Discussion:
Review: Hilary Hahn Plays an Unabashedly Romantic Bach
Add Reply
Frank Forman
2018-10-29 00:33:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I sure wish I could here them!

Review: Hilary Hahn Plays an Unabashedly Romantic Bach
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/24/arts/music/review-hilary-hahn-bach-lincoln-center.html

Hilary Hahn performed on Tuesday at Alice Tully Hall, Lincoln Center.

By Corinna da Fonseca-Wollheim

Encores have never been an afterthought for Hilary Hahn. In recent
years, this brilliant violinist has commissioned 27 short solo
pieces from as many composers to expand her stash of end-of-concert
treats.

She might have been expected to pick one on Tuesday, when she gave
her first-ever violin-alone recital in New York at Alice Tully Hall
as part of Lincoln Center's White Light Festival. But her evening of
Bach culminated in the sprawling, majestic Chaconne from the Partita
No. 2--the Everest of the violin repertory. Which one of her
commissioned encores would she pick to follow that?

None, it turned out. Instead, she scaled the Chaconne a second time.

It was a gutsy choice. But as I listened to Ms. Hahn, 38, embark
once more on that 18-minute workout of runs, arpeggios and triple
stops, I felt some of the magic drain out of the evening. That's
because this time around, my focus shifted from Bach's genius to Ms.
Hahn's skill, and to the audible deliberation that went into every
note.

Sure, the occasional bass tone rang out even more forcefully on her
second go; Ms. Hahn took extra time on one thoughtful pause and
allowed herself a tiny slurp on an expressive slide from one note to
the next. But her interpretation had clearly been hewed in stone,
one meticulous stroke at a time.

What most surprised me about Ms. Hahn's take on Bach--she
performed the first sonata and the first two partitas--was its
throwback glamour. On Tuesday she played on an 1865 Vuillaume (one
of two instruments by that maker that she used for her new Bach
recording), producing a high-gloss sound of enormous power. There is
an uncanny high-definition quality to the consistency of that sound:
Across strings, in different registers and bow strokes, it maintains
the same brilliance and focus.

In meditative movements like the Adagio of the G Minor Sonata, Ms.
Hahn takes an unabashedly Romantic approach, with slow tempos that
allow her to spin out the melody in shiny ribbons. Her take on that
sonata's fugue, too, was designed to maximize sound, with short
notes rendered solid--almost broad--and only the difficult
triple stops ringing out harshly, like gunshots.

Ms. Hahn dispatched fast movements like the Gigue of the D Minor
Partita with such fire and panache that the audience erupted in
spontaneous (and graciously acknowledged) applause. With sure
dramatic instinct she zoomed in on moments of pathos, lingering on a
sighing motif, or building up crescendos with muscular impatience.

Her playing evoked the Bach of past generations, like Itzhak
Perlman's recording from 1988. Her contemporaries often now play
this repertory with feathered bow strokes, gestural phrasing and
swift tempos inspired by the historically-informed-performance
movement. Ms. Hahn plays as if that shift never occurred.
Herman
2018-10-29 07:56:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Frank Forman
I sure wish I could here them!
you can, because the concert was essentially a cd promotion event.
Bob Harper
2018-10-29 13:38:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 10/28/18 5:33 PM, Frank Forman wrote:
(snip)
Post by Frank Forman
Her playing evoked the Bach of past generations, like Itzhak
Perlman's recording from 1988. Her contemporaries often now play
this repertory with feathered bow strokes, gestural phrasing and
swift tempos inspired by the historically-informed-performance
movement. Ms. Hahn plays as if that shift never occurred.
"Ms. Hahn plays as if that shift (HIP) never occurred."

Good for her! :)

Bob Harper
JohnGavin
2018-10-29 13:53:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
"Ms. Hahn plays as if that shift (HIP) never occurred."

