Discussion:
Which literary work has inspired the most musical works?
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dk
2021-01-25 10:10:36 UTC
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This is not a quiz -- I don't know the answer.

TIA

dk
Henk vT
2021-01-25 11:05:47 UTC
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Post by dk
This is not a quiz -- I don't know the answer.
I don't know either, but the bible still seems to inspire composers. Another candidate is Goethe's Faust.

Henk
Bob Harper
2021-01-25 18:32:12 UTC
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Post by Henk vT
Post by dk
This is not a quiz -- I don't know the answer.
I don't know either, but the bible still seems to inspire composers. Another candidate is Goethe's Faust.
Henk
The Ordinary of the Roman Rite Mass seems to me a pretty good guess.

Bob Harper
dk
2021-01-25 20:15:22 UTC
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Post by Bob Harper
Post by Henk vT
Post by dk
This is not a quiz -- I don't know the answer.
I don't know either, but the bible still seems to inspire composers. Another candidate is Goethe's Faust.
The Ordinary of the Roman Rite Mass seems to me a pretty good guess.
Thanks! Can you provide some examples?

BTW I would not consider masses to be
"literary works". Who is/are the authors?
Who/is are the copyright owners?

dk
Graham
2021-01-25 21:17:54 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by Bob Harper
Post by Henk vT
Post by dk
This is not a quiz -- I don't know the answer.
I don't know either, but the bible still seems to inspire composers. Another candidate is Goethe's Faust.
The Ordinary of the Roman Rite Mass seems to me a pretty good guess.
Thanks! Can you provide some examples?
BTW I would not consider masses to be
"literary works". Who is/are the authors?
Who/is are the copyright owners?
dk
The texts are ancient, and certainly predate the modern concept of
copyright.
For authors, I ould refer you to
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ordinary_(liturgy), and further to the
articles on the various sections.
Bob Harper
Didn't the 19C Vatican condemn new settings of the Requiem?
dk
2021-01-25 21:55:14 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by Bob Harper
Post by Henk vT
Post by dk
This is not a quiz -- I don't know the answer.
I don't know either, but the bible still seems to inspire composers. Another candidate is Goethe's Faust.
The Ordinary of the Roman Rite Mass seems to me a pretty good guess.
Thanks! Can you provide some examples?
BTW I would not consider masses to be
"literary works". Who is/are the authors?
Who/is are the copyright owners?
The texts are ancient, and certainly predate the modern concept of
copyright. For authors, I ould refer you to
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ordinary_(liturgy), and further to the
articles on the various sections.
The texts predate the concept of "art".

dk
number_six
2021-01-25 22:49:34 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Bob Harper
Post by Henk vT
Post by dk
This is not a quiz -- I don't know the answer.
I don't know either, but the bible still seems to inspire composers. Another candidate is Goethe's Faust.
The Ordinary of the Roman Rite Mass seems to me a pretty good guess.
Thanks! Can you provide some examples?
BTW I would not consider masses to be
"literary works". Who is/are the authors?
Who/is are the copyright owners?
The texts are ancient, and certainly predate the modern concept of
copyright. For authors, I ould refer you to
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ordinary_(liturgy), and further to the
articles on the various sections.
The texts predate the concept of "art".
dk
You're the OP here, and can define art as you please for purposes of your own query.

