Discussion:
Most recordings by composer?
(too old to reply)
Paul Ilechko
2005-06-05 00:36:41 UTC
Permalink
I was looking at which composers I currently have most recordings by,
and it's changed quite dramatically over the last year or two. Current
rankings:

1. Bach
2. Beethoven
3. Shostakovich
4. Mahler
5. Haydn
5. Bruckner (tie)
7. Mozart
8. Wagner
9. Monteverdi
10. Schubert
11. Brahms
12. Bartok

Certainly Monteverdi, Bruckner and Wagner would not have been in the
list not too long ago, but they've displaced other composers such as
Stravinsky, Chopin and Vaughan Williams.
Thornhill
2005-06-05 01:32:54 UTC
Permalink
Mozart has always been in the lead for me, though recently Schubert has
been edging up on Bach and Beethoven, 2nd and 3rd respectively.
b.a.
2005-06-07 04:06:32 UTC
Permalink
For me, in no particular order:

Mahler
Beethoven
Shostakovich
Sibelius
d***@aol.com
2005-06-05 01:34:36 UTC
Permalink
Statistics about one's collection can be misleading, of course. Let's
say Webern and Bach are your favorite composers: you'll never run out
of Bach, but the complete works of Webern including unfinished works
and all of the early music will easily fit on half a dozen CD's. (Is
the complete Webern on DG truly complete? Did they really record
Siegfrieds Schwert and every early song? Heather Harper and Charles
Rosen did record every song for CBS, but CBS lost the masters before
volume 2 of THEIR complete Webern was issued.)

I love Bellini, but I only really feel passionately about two of his
operas: Norma and Puritani. (He died apallingly young and was not
remotely as prolific as Donizetti.) The comparatively small number of
Bellini recordings I have doesn't mean a thing.

I do have countless recordings of Don Giovanni, the Eroica, and the
Symphonie Fantastique: these are probably the three works represented
by the largest number of recordings in my collection.

Bach, Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven are all represented by huge
quantities of recordings in my collection, but they were not only
giants: they lived in an age when the language enabled composers to be
prolific at writing extraordinarily substantial music. I have more
recordings of Mozart than anybody else, with Verdi coming in a close
second. (Wagner is far less well represented.) I can't stop buying
Bach, although I have a genuinely difficult time finding performances I
truly like.

I have tons of Donizetti: he will soon overtake Verdi in my
collection. Then again, he wrote three times as many operas. For some
people, Italian opera is an addiction.

I have all the Mahler, Debussy, Schoenberg, and Berg I can lay my hands
on. I also have just about every Carter or Boulez CD commercially
issued and quite a few that weren't, including every recording of a
Carter String Quartet ever made. (I would never have bought the
Arditti 1-4 on Et Cetera had it not been the first "complete" Carter
Quartet set on CD). Also have four recordings of Carter's Concerto for
Orchestra and five of Boulez's Pli selon pli.

On the earlier end of the spectrum, I have a substantial amount of
Monteverdi and growing but hardly terribly large collections of Dufay
and Josquin. I know Ockeghem far less well and have greater difficulty
coming to terms with his music, but I've got to save something for my
old age. Lassus is another interest, but there can be few people alive
conversant with his vast, varied, and uneven oeuvre: always hard to
know what to buy.

Needless to say, I have all the Spontini I can lay my hands on and a
disproportionate quantity of Berlioz (if there can be such a thing).

-david gable
Paul Ilechko
2005-06-05 01:47:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by d***@aol.com
Statistics about one's collection can be misleading, of course. Let's
say Webern and Bach are your favorite composers: you'll never run out
of Bach, but the complete works of Webern including unfinished works
and all of the early music will easily fit on half a dozen CD's.
Agree totally. In fact, unless you really like a lot of duplication, it
doesn't take all that many CDs to collect all the interesting work of
Debussy, Sibelius, Kodaly or Nielsen either, who are all composers that
I like a lot. I was really looking more at the changes in my collection
than the absolute numbers.
Owen Hartnett
2005-06-05 03:18:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Ilechko
Post by d***@aol.com
Statistics about one's collection can be misleading, of course. Let's
say Webern and Bach are your favorite composers: you'll never run out
of Bach, but the complete works of Webern including unfinished works
and all of the early music will easily fit on half a dozen CD's.
Agree totally. In fact, unless you really like a lot of duplication, it
doesn't take all that many CDs to collect all the interesting work of
Debussy, Sibelius, Kodaly or Nielsen either, who are all composers that
I like a lot. I was really looking more at the changes in my collection
than the absolute numbers.
And how do you cound them?

The box of 32 Beethoven sonatas by Schnabel. Does that count for 32
(sonatas), 10 (disks) or 1 (set)?

-Owen
Paul Ilechko
2005-06-05 12:34:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Owen Hartnett
Post by Paul Ilechko
Post by d***@aol.com
Statistics about one's collection can be misleading, of course. Let's
say Webern and Bach are your favorite composers: you'll never run out
of Bach, but the complete works of Webern including unfinished works
and all of the early music will easily fit on half a dozen CD's.
Agree totally. In fact, unless you really like a lot of duplication, it
doesn't take all that many CDs to collect all the interesting work of
Debussy, Sibelius, Kodaly or Nielsen either, who are all composers that
I like a lot. I was really looking more at the changes in my collection
than the absolute numbers.
And how do you cound them?
Number of discs. Somewhat arbitrary, I suppose ...
-E.M_
2005-06-05 18:05:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Ilechko
Post by Owen Hartnett
And how do you cound them?
Number of discs. Somewhat arbitrary, I suppose ...
And an opera recording on, let's say, 3 cd's, or Wagner's Ring on 14
cd's?

El-tj-o Me-i-je_r
Paul Ilechko
2005-06-05 18:26:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by -E.M_
Post by Paul Ilechko
Post by Owen Hartnett
And how do you cound them?
Number of discs. Somewhat arbitrary, I suppose ...
And an opera recording on, let's say, 3 cd's, or Wagner's Ring on 14
cd's?
Yes, that's fairly typical ... what's your point ?
-E.M_
2005-06-05 20:16:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Ilechko
Post by -E.M_
And an opera recording on, let's say, 3 cd's, or Wagner's Ring on 14
cd's?
Yes, that's fairly typical ... what's your point ?
No point, only a simple question, which I'll rephrase. Do they count
as 3 or 14, or as 1 item in your statistics?

El-t-j-o Me-i-j-e_r
Paul Ilechko
2005-06-05 20:40:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by -E.M_
Post by Paul Ilechko
Post by -E.M_
And an opera recording on, let's say, 3 cd's, or Wagner's Ring on 14
cd's?
Yes, that's fairly typical ... what's your point ?
No point, only a simple question, which I'll rephrase. Do they count
as 3 or 14, or as 1 item in your statistics?
I already answered that question. I specifically said the number of
*discs*, not the number of *sets*. So they counnt as 3 and 14
respectively. It's more a measurement of how much music I have by a
particular composer. The Ring is a lot more music than anything that
fits on a single CD. Not that quantity necessarily equates with quality
of course ;-)
j***@aol.com
2005-06-05 09:12:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Ilechko
Post by d***@aol.com
Statistics about one's collection can be misleading, of course. Let's
say Webern and Bach are your favorite composers: you'll never run out
of Bach, but the complete works of Webern including unfinished works
and all of the early music will easily fit on half a dozen CD's.
Agree totally. In fact, unless you really like a lot of duplication, it
doesn't take all that many CDs to collect all the interesting work of
Debussy, Sibelius, Kodaly or Nielsen either, who are all composers that
I like a lot. I was really looking more at the changes in my collection
than the absolute numbers.
Judging from shelf space, my biggest chunk still seems to be Mahler,
and his percentage--roughly 6%--is about the same as it was a decade
ago. I guess the more my tastes change the more they stay the same. For
instance, my interest in Donizetti has really blossomed but that hardly
has made a blip of a difference in terms of percentage of shelf space
over that decade. The reason: my interest in nearly everything has
blossomed at the same time. There's one major exception: I bought a
chunk of pre-Baroque choral music early in my "collecting" and it has
basically stagnated in the last 9 years while every other category has
grown.--Jeff
j***@aol.com
2005-06-05 08:48:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by d***@aol.com
Statistics about one's collection can be misleading, of course.
The statistics only need to be interpreted by someone with the right
knowledge of recordings and the ways in which people amass them. Some
examples below:


Let's
Post by d***@aol.com
say Webern and Bach are your favorite composers: you'll never run out
of Bach, but the complete works of Webern including unfinished works
and all of the early music will easily fit on half a dozen CD's.
Thus, it would be fairly obvious to another knowledgeable collector,
glancing at your "statistics," that Webern meant more to you than
Beethoven's 5th Symphony, even if you have two dozen of the latter,
because Beethoven 5s grows on trees, but a shelf with a dozen Webern
discs is hard to find.
Post by d***@aol.com
I have tons of Donizetti: he will soon overtake Verdi in my
collection. Then again, he wrote three times as many operas. For some
people, Italian opera is an addiction.
Most people stop at a half dozen or so Donizetti operas and consider
themselves satisfied. It is easy to spot someone with a real Donizetti
enthusiasm. It is not those people with a dozen Lucia's and not one
"Belisario".
Post by d***@aol.com
I have all the Mahler, Debussy, Schoenberg, and Berg I can lay my hands
on.
Maybe you do, or maybe you just have all you care to have. Mahler
recordings, in particular, are multiplying like rabbits these days--you
can lay your hands on them, but you'd be nearly foolish to try. I've
never heard of anyone who has all the Mahler they can lay their hands
on and who also has a strong interest in any other composer.

