Discussion:
Liszt Opera Transcriptions
(too old to reply)
rderieux
2004-01-23 04:09:41 UTC
Permalink
Hi!

After searching and reading everything I found on the Hyperion Liszt
set by Howard I still don't have a good idea if the Opera sets are
worth getting (at used CD prices).

I am a novice but really enjoy solo piano music and opera so I thought
this would be a good choice.

What I have learned from the group is that the early volumes are
considered superior, so I guess Vol 1 and maybe 2 would be the best of
the lot, and that a lot of the latter volumes are a bit stiff.

Can anyone that likes Leslie Howard's playing comment?

Thanks, Rene'
Mark Gold
2004-01-23 18:17:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by rderieux
After searching and reading everything I found on the Hyperion Liszt
set by Howard I still don't have a good idea if the Opera sets are
worth getting (at used CD prices).
I am a novice but really enjoy solo piano music and opera so I thought
this would be a good choice.
What I have learned from the group is that the early volumes are
considered superior, so I guess Vol 1 and maybe 2 would be the best of
the lot, and that a lot of the latter volumes are a bit stiff.
Can anyone that likes Leslie Howard's playing comment?
How about telling us what's to like about Leslie Howard's playing?
Her/his/it's Douz Etudes play better than Complete Paganini Etudes,
but still. Is there ANY other recording of Liszt Grand Etudes
available, or the early version of Liszt Paganini Etudes? CD's often
give a false opus number for it, listing the early version when it's
really the later opus.
Ian Pace
2004-01-23 18:23:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark Gold
Post by rderieux
After searching and reading everything I found on the Hyperion Liszt
set by Howard I still don't have a good idea if the Opera sets are
worth getting (at used CD prices).
I am a novice but really enjoy solo piano music and opera so I thought
this would be a good choice.
What I have learned from the group is that the early volumes are
considered superior, so I guess Vol 1 and maybe 2 would be the best of
the lot, and that a lot of the latter volumes are a bit stiff.
Can anyone that likes Leslie Howard's playing comment?
How about telling us what's to like about Leslie Howard's playing?
Her/his/it's Douz Etudes play better than Complete Paganini Etudes,
but still. Is there ANY other recording of Liszt Grand Etudes
available, or the early version of Liszt Paganini Etudes? CD's often
give a false opus number for it, listing the early version when it's
really the later opus.
I'm sure there are several; I have a recording of Nikolai Petrov playing the
early version on Olympia, with other Paganini-influenced pieces. It's in
one of many boxes of CDs awaiting some new shelves at the moment, so can't
access the details. I bought it some 14 years ago or so, so don't know if
it's still available. Stunning playing.

Best,
Ian
ajb723
2004-01-23 23:15:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by rderieux
Hi!
After searching and reading everything I found on the Hyperion Liszt
set by Howard I still don't have a good idea if the Opera sets are
worth getting (at used CD prices).
I am a novice but really enjoy solo piano music and opera so I thought
this would be a good choice.
What I have learned from the group is that the early volumes are
considered superior, so I guess Vol 1 and maybe 2 would be the best of
the lot, and that a lot of the latter volumes are a bit stiff.
Can anyone that likes Leslie Howard's playing comment?
Thanks, Rene'
My 2 cents: The Leslie Howard traversal of Liszt offers completeness and
little else. His playing is adequately boring.Competent yet bland. For the
more familiar operatic transcriptions, there is likely a better choice in
every instance. For the seldom played piece, there is frequently no other
choice.
--
Alan
rderieux
2004-01-24 14:52:50 UTC
Permalink
ajb723 <***@optonline.net> wrote in message news:<BC371550.9DE8B%***@optonline.net>...

[SNIP]
Post by ajb723
My 2 cents: The Leslie Howard traversal of Liszt offers completeness and
little else. His playing is adequately boring.Competent yet bland. For the
more familiar operatic transcriptions, there is likely a better choice in
every instance. For the seldom played piece, there is frequently no other
choice.
I must be naive because I can't understand how a record label would
issue ~50 volumes of music by a pianist that is bland and boring.
Does his dad own the label?

Are there any sets of Liszt operatic transcriptions by better pianist,
or do I have to buy 30 CDs to get the content in one of the volumes
from the Hyperion Liszt series?

I am most interested in the pieces based on Don Giovanni, Norma,
Lucia, Aida, Robert le Diable, Onegin and Lucrezia Borgia.