i prefer a broader usage myself. Dance, singing, storytelling and ornamentation are universal, and as such are likely to have been already present in the ancestral population from whom we're all descended. Under that usage, art predates text.
dk
2021-01-25 23:03:05 UTC
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Post by number_six
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Bob Harper
Post by Henk vT
Post by dk
This is not a quiz -- I don't know the answer.
I don't know either, but the bible still seems to inspire composers. Another candidate is Goethe's Faust.
The Ordinary of the Roman Rite Mass seems to me a pretty good guess.
Thanks! Can you provide some examples?
BTW I would not consider masses to be
"literary works". Who is/are the authors?
Who/is are the copyright owners?
The texts are ancient, and certainly predate the modern concept of
copyright. For authors, I ould refer you to
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ordinary_(liturgy), and further to the
articles on the various sections.
The texts predate the concept of "art".
You're the OP here, and can define art as you please for purposes of your own query.
Of course, however I do not want to abuse the "power of the OP"! ;-)
Post by number_six
i prefer a broader usage myself. Dance, singing, storytelling and
ornamentation are universal, and as such are likely to have been
already present in the ancestral population from whom we're all
descended. Under that usage, art predates text.
Art certainly predates text, however the concept of "art" does not. I
consider intent as defining. To my ears and eyes, any work written
with a manifest social/political/religious intent is not "art".

dk
number_six
2021-01-26 16:16:02 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by number_six
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Bob Harper
Post by Henk vT
Post by dk
This is not a quiz -- I don't know the answer.
I don't know either, but the bible still seems to inspire composers. Another candidate is Goethe's Faust.
The Ordinary of the Roman Rite Mass seems to me a pretty good guess.
Thanks! Can you provide some examples?
BTW I would not consider masses to be
"literary works". Who is/are the authors?
Who/is are the copyright owners?
The texts are ancient, and certainly predate the modern concept of
copyright. For authors, I ould refer you to
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ordinary_(liturgy), and further to the
articles on the various sections.
The texts predate the concept of "art".
You're the OP here, and can define art as you please for purposes of your own query.
Of course, however I do not want to abuse the "power of the OP"! ;-)
Post by number_six
i prefer a broader usage myself. Dance, singing, storytelling and
ornamentation are universal, and as such are likely to have been
already present in the ancestral population from whom we're all
descended. Under that usage, art predates text.
Art certainly predates text, however the concept of "art" does not. I
consider intent as defining. To my ears and eyes, any work written
with a manifest social/political/religious intent is not "art".
dk
There goes Rzewski's variations on The People United, I guess...?
dk
2021-01-26 16:28:58 UTC
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Post by number_six
Post by dk
Post by number_six
i prefer a broader usage myself. Dance, singing, storytelling and
ornamentation are universal, and as such are likely to have been
already present in the ancestral population from whom we're all
descended. Under that usage, art predates text.
Art certainly predates text, however the concept of "art" does not. I
consider intent as defining. To my ears and eyes, any work written
with a manifest social/political/religious intent is not "art".
There goes Rzewski's variations on The People United, I guess...?
No need to guess. I stated many times in this ng
that I consider Rzewski to be toxic trash.

dk
number_six
2021-01-26 17:00:51 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by number_six
Post by dk
Post by number_six
i prefer a broader usage myself. Dance, singing, storytelling and
ornamentation are universal, and as such are likely to have been
already present in the ancestral population from whom we're all
descended. Under that usage, art predates text.
Art certainly predates text, however the concept of "art" does not. I
consider intent as defining. To my ears and eyes, any work written
with a manifest social/political/religious intent is not "art".
There goes Rzewski's variations on The People United, I guess...?
No need to guess. I stated many times in this ng
that I consider Rzewski to be toxic trash.
dk
He gets a more sympathetic hearing from me.
But without strongly held opinions, this forum wouldn't flourish.
Todd Michel McComb
2021-01-26 19:47:09 UTC
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Post by dk
Art certainly predates text, however the concept of "art" does not.
Interesting declaration.... In any case, the concept of "art"
certainly predates the text of the Mass Ordinary. Unless you want
to say that e.g. Aristotle had no concept of art....

