
Canberra
Andrew Clarke
2021-01-11 06:54:35 UTC
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Buxtehude. Complete Chamber Music. John Holloway, Jaap ter Linden, Lars Ulrik Mortensen et al., 3 CDs worth, Naxos, formerly available on Da Capo. The more I listen to Buxtehude the more he grows in stature, in my estimation.

NB: The CD of the Trio Sonatas Op 2 has been published twice by Naxos, one as a "separate" and the other as part of the set. Don't get muddled, as I did, and buy the same recording twice. The Naxos catalogue numbers are 8557249 and 8224004.

Andrew Clarke
Canberra
raymond....@gmail.com
2021-01-11 09:47:01 UTC
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Post by Andrew Clarke
Buxtehude. Complete Chamber Music. John Holloway, Jaap ter Linden, Lars Ulrik Mortensen et al., 3 CDs worth, Naxos, formerly available on Da Capo. The more I listen to Buxtehude the more he grows in stature, in my estimation.
NB: The CD of the Trio Sonatas Op 2 has been published twice by Naxos, one as a "separate" and the other as part of the set. Don't get muddled, as I did, and buy the same recording twice. The Naxos catalogue numbers are 8557249 and 8224004.
Andrew Clarke
Canberra
I have read that J S Bach walked over 400km to hear and absorb himself in Buxtehude's music, and also hear his playing as an organist. I have those Naxos Buxtehude cds and they are excellent.

The 3 cds of the trios for violin, viola da gamba and (cembalo for Vol I, with harpsichord for Vol II, with harpsichord or organ for Vol III), are not consistently labeled by Naxos, so below is what I have :-

Vol I ( 7 trio sonatas, Op.1, Bux WV 252-258) -- 8.557248
Vol II (7 trio sonatas, Op.2, Bux WV 259-265) -- 8.557249
Vol III (6 sonatas Without Opus Numbers, Bux WV 266,267,269,271,272,273) -- 8.557250

A bit of a mess, but the music is well worth it for the "Danish Bach".

Ray Hall, Taree
Andrew Clarke
2021-01-11 23:10:20 UTC
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Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by Andrew Clarke
Buxtehude. Complete Chamber Music. John Holloway, Jaap ter Linden, Lars Ulrik Mortensen et al., 3 CDs worth, Naxos, formerly available on Da Capo. The more I listen to Buxtehude the more he grows in stature, in my estimation.
NB: The CD of the Trio Sonatas Op 2 has been published twice by Naxos, one as a "separate" and the other as part of the set. Don't get muddled, as I did, and buy the same recording twice. The Naxos catalogue numbers are 8557249 and 8224004.
Andrew Clarke
Canberra
I have read that J S Bach walked over 400km to hear and absorb himself in Buxtehude's music, and also hear his playing as an organist. I have those Naxos Buxtehude cds and they are excellent.
The 3 cds of the trios for violin, viola da gamba and (cembalo for Vol I, with harpsichord for Vol II, with harpsichord or organ for Vol III), are not consistently labeled by Naxos, so below is what I have :-
Vol I ( 7 trio sonatas, Op.1, Bux WV 252-258) -- 8.557248
Vol II (7 trio sonatas, Op.2, Bux WV 259-265) -- 8.557249
Vol III (6 sonatas Without Opus Numbers, Bux WV 266,267,269,271,272,273) -- 8.557250
A bit of a mess, but the music is well worth it for the "Danish Bach".
There's also "Cantatas volume 1" with ter Linden and Mortensen plus the very lovely Emma Kirkby, but no sign of subsequent volumes. Strangely, the original Da Capo discs are still available from Presto Classical. It looks as if Da Capo was planning a whole series of Buxtehude and suddenly gave up, subsequently selling the masters to Naxos, which is odd, given that Da Capo is a Danish label and Bux one of their most famous composers. Were there copyright problems? Did somebody die?

