Discussion:
Vaughan Williams recommendations
(too old to reply)
Bob Harper
2008-08-20 02:32:52 UTC
Permalink
The subject line pretty well says it. As it happens, I just read Simon
Heffer's article in the Daily Telegraph
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/main.jhtml?xml=/opinion/2008/08/20/do2001.xml
and it makes me think I need to explore his music in something more than
the desultory fashion I have done up 'til now.

So...your recommendations for recordings, especially of the orchestral
and chamber music, are solicited.

TIA.

Bob Harper
Sol L. Siegel
2008-08-20 03:17:43 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 19 Aug 2008 19:32:52 -0700, Bob Harper
Post by Bob Harper
...your recommendations for recordings, especially of the orchestral
and chamber music, are solicited.
There have been many threads on this. But I'll give you my $.02
anyway.

Symphonies: The Boult box on Universal is mostly mono, but also close
to definitive. Stereo versions I like (involving duplications of
couplings, alas):

"Sea Symphony": Boult/EMI, Previn
"London Symphony": Those two again, and the earlier (ca. 1958)
Barbirolli, coupled with 8.
"Pastoral Symphony": Previn, though I don't care for the 4 it's
coupled with.
4- Bernstein. I have the Daniel, which seemed fine, but I have to
play it again to be certain. There are also historic renditions by
Stokowski, Mitropoulos and the composer that should be heard.
5- Handley, Barbirolli/EMI. Koussevitzky/Boston may be best of all,
despite the ancient sound - what string playing!
6 & 9 - Handley, Previn
7 & 8 - Previn, Bakels
Job - Handley

There's a Boult/EMI disc including The Lark Ascending and Serenade to
Music that's as essential as any of these; Amazon's selling it for $8.

The cantata Dona Nobis Pacem is a major-major IMHO, which is perhaps
warped by the fact that I once sang with a choir in it. Boult and
Thomson are just fine here. A disc I'd like to hear but haven't is
the composer's live performances of this and the 5th Symphony.

After that: the operas The Pilgrim's Progress and Sir John in Love,
EMI's splendid recordings of which have made it to CD.

Happy hunting.

- Sol L. Siegel, Philadelphia, PA USA
Dawg
2008-08-20 04:17:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sol L. Siegel
On Tue, 19 Aug 2008 19:32:52 -0700, Bob Harper
Post by Bob Harper
...your recommendations for recordings, especially of the orchestral
and chamber music, are solicited.
There have been many threads on this. But I'll give you my $.02
anyway.
Symphonies: The Boult box on Universal is mostly mono, but also close
to definitive. Stereo versions I like (involving duplications of
"Sea Symphony": Boult/EMI, Previn
"London Symphony": Those two again, and the earlier (ca. 1958)
Barbirolli, coupled with 8.
"Pastoral Symphony": Previn, though I don't care for the 4 it's
coupled with.
4- Bernstein. I have the Daniel, which seemed fine, but I have to
play it again to be certain. There are also historic renditions by
Stokowski, Mitropoulos and the composer that should be heard.
5- Handley, Barbirolli/EMI. Koussevitzky/Boston may be best of all,
despite the ancient sound - what string playing!
6 & 9 - Handley, Previn
7 & 8 - Previn, Bakels
Job - Handley
There's a Boult/EMI disc including The Lark Ascending and Serenade to
Music that's as essential as any of these; Amazon's selling it for $8.
The cantata Dona Nobis Pacem is a major-major IMHO, which is perhaps
warped by the fact that I once sang with a choir in it. Boult and
Thomson are just fine here. A disc I'd like to hear but haven't is
the composer's live performances of this and the 5th Symphony.
After that: the operas The Pilgrim's Progress and Sir John in Love,
EMI's splendid recordings of which have made it to CD.
Happy hunting.
- Sol L. Siegel, Philadelphia, PA USA
A good choice above as far as I am concerned. Essentially Previn figures
a lot, and I agree that he is mostly excellent. The Previn/LSO
combination was dynamite at its best. Also agree about Handley's Job,
and his 5th symphony, which rate very highly, although I was
disappointed with his 3&4 and 7&8 couplings, which lacked any real
urgency. I still maintain that in the IceFall section of the 7th, that
the off-key horns, set against the organ, is far more terrifying in
Previn's account, regardless of the fact that many criticize the dynamic
of the organ. It isn't the organ that terrifies here, but the LSO horns,
and Previn has it entirely correct, and he creates a truly terrifying
picture. Previn, in general, goes for atmosphere, and it pays off.