Thanks, Rene'
Mark Gold
2004-01-24 17:11:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by rderieux
Post by ajb723
My 2 cents: The Leslie Howard traversal of Liszt offers completeness and
little else. His playing is adequately boring.Competent yet bland. For the
more familiar operatic transcriptions, there is likely a better choice in
every instance. For the seldom played piece, there is frequently no other
choice.
I must be naive because I can't understand how a record label would
issue ~50 volumes of music by a pianist that is bland and boring.
Does his dad own the label?
I bet it's political.
Post by rderieux
Are there any sets of Liszt operatic transcriptions by better pianist,
or do I have to buy 30 CDs to get the content in one of the volumes
from the Hyperion Liszt series?
Can't you just buy the individual CD's you want? Two was enough
for me.
Post by rderieux
I am most interested in the pieces based on Don Giovanni, Norma,
Lucia, Aida, Robert le Diable, Onegin and Lucrezia Borgia.
HankM219
2004-01-24 17:30:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by rderieux
I must be naive because I can't understand how a record label would
issue ~50 volumes of music by a pianist that is bland and boring.
Does his dad own the label?
No, but tastes differ. I am among those who think that there are better
alternatives to Howard.
Post by rderieux
I am most interested in the pieces based on Don Giovanni, Norma,
Lucia, Aida, Robert le Diable, Onegin and Lucrezia Borgia.
On alternative is a disc by Earl Wild entitled, "The Demonic Liszt." It
includes two of the transcriptions you requested, Don Giovanni and Robert le
Diable, as well as great performances of the Waltzes from Gounod's Faust, the
Mephisto Waltz, Mephisto Polka and Gnomenreigen.



Henry Maurer, Cherry Hill, NJ, USA
***@aol.com or ***@comcast.net
LaVirtuosa
2004-01-25 04:25:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by HankM219
No, but tastes differ.
I am among those who think
that there are better
alternatives to Howard.
There's some by Raekallio
on an opera transcription disc
with other arrangers as well,
and a Liszt opera transcription disc
by Thibaudet (I haven't heard it).
And Chiu did one.
Roberto Poli does a splended Don Juan.
Of course, for Rigoletto there's Cortot.

******Val
Ian Pace
2004-01-24 18:05:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by rderieux
[SNIP]
Post by ajb723
My 2 cents: The Leslie Howard traversal of Liszt offers completeness and
little else. His playing is adequately boring.Competent yet bland. For the
more familiar operatic transcriptions, there is likely a better choice in
every instance. For the seldom played piece, there is frequently no other
choice.
I must be naive because I can't understand how a record label would
issue ~50 volumes of music by a pianist that is bland and boring.
Does his dad own the label?
Are there any sets of Liszt operatic transcriptions by better pianist,
or do I have to buy 30 CDs to get the content in one of the volumes
from the Hyperion Liszt series?
There is an ongoing Naxos series of the complete Liszt piano works, with a
variety of pianists, which I haven't heard so can't comment on. As regards
the Howards series, it is indeed a mixed bag, but has been unfairly
dismissed out of hand by some, I feel. I have quite a number of the
volumes, and there are definitely some wonderful performances. The first
few volumes to be released in particular are worth getting - Waltzes,
Ballades, Legends and Polonaises, Fantasy and other pieces. The disc of the
Late Pieces has some great playing also, and of course there are many works
only available in this series to date. I reckon there was probably too much
pressure from above to get through the series quickly, hence why the results
can be variable. I've heard him give some spectacular performances of Liszt
live on several occasions.

As for the Operatic Transcriptions, I have most of these volumes, and feel
that in general Howard is at his best in the lesser-known works, where some
sense of discovery can be communicated more readily, perhaps. The two
transcriptions from Meyerbeer's L'Africaine on the first volume are
extremely exciting, for example. The Norma Fantasy isn't big on high-blown
'operatic' rhetoric upon appearance of many of the big themes, but it has a
particular momentum and structural coherence that is compelling.