(There remain controversies in archeology on this point, but there
seems to be a developing consensus that religious ritual developed
-- at least on many occasions -- out of artistic enclaves. You can
read such a discussion from the aesthetics side in e.g. Steyerl....)
Post by dk
To my ears and eyes, any work written with a manifest
social/political/religious intent is not "art".
What a silly statement. And this notion of "useless art" that you
seem to be channeling... one of the most perverse notions of the
toxic Western philosophy. So if you want to say that Aristotle had
no concept of art, I actually won't argue.
Frank Berger
2021-02-01 22:50:32 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by number_six
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Bob Harper
Post by Henk vT
Post by dk
This is not a quiz -- I don't know the answer.
I don't know either, but the bible still seems to inspire composers. Another candidate is Goethe's Faust.
The Ordinary of the Roman Rite Mass seems to me a pretty good guess.
Thanks! Can you provide some examples?
BTW I would not consider masses to be
"literary works". Who is/are the authors?
Who/is are the copyright owners?
The texts are ancient, and certainly predate the modern concept of
copyright. For authors, I ould refer you to
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ordinary_(liturgy), and further to the
articles on the various sections.
The texts predate the concept of "art".
You're the OP here, and can define art as you please for purposes of your own query.
Of course, however I do not want to abuse the "power of the OP"! ;-)
Post by number_six
i prefer a broader usage myself. Dance, singing, storytelling and
ornamentation are universal, and as such are likely to have been
already present in the ancestral population from whom we're all
descended. Under that usage, art predates text.
Art certainly predates text, however the concept of "art" does not. I
consider intent as defining. To my ears and eyes, any work written
with a manifest social/political/religious intent is not "art".
dk
Random amateur musings:

What is the "intent" of, say, a portrait of Madonna and
child? Seems to me art is almost independent of the subject
matter. Suppose you write an instruction manual in rhyme.
Does that make it art? How about "Zen and the Art of
Motorcycle Maintenance?" Is it literature? Art? It has
aspects of art. Does the purpose of art have to be to
instill some emotional response that would be impossible in
an instruction manual to do even if it rhymes?

Re: the bible. The fact (according to secular scholars)
that different parts were written by different people or
that the whole of any work was "written by committee" has
nothing to do with whether it or any part of it is
literature. Wikipedia has entries (which I have not read)
for "Collaborative Fiction" and "Collaborative Poetry."

Frank Berger
2021-01-26 00:33:18 UTC
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Post by number_six
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Bob Harper
Post by Henk vT
Post by dk
This is not a quiz -- I don't know the answer.
I don't know either, but the bible still seems to inspire composers. Another candidate is Goethe's Faust.
The Ordinary of the Roman Rite Mass seems to me a pretty good guess.
Thanks! Can you provide some examples?
BTW I would not consider masses to be
"literary works". Who is/are the authors?
Who/is are the copyright owners?
The texts are ancient, and certainly predate the modern concept of
copyright. For authors, I ould refer you to
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ordinary_(liturgy), and further to the
articles on the various sections.
The texts predate the concept of "art".
dk
You're the OP here, and can define art as you please for purposes of your own query.
i prefer a broader usage myself. Dance, singing, storytelling and ornamentation are universal, and as such are likely to have been already present in the ancestral population from whom we're all descended. Under that usage, art predates text.
Taking a purely secular view, I would guess the first
artistic was more or less concurrent with the first
religious thought. Surely there were religious oral
traditions that preceded writing.
number_six
2021-01-26 16:19:52 UTC
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Post by Frank Berger
Post by number_six
Post by dk
Post by dk
Post by Bob Harper
Post by Henk vT
Post by dk
This is not a quiz -- I don't know the answer.
I don't know either, but the bible still seems to inspire composers. Another candidate is Goethe's Faust.
The Ordinary of the Roman Rite Mass seems to me a pretty good guess.
Thanks! Can you provide some examples?
BTW I would not consider masses to be
"literary works". Who is/are the authors?
Who/is are the copyright owners?
The texts are ancient, and certainly predate the modern concept of
copyright. For authors, I ould refer you to
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ordinary_(liturgy), and further to the
articles on the various sections.
The texts predate the concept of "art".
dk
You're the OP here, and can define art as you please for purposes of your own query.
i prefer a broader usage myself. Dance, singing, storytelling and ornamentation are universal, and as such are likely to have been already present in the ancestral population from whom we're all descended. Under that usage, art predates text.
Taking a purely secular view, I would guess the first
artistic was more or less concurrent with the first
religious thought. Surely there were religious oral
traditions that preceded writing.
Yes, probably by tens of thousands of years -- at least.
Owen
2021-01-26 16:37:33 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by Bob Harper
Post by Henk vT
Post by dk
This is not a quiz -- I don't know the answer.
I don't know either, but the bible still seems to inspire composers. Another candidate is Goethe's Faust.
The Ordinary of the Roman Rite Mass seems to me a pretty good guess.
Thanks! Can you provide some examples?
BTW I would not consider masses to be
"literary works". Who is/are the authors?
Who/is are the copyright owners?
God is my copyright holder!