Naxos have also given us a fine recording of Bux cantatas from Kevin Mallon in Toronto, and there's more from Cantus Coelln. I also have 'Membra Jesu nostri' from the Ricecar Consort under Philippe Pierlot, another Belgian baroque specialist although, unusually, he's from Wallonia and not Flanders. Born in Liege, like Arcadelt, Cesar Franck, Ysaye, Pousseur and Georges Simenon.

Andrew Clarke
Canberra
Peter
2021-01-11 23:32:35 UTC
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Buxtehude wrote a lot of fine music. I recommend the complete organ works played by Vogel (MDG 314 1438-2).

But right now I'm on a Zelenka kick. The masses, psalms etc. on the Nibiru label (conducted by Viktora) are superb, and of course his trio sonatas are also wonderful. At his best he is almost the equal of Bach, just not as memorable a tunesmith. Bach supposedly held him in high esteem, although Z never got the career opportunities he sought.
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by Andrew Clarke
Buxtehude. Complete Chamber Music. John Holloway, Jaap ter Linden, Lars Ulrik Mortensen et al., 3 CDs worth, Naxos, formerly available on Da Capo. The more I listen to Buxtehude the more he grows in stature, in my estimation.
NB: The CD of the Trio Sonatas Op 2 has been published twice by Naxos, one as a "separate" and the other as part of the set. Don't get muddled, as I did, and buy the same recording twice. The Naxos catalogue numbers are 8557249 and 8224004.
Andrew Clarke
Canberra
I have read that J S Bach walked over 400km to hear and absorb himself in Buxtehude's music, and also hear his playing as an organist. I have those Naxos Buxtehude cds and they are excellent.
The 3 cds of the trios for violin, viola da gamba and (cembalo for Vol I, with harpsichord for Vol II, with harpsichord or organ for Vol III), are not consistently labeled by Naxos, so below is what I have :-
Vol I ( 7 trio sonatas, Op.1, Bux WV 252-258) -- 8.557248
Vol II (7 trio sonatas, Op.2, Bux WV 259-265) -- 8.557249
Vol III (6 sonatas Without Opus Numbers, Bux WV 266,267,269,271,272,273) -- 8.557250
A bit of a mess, but the music is well worth it for the "Danish Bach".
Ray Hall, Taree
dk
2021-01-17 04:47:34 UTC
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Myaskovsky symphonies.

dk
Alan Cooper
2021-01-17 14:19:45 UTC
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Post by dk
Myaskovsky symphonies.
dk
Mining the dross for the occasional nugget? Been there done that (with the string quartets too). Let us know what you come up with. I'm still a big fan of the respective concerti for violin and 'cello though.

AC
Ricardo Jimenez
2021-01-17 16:34:49 UTC
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On Sun, 17 Jan 2021 06:19:45 -0800 (PST), Alan Cooper
Post by Alan Cooper
Post by dk
Myaskovsky symphonies.
dk
Mining the dross for the occasional nugget? Been there done that (with the string quartets too). Let us know what you come up with. I'm still a big fan of the respective concerti for violin and 'cello though.
AC
Anybody ever undertake a similar project to find the gem(s) among the
32 of Havergal Brian or the 342 (as of Sept 2020) of Leif Segerstam?
dk
2021-01-17 20:07:33 UTC
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Post by Ricardo Jimenez
On Sun, 17 Jan 2021 06:19:45 -0800 (PST), Alan Cooper
Post by dk
Myaskovsky symphonies.
Mining the dross for the occasional nugget? Been there done that
(with the string quartets too). Let us know what you come up with.
I'm still a big fan of the respective concerti for violin and 'cello though.
Anybody ever undertake a similar project to find the gem(s) among the
32 of Havergal Brian or the 342 (as of Sept 2020) of Leif Segerstam?
I don't listen to music that is so long as to prevent one from using the
bathroom! ;-)

dk
Al Eisner
2021-01-18 01:19:04 UTC
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For those who subscribe to medici.tv: a 2015 performance of Sibelius's
Symphony #7 by Hannu Lintu with the Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra
before a live audience:
https://www.medici.tv/en/concerts/sibelius-symphonies-n7-hannu-lintu-finnish-radio-symphony-orchestra/