The other recordings I have of this include Bolet (endearing, but made after
his prime), Grante (woefully pedestrian, at a rigidly slow tempo, pedantic
and inflexible), and one which I just recently purchased, and was most
surprising, Brendel on the VoxBox Brendel Plays Liszt Volume 2. Not so many
Liszt lovers would agree with me here, I imagine, but I wholeheartedly
recommend this set, at ultra-budget price, also includes the Paganini Etudes
(extremely brilliant), Petrach Sonnets, Tarantella, and some of the
Harmonies Poetiques et Religeuses (his later Philips recordings of the
latter pieces is better, though, I think). The operatic transcriptions
are those from Lucia di Lammermoor, Il Trovatore, Noram, Oberon, Benvenuto
Cellini, Tannhauser (Pilgrim's Chorus). Lucia di Lammermoor is more direct,
less obviously 'charming' than in many other pianists' performances (can't
think of an ideal recording of this at the moment), but I don't mind this so
much in such a rather schmalzy piece. Brendel brings his usual powerful
harmonic sense to bear upon the Norma fantasy, making an utterly compelling
and quite symphonic experience. There is no lack of melodic feel or
brilliance, also, though as with Howard the 'big tunes' are played less
expansively than with some other performers. Sound is pretty dreadful, as
per Vox-usual, alas, very clattery, so bad that it might put one off the
recording, however.
Post by rderieux
I am most interested in the pieces based on Don Giovanni, Norma,
Lucia, Aida, Robert le Diable, Onegin and Lucrezia Borgia.
For Don Giovanni, there are many choices, I would recommend the recordings
by Simon Barere (on Pearl), Earl Wild (on the Daemonic Liszt), John Ogdon
(contained in Volume 2 of the GPOTC). There is a recording by Ginsburg that
I haven't heard but would imagine to be fantastic, also recordings by
Friedman and much more recently by Marc-Andre Hamelin that I would guess
would be very worth hearing. For Aida, there is an Arrau recording which I
recall being of interest (haven't heard it for ages), otherwise I just know
Howard, which is OK - wonderful piece, one of Liszt's finest. For Robert le
Diable, undoubtedly go for Earl Wild again, for Onegin, Cziffra (contained
in Les Introuvables de Cziffra, don't know if you can get it elsewhere).
Haven't heard a recording of Lucrezia Borgia (a real monster of a piece to
play, almost comical in some ways!), it's in one of the Howard volumes that
I don't have; I know there is also a slightly obscure recording by the
British pianist Anthony Peebles which might be worth checking out.