-Owen
Herman
2021-01-29 12:31:37 UTC
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Post by dk
BTW I would not consider masses to be
"literary works". Who is/are the authors?
Who/is are the copyright owners?
dk
Dante is not copyrighted, so it's no literary text?

A modern book, published under pseudonym, like the insanely successful Elena Ferrante series, would not be a literary text, because there is no telling who is the author, and whether he / she works alone, or whether it's really a couple?

Sophocles 'Electra' - no copyright.
dk
2021-01-25 20:24:29 UTC
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Post by Henk vT
Post by dk
This is not a quiz -- I don't know the answer.
I don't know either, but the bible still seems to inspire composers. Another candidate is Goethe's Faust.
I found a rather surprising number of works inspired by Dante's
Francesca da Rimini story. From the Wikipedia, which rather
curiously groups opera with theatre rather than with music:

Music
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, Francesca da Rimini, symphonic poem (1876)
Arthur Foote, Symphonic Prologue Francesca da Rimini, Op. 24 (1890)
Antonio Bazzini, Francesca da Rimini, Symphonic Poem, Op. 77 (Berlin 1890)
Pierre Maurice, Francesca da Rimini, Symphonic Poem, Op. 6 (1899)
Paul von Klenau, Francesca da Rimini, Symphonic Poem (1913, revised 1919)
Olga Gorelli, Paolo e Francesca, guitar duo from the album Hausmusik. 20th Century Chamber Music for the Home (2000)
Mediæval Bæbes, "The Circle of the Lustful" from The Rose album (2002)

Theatre and opera
Feliciano Strepponi, Francesca da Rimini, opera in two acts, libretto by Felice Romani (Padua 1823)
Luigi Carlini, Francesca da Rimini, opera in two acts, libretto by Felice Romani (Naples 1825)
Saverio Mercadante, Francesca da Rimini, opera (Madrid 1831)
Pietro Generali, Francesca da Rimini, opera, libretto by Paolo Pola (Venice 1828)
Gaetano Quilici, Francesca da Rimini, opera in two acts, libretto by Felice Romani (Lucca 1829)
Giuseppe Staffa, Francesca da Rimini, opera in two acts, libretto by Felice Romani (Naples 1831)
Giuseppe Fournier-Gorre, Francesca da Rimini, opera in two acts, libretto by Felice Romani (Livorno 1832)
Giuseppe Tamburini, Francesca da Rimini, opera in three acts, libretto by Felice Romani (Rimini 1835)
Francesco Morlacchi, Francesca da Rimini, opera (composed for Venice 1836, but unperformed)
Emanuele Borgatta, Francesca da Rimini, opera in three acts, libretto by Felice Romani (Genoa 1837)
Gioacchino Maglioni, Francesca da Rimini, opera (Genoa 1840)
Eugen Nordal (pseudonym of Johann Arnold-Gruber), Francesca da Rimini, opera after Paolo Pola (Linz 1840; performed posthumously)
Salvatore Papparlado, Francesca da Rimini, opera in four acts (Genoa 1840; unperformed)
Francesco Cannetti, Francesca da Rimini, opera, libretto by Felice Romani (Vicenza 1843)
Vincenzo Sassaroli, Francesca da Rimini, opera, libretto by Felice Romani (Catania 1846)
Giovanni Franchini, Francesca da Rimini, opera in three acts, libretto by Felice Romani (Lisbon 1857)
Giuseppe Marcarini, Francesca da Rimini, opera, libretto by Benvenuti (Piacenza 1870)
Hermann Goetz, Francesca von Rimini, opera in three acts, libretto by the composer (Mannheim 1877; overture and act III completed by Ernst Frank)
Antonio Cagnoni, Francesca da Rimini, opera in four acts, libretto by Antonio Ghislanzoni (Turin 1878)
Ambroise Thomas, Françoise de Rimini, opera (Paris 1882)
Antonio Scontrino, Francesca da Rimini, "tragedia" (in fact an opera) in five acts, libretto after D'Annunzio (Rome 1901)
Eduard Nápravník, Francesca da Rimini, opera (St. Petersburg 1902)
Sergei Rachmaninoff, Francesca da Rimini, opera in four acts, libretto by Modest Tchaikovsky (Moscow 1906)
Luigi Mancinelli, Paolo e Francesca, opera in one act (1907)[8]
Emil Ábrányi, Paolo és Francesca, opera in three acts, libretto after Dante by Emil Ábrányi, Sr. (Budapest 1912)
Franco Leoni, Francesca da Rimini, opera in three tableaux, based on Crawford's play (Paris 1914, Opéra-Comique)
Primo Riccitelli, Francesca da Rimini, opera
Riccardo Zandonai, Francesca da Rimini, opera in four acts, libretto by Tito Ricordi, based on D'Annunzio (Turin 1914)