The preformance is a fine one (the strings may be a bit underpowered, or,
more likely, this could be an issue of the recorded sound). But the
best thing is that the video, which starts with historical background,
includes a fascinating and illuminating analysis of the work by Lintu,
integrated fully with rehearsal footage. It is a wonderfully well-
produced video overall. There are corresponding videos at medici
for all of the Sibelius symphonies (I think all from 2015). I will
certainly view more of them.
--
Al Eisner
raymond....@gmail.com
2021-01-18 10:24:52 UTC
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Post by dk
Myaskovsky symphonies.
dk
Are they in the Svetlanov Warner France box? If they are you may or may not know of the mis-labelling that needs to be corrected. The symphonies are serious works, and worth the effort methinks. They grow on you.

Corrections:- the most important.

*1. CD #10 the 3 movement suite following No.3 is really symphony No.23.
*2. CD #11 the symphony No.8 is really No.18. Symphony No.8 is correctly called on CD #4.
the symphony No.16 has the title "The Aviation Symphony".
*3. CD #5 the symphony No.12 has the title "The Collective Farm".
*4. CD #15 the sinfonietta is in b-moll and not a-dur
track 10 is ''andante elevato" not "allegro giocoso".

There are several other boo boos but are minor errors, key signatures to some suites, etc.
Cheers.

Ray Hall, Taree
Gerard
2021-01-18 11:40:41 UTC
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Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by dk
Myaskovsky symphonies.
dk
Are they in the Svetlanov Warner France box? If they are you may or may not know of the mis-labelling that needs to be corrected. The symphonies are serious works, and worth the effort methinks. They grow on you.
Corrections:- the most important.
*1. CD #10 the 3 movement suite following No.3 is really symphony No.23.
*2. CD #11 the symphony No.8 is really No.18. Symphony No.8 is correctly called on CD #4.
the symphony No.16 has the title "The Aviation Symphony".
*3. CD #5 the symphony No.12 has the title "The Collective Farm".
*4. CD #15 the sinfonietta is in b-moll and not a-dur
track 10 is ''andante elevato" not "allegro giocoso".
There are several other boo boos but are minor errors, key signatures to some suites, etc.
Cheers.
Ray Hall, Taree
Thanks for this information.
JohnGavin
2021-01-18 21:13:45 UTC
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Post by Gerard
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by dk
Myaskovsky symphonies.
dk
Are they in the Svetlanov Warner France box? If they are you may or may not know of the mis-labelling that needs to be corrected. The symphonies are serious works, and worth the effort methinks. They grow on you.
Corrections:- the most important.
*1. CD #10 the 3 movement suite following No.3 is really symphony No.23.
*2. CD #11 the symphony No.8 is really No.18. Symphony No.8 is correctly called on CD #4.
the symphony No.16 has the title "The Aviation Symphony".
*3. CD #5 the symphony No.12 has the title "The Collective Farm".
*4. CD #15 the sinfonietta is in b-moll and not a-dur
track 10 is ''andante elevato" not "allegro giocoso".
There are several other boo boos but are minor errors, key signatures to some suites, etc.
Cheers.
Ray Hall, Taree
Thanks for this information.
Jean Francaix - L’Insectarium


number_six
2021-01-23 20:07:27 UTC
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Post by JohnGavin
Jean Francaix - L’Insectarium
http://youtu.be/qgln1jaXSa0
Looking forward to hearing this

love his chamber works but not familiar with this
Al Eisner
2021-01-30 23:26:46 UTC
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A 2-CD VoxBox from violinist Aaron Rosand, with Louis de Froment and the
Orchestra of Radio Luxembourg. I've had this, unlistened to, for 7
years, probably acquired after an rmcr recommendation, since I doubt
if I would have been sufficiently attracted by the contents on my own.