I also have just about every Carter or Boulez CD commercially
Post by d***@aol.com
issued and quite a few that weren't, including every recording of a
Carter String Quartet ever made. (I would never have bought the
Arditti 1-4 on Et Cetera had it not been the first "complete" Carter
Quartet set on CD). Also have four recordings of Carter's Concerto for
Orchestra and five of Boulez's Pli selon pli.
Again, as in Webern, four or five Pli selon pli's is more unusual than,
say, a dozen Bruckner 9s, and any shrewd collector can see that. And
it's the few that aren't commercially available that speak the loudest
about your priorities as a collector. By contrast, some people never
stray from the three-star choices in the Penguin guide. That's a whole
different level of collecting than the self-made tastes that your shelf
undoubtedly would reveal.

--Jeff
Johannes Roehl
2005-06-05 10:29:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Ilechko
I was looking at which composers I currently have most recordings by,
and it's changed quite dramatically over the last year or two. Current
1. Bach
2. Beethoven
3. Shostakovich
4. Mahler
5. Haydn
5. Bruckner (tie)
7. Mozart
8. Wagner
9. Monteverdi
10. Schubert
11. Brahms
12. Bartok
Certainly Monteverdi, Bruckner and Wagner would not have been in the
list not too long ago, but they've displaced other composers such as
Stravinsky, Chopin and Vaughan Williams.
With all the caveats mentioned by others in the thread, Beethoven still
clearly heads my list with more than 4 shelf rows, one row holds about
50 Jewel cases, but many discs are in boxed sets, so it's probably more
then 300 discs for Beethoven.). Without explicit counting Mozart (about
three rows) comes next and than Bach and Handel (two and a half each,
but those Handel opera boxes take more space, probably misleading) then
Haydn (slightly less than two), Schubert and Brahms (between one and two
each), everybody else is clearly below one row. The main change with the
last two years has been Handel's advancement from a few discs of the
best known stuff to many of his operas and oratorios. Usually, I don't
believe in owning too many versions of a piece (although I have about 10
versions of several Beethoven pieces and 5 or 6 sets of Haydn's Paris
symphonies), so Bruckner or Mahler will never stand a chance against
more productive composers.

Johannes
p***@hotmail.com
2005-06-05 14:53:58 UTC
Permalink
Are we really into the routine from "Annie Get Your Gun"

SHE: Anything you can do, I can do better.
I can do anything better than you
HE: No, you can't
SHE: Yes, I can
HE: No, you can't
SHE: Yes, I can
HE: No, you can't
SHE: Yes, I can! Yes, I can!!
HE: Anything you can be, I can be greater.
Sooner or later, I'm greater than you
SHE: No, you're not
HE: Yes, I am
SHE: No, you're not
HE: Yes, I am
SHE: No, you're not
HE: Yes, I am! Yes, I am!!

Etc. Etc. Etc.

Why don't we start citing size of collections to really make the
"Annie" thing work.


Peter Schenkman
A. Brain
2005-06-05 21:25:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Johannes Roehl
With all the caveats mentioned by others in the thread, Beethoven
still clearly heads my list with more than 4 shelf rows, one row holds
about 50 Jewel cases, but many discs are in boxed sets, so it's
probably more then 300 discs for Beethoven.). Without explicit
counting Mozart (about three rows) comes next and than Bach and Handel
(two and a half each, but those Handel opera boxes take more space,
probably misleading) then Haydn (slightly less than two), Schubert and
Brahms (between one and two each), everybody else is clearly below one
row. The main change with the last two years has been Handel's
advancement from a few discs of the best known stuff to many of his
operas and oratorios. Usually, I don't believe in owning too many
versions of a piece (although I have about 10 versions of several
Beethoven pieces and 5 or 6 sets of Haydn's Paris symphonies), so
Bruckner or Mahler will never stand a chance against more productive
composers.
I'm way too disorganized to do an accurate count, and
even though I have multiple versions of some Mahler
and Bruckner, etc. my guesses are:

1. Bach
2. Mozart
3. Schubert
4. Haydn
5. Handel
6. Beethoven
7. Brahms
8. Schumann
9. Purcell
10. Tchaikovsky, Dvorak, Mahler, Bruckner

Anyone else got Purcell in his/her top ten?
--
A. Brain

Remove NOSPAM for email.
j***@aol.com
2005-06-05 21:38:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by A. Brain
I'm way too disorganized to do an accurate count, and
even though I have multiple versions of some Mahler
1. Bach
2. Mozart
3. Schubert
4. Haydn
5. Handel
6. Beethoven
7. Brahms
8. Schumann
9. Purcell
10. Tchaikovsky, Dvorak, Mahler, Bruckner
I'm impressed with your Purcell. What do you recommend, in particular?
The songs? The staage music? All of it?

--Jeff
A. Brain
2005-06-06 04:24:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by j***@aol.com
I'm impressed with your Purcell. What do you recommend, in particular?
The songs? The staage music? All of it?
I like pretty much all of it that I can find. And for
whatever reason, most of the recordings are really
good.

Best place to get Purcell right now is Berkshire.
Since there is so little competition, I cannot imagine
Hyperion reissuing the Robert King set of anthems
and songs on "Helios". BRO has many of them
for $6.99, whereas Hyperion at stores can go as
high as $23. The whole set of what, eleven discs
of the sacred music comes out to around $10
each from some web sites.

DGG had a nice Purcell set that came out in 1995,
three hundred years after Purcell died (age 35). It
is still around here and there, or at least parts
thereof, but only as "imports".

A two-CD "Sacred Music" set with Preston is
a really good deal, includes "Te Deum" and
"Jubilate Deo". See below.

Erato recorded a lot of Purcell with Gardiner in the
80s. That may be hard to find also. All of it is
worth getting.

Hogwood and Mackerras also recorded Purcell
items on Oiseau and DGG. I think Mackerras'
"Ode on St. Cecilia's Day" is still around. That
work, "Dido and Aeneas", and some of the
"Funeral Music for Queen Mary" would be good
starting places. "Funeral Music" by Gardiner
is on a dirt-cheap "Apex" recording.

If you like Janet Baker, as I do, she has recorded
"Dido" two or three times.


The Sony disc, "Music for Queen Mary", is also
worthwhile. Recently discussed here in connection
with Sony abortions.

My personal favorites of the Purcell works I
know are the Te Deum and
Jubilate Deo. Until very recently, my favorite
recording was an OOP '70s recording by
St. John's Choir. There's a "Brilliant Classics"
collection that has these two works, I think.
My favorites are now the Robert King ones,
Hyperion "Complete Anthems and Services,
Volume 2". This music is right up there with
that of J.S. Bach in beauty and spirituality.

The King volumes have copious notes and
full texts.
--
A. Brain

Remove NOSPAM for email.
j***@aol.com
2005-06-06 16:27:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by A. Brain
Post by j***@aol.com
I'm impressed with your Purcell. What do you recommend, in particular?
The songs? The staage music? All of it?
I like pretty much all of it that I can find. And for
whatever reason, most of the recordings are really
good.
Best place to get Purcell right now is Berkshire.
Since there is so little competition, I cannot imagine
Hyperion reissuing the Robert King set of anthems
and songs on "Helios". BRO has many of them
for $6.99, whereas Hyperion at stores can go as
high as $23. The whole set of what, eleven discs
of the sacred music comes out to around $10
each from some web sites.
DGG had a nice Purcell set that came out in 1995,
three hundred years after Purcell died (age 35). It
is still around here and there, or at least parts
thereof, but only as "imports".
A two-CD "Sacred Music" set with Preston is
a really good deal, includes "Te Deum" and
"Jubilate Deo". See below.
Erato recorded a lot of Purcell with Gardiner in the
80s. That may be hard to find also. All of it is
worth getting.
Hogwood and Mackerras also recorded Purcell
items on Oiseau and DGG. I think Mackerras'
"Ode on St. Cecilia's Day" is still around. That
work, "Dido and Aeneas", and some of the
"Funeral Music for Queen Mary" would be good
starting places. "Funeral Music" by Gardiner
is on a dirt-cheap "Apex" recording.
If you like Janet Baker, as I do, she has recorded
"Dido" two or three times.
The Sony disc, "Music for Queen Mary", is also
worthwhile. Recently discussed here in connection
with Sony abortions.
My personal favorites of the Purcell works I
know are the Te Deum and
Jubilate Deo. Until very recently, my favorite
recording was an OOP '70s recording by
St. John's Choir. There's a "Brilliant Classics"
collection that has these two works, I think.
My favorites are now the Robert King ones,
Hyperion "Complete Anthems and Services,
Volume 2". This music is right up there with
that of J.S. Bach in beauty and spirituality.
The King volumes have copious notes and
full texts.
Thanks for the pointers. Mostly I've bought (and adored) performances
of "Dido"--including one with Baker--but aside from one or two famous
vocal works and the "Fairy Queen", I can't think of much else I've
heard. I'll look into some of your suggestions.

--Jeff
Simon Roberts
2005-06-06 18:14:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by j***@aol.com
Thanks for the pointers. Mostly I've bought (and adored) performances
of "Dido"--including one with Baker--but aside from one or two famous
vocal works and the "Fairy Queen", I can't think of much else I've
heard. I'll look into some of your suggestions.
Since these works weren't mentioned, let me toss in a couple of other
suggestions: First, his sonatas and fantasies for viol consort (Savall's disc on
Astree is probably as good a place to start as any). Second, at least some of
his songs. "Music for a While" is not to be missed. The best performance I know
is on an engaging pot-pourri disc (much of it is arrangements), also Astree, by
Andrew Lawrence-King's Harp Consort, called "Musick's Hand-Maid" (I would
mention the singer, except I can't figure out who he is from the booklet;
whoever it is seems to be a non-falsetto countertenor). If you want a couple of
discs' worth of songs, I'm pretty sure Virgin reissued Nancy Argenta's two discs
as a dirt cheap twofer not long ago.