Not too far back, I got the Haitink set, and discovered that apart from
a very disappointing London symphony, there is much to be enjoyed,
especially with richer sound, and a more symphonic approach. His Tallis
is rather weak though, as is his Lark Ascending, and for the Tallis then
Silvestri, and or Barbirolli, are much finer.

I have yet to get Boult's set Belart set, but am put off by it being mono.

As for the 'ancients' then I may be missing out, but I hear good reports
about Lenny's 4th too, but Previn or Haitink are very good too, and
nothing clangs or chimes as brilliantly as with Previn in the 8th,
although Barbirolli really scores here. Agree about Daniel's 4th too,
but is it as biting as Previn? I think not.

Ray (Dawg) Hall, Taree
j***@aol.com
2008-08-20 04:22:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dawg
Post by Sol L. Siegel
On Tue, 19 Aug 2008 19:32:52 -0700, Bob Harper
Post by Bob Harper
...your recommendations for recordings, especially of the orchestral
and chamber music, are solicited.
There have been many threads on this. But I'll give you my $.02
anyway.
Symphonies: The Boult box on Universal is mostly mono, but also close
to definitive. Stereo versions I like (involving duplications of
"Sea Symphony": Boult/EMI, Previn
"London Symphony": Those two again, and the earlier (ca. 1958)
Barbirolli, coupled with 8.
"Pastoral Symphony": Previn, though I don't care for the 4 it's
coupled with.
4- Bernstein. I have the Daniel, which seemed fine, but I have to
play it again to be certain. There are also historic renditions by
Stokowski, Mitropoulos and the composer that should be heard.
5- Handley, Barbirolli/EMI. Koussevitzky/Boston may be best of all,
despite the ancient sound - what string playing!
6 & 9 - Handley, Previn
7 & 8 - Previn, Bakels
Job - Handley
There's a Boult/EMI disc including The Lark Ascending and Serenade to
Music that's as essential as any of these; Amazon's selling it for $8.
The cantata Dona Nobis Pacem is a major-major IMHO, which is perhaps
warped by the fact that I once sang with a choir in it. Boult and
Thomson are just fine here. A disc I'd like to hear but haven't is
the composer's live performances of this and the 5th Symphony.
After that: the operas The Pilgrim's Progress and Sir John in Love,
EMI's splendid recordings of which have made it to CD.
Happy hunting.
- Sol L. Siegel, Philadelphia, PA USA
A good choice above as far as I am concerned. Essentially Previn figures
a lot, and I agree that he is mostly excellent. The Previn/LSO
combination was dynamite at its best. Also agree about Handley's Job,
and his 5th symphony, which rate very highly, although I was
disappointed with his 3&4 and 7&8 couplings, which lacked any real
urgency. I still maintain that in the IceFall section of the 7th, that
the off-key horns, set against the organ, is far more terrifying in
Previn's account, regardless of the fact that many criticize the dynamic
of the organ. It isn't the organ that terrifies here, but the LSO horns,
and Previn has it entirely correct, and he creates a truly terrifying
picture. Previn, in general, goes for atmosphere, and it pays off.
Not too far back, I got the Haitink set, and discovered that apart from
a very disappointing London symphony, there is much to be enjoyed,
especially with richer sound, and a more symphonic approach. His Tallis
is rather weak though, as is his Lark Ascending, and for the Tallis then
Silvestri, and or Barbirolli, are much finer.
I have yet to get Boult's set Belart set, but am put off by it being mono.
I bought it a few weeks ago, and while it is excellent, I think you
are right to hesitate. The sound is mediocre on Belart and the fine
performances are compromised. Better to stick with good stereo sets in
general, or individual great performances by Berglund, Silvestri and
others.

