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Help me with this elegiac music?
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Precious Roy
2020-09-09 00:07:04 UTC
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Please ... At 43:35. This is "The First World War" BBC documentary. I know this music but can't remember what it is!


Precious Roy
2020-09-09 00:24:30 UTC
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Please ... At 43:35. This is "The First World War" BBC documentary. I know this music but can't remember what it is!
http://youtu.be/3tNft7sv-Zo
Is it a piece of the Enigma Variations?
Mark Melson
2020-09-09 00:56:46 UTC
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Post by Precious Roy
Please ... At 43:35. This is "The First World War" BBC documentary. I know this music but can't remember what it is!
http://youtu.be/3tNft7sv-Zo
Is it a piece of the Enigma Variations?
The closing credits attribute the title music to "Cecil Coles, 1888-1918." My guess is that Cecil was killed in that war.

Mark M
msw design
2020-09-09 03:47:55 UTC
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Post by Precious Roy
Is it a piece of the Enigma Variations?
I thought that was going to be hard. Yes, Enigma.


Kerrison
2020-09-10 16:41:42 UTC
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Post by msw design
Post by Precious Roy
Is it a piece of the Enigma Variations?
I thought that was going to be hard. Yes, Enigma.
http://youtu.be/sUgoBb8m1eE
Yes, 'Nimrod' from Elgar's "Enigma Variations" is always played at the annual Remembrance Day service in London, marking the deaths of members of the armed forces during the First World War ...


Daniel Pyle
2020-09-10 17:55:28 UTC
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It is a consistent irritant to me that the character of this movement is so misunderstood — a misunderstanding which is perpetuated by otherwise intelligent musicians like Andrew Davis In his dvd-video of the Enigma Variations. Elgar did *not* compose an elegy in this movement. It is a celebration of friendship, a friendship which continued for a decade after the publication of the Variations. It is not sad: it is joyful, it is full of love. Barbirolli got it right, more right than any other, I think. It is much like the way the Adagietto in Mahler’s 5th symphony is willfully distorted, changing a love-song into a funeral dirge.

GGRRRR!

Daniel
Post by Kerrison
Post by msw design
Post by Precious Roy
Is it a piece of the Enigma Variations?
I thought that was going to be hard. Yes, Enigma.
http://youtu.be/sUgoBb8m1eE
Yes, 'Nimrod' from Elgar's "Enigma Variations" is always played at the annual Remembrance Day service in London, marking the deaths of members of the armed forces during the First World War ...
http://youtu.be/O5sX99HODzg
Bob Harper
2020-09-12 05:16:22 UTC
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Post by Daniel Pyle
It is a consistent irritant to me that the character of this movement is so misunderstood — a misunderstanding which is perpetuated by otherwise intelligent musicians like Andrew Davis In his dvd-video of the Enigma Variations. Elgar did *not* compose an elegy in this movement. It is a celebration of friendship, a friendship which continued for a decade after the publication of the Variations. It is not sad: it is joyful, it is full of love. Barbirolli got it right, more right than any other, I think. It is much like the way the Adagietto in Mahler’s 5th symphony is willfully distorted, changing a love-song into a funeral dirge.
GGRRRR!
Daniel
Soooo, tell us what you think of Bernstein's version :).

Bob Harper (ducking)
Kerrison
2020-09-12 07:09:32 UTC
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Post by Bob Harper
It is a consistent irritant to me that the character of this movement is so misunderstood — a misunderstanding which is perpetuated by otherwise intelligent musicians like Andrew Davis In his dvd-video of the Enigma Variations. Elgar did *not* compose an elegy in this movement. It is a celebration of friendship, a friendship which continued for a decade after the publication of the Variations. It is not sad: it is joyful, it is full of love. Barbirolli got it right, more right than any other, I think. It is much like the way the Adagietto in Mahler’s 5th symphony is willfully distorted, changing a love-song into a funeral dirge.
GGRRRR!
Daniel
Soooo, tell us what you think of Bernstein's version :).
Bob Harper (ducking)
Bernstein had terrible trouble with the BBC Symphony in his one concert with them which started with the Enigma Variations. The first rehearsal was filmed and he kept stopping and starting the players and criticizing them until a feeling of mutual antipathy soon arouse. Needless to say his 6-minute "Nimrod" didn't go down well either. The outcome of his stint with the BBC SO was that he let it be known that he never wanted to conduct them again and for their part, the players were only too grateful to know that. Here is the longest ever "Nimrod" ...



And here's Bernstein having problems with the trumpet section ...


John Fowler
2020-09-12 12:45:31 UTC
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I can't help but thinking that Trump was right about World War I.
Bob Harper
2020-09-12 17:10:22 UTC
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Post by John Fowler
I can't help but thinking that Trump was right about World War I.
A good friend whose brother went to West Point and retired as a General
told him that cadets spent 6 weeks studying the campaigns of Lee and
Stonewall Jackson, and only 1 week on WWI. Probably the worst
generalship ever.

Bob Harper
ljk...@aol.com
2020-09-12 18:02:58 UTC
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Post by Bob Harper
Post by John Fowler
I can't help but thinking that Trump was right about World War I.
A good friend whose brother went to West Point and retired as a General
told him that cadets spent 6 weeks studying the campaigns of Lee and
Stonewall Jackson, and only 1 week on WWI. Probably the worst
generalship ever.
Bob Harper
I would say that once the forces were joined in Europe in WWI, the relatively cramped physical nature of the battlefield plus the rise in number of combatants (alf of which led to severe restrictions on maneuver), and the vast increase in the firepower of non-individual weapons (i.e. machine guns, mortars, and artillery) compared to what was available in the Civil War would have rendered the sorts of campaigns that Lee and Jackson had mounted virtually untenable. One still wonders, though, what Lee would have done in place of Haig, Foch et al.
Bob Harper
2020-09-13 04:56:41 UTC
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Post by ***@aol.com
Post by Bob Harper
Post by John Fowler
I can't help but thinking that Trump was right about World War I.
A good friend whose brother went to West Point and retired as a General
told him that cadets spent 6 weeks studying the campaigns of Lee and
Stonewall Jackson, and only 1 week on WWI. Probably the worst
generalship ever.
Bob Harper
I would say that once the forces were joined in Europe in WWI, the relatively cramped physical nature of the battlefield plus the rise in number of combatants (alf of which led to severe restrictions on maneuver), and the vast increase in the firepower of non-individual weapons (i.e. machine guns, mortars, and artillery) compared to what was available in the Civil War would have rendered the sorts of campaigns that Lee and Jackson had mounted virtually untenable. One still wonders, though, what Lee would have done in place of Haig, Foch et al.
You're right, of course, about the far greater lethality of WWI
technology. I suspect Lee and Jackson would have better appreciated the
necessity of maneuver and wold have done much more to prevent the
establishment of the continuous line of trenches from the Swiss border
to the sea. Whether they could have done so we don't know. In any case,
they couldn't have done any worse.

Bob Harper

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