Simon
Paul Ilechko
2005-06-06 21:35:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Simon Roberts
Post by j***@aol.com
Thanks for the pointers. Mostly I've bought (and adored) performances
of "Dido"--including one with Baker--but aside from one or two famous
vocal works and the "Fairy Queen", I can't think of much else I've
heard. I'll look into some of your suggestions.
Since these works weren't mentioned, let me toss in a couple of other
suggestions: First, his sonatas and fantasies for viol consort (Savall's disc on
Astree is probably as good a place to start as any). Second, at least some of
his songs. "Music for a While" is not to be missed. The best performance I know
is on an engaging pot-pourri disc (much of it is arrangements), also Astree, by
Andrew Lawrence-King's Harp Consort, called "Musick's Hand-Maid" (I would
mention the singer, except I can't figure out who he is from the booklet;
whoever it is seems to be a non-falsetto countertenor). If you want a couple of
discs' worth of songs, I'm pretty sure Virgin reissued Nancy Argenta's two discs
as a dirt cheap twofer not long ago.
If you're looking on BRO for Purcell, let me dis-recommend the Hyperion
CD "Hark How the Wild Musicians Sing: The Symphony Songs of Henry
Purcell" by The Parley of Instruments and Red Byrd. I thought this was
very unimpressive.
Jan Winter
2005-06-05 15:26:11 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 04 Jun 2005 20:36:41 -0400, Paul Ilechko
Post by Paul Ilechko
I was looking at which composers I currently have most recordings by,
I seldom buy because of the composer; I mostly buy because of the
performer. At a glance I'd say the contest is between Horowitz and
Richter, with Richter in the lead.

There are some composers I want to have every piece of that's
recorded. But only if there is a realistic prospect of reaching the
goal. I practically reached this goal with Lyadov and Mompou.
In my vinyl days I came a far end with Haydn. I only skipped the
pianosonatas because I didn't find no real alternative for McCabe.

-----
jan winter, amsterdam
email: name = j.winter; provider = xs4all; com = nl
John Harrington
2005-06-05 15:53:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Ilechko
I was looking at which composers I currently have most recordings by,
and it's changed quite dramatically over the last year or two. Current
1. Bach
2. Beethoven
3. Shostakovich
4. Mahler
5. Haydn
5. Bruckner (tie)
7. Mozart
8. Wagner
9. Monteverdi
10. Schubert
11. Brahms
12. Bartok
The statistics, however, are somewhat unfairly skewed by how much a
composer wrote. You can't fairly compare Ravel and Mozart.

In my own case, judging by shelf space, JS Bach is the clear winner for
me, taking up as he does about 10 feet. Mozart has about 8 feet.
Beethoven has all of 6 feet. Others have 4 feet or less.


J
a***@aol.com
2005-06-05 21:24:00 UTC
Permalink
I know I am going to be disqualified because No 1 (and a specific work
at that) is distributed between 78s, LPs, CDs, private cassette (mostly
radio) recordings (some taken from reel to reel tapes). Complete Ma
Vlast: Smetana including five for piano four hands, one commercial,
four private or radio.

I have 142 performances of complete Ma Vlast (including the amateur
performance in which I played 1st harp) and I am still looking.

No idea about the others. Am listening to Ma Vlast as I write this.

Kind regards,
Alan M. Watkins
j***@aol.com
2005-06-06 02:46:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@aol.com
I have 142 performances of complete Ma Vlast (including the amateur
performance in which I played 1st harp) and I am still looking.
Are there any recordings of Ma Vlast that you don't have and don't
want?

--Jeff
a***@aol.com
2005-06-06 08:15:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by j***@aol.com
Post by a***@aol.com
I have 142 performances of complete Ma Vlast (including the amateur
performance in which I played 1st harp) and I am still looking.
Are there any recordings of Ma Vlast that you don't have and don't
want?
--Jeff
There will be many, and particularly radio performances, that I do not
have. The one I would like to hear is that by Sir Adrian Boult made
during World War II by the BBC Symphony Orchestra and recorded on
Acetates but never issued nor played over the radio. I am not even
sure if the acetates survive although Sir Adrian was given a set of
them.

There was a recording by Svetlanov which I cannot find anywhere
although I have the cycle by Fedoseyev, somewhat interesting for the
fact that the first movement (for some reason) does not have a cymbal
player.

I cannot think of any that I wouldn't want. A very impressive
performance and beautifully recorded is that by the Slovak State
Philharmonic of Kosice conducted by Reinhard Seifried. It was issued
in the UK as part of a series exclusive to Dillons Bookstores.


Kind regards,
Alan M. Watkins
Robert Briggs
2005-06-06 21:42:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@aol.com
I have 142 performances of complete Ma Vlast (including the amateur
performance in which I played 1st harp) and I am still looking.
ISTR Grunin can beat that by a factor of two or so with all those
Eroicas littering his place up ...
j***@aol.com
2005-06-06 23:18:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Briggs
Post by a***@aol.com
I have 142 performances of complete Ma Vlast (including the amateur
performance in which I played 1st harp) and I am still looking.
ISTR Grunin can beat that by a factor of two or so with all those
Eroicas littering his place up ...
But I find 142 Ma Vlasts to be more impressive. Not even the U.N. has
that many.

--Jeff
Bill McCutcheon
2005-06-05 23:00:56 UTC
Permalink
I was looking at which composers I currently have most recordings by, and
it's changed quite dramatically over the last year or two. Current
1. Bach
2. Beethoven
3. Shostakovich
4. Mahler
5. Haydn
5. Bruckner (tie)
7. Mozart
8. Wagner
9. Monteverdi
10. Schubert
11. Brahms
12. Bartok
Certainly Monteverdi, Bruckner and Wagner would not have been in the
list not too long ago, but they've displaced other composers such as
Stravinsky, Chopin and Vaughan Williams.
Without doing an actual count, I think my top 5 are:
Mozart
Beethoven
Bach
Schubert
Haydn

-- Bill McC.
AMH
2005-06-06 02:58:55 UTC
Permalink
Since I have recently finished entering my collection into a computer
database, I can make a list easily. Here is my top ten, by number of
sets (i.e., a 4 CD Wagner opera counts as 1):

Beethoven - 27
Vaughan Williams - 21
Wagner - 18
Bach - 18
Bruckner -18
Mozart -17
Mahler - 16
Haydn - 15
Brahms -15
Schubert - 14
Matthew B. Tepper
2005-06-06 06:01:56 UTC
Permalink
"Bill McCutcheon" <***@earthlink.net> appears to have caused the
following letters to be typed in news:IuLoe.14355$M36.7767
Post by Paul Ilechko
I was looking at which composers I currently have most recordings by, and
it's changed quite dramatically over the last year or two. Current
1. Bach
2. Beethoven
3. Shostakovich
4. Mahler
5. Haydn
5. Bruckner (tie)
7. Mozart
8. Wagner
9. Monteverdi
10. Schubert
11. Brahms
12. Bartok
Certainly Monteverdi, Bruckner and Wagner would not have been in the
list not too long ago, but they've displaced other composers such as
Stravinsky, Chopin and Vaughan Williams.
Mozart
Beethoven
Bach
Schubert
Haydn
I'm pretty sure mine are

Beethoven
Berlioz
Shostakovich
Wagner
Mozart
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Take THAT, Daniel Lin, Mark Sadek, James Lin & Christopher Chung!
r***@gmail.com
2005-06-06 13:09:23 UTC
Permalink
My list does a pretty good job of showing my preferences; I'm a
lopsided collector (which has to do with the fact that I'm 21 and have
a great deal left to explore), and these composers vastly outnumber
others like Bruckner and Brahms and Haydn in my collection:

1. Beethoven
2. Mozart
3. Stravinsky
4. Mahler
5. Berlioz
6. Wagner
7. JS Bach
8. Copland
9. Mussorgsky
10. Carl Orff
11. Tchaikovsky
12. Chopin and Britten (tie)

-- Ronit
Raymond Hall
2005-06-07 04:36:26 UTC
Permalink
I was looking at which composers I currently have most recordings by, and
it's changed quite dramatically over the last year or two. Current
1. Bach
2. Beethoven
3. Shostakovich
4. Mahler
5. Haydn
5. Bruckner (tie)
7. Mozart
8. Wagner
9. Monteverdi
10. Schubert
11. Brahms
12. Bartok
Certainly Monteverdi, Bruckner and Wagner would not have been in the list
not too long ago, but they've displaced other composers such as
Stravinsky, Chopin and Vaughan Williams.
As a rough guess, and without having to actually count them, (a collection
of about 1,600, and smallish by some standards) I would say that my order is
:-

Haydn
Bach
Bruckner
Beethoven
Mahler
Shostakovich
Sibelius
.
.
.
.
.

BUT, if, because of the far fewer duplications I have of 20th century music,
then I would say that 50% of my collection is easily 20th / 21st century,
comprising a whole host of composers, far too numerous to name here, else
the list would be GI-normous. Another instance too, is that I would swap
Beethoven for Liszt anyday of the week, but the amount of Liszt I have, is
nowhere near as numerous as the LvB, for sheer logistical reasons. But it is
creeping up. And I want to hear the Liszt piano transcriptions of the LvB
symphonies too. Although will that be Liszt, or will that be Beethoven? Of
course, it must be Beethoven.

But mostly, I am drawn to 20th century and very new music these days. Lists
such as the above doesn't indicate composer preference necessarily, although
in Haydn's case, he comes out on top, not only on numeric accomplishment,
but because to me, he was the greatest, along with Bach.