Best,
Ian
ajb723
2004-01-24 20:40:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ian Pace
Post by rderieux
[SNIP]
Post by ajb723
My 2 cents: The Leslie Howard traversal of Liszt offers completeness and
little else. His playing is adequately boring.Competent yet bland. For
the
Post by rderieux
Post by ajb723
more familiar operatic transcriptions, there is likely a better choice
in
Post by rderieux
Post by ajb723
every instance. For the seldom played piece, there is frequently no
other
Post by rderieux
Post by ajb723
choice.
I must be naive because I can't understand how a record label would
issue ~50 volumes of music by a pianist that is bland and boring.
Does his dad own the label?
Are there any sets of Liszt operatic transcriptions by better pianist,
or do I have to buy 30 CDs to get the content in one of the volumes
from the Hyperion Liszt series?
There is an ongoing Naxos series of the complete Liszt piano works, with a
variety of pianists, which I haven't heard so can't comment on. As regards
the Howards series, it is indeed a mixed bag, but has been unfairly
dismissed out of hand by some, I feel. I have quite a number of the
volumes, and there are definitely some wonderful performances. The first
few volumes to be released in particular are worth getting - Waltzes,
Ballades, Legends and Polonaises, Fantasy and other pieces. The disc of the
Late Pieces has some great playing also, and of course there are many works
only available in this series to date. I reckon there was probably too much
pressure from above to get through the series quickly, hence why the results
can be variable. I've heard him give some spectacular performances of Liszt
live on several occasions.
As for the Operatic Transcriptions, I have most of these volumes, and feel
that in general Howard is at his best in the lesser-known works, where some
sense of discovery can be communicated more readily, perhaps. The two
transcriptions from Meyerbeer's L'Africaine on the first volume are
extremely exciting, for example. The Norma Fantasy isn't big on high-blown
'operatic' rhetoric upon appearance of many of the big themes, but it has a
particular momentum and structural coherence that is compelling.
The other recordings I have of this include Bolet (endearing, but made after
his prime), Grante (woefully pedestrian, at a rigidly slow tempo, pedantic
and inflexible), and one which I just recently purchased, and was most
surprising, Brendel on the VoxBox Brendel Plays Liszt Volume 2. Not so many
Liszt lovers would agree with me here, I imagine, but I wholeheartedly
recommend this set, at ultra-budget price, also includes the Paganini Etudes
(extremely brilliant), Petrach Sonnets, Tarantella, and some of the
Harmonies Poetiques et Religeuses (his later Philips recordings of the
latter pieces is better, though, I think). The operatic transcriptions
are those from Lucia di Lammermoor, Il Trovatore, Noram, Oberon, Benvenuto
Cellini, Tannhauser (Pilgrim's Chorus). Lucia di Lammermoor is more direct,
less obviously 'charming' than in many other pianists' performances (can't
think of an ideal recording of this at the moment), but I don't mind this so
much in such a rather schmalzy piece. Brendel brings his usual powerful
harmonic sense to bear upon the Norma fantasy, making an utterly compelling
and quite symphonic experience. There is no lack of melodic feel or
brilliance, also, though as with Howard the 'big tunes' are played less
expansively than with some other performers. Sound is pretty dreadful, as
per Vox-usual, alas, very clattery, so bad that it might put one off the
recording, however.
Post by rderieux
I am most interested in the pieces based on Don Giovanni, Norma,
Lucia, Aida, Robert le Diable, Onegin and Lucrezia Borgia.
For Don Giovanni, there are many choices, I would recommend the recordings
by Simon Barere (on Pearl), Earl Wild (on the Daemonic Liszt), John Ogdon
(contained in Volume 2 of the GPOTC). There is a recording by Ginsburg that
I haven't heard but would imagine to be fantastic, also recordings by
Friedman and much more recently by Marc-Andre Hamelin that I would guess
would be very worth hearing. For Aida, there is an Arrau recording which I
recall being of interest (haven't heard it for ages), otherwise I just know
Howard, which is OK - wonderful piece, one of Liszt's finest. For Robert le
Diable, undoubtedly go for Earl Wild again, for Onegin, Cziffra (contained
in Les Introuvables de Cziffra, don't know if you can get it elsewhere).
Haven't heard a recording of Lucrezia Borgia (a real monster of a piece to
play, almost comical in some ways!), it's in one of the Howard volumes that
I don't have; I know there is also a slightly obscure recording by the
British pianist Anthony Peebles which might be worth checking out.
Best,
Ian
Agree that Earl Wild is a fine choice. Too bad he didn't record more of
these works. Would also recommend Thibaudet who has recorded an entire CD of
them, including the Rigoletto Quartet, and Lucia Sextette. A Russioan lady
named Vlaeva has a lovely Liszt CD which includes the Rigoletto. The
highlight of this disc for me, though , is the Hungarian Rhapsody #9, IMO a
much underplayed work.
Alan
rderieux
2004-01-25 00:00:26 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for the very informative post. I will look around for some of
your recommendations.
Post by Ian Pace
Post by rderieux
[SNIP]
Post by ajb723
My 2 cents: The Leslie Howard traversal of Liszt offers completeness and