This beats Faust by a mile:

Operatic
Mefistofele, the only completed opera by Arrigo Boito
Doktor Faust, begun by Ferruccio Busoni and completed by his pupil Philipp Jarnach
Faust, by Charles Gounod to a French libretto by Jules Barbier and Michel Carré from Carré's play Faust et Marguerite, in turn loosely based on Goethe's Faust, Part 1
Faust (Spohr), one of the earliest operatic adaptations of the story, with separate versions premiering in 1816 and 1852 respectively.
Hector Berlioz's La Damnation de Faust (1846)
Symphonic
Faust Overture by Richard Wagner
Scenes from Goethe's Faust by Robert Schumann
Faust Symphony by Franz Liszt
Symphony No. 8 by Gustav Mahler
Histoire du soldat by Igor Stravinsky

Makes one wonder ......

dk
Herman
2021-01-25 20:40:10 UTC
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Bob is probably right in that liturgical texts like the Mass are at the top.
dk
2021-01-25 20:57:18 UTC
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Post by Herman
Bob is probably right in that liturgical texts like the Mass are at the top.
I do not consider liturgical texts (or in fact the writings of any religion) to
be literary works of art, as they were clearly written by "committees" over
time. My apologies if anyone finds this offensive.

dk
Andy Evans
2021-01-25 21:07:38 UTC
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The telephone book....

Sammy Cahn, when asked which came first—music or lyrics—reputedly used to answer, "The phone call...."
number_six
2021-01-25 21:32:41 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by Herman
Bob is probably right in that liturgical texts like the Mass are at the top.
I do not consider liturgical texts (or in fact the writings of any religion) to
be literary works of art, as they were clearly written by "committees" over
time. My apologies if anyone finds this offensive.
dk
Would you exclude the Vedas, the Ramayana, etc?

These -- and other ancient texts -- certainly have a boundless legacy of related musical expression...