Ray H
Taree
j***@aol.com
2005-06-07 05:09:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Raymond Hall
I was looking at which composers I currently have most recordings by, and
it's changed quite dramatically over the last year or two. Current
1. Bach
2. Beethoven
3. Shostakovich
4. Mahler
5. Haydn
5. Bruckner (tie)
7. Mozart
8. Wagner
9. Monteverdi
10. Schubert
11. Brahms
12. Bartok
Certainly Monteverdi, Bruckner and Wagner would not have been in the list
not too long ago, but they've displaced other composers such as
Stravinsky, Chopin and Vaughan Williams.
As a rough guess, and without having to actually count them, (a collection
of about 1,600, and smallish by some standards) I would say that my order is
:-
Haydn
Bach
Bruckner
Beethoven
Mahler
Shostakovich
Sibelius
.
.
.
.
.
BUT, if, because of the far fewer duplications I have of 20th century music,
then I would say that 50% of my collection is easily 20th / 21st century,
comprising a whole host of composers, far too numerous to name here, else
the list would be GI-normous. Another instance too, is that I would swap
Beethoven for Liszt anyday of the week, but the amount of Liszt I have, is
nowhere near as numerous as the LvB, for sheer logistical reasons. But it is
creeping up. And I want to hear the Liszt piano transcriptions of the LvB
symphonies too. Although will that be Liszt, or will that be Beethoven? Of
course, it must be Beethoven.
But mostly, I am drawn to 20th century and very new music these days. Lists
such as the above doesn't indicate composer preference necessarily, although
in Haydn's case, he comes out on top, not only on numeric accomplishment,
but because to me, he was the greatest, along with Bach.
Ray H
Taree
Ray, you should start a thread asking who has the most composers
represented in their classical "holdings". I suspect you have just
about the most, or at least the most _per disc_ of anyone here with a
substantial collection.

--Jeff
Raymond Hall
2005-06-07 05:25:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by j***@aol.com
Post by Raymond Hall
As a rough guess, and without having to actually count them, (a collection
of about 1,600, and smallish by some standards) I would say that my order is
:-
Haydn
Bach
Bruckner
Beethoven
Mahler
Shostakovich
Sibelius
.
.
.
.
.
BUT, if, because of the far fewer duplications I have of 20th century music,
then I would say that 50% of my collection is easily 20th / 21st century,
comprising a whole host of composers, far too numerous to name here, else
the list would be GI-normous. Another instance too, is that I would swap
Beethoven for Liszt anyday of the week, but the amount of Liszt I have, is
nowhere near as numerous as the LvB, for sheer logistical reasons. But it is
creeping up. And I want to hear the Liszt piano transcriptions of the LvB
symphonies too. Although will that be Liszt, or will that be Beethoven? Of
course, it must be Beethoven.
But mostly, I am drawn to 20th century and very new music these days. Lists
such as the above doesn't indicate composer preference necessarily, although
in Haydn's case, he comes out on top, not only on numeric accomplishment,
but because to me, he was the greatest, along with Bach.
Ray H
Taree
Ray, you should start a thread asking who has the most composers
represented in their classical "holdings". I suspect you have just
about the most, or at least the most _per disc_ of anyone here with a
substantial collection.
I may well have Jeff, with several others here as well, as I don't think I
am that unique. But creating the list is something I perhaps intend to do,
for fun, and for the actual stats. But the actual process ..... painful.
Creating a data base would be the easy way, but yet again, it is starting
the thing off, and actually doing it.

But it is nice to come across a shelf, and notice a composer that catches
one's eye, and one has completely forgotten about. And the simple fact is,
there are heaps more new composers I have still to add. I really need some
form of hiatus, whereby I can do some serious catching up on listening.

Ray H
Taree
j***@aol.com
2005-06-07 07:07:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Raymond Hall
Post by j***@aol.com
Post by Raymond Hall
As a rough guess, and without having to actually count them, (a collection
of about 1,600, and smallish by some standards) I would say that my order is
:-
Haydn
Bach
Bruckner
Beethoven
Mahler
Shostakovich
Sibelius
.
.
.
.
.
BUT, if, because of the far fewer duplications I have of 20th century music,
then I would say that 50% of my collection is easily 20th / 21st century,
comprising a whole host of composers, far too numerous to name here, else
the list would be GI-normous. Another instance too, is that I would swap
Beethoven for Liszt anyday of the week, but the amount of Liszt I have, is
nowhere near as numerous as the LvB, for sheer logistical reasons. But it is
creeping up. And I want to hear the Liszt piano transcriptions of the LvB
symphonies too. Although will that be Liszt, or will that be Beethoven? Of
course, it must be Beethoven.
But mostly, I am drawn to 20th century and very new music these days. Lists
such as the above doesn't indicate composer preference necessarily, although
in Haydn's case, he comes out on top, not only on numeric accomplishment,
but because to me, he was the greatest, along with Bach.
Ray H
Taree
Ray, you should start a thread asking who has the most composers
represented in their classical "holdings". I suspect you have just
about the most, or at least the most _per disc_ of anyone here with a
substantial collection.
I may well have Jeff, with several others here as well, as I don't think I
am that unique.
It is true that there are others. There is the one poster, for
instance, who seemed to have practically as many composers with his
post-1850 violin concertos than I do in an entire collection, c. 1100
to the present.

But creating the list is something I perhaps intend to do,
Post by Raymond Hall
for fun, and for the actual stats. But the actual process ..... painful.
Creating a data base would be the easy way, but yet again, it is starting
the thing off, and actually doing it.
A database. The suffering. The agony. I made one 10 years ago--it took
only a weekend. Last time I tried, it took me a weekend to do 50 discs.
I think it is hopeless. I am doomed to have it all memorized.
Post by Raymond Hall
But it is nice to come across a shelf, and notice a composer that catches
one's eye, and one has completely forgotten about. And the simple fact is,
there are heaps more new composers I have still to add. I really need some
form of hiatus, whereby I can do some serious catching up on listening.
--Jeff
Wayne Reimer
2005-06-07 22:50:19 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
***@aol.com says...
<...>
Post by j***@aol.com
A database. The suffering. The agony. I made one 10 years ago--it took
only a weekend. Last time I tried, it took me a weekend to do 50 discs.
I think it is hopeless. I am doomed to have it all memorized.
There should be a way to do a database without so much pain. Maybe
just input partial records when you first get the item and then fill in
the rest whenever.

Anyway, I bet many people wouldn't have too much trouble listing all
their composers if they took it one letter at a time.

My "A" composers are: Adam, J. Adams, J. L. Adams, Alkan, Atterberg,
Arensky, Albeniz, Arne, Alain, Albinioni, Albright, Auric, Arutiunian,
Adler, Ades, Aho, Aulin, Artiomov, Ashley, Anderson, Aubert, Avalon,
Arnold, Absil, d'Albert, Andriessen, Antheil. There may be a few more
scattered in collections and recitals (I'm pretty sure I've got
something by Amirkhanian somewhere but can't lay my hands on it), but
that's pretty close to all of them. And maybe it was't so easy after
all, but was interesting as far as list making goes - I'd forgotten I
had a few of those.

wr
j***@aol.com
2005-06-08 02:36:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Wayne Reimer
<...>
Post by j***@aol.com
A database. The suffering. The agony. I made one 10 years ago--it took
only a weekend. Last time I tried, it took me a weekend to do 50 discs.
I think it is hopeless. I am doomed to have it all memorized.
There should be a way to do a database without so much pain. Maybe
just input partial records when you first get the item and then fill in
the rest whenever.
Anyway, I bet many people wouldn't have too much trouble listing all
their composers if they took it one letter at a time.
My "A" composers are: Adam, J. Adams, J. L. Adams, Alkan, Atterberg,
Arensky, Albeniz, Arne, Alain, Albinioni, Albright, Auric, Arutiunian,
Adler, Ades, Aho, Aulin, Artiomov, Ashley, Anderson, Aubert, Avalon,
Arnold, Absil, d'Albert, Andriessen, Antheil. There may be a few more
scattered in collections and recitals (I'm pretty sure I've got
something by Amirkhanian somewhere but can't lay my hands on it), but
that's pretty close to all of them. And maybe it was't so easy after
all, but was interesting as far as list making goes - I'd forgotten I
had a few of those.
Isn't it ironic that in classical music, the A list isn't really the A
list?

I tried counting composers today for a little while, but the "recital"
and "collection" style discs were just too frustrating. If everything
were one composer to a disc, life would be easier, if not more
efficient. The idea of cataloguing those "Vienna Music Masters" discs
on MMC and the Corporon discs on Klavier, each with five or six
different pieces and composers, is just too daunting.