little else. His playing is adequately boring.Competent yet bland. For
the
Post by rderieux
Post by ajb723
more familiar operatic transcriptions, there is likely a better choice
in
Post by rderieux
Post by ajb723
every instance. For the seldom played piece, there is frequently no
other
Post by rderieux
Post by ajb723
choice.
I must be naive because I can't understand how a record label would
issue ~50 volumes of music by a pianist that is bland and boring.
Does his dad own the label?
Are there any sets of Liszt operatic transcriptions by better pianist,
or do I have to buy 30 CDs to get the content in one of the volumes
from the Hyperion Liszt series?
There is an ongoing Naxos series of the complete Liszt piano works, with a
variety of pianists, which I haven't heard so can't comment on. As regards
the Howards series, it is indeed a mixed bag, but has been unfairly
dismissed out of hand by some, I feel. I have quite a number of the
volumes, and there are definitely some wonderful performances. The first
few volumes to be released in particular are worth getting - Waltzes,
Ballades, Legends and Polonaises, Fantasy and other pieces. The disc of the
Late Pieces has some great playing also, and of course there are many works
only available in this series to date. I reckon there was probably too much
pressure from above to get through the series quickly, hence why the results
can be variable. I've heard him give some spectacular performances of Liszt
live on several occasions.
As for the Operatic Transcriptions, I have most of these volumes, and feel
that in general Howard is at his best in the lesser-known works, where some
sense of discovery can be communicated more readily, perhaps. The two
transcriptions from Meyerbeer's L'Africaine on the first volume are
extremely exciting, for example. The Norma Fantasy isn't big on high-blown
'operatic' rhetoric upon appearance of many of the big themes, but it has a
particular momentum and structural coherence that is compelling.
The other recordings I have of this include Bolet (endearing, but made after
his prime), Grante (woefully pedestrian, at a rigidly slow tempo, pedantic
and inflexible), and one which I just recently purchased, and was most
surprising, Brendel on the VoxBox Brendel Plays Liszt Volume 2. Not so many
Liszt lovers would agree with me here, I imagine, but I wholeheartedly
recommend this set, at ultra-budget price, also includes the Paganini Etudes
(extremely brilliant), Petrach Sonnets, Tarantella, and some of the
Harmonies Poetiques et Religeuses (his later Philips recordings of the
latter pieces is better, though, I think). The operatic transcriptions
are those from Lucia di Lammermoor, Il Trovatore, Noram, Oberon, Benvenuto
Cellini, Tannhauser (Pilgrim's Chorus). Lucia di Lammermoor is more direct,
less obviously 'charming' than in many other pianists' performances (can't
think of an ideal recording of this at the moment), but I don't mind this so
much in such a rather schmalzy piece. Brendel brings his usual powerful
harmonic sense to bear upon the Norma fantasy, making an utterly compelling
and quite symphonic experience. There is no lack of melodic feel or
brilliance, also, though as with Howard the 'big tunes' are played less
expansively than with some other performers. Sound is pretty dreadful, as
per Vox-usual, alas, very clattery, so bad that it might put one off the
recording, however.
Post by rderieux
I am most interested in the pieces based on Don Giovanni, Norma,
Lucia, Aida, Robert le Diable, Onegin and Lucrezia Borgia.
For Don Giovanni, there are many choices, I would recommend the recordings
by Simon Barere (on Pearl), Earl Wild (on the Daemonic Liszt), John Ogdon
(contained in Volume 2 of the GPOTC). There is a recording by Ginsburg that
I haven't heard but would imagine to be fantastic, also recordings by
Friedman and much more recently by Marc-Andre Hamelin that I would guess
would be very worth hearing. For Aida, there is an Arrau recording which I
recall being of interest (haven't heard it for ages), otherwise I just know
Howard, which is OK - wonderful piece, one of Liszt's finest. For Robert le
Diable, undoubtedly go for Earl Wild again, for Onegin, Cziffra (contained
in Les Introuvables de Cziffra, don't know if you can get it elsewhere).
Haven't heard a recording of Lucrezia Borgia (a real monster of a piece to
play, almost comical in some ways!), it's in one of the Howard volumes that
I don't have; I know there is also a slightly obscure recording by the
British pianist Anthony Peebles which might be worth checking out.
Best,
Ian
REG
2004-01-25 00:23:22 UTC
Permalink
One of the most remarkable performances, if you can get it - it's on a small
label - is Ivan Davis performing the Norma Transcription. It's the greatest
performance of any of the operatic transcriptions I know; he is himself a
great opera fan (accompanying, for example, Magda Olivero in her Carnegie
debut), and the performance simply sings and has a sweep that's rare even in
performances of the opera itself. It's on a disc with a great Waldstein
(listen to the transition to the final movement, arising out of nothing) and
some other works I don't have in my head right now.
Post by rderieux
Thanks for the very informative post. I will look around for some of
your recommendations.
Post by Ian Pace
Post by rderieux
[SNIP]
Post by ajb723
My 2 cents: The Leslie Howard traversal of Liszt offers completeness and