I do not exclude the possibility of literature by committee, but agree it's not the usual outcome.
dk
2021-01-25 21:45:17 UTC
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Post by number_six
Post by dk
Post by Herman
Bob is probably right in that liturgical texts like the Mass are at the top.
I do not consider liturgical texts (or in fact the writings of any religion) to
be literary works of art, as they were clearly written by "committees" over
time. My apologies if anyone finds this offensive.
Would you exclude the Vedas, the Ramayana, etc?
Yes.
Post by number_six
These -- and other ancient texts -- certainly have a boundless legacy of
related musical expression...
No single author, and written for social/religious purposes. Not written as "art".
Post by number_six
I do not exclude the possibility of literature by committee, but agree it's
not the usual outcome.
All traditional religious texts were written over many years "by committees".

dk
Henk vT
2021-01-26 07:54:53 UTC
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Post by dk
I found a rather surprising number of works inspired by Dante's
Francesca da Rimini story. From the Wikipedia, which rather
...
It seems so. An interesting overview, btw.

Henk
gggg gggg
2021-01-26 18:43:26 UTC
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Post by Henk vT
Post by dk
This is not a quiz -- I don't know the answer.
I don't know either, but the bible still seems to inspire composers. Another candidate is Goethe's Faust.
Henk
Have any musical works been inspired by Marlowe's or Mann's "Faust"?
gggg gggg
2021-01-26 18:58:30 UTC
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Post by Henk vT
Post by dk
This is not a quiz -- I don't know the answer.
I don't know either, but the bible still seems to inspire composers. Another candidate is Goethe's Faust.
Musical adaptations of "Faust":

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faust#Musical_adaptations
Mandryka
2021-01-25 13:23:56 UTC
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Post by dk
This is not a quiz -- I don't know the answer.
TIA
dk
I’ve been collecting works influenced by Samuel Beckett on this thread, there are a lot of them, and they are works of music.

https://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,30172.0.html
Mandryka
2021-01-25 13:27:10 UTC
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Post by Mandryka
Post by dk
This is not a quiz -- I don't know the answer.
TIA
dk
I’ve been collecting works influenced by Samuel Beckett on this thread, there are a lot of them, and they are works of music.
https://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,30172.0.html
I think Ancient Greek myths, Homeric and otherwise, must be a candidate. I once did some investigation into the Achilles myths in music and I found that there are a huge quantity of Achilles based operas, all completely forgotten, mostly from the 17th and 18th centuries.
Mandryka
2021-01-25 13:30:12 UTC
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Post by Mandryka
Post by Mandryka
Post by dk
This is not a quiz -- I don't know the answer.
TIA
dk
I’ve been collecting works influenced by Samuel Beckett on this thread, there are a lot of them, and they are works of music.
https://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,30172.0.html
I think Ancient Greek myths, Homeric and otherwise, must be a candidate. I once did some investigation into the Achilles myths in music and I found that there are a huge quantity of Achilles based operas, all completely forgotten, mostly from the 17th and 18th centuries.
Oh I forgot to say that one of the reasons why Achilles was a popular subject was that there’s a gender bending story about him. Basically his mum had him disguised as a girl when he was a teenager to protect him from his dad. This seemed to really inspire 17th century composers, for some reason.
gggg gggg
2021-01-25 16:28:45 UTC
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Post by dk
This is not a quiz -- I don't know the answer.
TIA
dk
What about ARMIDA?:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armida#In_opera
John Fowler
2021-01-25 17:56:07 UTC
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Post by gggg gggg
Post by dk
This is not a quiz -- I don't know the answer.
TIA
dk
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armida#In_opera
The Bible
Sol L. Siegel
2021-01-28 19:49:29 UTC
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Post by dk
This is not a quiz -- I don't know the answer.
TIA
dk
I don't know either. But how many iterations of Romeo & Juliet have
there been?
--
- Sol L. Siegel, Philadelphia, PA USA
--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
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dk
2021-01-29 04:21:31 UTC
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Post by Sol L. Siegel
Post by dk
This is not a quiz -- I don't know the answer.
I don't know either. But how many iterations of Romeo & Juliet have
there been?
Wikipedia claims "at least 24 operas".

dk
Chris J.
2021-01-29 09:18:48 UTC
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Post by Sol L. Siegel
Post by dk
This is not a quiz -- I don't know the answer.
I don't know either. But how many iterations of Romeo & Juliet have
there been?
"Jerusalem Delivered, also known as The Liberation of Jerusalem (Italian:
La Gerusalemme liberata), is an epic poem by the Italian poet Torquato
Tasso, first published in 1581"
Wikipedia lists 48 operas and other musical works based on this literary
work:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerusalem_Delivered#Music_and_operas

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Operas_based_on_literature

Other subject: fictional literature featuring opera.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_fictional_literature_featuring_opera

As to the bible, it's a collection of books, the vast majority of which
don't qualify as literary works (i.e. art) in my opinion.