--Jeff (who's hoping Arensky was an accidental oversight)
Wayne Reimer
2005-06-08 05:38:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by j***@aol.com
Post by Wayne Reimer
<...>
Post by j***@aol.com
A database. The suffering. The agony. I made one 10 years ago--it took
only a weekend. Last time I tried, it took me a weekend to do 50 discs.
I think it is hopeless. I am doomed to have it all memorized.
There should be a way to do a database without so much pain. Maybe
just input partial records when you first get the item and then fill in
the rest whenever.
Anyway, I bet many people wouldn't have too much trouble listing all
their composers if they took it one letter at a time.
My "A" composers are: Adam, J. Adams, J. L. Adams, Alkan, Atterberg,
Arensky, Albeniz, Arne, Alain, Albinioni, Albright, Auric, Arutiunian,
Adler, Ades, Aho, Aulin, Artiomov, Ashley, Anderson, Aubert, Avalon,
Arnold, Absil, d'Albert, Andriessen, Antheil. There may be a few more
scattered in collections and recitals (I'm pretty sure I've got
something by Amirkhanian somewhere but can't lay my hands on it), but
that's pretty close to all of them. And maybe it was't so easy after
all, but was interesting as far as list making goes - I'd forgotten I
had a few of those.
Isn't it ironic that in classical music, the A list isn't really the A
list?
I tried counting composers today for a little while, but the "recital"
and "collection" style discs were just too frustrating. If everything
were one composer to a disc, life would be easier, if not more
efficient. The idea of cataloguing those "Vienna Music Masters" discs
on MMC and the Corporon discs on Klavier, each with five or six
different pieces and composers, is just too daunting.
--Jeff (who's hoping Arensky was an accidental oversight)
OK, I'll bite. How was including Arensky an oversight?

wr
j***@aol.com
2005-06-08 18:02:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Wayne Reimer
Post by j***@aol.com
Post by Wayne Reimer
My "A" composers are: Adam, J. Adams, J. L. Adams, Alkan, Atterberg,
Arensky, Albeniz, Arne, Alain, Albinioni, Albright, Auric, Arutiunian,
Adler, Ades, Aho, Aulin, Artiomov, Ashley, Anderson, Aubert, Avalon,
Arnold, Absil, d'Albert, Andriessen, Antheil. There may be a few more
scattered in collections and recitals (I'm pretty sure I've got
something by Amirkhanian somewhere but can't lay my hands on it), but
that's pretty close to all of them. And maybe it was't so easy after
all, but was interesting as far as list making goes - I'd forgotten I
had a few of those.
Isn't it ironic that in classical music, the A list isn't really the A
list?
I tried counting composers today for a little while, but the "recital"
and "collection" style discs were just too frustrating. If everything
were one composer to a disc, life would be easier, if not more
efficient. The idea of cataloguing those "Vienna Music Masters" discs
on MMC and the Corporon discs on Klavier, each with five or six
different pieces and composers, is just too daunting.
--Jeff (who's hoping Arensky was an accidental oversight)
OK, I'll bite. How was including Arensky an oversight?
wr
Oops. Sorry. There he is. I looked at list several times and didn't see
him. Must clean those spots on my screen where the cat sneezed. I'm
going to guess that if you kept going and counted all your letters,
you'd come up with roughly 700 names, with countless more in the nether
reaches of "miscellany".

--Jeff
Wayne Reimer
2005-06-09 01:16:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by j***@aol.com
Post by Wayne Reimer
Post by j***@aol.com
Post by Wayne Reimer
My "A" composers are: Adam, J. Adams, J. L. Adams, Alkan, Atterberg,
Arensky, Albeniz, Arne, Alain, Albinioni, Albright, Auric, Arutiunian,
Adler, Ades, Aho, Aulin, Artiomov, Ashley, Anderson, Aubert, Avalon,
Arnold, Absil, d'Albert, Andriessen, Antheil. There may be a few more
scattered in collections and recitals (I'm pretty sure I've got
something by Amirkhanian somewhere but can't lay my hands on it), but
that's pretty close to all of them. And maybe it was't so easy after
all, but was interesting as far as list making goes - I'd forgotten I
had a few of those.
Isn't it ironic that in classical music, the A list isn't really the A
list?
I tried counting composers today for a little while, but the "recital"
and "collection" style discs were just too frustrating. If everything
were one composer to a disc, life would be easier, if not more
efficient. The idea of cataloguing those "Vienna Music Masters" discs
on MMC and the Corporon discs on Klavier, each with five or six
different pieces and composers, is just too daunting.
--Jeff (who's hoping Arensky was an accidental oversight)
OK, I'll bite. How was including Arensky an oversight?
wr
Oops. Sorry. There he is. I looked at list several times and didn't see
him. Must clean those spots on my screen where the cat sneezed. I'm
going to guess that if you kept going and counted all your letters,
you'd come up with roughly 700 names, with countless more in the nether
reaches of "miscellany".
In other words, a hopelessly unfocused collection. It's true, I'll
admit it. :-)

wr
j***@aol.com
2005-06-09 01:42:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Wayne Reimer
Post by j***@aol.com
Post by Wayne Reimer
Post by j***@aol.com
Post by Wayne Reimer
My "A" composers are: Adam, J. Adams, J. L. Adams, Alkan, Atterberg,
Arensky, Albeniz, Arne, Alain, Albinioni, Albright, Auric, Arutiunian,
Adler, Ades, Aho, Aulin, Artiomov, Ashley, Anderson, Aubert, Avalon,
Arnold, Absil, d'Albert, Andriessen, Antheil. There may be a few more
scattered in collections and recitals (I'm pretty sure I've got
something by Amirkhanian somewhere but can't lay my hands on it), but
that's pretty close to all of them. And maybe it was't so easy after
all, but was interesting as far as list making goes - I'd forgotten I
had a few of those.
Isn't it ironic that in classical music, the A list isn't really the A
list?
...
Post by Wayne Reimer
Post by j***@aol.com
Post by Wayne Reimer
Post by j***@aol.com
--Jeff (who's hoping Arensky was an accidental oversight)
OK, I'll bite. How was including Arensky an oversight?
wr
Oops. Sorry. There he is. I looked at list several times and didn't see
him. Must clean those spots on my screen where the cat sneezed. I'm
going to guess that if you kept going and counted all your letters,
you'd come up with roughly 700 names, with countless more in the nether
reaches of "miscellany".
In other words, a hopelessly unfocused collection. It's true, I'll
admit it. :-)
wr
I prefer the scattershot approach, myself.

I thought it was amusing that we have almost exactly the same number of
"A's" (not counting the recitals/collections). Not all the same,
entries, either: Abrahamsen, Adam, Adams, Ades, Adler, Adolphe, Aho,
Aitken, Akses, Alain, Albeniz, Albert, Albinoni, Alfano, Alfven, Alkan,
Alwyn, Amargos, Amram, H Andriessen, J Andriessen, L Andriessen,
Antheil, Arensky, Argento, Argersinger, Arma, Arnold, Asia, Atterberg.
(d'Albert is a D, for some reason; Adamus, Auber, Auric, and others are
in collections).

I'll bet Ray has other A's. ClassicsToday has reviewed 50 A's.

None of them plays baseball in Oakland.

--Jeff (with apologies to Arriaga)
j***@aol.com
2005-06-09 02:08:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by j***@aol.com
Post by Wayne Reimer
Post by j***@aol.com
Post by Wayne Reimer
Post by j***@aol.com
Post by Wayne Reimer
My "A" composers are: Adam, J. Adams, J. L. Adams, Alkan, Atterberg,
Arensky, Albeniz, Arne, Alain, Albinioni, Albright, Auric, Arutiunian,
Adler, Ades, Aho, Aulin, Artiomov, Ashley, Anderson, Aubert, Avalon,
Arnold, Absil, d'Albert, Andriessen, Antheil. There may be a few more
scattered in collections and recitals (I'm pretty sure I've got
something by Amirkhanian somewhere but can't lay my hands on it), but
that's pretty close to all of them. And maybe it was't so easy after
all, but was interesting as far as list making goes - I'd forgotten I
had a few of those.
Isn't it ironic that in classical music, the A list isn't really the A
list?
...
Post by Wayne Reimer
Post by j***@aol.com
Post by Wayne Reimer
Post by j***@aol.com
--Jeff (who's hoping Arensky was an accidental oversight)
OK, I'll bite. How was including Arensky an oversight?
wr
Oops. Sorry. There he is. I looked at list several times and didn't see
him. Must clean those spots on my screen where the cat sneezed. I'm
going to guess that if you kept going and counted all your letters,
you'd come up with roughly 700 names, with countless more in the nether
reaches of "miscellany".
In other words, a hopelessly unfocused collection. It's true, I'll
admit it. :-)
wr
I prefer the scattershot approach, myself.
I thought it was amusing that we have almost exactly the same number of
"A's" (not counting the recitals/collections). Not all the same,
entries, either: Abrahamsen, Adam, Adams, Ades, Adler, Adolphe, Aho,
Aitken, Akses, Alain, Albeniz, Albert, Albinoni, Alfano, Alfven, Alkan,
Alwyn, Amargos, Amram, H Andriessen, J Andriessen, L Andriessen,
Antheil, Arensky, Argento, Argersinger, Arma, Arnold, Asia, Atterberg.
(d'Albert is a D, for some reason; Adamus, Auber, Auric, and others are
in collections).
I'll bet Ray has other A's. ClassicsToday has reviewed 50 A's.
None of them plays baseball in Oakland.
--Jeff (with apologies to Arriaga)
I should note that there are about 500 "A's" listed at Arkivmusic,
though they include people like Aristophanes and Louis Armstrong. I've
never encountered the vast majority of their names, but this gives us
an idea of how far one must go to be comprehensive. Better to lay claim
to 100 Ma Vlasts, I say.

I am pleased to see that in terms of the most recordings, the "A"
number one composer is..."Anonymous."