little else. His playing is adequately boring.Competent yet bland. For
the
Post by rderieux
Post by ajb723
more familiar operatic transcriptions, there is likely a better choice
in
Post by rderieux
Post by ajb723
every instance. For the seldom played piece, there is frequently no
other
Post by rderieux
Post by ajb723
choice.
I must be naive because I can't understand how a record label would
issue ~50 volumes of music by a pianist that is bland and boring.
Does his dad own the label?
Are there any sets of Liszt operatic transcriptions by better pianist,
or do I have to buy 30 CDs to get the content in one of the volumes
from the Hyperion Liszt series?
There is an ongoing Naxos series of the complete Liszt piano works, with a
variety of pianists, which I haven't heard so can't comment on. As regards
the Howards series, it is indeed a mixed bag, but has been unfairly
dismissed out of hand by some, I feel. I have quite a number of the
volumes, and there are definitely some wonderful performances. The first
few volumes to be released in particular are worth getting - Waltzes,
Ballades, Legends and Polonaises, Fantasy and other pieces. The disc of the
Late Pieces has some great playing also, and of course there are many works
only available in this series to date. I reckon there was probably too much
pressure from above to get through the series quickly, hence why the results
can be variable. I've heard him give some spectacular performances of Liszt
live on several occasions.
As for the Operatic Transcriptions, I have most of these volumes, and feel
that in general Howard is at his best in the lesser-known works, where some
sense of discovery can be communicated more readily, perhaps. The two
transcriptions from Meyerbeer's L'Africaine on the first volume are
extremely exciting, for example. The Norma Fantasy isn't big on high-blown
'operatic' rhetoric upon appearance of many of the big themes, but it has a
particular momentum and structural coherence that is compelling.
The other recordings I have of this include Bolet (endearing, but made after
his prime), Grante (woefully pedestrian, at a rigidly slow tempo, pedantic
and inflexible), and one which I just recently purchased, and was most
surprising, Brendel on the VoxBox Brendel Plays Liszt Volume 2. Not so many
Liszt lovers would agree with me here, I imagine, but I wholeheartedly
recommend this set, at ultra-budget price, also includes the Paganini Etudes
(extremely brilliant), Petrach Sonnets, Tarantella, and some of the
Harmonies Poetiques et Religeuses (his later Philips recordings of the
latter pieces is better, though, I think). The operatic
transcriptions
Post by rderieux
Post by Ian Pace
are those from Lucia di Lammermoor, Il Trovatore, Noram, Oberon, Benvenuto
Cellini, Tannhauser (Pilgrim's Chorus). Lucia di Lammermoor is more direct,
less obviously 'charming' than in many other pianists' performances (can't
think of an ideal recording of this at the moment), but I don't mind this so
much in such a rather schmalzy piece. Brendel brings his usual powerful
harmonic sense to bear upon the Norma fantasy, making an utterly compelling
and quite symphonic experience. There is no lack of melodic feel or
brilliance, also, though as with Howard the 'big tunes' are played less
expansively than with some other performers. Sound is pretty dreadful, as
per Vox-usual, alas, very clattery, so bad that it might put one off the
recording, however.
Post by rderieux
I am most interested in the pieces based on Don Giovanni, Norma,
Lucia, Aida, Robert le Diable, Onegin and Lucrezia Borgia.
For Don Giovanni, there are many choices, I would recommend the recordings
by Simon Barere (on Pearl), Earl Wild (on the Daemonic Liszt), John Ogdon
(contained in Volume 2 of the GPOTC). There is a recording by Ginsburg that
I haven't heard but would imagine to be fantastic, also recordings by
Friedman and much more recently by Marc-Andre Hamelin that I would guess
would be very worth hearing. For Aida, there is an Arrau recording which I
recall being of interest (haven't heard it for ages), otherwise I just know
Howard, which is OK - wonderful piece, one of Liszt's finest. For Robert le
Diable, undoubtedly go for Earl Wild again, for Onegin, Cziffra (contained
in Les Introuvables de Cziffra, don't know if you can get it elsewhere).
Haven't heard a recording of Lucrezia Borgia (a real monster of a piece to
play, almost comical in some ways!), it's in one of the Howard volumes that
I don't have; I know there is also a slightly obscure recording by the
British pianist Anthony Peebles which might be worth checking out.
Best,
Ian
Jan Winter
2004-01-26 21:21:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by REG
One of the most remarkable performances, if you can get it - it's on a small
label - is Ivan Davis performing the Norma Transcription. It's the greatest
performance of any of the operatic transcriptions I know; he is himself a
great opera fan (accompanying, for example, Magda Olivero in her Carnegie
debut), and the performance simply sings and has a sweep that's rare even in
performances of the opera itself. It's on a disc with a great Waldstein
(listen to the transition to the final movement, arising out of nothing) and
some other works I don't have in my head right now.
Can you give some more details? Label f.i.? Ivan Davis is my favourite
Gottschalk performer. I never saw or heard anything else by him. But
from my experience with this Gottschalk lp I can imagine the
performances you describe.