Chris
Bob Harper
2021-01-29 17:39:52 UTC
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On 1/29/21 1:18 AM, Chris J. wrote:
(snip)
Post by Chris J.
As to the bible, it's a collection of books, the vast majority of which
don't qualify as literary works (i.e. art) in my opinion.
Chris
That's certainly correct, although at least two--Job and the Song of
Songs--are certainly literature, as arguably are many of the Psalms. But
one must remember that the purpose was never literary production, but
something rather more important :).

Bob Harper
Henk vT
2021-01-29 18:56:55 UTC
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Post by Bob Harper
That's certainly correct, although at least two--Job and the Song of
Songs--are certainly literature, as arguably are many of the Psalms. But
one must remember that the purpose was never literary production, but
something rather more important :).
<g> Literature as a pastime for authors and readers and a dubious source of income for publishers. Without the gravitas of (ancient) myths, legends, rituals, and codes of behaviour. A tempting view ...

Henk
Frank Berger
2021-01-29 20:18:15 UTC
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Post by Henk vT
Post by Bob Harper
That's certainly correct, although at least two--Job and the Song of
Songs--are certainly literature, as arguably are many of the Psalms. But
one must remember that the purpose was never literary production, but
something rather more important :).
<g> Literature as a pastime for authors and readers and a dubious source of income for publishers. Without the gravitas of (ancient) myths, legends, rituals, and codes of behaviour. A tempting view ...
Henk
Want to try that again?
Henk vT
2021-01-29 21:54:11 UTC
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Post by Frank Berger
Want to try that again?
Perhaps. If I knew what "that" was ...

Henk
Frank Berger
2021-01-29 20:19:18 UTC
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Post by Bob Harper
(snip)
Post by Chris J.
As to the bible, it's a collection of books, the vast
majority of which
don't qualify as literary works (i.e. art) in my opinion.
Chris
That's certainly correct, although at least two--Job and the
Song of Songs--are certainly literature, as arguably are
many of the Psalms. But one must remember that the purpose
was never literary production, but something rather more
important :).
Bob Harper
You mean control of the masses?
Bob Harper
2021-01-29 22:16:31 UTC
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Post by Frank Berger
Post by Bob Harper
(snip)
Post by Chris J.
As to the bible, it's a collection of books, the vast majority of which
don't qualify as literary works (i.e. art) in my opinion.
Chris
That's certainly correct, although at least two--Job and the Song of
Songs--are certainly literature, as arguably are many of the Psalms.
But one must remember that the purpose was never literary production,
but something rather more important :).
Bob Harper
You mean control of the masses?
Now Frank, I think you of all people should have a good idea of what I
mean :).

Bob Harper
Tassilo
2021-01-31 22:14:14 UTC
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Romeo and Juliet? Faust?
Post by dk
This is not a quiz -- I don't know the answer.
TIA
dk
dk
2021-02-01 21:26:33 UTC
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Post by Tassilo
Romeo and Juliet? Faust?
Post by dk
This is not a quiz -- I don't know the answer.
If you refer back to the original post, it includes a
list of 5 symphonic poems and 28 operas inspired by
Francesca da Rimini, courtesy of the Wikipedia. For
Romeo and Juliet, the Wikipedia claims "at least 24"
operas, without providing a detailed list. For Faust
the Wikipedia lists 5 operas and 6 symphonies or tone
poems.

dk
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