It includes Concertos by Joachim, Jeno Hubay, Heinrich Wilhelm Ernst
and Benjamin Godard, and shorter works by Enescu (Prelude for Solo
Violin), Ysaye (Chant d'Hiver), Lehar (Hungarian Fantasy), Hubay
(Hejre Kati) and Wieniawski (Concert Polonaise). Apart from the
Joachim (parts of which rang a bell) and the popular Wienawski, I
doubt if I had previously heard any of this music. The Joachim was.
to me, the most compelling and interesting work, but I generally
enjoyed all of the set, although the Hubay concerto, apart from a
fine Adagio, had too high a ratio of virtusity to substance. Other
favorites for me were the lovely Ernst concerto and the lovely and
passionate Ysaye piece.

The violin playing seemed unifirm excellent - ust check out the
first movement cadenza in tbhe Joachim. Thanks fo whovever
recommended this; I can pass that on.

--
Al Eisner
Lawrence Chalmers
2021-01-31 00:47:45 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
A 2-CD VoxBox from violinist Aaron Rosand, with Louis de Froment and the
Orchestra of Radio Luxembourg. I've had this, unlistened to, for 7
years, probably acquired after an rmcr recommendation, since I doubt
if I would have been sufficiently attracted by the contents on my own.
It includes Concertos by Joachim, Jeno Hubay, Heinrich Wilhelm Ernst
and Benjamin Godard, and shorter works by Enescu (Prelude for Solo
Violin), Ysaye (Chant d'Hiver), Lehar (Hungarian Fantasy), Hubay
(Hejre Kati) and Wieniawski (Concert Polonaise). Apart from the
Joachim (parts of which rang a bell) and the popular Wienawski, I
doubt if I had previously heard any of this music. The Joachim was.
to me, the most compelling and interesting work, but I generally
enjoyed all of the set, although the Hubay concerto, apart from a
fine Adagio, had too high a ratio of virtusity to substance. Other
favorites for me were the lovely Ernst concerto and the lovely and
passionate Ysaye piece.
The violin playing seemed unifirm excellent - ust check out the
first movement cadenza in tbhe Joachim. Thanks fo whovever
recommended this; I can pass that on.
--
Al Eisner
The complete piano music of Mompou on Brilliant Classics played by the composer. What a great pleasure afforded me courtesy of Dave Hurwitz.
Alan Cooper
2021-01-31 19:41:28 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
A 2-CD VoxBox from violinist Aaron Rosand, with Louis de Froment and the
Orchestra of Radio Luxembourg. I've had this, unlistened to, for 7
years, probably acquired after an rmcr recommendation, since I doubt
if I would have been sufficiently attracted by the contents on my own.
It includes Concertos by Joachim, Jeno Hubay, Heinrich Wilhelm Ernst
and Benjamin Godard, and shorter works by Enescu (Prelude for Solo
Violin), Ysaye (Chant d'Hiver), Lehar (Hungarian Fantasy), Hubay
(Hejre Kati) and Wieniawski (Concert Polonaise). Apart from the
Joachim (parts of which rang a bell) and the popular Wienawski, I
doubt if I had previously heard any of this music. The Joachim was.
to me, the most compelling and interesting work, but I generally
enjoyed all of the set, although the Hubay concerto, apart from a
fine Adagio, had too high a ratio of virtusity to substance. Other
favorites for me were the lovely Ernst concerto and the lovely and
passionate Ysaye piece.
The violin playing seemed unifirm excellent - ust check out the
first movement cadenza in tbhe Joachim. Thanks fo whovever
recommended this; I can pass that on.
--
Al Eisner
Yeah, I recommended it about 5 years ago in a thread on Vox Boxes, along with anything else by Rosand. My comment on this particular set, "I doubt that it will duplicate much of what you own unless you already have it :-)." The performances are wonderful. No undiscovered masterpieces among the compositions--I agree that the Joachim is closest to that level--but they fall nicely on the ear in performances of this caliber.

I've been listening alternately to Saraste's first Sibelius cycle c/w many additional compositions and the set of Panufnik's complete orchestral works on CPO (an excellent bargain from JPC). I enjoy Saraste's way with Sibelius, and I like Panufnik more and more with each rehearing. Maybe I'm deluding myself, but I hear occasional commonalities between the two composers, esp. the way they build works out of small fragments that eventually cohere (or not).