--Jeff
Simon Roberts
2005-06-09 15:24:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by j***@aol.com
Post by j***@aol.com
I thought it was amusing that we have almost exactly the same number of
"A's" (not counting the recitals/collections). Not all the same,
entries, either: Abrahamsen, Adam, Adams, Ades, Adler, Adolphe, Aho,
Aitken, Akses, Alain, Albeniz, Albert, Albinoni, Alfano, Alfven, Alkan,
Alwyn, Amargos, Amram, H Andriessen, J Andriessen, L Andriessen,
Antheil, Arensky, Argento, Argersinger, Arma, Arnold, Asia, Atterberg.
(d'Albert is a D, for some reason; Adamus, Auber, Auric, and others are
in collections).
I'll bet Ray has other A's. ClassicsToday has reviewed 50 A's.
None of them plays baseball in Oakland.
--Jeff (with apologies to Arriaga)
I should note that there are about 500 "A's" listed at Arkivmusic,
though they include people like Aristophanes and Louis Armstrong. I've
never encountered the vast majority of their names, but this gives us
an idea of how far one must go to be comprehensive. Better to lay claim
to 100 Ma Vlasts, I say.
I am pleased to see that in terms of the most recordings, the "A"
number one composer is..."Anonymous."
You shouldn't rest until you've acquired some Albrechtsberger, especially the
performance of his concerto for jew's harp on Orfeo.

Simon
j***@aol.com
2005-06-09 16:06:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Simon Roberts
Post by j***@aol.com
Post by j***@aol.com
I thought it was amusing that we have almost exactly the same number of
"A's" (not counting the recitals/collections). Not all the same,
entries, either: Abrahamsen, Adam, Adams, Ades, Adler, Adolphe, Aho,
Aitken, Akses, Alain, Albeniz, Albert, Albinoni, Alfano, Alfven, Alkan,
Alwyn, Amargos, Amram, H Andriessen, J Andriessen, L Andriessen,
Antheil, Arensky, Argento, Argersinger, Arma, Arnold, Asia, Atterberg.
(d'Albert is a D, for some reason; Adamus, Auber, Auric, and others are
in collections).
I'll bet Ray has other A's. ClassicsToday has reviewed 50 A's.
None of them plays baseball in Oakland.
--Jeff (with apologies to Arriaga)
I should note that there are about 500 "A's" listed at Arkivmusic,
though they include people like Aristophanes and Louis Armstrong. I've
never encountered the vast majority of their names, but this gives us
an idea of how far one must go to be comprehensive. Better to lay claim
to 100 Ma Vlasts, I say.
I am pleased to see that in terms of the most recordings, the "A"
number one composer is..."Anonymous."
You shouldn't rest until you've acquired some Albrechtsberger, especially the
performance of his concerto for jew's harp on Orfeo.
Simon
Oy. This was a piece written for commercial classical radio. Maybe I'll
try some of the organ music...

--Jeff
Robert Briggs
2005-06-08 17:52:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by j***@aol.com
My "A" composers are: Adam, J. Adams, J. L. Adams, Alkan ...
Isn't it ironic that in classical music, the A list isn't really
the A list?
And the B list remains rather good even if you discount J. S. Bach,
Beethoven, and Brahms ...
j***@aol.com
2005-06-08 19:09:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Briggs
Post by j***@aol.com
My "A" composers are: Adam, J. Adams, J. L. Adams, Alkan ...
Isn't it ironic that in classical music, the A list isn't really
the A list?
And the B list remains rather good even if you discount J. S. Bach,
Beethoven, and Brahms ...
True, unless you can't stand the "Busnois" on the Bridge by the Beach,
near the Bolling alley.

--Jeff
Robert Briggs
2005-06-08 20:35:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by j***@aol.com
Post by Robert Briggs
Post by j***@aol.com
Isn't it ironic that in classical music, the A list isn't really
the A list?
And the B list remains rather good even if you discount J. S. Bach,
Beethoven, and Brahms ...
True, unless you can't stand the "Busnois" on the Bridge by the Beach,
near the Bolling alley.
:-)

Without them, we still have several Bachs, Barber, Bartok, Bax, Mr.
Tepper's beloved Berlioz (His 'B' doesn't stand for Berlioz, does it?),
Boulez, Britten, Bruch, Bruckner, and Byrd, several other well-known
names, and quite a few less well-known (to me, at least) names I can
read from this here 2002 Naxos catalogue ...
d***@aol.com
2005-06-08 20:44:35 UTC
Permalink
"From Bix to Buxtehude to Boulez"

Opening (iambic pentameter) line of a poem by James Merrill about the
RCA Victor dog.

-david gable
a***@aol.com
2005-06-08 21:27:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Briggs
Post by j***@aol.com
Post by Robert Briggs
Post by j***@aol.com
Isn't it ironic that in classical music, the A list isn't really
the A list?
And the B list remains rather good even if you discount J. S. Bach,
Beethoven, and Brahms ...
True, unless you can't stand the "Busnois" on the Bridge by the Beach,
near the Bolling alley.
:-)
Without them, we still have several Bachs, Barber, Bartok, Bax, Mr.
Tepper's beloved Berlioz (His 'B' doesn't stand for Berlioz, does it?),
Boulez, Britten, Bruch, Bruckner, and Byrd, several other well-known
names, and quite a few less well-known (to me, at least) names I can
read from this here 2002 Naxos catalogue ...
Only know a few A-list people: Adams: Short Ride in a Fast Machine,
Arriaga's Symphony, William Alwyn, Thomas Arne, and, most memorably,
Richard Addison: ballet Carte Blanche which contains the toughest
xylophone solo I have encountered (so far): 19-bar extremely difficult
solo Prelude, 19-bar extremely difficult solo Postlude.

And I've done a bit of Auber from time to time but probably he doesn't
count either. In any case absolutely none of them were as difficult as
Addison.

A sticking nightmare as they say in the trade....but a fabulous piece
to play. Hang on, is that LL-R-L-RR-LL or should it go L-RR-LL-R-LL?

Kind regards,
Alan M. Watkins
Alan P Dawes
2005-06-09 10:36:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@aol.com
Only know a few A-list people: Adams: Short Ride in a Fast Machine,
Arriaga's Symphony, William Alwyn, Thomas Arne, and, most memorably,
Richard Addison: ballet Carte Blanche which contains the toughest
xylophone solo I have encountered (so far): 19-bar extremely difficult
solo Prelude, 19-bar extremely difficult solo Postlude.
And I've done a bit of Auber from time to time but probably he doesn't
count either. In any case absolutely none of them were as difficult as
Addison.
What no Malcolm Arnold? A couple of years ago my son was performing in one
of his symphonies in Birmingham. Unexpectedly Malcolm Arnold turned up for
the rehearsal in top form cracking jokes and showing no signs of the
depression that he sometimes suffers from. He was particularly
complementary about the horn section that my son plays in.

Any anecdotes about Malcom Arnold.

Best wishes
Alan
--
--. --. --. --. : : --- --- ----------------------------
|_| |_| | _ | | | | |_ | ***@argonet.co.uk
| | |\ | | | | |\| | |
| | | \ |_| |_| | | |__ | Using an Acorn RiscPC
Robert Briggs
2005-06-09 18:39:45 UTC
Permalink
What no Malcolm Arnold? ... [Arnold] was particularly
complementary about the horn section that my son plays in.
ITYM "complimentary".

Or did the great man reach for a spare horn and sit down next to
your son?
Matthew B. Tepper
2005-06-09 19:35:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Briggs
What no Malcolm Arnold? ... [Arnold] was particularly
complementary about the horn section that my son plays in.
ITYM "complimentary".
Or did the great man reach for a spare horn and sit down next to
your son?
Actually, he was a trumpeter.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Take THAT, Daniel Lin, Mark Sadek, James Lin & Christopher Chung!
j***@aol.com
2005-06-09 19:43:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Robert Briggs
What no Malcolm Arnold? ... [Arnold] was particularly
complementary about the horn section that my son plays in.
ITYM "complimentary".
Or did the great man reach for a spare horn and sit down next to
your son?
Actually, he was a trumpeter.
Knowing his music, I'd say his favorite instruments were the trombone
and the piccolo.

--Jeff
Matthew B. Tepper
2005-06-09 23:45:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by j***@aol.com
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Robert Briggs
What no Malcolm Arnold? ... [Arnold] was particularly
complementary about the horn section that my son plays in.
ITYM "complimentary".
Or did the great man reach for a spare horn and sit down next to
your son?
Actually, he was a trumpeter.
Knowing his music, I'd say his favorite instruments were the trombone
and the piccolo.
He does seem to favor them in all his music I've heard, even the symphonies.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Take THAT, Daniel Lin, Mark Sadek, James Lin & Christopher Chung!
Wayne Reimer
2005-06-09 01:18:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Briggs
Post by j***@aol.com
My "A" composers are: Adam, J. Adams, J. L. Adams, Alkan ...
Isn't it ironic that in classical music, the A list isn't really
the A list?
And the B list remains rather good even if you discount J. S. Bach,
Beethoven, and Brahms ...
You're right, it is a good letter. Other favorite letters of mine are
M, P, R, and S. Not that C and T and L are all that bad, really.

wr
Robert Briggs
2005-06-10 17:29:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Wayne Reimer
Post by Robert Briggs
Post by j***@aol.com
My "A" composers are: Adam, J. Adams, J. L. Adams, Alkan ...
Isn't it ironic that in classical music, the A list isn't really
the A list?
And the B list remains rather good even if you discount J. S. Bach,
Beethoven, and Brahms ...
You're right, it is a good letter. Other favorite letters of mine are
M, P, R, and S. Not that C and T and L are all that bad, really.
And W is remarkably good, given its position in the alphabet ...
John Harrington
2005-06-10 18:12:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Briggs
Post by Wayne Reimer
Post by Robert Briggs
Post by j***@aol.com
My "A" composers are: Adam, J. Adams, J. L. Adams, Alkan ...
Isn't it ironic that in classical music, the A list isn't really
the A list?
And the B list remains rather good even if you discount J. S. Bach,
Beethoven, and Brahms ...
You're right, it is a good letter. Other favorite letters of mine are
M, P, R, and S. Not that C and T and L are all that bad, really.
And W is remarkably good, given its position in the alphabet ...
In the last 5 years I've come to view it as the alphabet's most moronic
letter.