--Jeff
Steve de Mena
2008-08-20 08:34:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by j***@aol.com
Post by Dawg
Post by Sol L. Siegel
On Tue, 19 Aug 2008 19:32:52 -0700, Bob Harper
Post by Bob Harper
...your recommendations for recordings, especially of the orchestral
and chamber music, are solicited.
There have been many threads on this. But I'll give you my $.02
anyway.
Symphonies: The Boult box on Universal is mostly mono, but also close
to definitive. Stereo versions I like (involving duplications of
"Sea Symphony": Boult/EMI, Previn
"London Symphony": Those two again, and the earlier (ca. 1958)
Barbirolli, coupled with 8.
"Pastoral Symphony": Previn, though I don't care for the 4 it's
coupled with.
4- Bernstein. I have the Daniel, which seemed fine, but I have to
play it again to be certain. There are also historic renditions by
Stokowski, Mitropoulos and the composer that should be heard.
5- Handley, Barbirolli/EMI. Koussevitzky/Boston may be best of all,
despite the ancient sound - what string playing!
6 & 9 - Handley, Previn
7 & 8 - Previn, Bakels
Job - Handley
There's a Boult/EMI disc including The Lark Ascending and Serenade to
Music that's as essential as any of these; Amazon's selling it for $8.
The cantata Dona Nobis Pacem is a major-major IMHO, which is perhaps
warped by the fact that I once sang with a choir in it. Boult and
Thomson are just fine here. A disc I'd like to hear but haven't is
the composer's live performances of this and the 5th Symphony.
After that: the operas The Pilgrim's Progress and Sir John in Love,
EMI's splendid recordings of which have made it to CD.
Happy hunting.
- Sol L. Siegel, Philadelphia, PA USA
A good choice above as far as I am concerned. Essentially Previn figures
a lot, and I agree that he is mostly excellent. The Previn/LSO
combination was dynamite at its best. Also agree about Handley's Job,
and his 5th symphony, which rate very highly, although I was
disappointed with his 3&4 and 7&8 couplings, which lacked any real
urgency. I still maintain that in the IceFall section of the 7th, that
the off-key horns, set against the organ, is far more terrifying in
Previn's account, regardless of the fact that many criticize the dynamic
of the organ. It isn't the organ that terrifies here, but the LSO horns,
and Previn has it entirely correct, and he creates a truly terrifying
picture. Previn, in general, goes for atmosphere, and it pays off.
Not too far back, I got the Haitink set, and discovered that apart from
a very disappointing London symphony, there is much to be enjoyed,
especially with richer sound, and a more symphonic approach. His Tallis
is rather weak though, as is his Lark Ascending, and for the Tallis then
Silvestri, and or Barbirolli, are much finer.
I have yet to get Boult's set Belart set, but am put off by it being mono.
I bought it a few weeks ago, and while it is excellent, I think you
are right to hesitate. The sound is mediocre on Belart and the fine
performances are compromised. Better to stick with good stereo sets in
general, or individual great performances by Berglund, Silvestri and
others.
--Jeff
I thought the Decca box set with Boult of the Vaughan Williams
symphonies had better sound than the Belart set, so I am wondering why
anyone why buy the Belart now? The Decca also has the 9th symphony
and some spoken items.