Hoping that the warning of a colossal winter storm heading our way is overstated,

AC
Al Eisner
2021-01-31 20:57:32 UTC
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Post by Alan Cooper
Post by Al Eisner
A 2-CD VoxBox from violinist Aaron Rosand, with Louis de Froment and the
Orchestra of Radio Luxembourg. I've had this, unlistened to, for 7
years, probably acquired after an rmcr recommendation, since I doubt
if I would have been sufficiently attracted by the contents on my own.
It includes Concertos by Joachim, Jeno Hubay, Heinrich Wilhelm Ernst
and Benjamin Godard, and shorter works by Enescu (Prelude for Solo
Violin), Ysaye (Chant d'Hiver), Lehar (Hungarian Fantasy), Hubay
(Hejre Kati) and Wieniawski (Concert Polonaise). Apart from the
Joachim (parts of which rang a bell) and the popular Wienawski, I
doubt if I had previously heard any of this music. The Joachim was.
to me, the most compelling and interesting work, but I generally
enjoyed all of the set, although the Hubay concerto, apart from a
fine Adagio, had too high a ratio of virtusity to substance. Other
favorites for me were the lovely Ernst concerto and the lovely and
passionate Ysaye piece.
The violin playing seemed unifirm excellent - ust check out the
first movement cadenza in tbhe Joachim. Thanks fo whovever
recommended this; I can pass that on.
Al Eisner
Yeah, I recommended it about 5 years ago in a thread on Vox Boxes, along with anything else by Rosand. My comment on this particular set, "I doubt that it will duplicate much of what you own unless you already have it :-)." The performances are wonderful. No undiscovered masterpieces among the compositions--I agree that the Joachim is closest to that level--but they fall nicely on the ear in performances of this caliber.
Thanks. I'll assume your "about 5 years" can match my late-2013 purchase. :)
I think the Ysaye could also be close to that level, but I should listen
again some time. I do see that I need to apologize for a bunch of typos in
my post, but hopefully it's all still readable.
Post by Alan Cooper
I've been listening alternately to Saraste's first Sibelius cycle c/w many additional compositions and the set of Panufnik's complete orchestral works on CPO (an excellent bargain from JPC). I enjoy Saraste's way with Sibelius, and I like Panufnik more and more with each rehearing. Maybe I'm deluding myself, but I hear occasional commonalities between the two composers, esp. the way they build works out of small fragments that eventually cohere (or not).
Hoping that the warning of a colossal winter storm heading our way is overstated,
AC
--
Al Eisner
Al Eisner
2021-02-01 05:56:26 UTC
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More violin music, this time Schubert's complete works for violin and
piano, on a 2-(hybrid)CD Pentatone release, with Julia Fischer and
Martin Helmchen: the three Sonatinas (Op. posth. 137), the Grand Duo
(D574), Rondo Brillant (D895) and Fantasia in C (D934).

The first two Sonatinas could haven used a bit more "lilt" from the
violin (the very good playing was rather smooth) - they didn't provide
as much joy as I recall from the old A.Schneider/P.Serkin disk. But
the later works have more substance to them, and the performances
were very good fits. (The Grand Duo may be the best I've heard.)
A delight to have all of this music, so well performed, in one set.

But the above do not fill two CD's, and the filler was a surprise:
the Fantasia in F minor (D940) for piano duet, with Fischer
joining Helmchen at the keyboard. (I don't know who played
which part.) A quite commendable job.