--
Jan Winter, Amsterdam
email: name = j.winter; provider = xs4all; com = nl

"Real jazz is classical music now" (Kenny Clarke)
Matthew B. Tepper
2004-01-26 22:35:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jan Winter
Post by REG
One of the most remarkable performances, if you can get it - it's on a
small label - is Ivan Davis performing the Norma Transcription. It's the
greatest performance of any of the operatic transcriptions I know; he is
himself a great opera fan (accompanying, for example, Magda Olivero in
her Carnegie debut), and the performance simply sings and has a sweep
that's rare even in performances of the opera itself. It's on a disc
with a great Waldstein (listen to the transition to the final movement,
arising out of nothing) and some other works I don't have in my head
right now.
Can you give some more details? Label f.i.? Ivan Davis is my favourite
Gottschalk performer. I never saw or heard anything else by him. But
from my experience with this Gottschalk lp I can imagine the
performances you describe.
I think Ivan Davis once played the Leschetizky arrangement of the Lucia
Sextet, as part of a talk about that opera on a Met intermission feature.
How I wish I had a recording of that!
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
War is Peace. ** Freedom is Slavery. ** It's all Napster's fault!
Alan Cooper
2004-01-26 23:08:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jan Winter
Post by REG
One of the most remarkable performances, if you can get it - it's on a small
label - is Ivan Davis performing the Norma Transcription. It's the greatest
performance of any of the operatic transcriptions I know; he is himself a
great opera fan (accompanying, for example, Magda Olivero in her Carnegie
debut), and the performance simply sings and has a sweep that's rare even in
performances of the opera itself. It's on a disc with a great Waldstein
(listen to the transition to the final movement, arising out of nothing) and
some other works I don't have in my head right now.
Can you give some more details? Label f.i.? Ivan Davis is my favourite
Gottschalk performer. I never saw or heard anything else by him. But
from my experience with this Gottschalk lp I can imagine the
performances you describe.
http://www.audiofonrecords.com/Davis/72004.htm

No evidence of a Waldstein there. though.

AC
REG
2004-01-27 01:35:50 UTC
Permalink
My apologies. In live recital, he played the Waldstein along with the Liszt,
but I see on the cd that he didn't make that part of the cd recital.
Post by Jan Winter
Post by REG
One of the most remarkable performances, if you can get it - it's on a small
label - is Ivan Davis performing the Norma Transcription. It's the greatest
performance of any of the operatic transcriptions I know; he is himself a
great opera fan (accompanying, for example, Magda Olivero in her Carnegie
debut), and the performance simply sings and has a sweep that's rare even in
performances of the opera itself. It's on a disc with a great Waldstein
(listen to the transition to the final movement, arising out of nothing) and
some other works I don't have in my head right now.
Can you give some more details? Label f.i.? Ivan Davis is my favourite
Gottschalk performer. I never saw or heard anything else by him. But
from my experience with this Gottschalk lp I can imagine the
performances you describe.
--
Jan Winter, Amsterdam
email: name = j.winter; provider = xs4all; com = nl
"Real jazz is classical music now" (Kenny Clarke)
Alan Cooper
2004-01-24 21:28:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by rderieux
Are there any sets of Liszt operatic transcriptions by better pianist,
or do I have to buy 30 CDs to get the content in one of the volumes
from the Hyperion Liszt series?
I would start with Grigory Ginsburg (a much better pianist):
http://www.rbcmp3.com/store/product.asp?dept%5Fid=32716&sku=32704

For the Lucia Sextet, you might enjoy Bolet on Ensayo. That disk also
includes the Spinning Song from Dutchman, the Rigoletto Quartet, and
several song transcriptions.

AC
Matthew B. Tepper
2004-01-24 21:58:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alan Cooper
Post by rderieux
Are there any sets of Liszt operatic transcriptions by better pianist,
or do I have to buy 30 CDs to get the content in one of the volumes
from the Hyperion Liszt series?
http://www.rbcmp3.com/store/product.asp?dept%5Fid=32716&sku=32704
For the Lucia Sextet, you might enjoy Bolet on Ensayo. That disk also
includes the Spinning Song from Dutchman, the Rigoletto Quartet, and
several song transcriptions.
My favorite transcription of the Lucia Sextet is the one made by Leschetizky,
which I worked up after my right hand tendons began to act up. I'm not aware
of any recording of it by a non-inept pianist. Yes, I am aware that Paul
Wittgenstein recorded it.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
War is Peace. ** Freedom is Slavery. ** It's all Napster's fault!
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