Steve
Matthew B. Tepper
2008-08-20 14:42:46 UTC
Permalink
I thought the Decca box set with Boult of the Vaughan Williams symphonies
had better sound than the Belart set, so I am wondering why anyone why buy
the Belart now? The Decca also has the 9th symphony and some spoken items.
For the 1956 stereo Partita for Double String Orchestra, not available
anywhere else to my knowledge. (Fill me in if I'm wrong.) Boult's stereo
9th I have on Everest EVC 9001, coupled with Sir Malcolm Arnold's 3rd with
the composer conducting.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
j***@aol.com
2008-08-20 17:19:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
I thought the Decca box set with Boult of the Vaughan Williams symphonies
had better sound than the Belart set, so I am wondering why anyone why buy
the Belart now? The Decca also has the 9th symphony and some spoken items.
For the 1956 stereo Partita for Double String Orchestra, not available
anywhere else to my knowledge. (Fill me in if I'm wrong.) Boult's stereo
9th I have on Everest EVC 9001, coupled with Sir Malcolm Arnold's 3rd with
the composer conducting.
That's one reason--I was not going to toss my Everest disc and I
wanted that Partita.

The thread comparing the Decca (or Eloquence) versions to the Belart
in 2003 yielded a few comments about the sound. A couple listeners
heard no important difference in sound. JR Robinson probably spent the
most time comparing "with the newer Decca remastering
sounding just a degree warmer and richer, a gnat's ass more refined
and atmospheric than the Belart." Translation: not worth a repurchase,
and possibly not worth my concern.

When I found the Belart recently at a brick and mortar store at a very
attractive price (ie, cheaper than the Decca box), I decided to put my
money with my local merchants. Other people might reasonably conclude
the Decca is the right choice for them, but I am not unhappy with my
choice. The main problem with the sound is that it's mono and not
particularly good. Not something that a subtle remastering is going to
fix. In any case the set, while it has its charms, is not a first
choice in this repertoire anymore.

--Jeff
Steve de Mena
2008-08-20 19:33:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
I thought the Decca box set with Boult of the Vaughan Williams symphonies
had better sound than the Belart set, so I am wondering why anyone why buy
the Belart now? The Decca also has the 9th symphony and some spoken items.
For the 1956 stereo Partita for Double String Orchestra, not available
anywhere else to my knowledge. (Fill me in if I'm wrong.)
That's on a Double Decca set of VW works.

Steve
Matthew B. Tepper
2008-08-20 19:34:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve de Mena
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Steve de Mena
I thought the Decca box set with Boult of the Vaughan Williams
symphonies had better sound than the Belart set, so I am wondering why
anyone why buy the Belart now? The Decca also has the 9th symphony
and some spoken items.
For the 1956 stereo Partita for Double String Orchestra, not available
anywhere else to my knowledge. (Fill me in if I'm wrong.)
That's on a Double Decca set of VW works.
Excellent, I'll look for it. The Decca symphony box does have another
advantage over the Belart other than its completeness: it's narrower.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
Steve de Mena
2008-08-21 03:39:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Steve de Mena
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Steve de Mena
I thought the Decca box set with Boult of the Vaughan Williams
symphonies had better sound than the Belart set, so I am wondering why
anyone why buy the Belart now? The Decca also has the 9th symphony
and some spoken items.
For the 1956 stereo Partita for Double String Orchestra, not available
anywhere else to my knowledge. (Fill me in if I'm wrong.)
That's on a Double Decca set of VW works.
Excellent, I'll look for it. The Decca symphony box does have another
advantage over the Belart other than its completeness: it's narrower.
I'm surprised you don't have this already:
http://tinyurl.com/6e9p6q

Steve
Matthew B. Tepper
2008-08-21 04:00:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve de Mena
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Steve de Mena
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Steve de Mena
I thought the Decca box set with Boult of the Vaughan Williams
symphonies had better sound than the Belart set, so I am wondering
why anyone why buy the Belart now? The Decca also has the 9th
symphony and some spoken items.
For the 1956 stereo Partita for Double String Orchestra, not
available anywhere else to my knowledge. (Fill me in if I'm wrong.)
That's on a Double Decca set of VW works.
Excellent, I'll look for it. The Decca symphony box does have another
advantage over the Belart other than its completeness: it's narrower.
http://tinyurl.com/6e9p6q
You know, I may have seen that a few times in stores and never bothered to
examine the contents, since at first glance it appeared to be just another
"greatest hits" set that I didn't need. For that reason, I never noticed
it contained the Partita. Thanks! I've now added it to my wish list!
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of my employers
D***@aol.com
2008-08-20 18:15:56 UTC
Permalink
On Aug 20, 3:34�am, Steve de Mena <***@stevedemena.com> wrote:

(big edit)
Post by Steve de Mena
I thought the Decca box set with Boult of the Vaughan Williams
symphonies had better sound than the Belart set, so I am wondering why
anyone why buy the Belart now? �The Decca also has the 9th symphony
and some spoken items.
Has Boult's mono Decca/London recording of Job been reissued? I
think it's more flexible and eloquent than his stereo EMI version, but
I sometimes listen to the work repeatedly and don't feel like playing
the LP (I should try to look up the Decca CD box, I know). Thanks.

Don Tait
Steve de Mena
2008-08-20 19:35:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by D***@aol.com
(big edit)
Post by Steve de Mena
I thought the Decca box set with Boult of the Vaughan Williams
symphonies had better sound than the Belart set, so I am wondering why
anyone why buy the Belart now? �The Decca also has the 9th symphony
and some spoken items.
Has Boult's mono Decca/London recording of Job been reissued? I
think it's more flexible and eloquent than his stereo EMI version, but
I sometimes listen to the work repeatedly and don't feel like playing
the LP (I should try to look up the Decca CD box, I know). Thanks.
Don Tait
Yes, on Australian Decca Eloquence:

http://www.buywell.com/cgi-bin/buywellic2/efly.html?mv_arg=01232

Steve
D***@aol.com
2008-08-20 19:39:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve de Mena
� (big edit)
Post by Steve de Mena
I thought the Decca box set with Boult of the Vaughan Williams
symphonies had better sound than the Belart set, so I am wondering why
anyone why buy the Belart now? The Decca also has the 9th symphony
and some spoken items.
� Has Boult's mono Decca/London recording of Job been reissued? I
think it's more flexible and eloquent than his stereo EMI version, but
I sometimes listen to the work repeatedly and don't feel like playing
the LP (I should try to look up the Decca CD box, I know). Thanks.
� Don Tait
http://www.buywell.com/cgi-bin/buywellic2/efly.html?mv_arg=01232
Steve- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Thanks! Much appreciated. I must get one.

Don T.
j***@aol.com
2008-08-20 03:41:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Harper
The subject line pretty well says it. As it happens, I just read Simon
Heffer's article in the Daily Telegraphhttp://www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/main.jhtml?xml=/opinion/2008/08/20...
and it makes me think I need to explore his music in something more than
the desultory fashion I have done up 'til now.
So...your recommendations for recordings, especially of the orchestral
and chamber music, are solicited.
TIA.
Bob Harper
You'll get plenty of recommendations for the symphonies but let me
just push you gently toward the operas. They are gorgeous--arguably
his finest music.

The songs are also a treat, such as "Songs of Travel" and "Ten Blake
Songs"

--Jeff
j***@midman503a.freeserve.co.uk
2008-09-01 22:24:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by j***@aol.com
Post by Bob Harper
The subject line pretty well says it. As it happens, I just read Simon
Heffer's article in the Daily Telegraphhttp://www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/main.jhtml?xml=/opinion/2008/08/20...
and it makes me think I need to explore his music in something more than
the desultory fashion I have done up 'til now.
So...your recommendations for recordings, especially of the orchestral
and chamber music, are solicited.
TIA.
Bob Harper
You'll get plenty of recommendations for the symphonies but let me
just push you gently toward the operas. They are gorgeous--arguably
his finest music.
Thesongsare also a treat, such as "Songsof Travel" and "Ten BlakeSongs"
--Jeff
Vaughan Williams's songs are a really important part of his output.
He had a great understanding of the voice and his sensitivity to the
rhythms and inflections of the English language is second to none.
The "Songs of Travel" and "Ten BlakeSongs" mentioned above are fine
sets and you also might like to sample the "Four Poems by Fredegond
Shove" and the "Four Last Songs". The Fredegond Shove settings,
written in 1925, represent a complete cross-section of the mature VW's
compositional personality, whilst the Four Last Songs show the more
ascetic style of his later years. You can hear substantial extracts
of these songs, sung by the British mezzo-soprano Claire-Louise Lucas,
on the Midsummer Management web site. You will find this at:

www.midsummer-mgt.com

The Housman settings of 1927 are also very well worth hearing. These
are for soprano and violin, quite a sparse texture but all the more
fascinating for that. The only recording that I am aware of is by
Ruth Golden but there may be others.

Dan Fowler
2008-08-20 04:42:28 UTC
Permalink
I have the boxed sets by Boult (stereo and mono), Previn, and Handley.
Of these, I tend to listen to the Boult mono and Previn sets more often.
Boult's mono set really nails the atmosphere of the Sea Symphony and
Sinfonia Antartica. Previn's set is very well recorded, and the phrasing
and playing (especially the horns) is first-rate. Previn's
interpretations offer a nice contrast to Boult's approach. I keep
thinking I should like the Handley set more than I do, but it hasn't
really caught on with me.

I also have immensely enjoyed the versions of the Sea Symphony and
Sinfonia Antartica from the Haitink set. I haven't heard the other
performances in the set but should probably pick it up. Also, I see that
Naxos will be offering a boxed set of the Bakels/Daniel performances
with the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra. I've read mixed reviews of
those performances and am wondering how they compare with Haitink and
Thomson.

Recently, I acquired several Vaughan Williams recordings conducted by
Sir John Barbirolli. His Sinfonia Antartica is definitely a keeper, and
I'm liking the other performances I've heard so far.

I'll also second the vote for Dona Nobis Pacem (I have the recording
conducted by Boult).

Hope you find something you like!
Dan
Post by Bob Harper
So...your recommendations for recordings, especially of the orchestral
and chamber music, are solicited.
TIA.
Bob Harper
makropulos
2008-08-20 05:19:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Harper
The subject line pretty well says it. As it happens, I just read Simon
Heffer's article in the Daily Telegraphhttp://www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/main.jhtml?xml=/opinion/2008/08/20...
and it makes me think I need to explore his music in something more than
the desultory fashion I have done up 'til now.
So...your recommendations for recordings, especially of the orchestral
and chamber music, are solicited.
TIA.
Bob Harper
Lots of really excellent recommendations already. For the whole cycle,
Boult (Decca), Boult (EMI), Haitink (EMI) and Previn (RCA) all have
great things. I wouldn't be put off by the sound of the mono cycle -
mono it may be, but it's come up wonderfully well in the recent-ish
Decca remastering. I don't get on with Handley's VW - I find it all
very pallid. Hickox gets very high ratings in the Penguin Guide, but
I've yet to understand why. Still, he is the only person to have
recorded the original version of No. 2 (London), and that's
interesting.

Individual symphonies - as well as those already mentioned (Bernstein
in No. 4, Mitropoulos, Stokowski in several of them), there's also a
very fine No. 5 with Previn conducting the Curtis Institute orchestra
(EMI Angel) - one of the most radiant performances I've ever heard of
this gorgeous symphony. I would really urge you to give that one a try
too.

For other works, Boult's EMI Job (deleted as a single disc, but it
comes in the ultra-cheap EMI stereo symphonies cycle) is quite
marvellous, and beautifully recorded. Again, I find Handley lumpy and
unimaginative by comparison. Boult's Decca Job is on Australian
Eloquence (in mono), and it's very fine indeed. His Everest recording
has recently resurfaced, and I was listening to it this evening.
Frankly the sound's a bit ropey, and the playing isn't great either.
There are at least two other Boult recordings of the work - he had it
in his bloodstream.