I picked this up at Berkshire, which sells Pentatone for $6.99 a disk,
quite a good discount, and they keep coming in. I also picked up
two volumes of Chorzempa's Handel organ concertos. There is more Helmchen
among their Pentatones (Schubert, Schumann, Mendelssohn), such as a CD
of Schubert chamber works (including the Trout Quintet), with several
of them also including Christian Tetzlaff, which may be attractive;
work with coductors Janowski, Gimeno (who?) and Kreizberg; and so on.
I think all hybrid SACDs, but just CD for my purposes....
--
Al Eisner
dk
2021-01-18 22:14:43 UTC
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Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by dk
Myaskovsky symphonies.
Are they in the Svetlanov Warner France box?
Nope. Various. I am no Svetlanov fan. Thanks for the advice anyway.
Post by ***@gmail.com
If they are you may or may not know of the mis-labelling that needs to be corrected.
The symphonies are serious works, and worth the effort methinks. They grow on you.
I certainly hope nothing ever grows on me! ;-)

dk
Oscar
2021-01-19 04:48:12 UTC
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Still in my Karajan Re-visited phase:

Verdi: Aida (discs 13 & 14)

Renata Tebaldi (S)
Carlo Bergonzi (T)
Giulietta Simionato (Mz)
Singverein der Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde
Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra / Herbert von Karajan

Decca/UME 483 4903 ℗ 1959 © 2019. From 33CD boxed set 'Herbert von Karajan: The Complete Decca Recordings'.
Recorded at Sofiensaal, Vienna, September 2-15, 1959.
Stereo.
Recording producers: John Culshaw, James Walker.
Balance engineers: Gordon Parry, James Brown.
First released as Decca SXL 2168/9.
℗ 1959 Decca Music Group Limited.
TRT 149:39.

This edition ℗ 2019 Decca Music Group Limited.
© 2019 Decca Music Group Limited.
24-bit/96 kHz Remastering ℗ 2019 Decca Music Group Limited.
All recordings remastered at 24-bit/96 kHz from original analogue sources.
Decca product management: Edward Weston.
Special thanks to Gary Pietronave (EMI Hayes Archive) and Pollard Collection, EMI Trust for the scans of the original LP sleeves.
Booklet editing and art direction: WLP Limited.

COMMENT: I can't say I've listened a bunch of Aidas in my listening career. Not a go-to Verdi for me. This is pretty good, though. The singers, the recording, Karajan's conducting—although seemingly on the slow side in sections, viz. "Celeste Aida"—it's all very good. No complaints. The Golden Age! Any other Aidas of note?
dk
2021-01-19 04:55:31 UTC
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Post by Oscar
Any other Aidas of note?


dk
number_six
2021-01-23 20:17:03 UTC
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Satie - Socrate /Cage - Cheap Imitation for piano solo (Wergo)

Mozart K 314 /R Strauss - Oboe cto in D - Holliger, de Waart (Philips)

Meteors vs. the World (Anagram)
M&S Frost
2021-01-23 23:50:20 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by Oscar
Any other Aidas of note?
http://youtu.be/Sgnw7kV76_4
dk
Other Aidas of note? My favorite is Price/Solti.

MIFrost
dk
2021-01-24 02:04:34 UTC
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Post by M&S Frost
Post by dk
Post by Oscar
Any other Aidas of note?
http://youtu.be/Sgnw7kV76_4
Other Aidas of note? My favorite is Price/Solti.
Are you looking for price or for value? ;-

dk
raymond....@gmail.com
2021-01-24 04:14:13 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by M&S Frost
Post by dk
Post by Oscar
Any other Aidas of note?
http://youtu.be/Sgnw7kV76_4
Other Aidas of note? My favorite is Price/Solti.
Are you looking for price or for value? ;-
dk
I've started the Miaskovsky symphony journey with the Svetlanov Warner box. Nothing so far tells me this will be a wasted journey, but will be a process of assimilating new music, albeit rather conservatively written, but none the worse for that. I am prepared for a few duds (relatively) in this rather large symphonic output. I've heard 1, 2 and 3 so far.

Pulled the trigger on the Villa Lobos symphonies on Naxos, but with individual CDs, starting with the 12th which has interesting couplings. The Sao Paulo orchestra has gained many written plaudits, especially wrt this music.

Chasing Jean Francaix's L'horloge des fleurs. I remember in the thread on French composers that somehow Francaix was mostly missed out. This work was a real fave of mine many moons ago, and I need a good recording of it. Any recommendations? Thx.