J
j***@aol.com
2005-06-10 18:28:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Harrington
In the last 5 years I've come to view it as the alphabet's most moronic
letter.
J
That's the reason I realphabetized and refiled Agner, Olf, Ebern, and
Iena'ski.

--Jeff

Dana Hill
2005-06-07 12:49:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Raymond Hall
I may well have Jeff, with several others here as well, as I don't think I
am that unique. But creating the list is something I perhaps intend to do,
for fun, and for the actual stats. But the actual process ..... painful.
Creating a data base would be the easy way, but yet again, it is starting
the thing off, and actually doing it.
I have neglected my database for well over a year now. I don't know how
many discs I have added in that time, but I get an idea by the number of
Hammermill boxes which were required to move my collection: 11 when I moved
in June 2003; 17 when I moved last month.

At the station we keep up a database, and there are many thousands of discs
there. But that's somebody's job. I pity the jazz people, because they
have no database. They must have very good memories.
Post by Raymond Hall
But it is nice to come across a shelf, and notice a composer that catches
one's eye, and one has completely forgotten about. And the simple fact is,
there are heaps more new composers I have still to add. I really need some
form of hiatus, whereby I can do some serious catching up on listening.
I was about to suggest buying a house, moving and getting married all in a
60 day period, since that has been working for me. But since you want to
increase listening, I have found the only way is to go through a really poor
period. With no money to buy, you become better acquainted with what you
already have.
--
Dana Hill
Gainesville, Florida
Photography: www.danajohnhill.com
Personal: www.danajohnhill.org
d***@aol.com
2005-06-07 18:01:37 UTC
Permalink
Dana,

What are Hammermill boxes? Are they ideal for packing CD's for moving?

-david gable
Dana Hill
2005-06-08 18:04:01 UTC
Permalink
David,

Hammermill makes the office paper that we get around here. Here's a picture
of the box:

Loading Image...

I suppose that every brand of office paper comes in the same box, though.
They pack ten reams to the case, and the boxes are especially ideal for
packing CDs. Essentially, I pack two rows of CDs spine-up (so I can read
the labels if I need to leave them in the boxes for a while) going down the
box. On top of those I place any box sets with slipcases flat on their
backs. I can fit about 12 box sets (of opera proportions; bigger sets of
more than two double-jewel cases take more space) on top of the CDs sitting
on their spines. Naturally I wound up with many left over after I had
packed all my slipcase-free discs. So I use additional boxes for those, and
placed them gently inside on their backs. Here's a diagram I made:

Loading Image...

I think after packing my whole collection, (c. 2,000 discs), I ended up
having two or three boxes which were solely box sets in slipcases. The rest
were the jewelcases packed spine up with box sets with slipcases placed
gently on top.

The main benefits of these boxes--aside from allowing everything to fit
nice--is that they have handy lids which help put most of the weight on the
side walls of the boxes when stacked, as opposed to on the contents. Still,
I don't stack them more than three high, just to be on the safe side. Best
of all, you can't pack so many CDs in them that they become prohibitively
heavy.

You can get them from any office supply store if you need that much paper.
Or, you might try asking at a Kinko's or something. They probably go
through twenty or more of those boxes in a couple days, and if you agree to
come by at the right time you might catch them before they flatten them.

I've moved my CDs several times with these kind of boxes and they are super.

Good luck. I know moving is awful.
--
Dana Hill
Gainesville, Florida
Photography: www.danajohnhill.com
Personal: www.danajohnhill.org
Post by d***@aol.com
Dana,
What are Hammermill boxes? Are they ideal for packing CD's for moving?
-david gable
j***@aol.com
2005-06-08 00:11:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dana Hill
Post by Raymond Hall
I may well have Jeff, with several others here as well, as I don't think I
am that unique. But creating the list is something I perhaps intend to do,
for fun, and for the actual stats. But the actual process ..... painful.
Creating a data base would be the easy way, but yet again, it is starting
the thing off, and actually doing it.
I have neglected my database for well over a year now. I don't know how
many discs I have added in that time, but I get an idea by the number of
Hammermill boxes which were required to move my collection: 11 when I moved
in June 2003; 17 when I moved last month.
At the station we keep up a database, and there are many thousands of discs
there. But that's somebody's job. I pity the jazz people, because they
have no database. They must have very good memories.
Post by Raymond Hall
But it is nice to come across a shelf, and notice a composer that catches
one's eye, and one has completely forgotten about. And the simple fact is,
there are heaps more new composers I have still to add. I really need some
form of hiatus, whereby I can do some serious catching up on listening.
I was about to suggest buying a house, moving and getting married all in a
60 day period, since that has been working for me. But since you want to
increase listening, I have found the only way is to go through a really poor
period. With no money to buy, you become better acquainted with what you
already have.
Congratulations!

Now, all you need to do is get the CIA to take a look at your website.
With their image enhancement software, they should be able to be able
to update the index from the picture of your media room wall. For
instance, did I not detect the bright reddish Nabucco of Sinopoli?

--Jeff
Matthew B. Tepper
2005-06-08 01:28:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by j***@aol.com
Now, all you need to do is get the CIA to take a look at your website.
With their image enhancement software, they should be able to be able
to update the index from the picture of your media room wall. For
instance, did I not detect the bright reddish Nabucco of Sinopoli?
Haw! It's Dutoit's _Les troyens_!
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Take THAT, Daniel Lin, Mark Sadek, James Lin & Christopher Chung!
j***@aol.com
2005-06-08 02:59:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by j***@aol.com
Now, all you need to do is get the CIA to take a look at your website.
With their image enhancement software, they should be able to be able
to update the index from the picture of your media room wall. For
instance, did I not detect the bright reddish Nabucco of Sinopoli?
Haw! It's Dutoit's _Les troyens_!
But definitely not Jarvi's Mazeppa?

--Jeff
Matthew B. Tepper
2005-06-08 03:46:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by j***@aol.com
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by j***@aol.com
Now, all you need to do is get the CIA to take a look at your website.
With their image enhancement software, they should be able to be able
to update the index from the picture of your media room wall. For
instance, did I not detect the bright reddish Nabucco of Sinopoli?
Haw! It's Dutoit's _Les troyens_!
But definitely not Jarvi's Mazeppa?
Nor Ulf Schirmer's _Maskarade_?

Actually, anyone who chooses to look closely at the photos of my partially-
unpacked collection, once URL'ed (after several false starts) in this
group, will have an idea of some of the items I own. I won't give the URLs
again because of the unaccustomed bile and spite which resulted from my
simple request for assistance in finding more of the exact same shelves.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Take THAT, Daniel Lin, Mark Sadek, James Lin & Christopher Chung!
Dana Hill
2005-06-08 18:30:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by j***@aol.com
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by j***@aol.com
Now, all you need to do is get the CIA to take a look at your website.
With their image enhancement software, they should be able to be able
to update the index from the picture of your media room wall. For
instance, did I not detect the bright reddish Nabucco of Sinopoli?
Haw! It's Dutoit's _Les troyens_!
But definitely not Jarvi's Mazeppa?
Nor Ulf Schirmer's _Maskarade_?
Actually, you can't see my Berlioz shelf (the door's closed), but you can
see Jarvi's Mazeppa near the bottom, next to a blue box (Gergiev's Queen of
Spades). Ulf Schirmer's Nielsen set is behind the middle door beneath my
Mozart shelves. It's pink and yellow with a fancy cut-out on the cover that
requires extra care, not unlike Abbado's DG Pelleas.

I think the easiest sets to identify in that picture are Jochum's DG
Bruckner, Rousset's Couperin, Boulez' Lulu, Bilson/Gardiner's Mozart Piano
Concerti, all of the Gardelli Verdi, Bernstein's Tristan and Solti's Ring
and Dorati's Haydn Symphonies (alas I don't have the operas).
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Actually, anyone who chooses to look closely at the photos of my partially-
unpacked collection, once URL'ed (after several false starts) in this
group, will have an idea of some of the items I own. I won't give the URLs
again because of the unaccustomed bile and spite which resulted from my
simple request for assistance in finding more of the exact same shelves.
I'd be interested in seeing other people's collections.
--
Dana Hill
Gainesville, Florida
Photography: www.danajohnhill.com
Personal: www.danajohnhill.org
Matthew B. Tepper
2005-06-08 19:35:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dana Hill
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by j***@aol.com
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by j***@aol.com
Now, all you need to do is get the CIA to take a look at your
website. With their image enhancement software, they should be able
to be able to update the index from the picture of your media room
wall. For instance, did I not detect the bright reddish Nabucco of
Sinopoli?
Haw! It's Dutoit's _Les troyens_!
But definitely not Jarvi's Mazeppa?
Nor Ulf Schirmer's _Maskarade_?
Actually, you can't see my Berlioz shelf (the door's closed), but you
can see Jarvi's Mazeppa near the bottom, next to a blue box (Gergiev's
Queen of Spades). Ulf Schirmer's Nielsen set is behind the middle door
beneath my Mozart shelves. It's pink and yellow with a fancy cut-out on
the cover that requires extra care, not unlike Abbado's DG Pelleas.
Indeed; I was glad to acquire it shrink-wrapped, and it survived my move last
year having been separately-wrapped before being put into a box.
Post by Dana Hill
I think the easiest sets to identify in that picture are Jochum's DG
Bruckner, Rousset's Couperin, Boulez' Lulu, Bilson/Gardiner's Mozart Piano
Concerti, all of the Gardelli Verdi, Bernstein's Tristan and Solti's Ring
and Dorati's Haydn Symphonies (alas I don't have the operas).
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Actually, anyone who chooses to look closely at the photos of my
partially-unpacked collection, once URL'ed (after several false starts) in
this group, will have an idea of some of the items I own. I won't give
the URLs again because of the unaccustomed bile and spite which resulted
from my simple request for assistance in finding more of the exact same
shelves.
I'd be interested in seeing other people's collections.
I'll certainly want to post pictures of my collection on my Website, but it
will wait until I have those additional needed shelves, which my sister is
going to have custom-built. (She needs some too!) Right now the collection
is double-ganged, and if you want to get to the Gershwin you have to remove
some of the Dvorak and reach back, for example.