I agree wholeheartedly about the operas, especially Pilgrim's Progress
- while the Boult recording is still around, it's well worth
acquiring. Again, there's a Hickox alternative but I don't find it as
poetic or as involving (though it is in very good sound). It's the
same story with Dona Nobis Pacem - Boult is splendid in this and he
has good soloists.

As for chamber music, there's a good Naxos disc of the String Quartets
played by the Maggini Quartet - very good value. And since it's a
mixture of chamber music and song, I should mention On Wenlock Edge -
Ian Partridge (EMI) or Langridge (EMI) are both good.

Happy hunting!
Richard Schultz
2008-08-20 05:45:13 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@comcast.com>, Bob Harper <***@comcast.net> wrote:

: So...your recommendations for recordings, especially of the orchestral
: and chamber music, are solicited.

I'm going to ignore the "especially" part and recommend the London Madrigal
Singers' recording of choral folk song settings. They filled out the CD
release with some Holst choral music (I bet you didn't know that the
Rig Veda was an English folk song) performed by the Baccholian Singers
of London (not connected in any way with Snyder's of Berlin).

-----
Richard Schultz ***@mail.biu.ac.il
Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan, Israel
Opinions expressed are mine alone, and not those of Bar-Ilan University
-----
It's a bird, it's a plane -- no, it's Mozart. . .
Proboscis
2008-08-20 05:50:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Harper
The subject line pretty well says it. As it happens, I just read Simon
Heffer's article in the Daily Telegraph
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/main.jhtml?xml=/opinion/2008/08/20/do2001.xml
and it makes me think I need to explore his music in something more than
the desultory fashion I have done up 'til now.
So...your recommendations for recordings, especially of the orchestral and
chamber music, are solicited.
TIA.
Bob Harper
Just out, and unbeatable IMHO:

http://www.amazon.com/Vaughan-Williams-The-Collectors-Edition/dp/B00156ZWV0/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1219211371&sr=8-1
Akiralx
2008-08-20 10:36:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Harper
The subject line pretty well says it. As it happens, I just read Simon
Heffer's article in the Daily Telegraph
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/main.jhtml?xml=/opinion/2008/08/20/do2001.xml
and it makes me think I need to explore his music in something more than
the desultory fashion I have done up 'til now.
So...your recommendations for recordings, especially of the orchestral and
chamber music, are solicited.
The Piano Concerto by Howard Shelley and Handley on Lyrita.
Barbirolli's Sinfonia Antartica etc on EMI twofer.
Syms 4 + 6 with Berglund on EMI.
Sym 5 with Handley on EMI.
D***@aol.com
2008-08-20 18:00:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Akiralx
Post by Bob Harper
The subject line pretty well says it. As it happens, I just read Simon
Heffer's article in the Daily Telegraph
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/main.jhtml?xml=/opinion/2008/08/20...
and it makes me think I need to explore his music in something more than
the desultory fashion I have done up 'til now.
So...your recommendations for recordings, especially of the orchestral and
chamber music, are solicited.
The Piano Concerto by Howard Shelley and Handley on Lyrita.
Barbirolli's Sinfonia Antartica etc on EMI twofer.
Syms 4 + 6 with Berglund on EMI.
Sym 5 with Handley on EMI.
Another chamber work to explore is the Phantasy [sic] Quintet for
strings. Outstanding, for me.

Don Tait
Terry
2008-08-20 12:35:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Harper
The subject line pretty well says it. As it happens, I just read Simon
Heffer's article in the Daily Telegraph
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/main.jhtml?xml=/opinion/2008/08/20/do2001.x
Post by Bob Harper
ml
and it makes me think I need to explore his music in something more than
the desultory fashion I have done up 'til now.
So...your recommendations for recordings, especially of the orchestral
and chamber music, are solicited.
TIA.
Bob Harper
Hell, get the "Vaughan Williams: The Collector's Edition " box. It's a steal
wherever you get it from.
--
Cheers!