Ray Hall, Taree
Oscar
2021-01-28 07:32:55 UTC
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Wagner • Karajan

Berliner Philharmoniker / Herbert von Karajan

DG 289 479 3448 ℗ 1984 © 2014. From 78CD boxed set 'Karajan 1980s'.
DDD. Stereo.
Recorded at the Philharmonie, Berlin, February 1984.
Executive producer: Günther Breest.
Recording producer: Michel Glotz.
Balance engineer: Günther Hermanns.
Editing: Reinhild Schmidt.
Total time: 50:07.

This edition:
℗ & © 2014 Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Berlin.
Project manager: Harald Reiter.
Booklet editors: texthouse.
Design: WAPS.
Art direction: Merle Kersten.
Printed in the E.U.

COMMENT: It's Fluffy. It's the '80s. Let it all hang out. No, seriously, the Tännhauser music is quite breathtaking here in sweep and passion from the Berliners. I've played the entire album two nights in a row. Never heard this CD previous to yesterday. The multi-miking makes this one not as accurate, in my opinion, from the perspective of imaging as the 1970s Wagner album for EMI, but it is a record of deep musical affinity and shows Karajan at the best of his latter-day abilities. I can't believe I'm enjoying this 1980s box as much as I am. Happy I bought it (and then scarcely listened to it) in 2014. Some duds, but some good stuff, like this one. Again, for side 1 alone, it's worth a listen. I, for one, did not want it to end.

Tännhauser und er Sängerkriegand auf Wartburg
-Overtüre
-Bacchanale (Venusberg)

Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg
-Vorspiel num 3. Aufzug

Tristan und Isolde
-Vorspiel num 1. Aufzug
-Isoldes Liebstod
dk
2021-01-29 04:24:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Oscar
Wagner • Karajan
Berliner Philharmoniker / Herbert von Karajan
DG 289 479 3448 ℗ 1984 © 2014. From 78CD boxed set 'Karajan 1980s'.
DDD. Stereo.
Recorded at the Philharmonie, Berlin, February 1984.
Executive producer: Günther Breest.
Recording producer: Michel Glotz.
Balance engineer: Günther Hermanns.
Editing: Reinhild Schmidt.
Total time: 50:07.
℗ & © 2014 Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Berlin.
Project manager: Harald Reiter.
Booklet editors: texthouse.
Design: WAPS.
Art direction: Merle Kersten.
Printed in the E.U.
COMMENT: It's Fluffy. It's the '80s. Let it all hang out. No, seriously, the Tännhauser music is quite breathtaking here in sweep and passion from the Berliners. I've played the entire album two nights in a row. Never heard this CD previous to yesterday. The multi-miking makes this one not as accurate, in my opinion, from the perspective of imaging as the 1970s Wagner album for EMI, but it is a record of deep musical affinity and shows Karajan at the best of his latter-day abilities. I can't believe I'm enjoying this 1980s box as much as I am. Happy I bought it (and then scarcely listened to it) in 2014. Some duds, but some good stuff, like this one. Again, for side 1 alone, it's worth a listen. I, for one, did not want it to end.
Tännhauser und er Sängerkriegand auf Wartburg
-Overtüre
-Bacchanale (Venusberg)
Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg
-Vorspiel num 3. Aufzug
Tristan und Isolde
-Vorspiel num 1. Aufzug
-Isoldes Liebstod
In other words, if one cannot have Fascism in the
White House, at least have it on one's CD player ?!?