I'll also have to get another photographer; the friend who took the pictures
I earlier cited was an undiagnosed diabetic, and died unexpectedly a few
weeks after those photos were taken.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Take THAT, Daniel Lin, Mark Sadek, James Lin & Christopher Chung!
Dana Hill
2005-06-08 18:08:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by j***@aol.com
Now, all you need to do is get the CIA to take a look at your website.
With their image enhancement software, they should be able to be able
to update the index from the picture of your media room wall. For
instance, did I not detect the bright reddish Nabucco of Sinopoli?
Indeed. It's near the far right side of the picture between Karajan's Ballo
and Sinopoli's Forza. After I took that picture I alphabetized them
instead.
--
Dana Hill
Gainesville, Florida
Photography: www.danajohnhill.com
Personal: www.danajohnhill.org
d***@aol.com
2005-06-08 19:08:37 UTC
Permalink
Database? What database?

-david gable
Raymond Hall
2005-06-08 21:59:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by d***@aol.com
Database? What database?
An empty one in my case.

Ray H
Taree
A. Brain
2005-06-09 05:00:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Raymond Hall
Post by d***@aol.com
Database? What database?
An empty one in my case.
I'm listening to a lot of stuff that I did not
even realize I had, along with a huge haul
of Purcell by Robert King that I referred to
here recently. And just ordered some more of
that from Berkshire, including several copies
of Volume 2 Anthems and Services.
--
A. Brain

Remove NOSPAM for email.
j***@aol.com
2005-06-09 05:26:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by A. Brain
Post by Raymond Hall
Post by d***@aol.com
Database? What database?
An empty one in my case.
I'm listening to a lot of stuff that I did not
even realize I had, along with a huge haul
of Purcell by Robert King that I referred to
here recently. And just ordered some more of
that from Berkshire, including several copies
of Volume 2 Anthems and Services.
Hey! Slow down there. Leave some of those Purcell's for the rest of us.
I just got Volume 5 of the Odes and Welcome Songs, plus Parrott's
recording of Te Deum & Jubilate. Great stuff, but I got waylaid by the
disarming fun of Galuppi's La Caduto di Adamo. You can order all the
copies of that you want from Berkshire--it's a great deal at $5.98.

--Jeff
Raymond Hall
2005-06-09 06:27:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by A. Brain
Post by Raymond Hall
Post by d***@aol.com
Database? What database?
An empty one in my case.
I'm listening to a lot of stuff that I did not
even realize I had, along with a huge haul
of Purcell by Robert King that I referred to
here recently. And just ordered some more of
that from Berkshire, including several copies
of Volume 2 Anthems and Services.
Purcell represents a glaring gap in my collection, and I do have a smallish
selection of early music, mostly vocal (Gesualdo, Tallis, Lassus, and the
even earlier Ockeghem), which in the right mood almost persuade one whether
music ever got better. Purcell wrote a fair deal of music too, and I might
make a start with his Fantasias for several numbers of viols, reckoned to be
some pretty profound stuff by scholars. And then there are his songs and
various operas.

Ray H
Taree
d***@aol.com
2005-06-09 07:07:39 UTC
Permalink
Ray,

I'd be curious what Lassus you have.

-david gable
Raymond Hall
2005-06-09 08:32:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by d***@aol.com
Ray,
I'd be curious what Lassus you have.
Two Naxois, (1) Le lagrime di San Petro, with Ars Nova, Holten, and (2) the
Oxford Schola Cantorum, Summerly doing Missa bell'amfitrit'alterna, which is
coupled with Missa Hodie Christus by Palestrina. This mass by Lassus is a
must imo, as I remember it as a definite re-listenable, but then so is much
else of early music, and it is just the effort to tear myself away from so
much 20th century stuff, that prevents me. And one other recording of note,
is on an Hyperion twofer (22012), which contain the 9 Lamentations, motets,
a requiem for 4 voices and several other works, with Pro Antiqua, by Mark
Brown and Bruno Turner.

From memory, I was expecting Lassus to hit me for six, but to be honest, I
really found myself turning to Lobo and Cardosa, whose masses pro defunctis,
I found much more moving and appealing. A good CD of this coupling is
Summerly's on Naxos. I mention Lobo and Cordosa, primarily, because they
were born about 20-30 years later than Lassus, and almost contemporaneous.
But the music is gorgeous.

Ray H
Taree
Wayne Reimer
2005-06-07 22:20:48 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
***@aol.com says...
<...>
Post by j***@aol.com
Ray, you should start a thread asking who has the most composers
represented in their classical "holdings". I suspect you have just
about the most, or at least the most _per disc_ of anyone here with a
substantial collection.
And then we need a thread on which disc has been listened to the most,
don't you think? I'd love to find out that someone here has less than
a hundred CDs and they play through their entire collection every month
at least once, and never tire of it.

wr
Simon Roberts
2005-06-08 00:55:25 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@news.sf.sbcglobal.net>, Wayne Reimer
says...
Post by Wayne Reimer
<...>
Post by j***@aol.com
Ray, you should start a thread asking who has the most composers
represented in their classical "holdings". I suspect you have just
about the most, or at least the most _per disc_ of anyone here with a
substantial collection.
And then we need a thread on which disc has been listened to the most,
don't you think?
That's actually a question I can answer - a tie between Karajan's 1975 EMI Missa
Solemnis and the cum sancto spiritu fugue in Rifkin's Bach B Minor Mass (though
as it happens I've not listened to either in a while, and listened to the former
most when it was first released on LP, playing it every day for months on end).

Simon
d***@aol.com
2005-06-08 01:43:16 UTC
Permalink
"That's actually a question I can answer"

I'm pretty sure the single recording I've listened to the most times is
Boulez's first recording of Pli selon pli: on LP, not that I don't have
two different CD reissues of the same recording. Another recording
that's certainly in the running is the Trovatore with Price, Elias,
Tucker, Warren, and Basile.

I can be a bit obsessive/compulsive, so pieces that really do it for me
tend to have been played obscene quantities of times within a
comparatively short span of time. This was even more true when I was
in my teens and twenties.

-david gable
Raymond Hall
2005-06-08 01:52:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by d***@aol.com
"That's actually a question I can answer"
I'm pretty sure the single recording I've listened to the most times is
Boulez's first recording of Pli selon pli: on LP, not that I don't have
two different CD reissues of the same recording. Another recording
that's certainly in the running is the Trovatore with Price, Elias,
Tucker, Warren, and Basile.
I can be a bit obsessive/compulsive, so pieces that really do it for me
tend to have been played obscene quantities of times within a
comparatively short span of time. This was even more true when I was
in my teens and twenties.
I'm exactly the same by nature. I tend to exhaust the newer recordings over
a short span of time. Goodness knows what percentage of recordings on my
shelves I turn to again. I dread to think really, because I am always
turning to the newly bought stuff.

Once again, a slightly obsessive/compulsive nature could be the reason.

Ray H
Taree
j***@aol.com
2005-06-08 03:01:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Wayne Reimer
<...>
Post by j***@aol.com
Ray, you should start a thread asking who has the most composers
represented in their classical "holdings". I suspect you have just
about the most, or at least the most _per disc_ of anyone here with a
substantial collection.
And then we need a thread on which disc has been listened to the most,
don't you think? I'd love to find out that someone here has less than
a hundred CDs and they play through their entire collection every month
at least once, and never tire of it.
wr
By dint of early purchase (going back to the lps) and deep attachment,
Solti's first Mahler 5 is probably the recording I've listened to the
most. His second Mahler 5 is actually high up on the list too.
Toscanini's NYPSO Beethoven 7 is somewhere up there as well. So is
Fennell/Cleveland Symphonic Winds playing Holst and Lipatti's recording
of the Chopin Waltzes (which I still haven't gotten on CD, for some
reason).

--Jeff
d***@aol.com
2005-06-08 05:50:44 UTC
Permalink
"By dint of early purchase (going back to the lps) and deep attachment,
Solti's first Mahler 5 is probably the recording I've listened to the
most."

Many of the recordings I've listened to the most times are recordings
that have been superceded in my affections. I played Toscanini's NBC
SO recording of the Eroica to death in my teens, and I still like it.
It's just that there are quite a few recordings of the Eroica that I
like rather more. But I was no longer in my
listening-to-the-Eroica-at-least-ten-times-a-week period when I
discovered these other performances.

-david gable
j***@aol.com
2005-06-08 06:14:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by d***@aol.com
"By dint of early purchase (going back to the lps) and deep attachment,
Solti's first Mahler 5 is probably the recording I've listened to the
most."
Many of the recordings I've listened to the most times are recordings
that have been superceded in my affections. I played Toscanini's NBC
SO recording of the Eroica to death in my teens, and I still like it.
It's just that there are quite a few recordings of the Eroica that I
like rather more. But I was no longer in my
listening-to-the-Eroica-at-least-ten-times-a-week period when I
discovered these other performances.
-david gable
Exactly. I know every scratch on that lp of Toscanini's Beethoven 7th.
I heard it over and over for years--it was my only 7th for close to a
decade--but not anymore. I have listened to it maybe twice in the last
ten years.

--Jeff
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