Terry
Frank Berger
2008-08-20 18:19:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Harper
The subject line pretty well says it. As it happens, I just read Simon
Heffer's article in the Daily Telegraph
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/main.jhtml?xml=/opinion/2008/08/20/do2001.xml
and it makes me think I need to explore his music in something more than
the desultory fashion I have done up 'til now.
So...your recommendations for recordings, especially of the orchestral and
chamber music, are solicited.
TIA.
Bob Harper
Inexplicably not yet mentioned, unless I missed it, is one of my favorite
CDs, including the 1938 world premiere recording of VW's "Serenade to
Music," the second symphony and other stuff, all conducted by Sir Henry
Wood. Hell, here it is:


http://www.amazon.com/Wood-Conducts-Vaughan-Williams/dp/B00005B0HQ
j***@aol.com
2008-08-20 19:15:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Frank Berger
Post by Bob Harper
The subject line pretty well says it. As it happens, I just read Simon
Heffer's article in the Daily Telegraph
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/main.jhtml?xml=/opinion/2008/08/20...
and it makes me think I need to explore his music in something more than
the desultory fashion I have done up 'til now.
So...your recommendations for recordings, especially of the orchestral and
chamber music, are solicited.
TIA.
Bob Harper
Inexplicably not yet mentioned, unless I missed it, is one of my favorite
CDs, including the 1938 world premiere recording of VW's "Serenade to
Music," the second symphony and other stuff, all conducted by Sir Henry
http://www.amazon.com/Wood-Conducts-Vaughan-Williams/dp/B00005B0HQ
That disc has been tempting me, but I've been holding off getting it
simply because I have a fair amount of VW to catch up on, including
the two recent Spano recordings. Given what I heard on his recent
Chicago broadcast, I'm thinking his will be the next VW2 I'll buy
assuming he'll record it in Atlanta.

--Jeff
Frank Berger
2008-08-20 21:42:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by j***@aol.com
Post by Frank Berger
Post by Bob Harper
The subject line pretty well says it. As it happens, I just read Simon
Heffer's article in the Daily Telegraph
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/main.jhtml?xml=/opinion/2008/08/20...
and it makes me think I need to explore his music in something more than
the desultory fashion I have done up 'til now.
So...your recommendations for recordings, especially of the orchestral and
chamber music, are solicited.
TIA.
Bob Harper
Inexplicably not yet mentioned, unless I missed it, is one of my favorite
CDs, including the 1938 world premiere recording of VW's "Serenade to
Music," the second symphony and other stuff, all conducted by Sir Henry
http://www.amazon.com/Wood-Conducts-Vaughan-Williams/dp/B00005B0HQ
That disc has been tempting me, but I've been holding off getting it
simply because I have a fair amount of VW to catch up on, including
the two recent Spano recordings. Given what I heard on his recent
Chicago broadcast, I'm thinking his will be the next VW2 I'll buy
assuming he'll record it in Atlanta.
--Jeff
Well, if you want something that *sounds* good.... Seriously, I have
nothing to say about Atlanta/Spano. Haven't heard them. But I doubt they'll
out-perform Henry Wood & Co.. Nevertheless, I just grabbed one of the many
used ones on Amazon. One I do have that is well-performed and sounds good
is by Matthew Best on Hyperion:

http://www.amazon.com/Vaughan-Williams-Serenade-Mystical-Christmas/dp/B000002ZNQ

Also available cheaply used.
Bob Harper
2008-08-21 15:58:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Harper
The subject line pretty well says it. As it happens, I just read Simon
Heffer's article in the Daily Telegraph
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/main.jhtml?xml=/opinion/2008/08/20/do2001.xml
and it makes me think I need to explore his music in something more than
the desultory fashion I have done up 'til now.
So...your recommendations for recordings, especially of the orchestral
and chamber music, are solicited.
TIA.
Bob Harper
My thanks to all posters for their recommendations. Not sure what I'll
get yet, but it's clear there are numerous good choices out there. The
Boult monos look like a good place to start, followed by something in
more modern sound.

Bob Harper
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