dk
dk
2021-01-23 21:31:04 UTC
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Overdosing on lesser known Japanese conductors.
Néstor Castiglione
2021-01-23 22:28:46 UTC
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Post by dk
Overdosing on lesser known Japanese conductors.
Which ones? Ozawa Seiji is a fine conductor; better than he's often given credit for. But there are quite a few other Japanese conductors--living and deceased--who are, arguably, more interesting and consistent in quality. Japanese pianists, especially those whose careers developed in the 1930s - 1950s, are another group which remain little known in the West.
dk
2021-01-23 22:52:30 UTC
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Post by Néstor Castiglione
Post by dk
Overdosing on lesser known Japanese conductors.
Which ones?
I will post a review when I complete my research! Keeping mum for now! ;-)
Post by Néstor Castiglione
Ozawa Seiji is a fine conductor; better than he's often given credit for.
Ozawa does not really fit the "lesser known" description. I am currently
listening to conductors who are less known then even Takashi Asahina!
Post by Néstor Castiglione
But there are quite a few other Japanese conductors--living and deceased --
who are, arguably, more interesting and consistent in quality.
Japanese pianists, especially those whose careers developed in the
1930s - 1950s, are another group which remain little known in the West.
Amen! Will get there in due time.

dk
JohnGavin
2021-01-29 15:43:52 UTC
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Post by Néstor Castiglione
Post by dk
Overdosing on lesser known Japanese conductors.
Which ones? Ozawa Seiji is a fine conductor; better than he's often given credit for. But there are quite a few other Japanese conductors--living and deceased--who are, arguably, more interesting and consistent in quality. Japanese pianists, especially those whose careers developed in the 1930s - 1950s, are another group which remain little known in the West.
Not sure of what happened to Minoru Nojima who was an exceptionally brilliant and polished pianist.
Henk vT
2021-01-29 16:05:54 UTC
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Post by JohnGavin
Post by Néstor Castiglione
Japanese pianists, especially those whose careers developed in the 1930s - 1950s, are another group which remain little known in the West.
Not sure of what happened to Minoru Nojima who was an exceptionally brilliant and polished pianist.
Seconded. And Hiromi Okada.

Henk
number_six
2021-01-29 20:35:22 UTC
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various artists - The Stuff Dreams are Made of (Yazoo)

who among us has not at some point experienced something akin to what the R Crumb cover depicts --

"After forty years, at last it's MINE..."
Frank Berger
2021-01-29 16:26:22 UTC
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Post by JohnGavin
Post by Néstor Castiglione
Post by dk
Overdosing on lesser known Japanese conductors.
Which ones? Ozawa Seiji is a fine conductor; better than he's often given credit for. But there are quite a few other Japanese conductors--living and deceased--who are, arguably, more interesting and consistent in quality. Japanese pianists, especially those whose careers developed in the 1930s - 1950s, are another group which remain little known in the West.
Not sure of what happened to Minoru Nojima who was an exceptionally brilliant and polished pianist.
According to one source, as of 2016:

"He's now president of the Tokyo College of Music and
established the Minoru Nojima Yokosuka Piano Competition to
further the professional development of Japanese pianists."
Frank Berger
2021-01-29 16:32:28 UTC
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Post by JohnGavin
Post by Néstor Castiglione
Post by dk
Overdosing on lesser known Japanese conductors.
Which ones? Ozawa Seiji is a fine conductor; better than he's often given credit for. But there are quite a few other Japanese conductors--living and deceased--who are, arguably, more interesting and consistent in quality. Japanese pianists, especially those whose careers developed in the 1930s - 1950s, are another group which remain little known in the West.
Not sure of what happened to Minoru Nojima who was an exceptionally brilliant and polished pianist.
Perhaps his concentration on Japanese composers limited his
international career?
dk
2021-02-01 04:32:55 UTC
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Post by Oscar
A new decade! Peace on earth. Good tidings to all. Stay safe, wear a mask.
Liszt -- Vallée d'Obermann -- comparative analysis of
all the recordings I have or can find.

dk
MELMOTH
2021-02-01 08:41:08 UTC
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Post by dk
Liszt -- Vallée d'Obermann -- comparative analysis of
all the recordings I have or can find.
I remain faithful to my first acquisition: *Edith FARNADI*...
dk
2021-02-01 19:33:39 UTC
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Post by MELMOTH
Post by dk
Liszt -- Vallée d'Obermann -- comparative analysis of
all the recordings I have or can find.
I remain faithful to my first acquisition: *Edith FARNADI*...
When one lives in a cave one should watch out for floods!

dk

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