Good for her! :)

Bob Harper

If only there could be harpsichordists today with the same description.
Joe Roberts
2018-10-29 13:56:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bob Harper
(snip)
Post by Frank Forman
Her playing evoked the Bach of past generations, like Itzhak
Perlman's recording from 1988. Her contemporaries often now play
this repertory with feathered bow strokes, gestural phrasing and
swift tempos inspired by the historically-informed-performance
movement. Ms. Hahn plays as if that shift never occurred.
"Ms. Hahn plays as if that shift (HIP) never occurred."
Good for her! :)
Bob Harper
And she's here:



Joe
HT
2018-10-29 14:21:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe Roberts
http://youtu.be/QqA3qQMKueA
Thanks! Great performance. Unabashedly romantic can be very impressive. Good to hear that Hahn can still play the old way.

Henk
8***@gmail.com
2018-10-29 21:14:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by HT
Post by Joe Roberts
http://youtu.be/QqA3qQMKueA
Thanks! Great performance. Unabashedly romantic can be very impressive. Good to hear that Hahn can still play the old way.
Henk
And who is to say that Bach didn't, or wouldn't, have played it similarly?

Dave H
Bob Harper
2018-10-29 22:51:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by 8***@gmail.com
Post by HT
Post by Joe Roberts
http://youtu.be/QqA3qQMKueA
Thanks! Great performance. Unabashedly romantic can be very impressive. Good to hear that Hahn can still play the old way.
Henk
And who is to say that Bach didn't, or wouldn't, have played it similarly?
Dave H
No one. The HIP Taliban (OK, I exaggerate) pretends to knowledge it
cannot have. That's not to say that HIP hasn't given us things of value;
it has. But it is no substitute for great musicianship--something Hilary
Hahn clearly has.

Bob Harper
Herman
2018-10-30 08:59:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by 8***@gmail.com
And who is to say that Bach didn't, or wouldn't, have played it similarly?
Dave H
I don't care either way, but it's positive Bach did not play that way; the instruments were different at the time (all violins have been extensively reconfigured since) and there is an massive literature about music practice and philosophy around Bach's time.

It's perfectly okay to ignore all those things and enjoy the way Hahn plays her Bach, after all, music has become a consumer's good (which it was not in Bach's era), just like you can get a large coke or a medium. But to claim that Bach would have played like Hahn is kind of silly. "Yeah, but maybe he would have liked to play like her if he were alive now!" He isn't.

BTW I enjoy Szeryng, Milstein and Szigeti in Bach's S&P. These are giants. Hahn is a great violinist in 20th C repertoire; her Bach records just sound weird to me. How can you be so not interested in the music you're performing? I can imagine enjoying her Bach in a recital, being part of the experience. I don't see the point of listening to her Bach on record, when there are the above mentioned, too, if you want to hear a monumentally played Bach.

And then of course there are just as many excellent violinists who have recorded the Bach S&P having studied baroque practices - and they are all different. There is no single way.
HT
2018-10-30 12:38:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Herman
How can you be so not interested in the music you're performing?
Hahn wouldn't play Bach the way she does if she weren't interested in the music. It's great music and as you say, even those who try to play it the way Bach is supposed to have played it, sound different.

Distler implicitly warns us not to take the composer more seriously than his music, when he says:
"Reviewing Freddy Kempf’s 2010 Chaconne, I wrote: ‘What may sound oddly emphatic or sectionalised has to do with Kempf’s taking Busoni’s articulation markings, expressive directives and tempo modifications on faith.’

Henk
Herman
2018-10-30 14:59:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by HT
Post by Herman
How can you be so not interested in the music you're performing?
Hahn wouldn't play Bach the way she does if she weren't interested in the music. It's great music and as you say, even those who try to play it the way Bach is supposed to have played it, sound different.
Of course I have no way of knowing her thinking. Interviews, a natural part of the promotion effort to get the Bach cd sold (the concerts are part of the promo, or the other way around, it's hard to tell), don't say a lot either.

However, I mean she is not evincing any awareness of what Bach and Baroque research has yielded the past half century. She seems primarily focused on getting the job done, scaling that Violinist Everest, i.e. performing the Bach S & P, or as they are called by large parts of the audience "the Chaconne".

Playing "the Chaconne" is the ultimate status symbol for young violinists (never mind that there are pieces even more difficult; they are not as famous) the majority of these young violinists don't give a damn about musically contextualizing this (as is shown by the way the Chaconne is commonly seen as a stand-alone piece).
S***@aol.com
2018-10-31 04:40:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Herman
Post by HT
Post by Herman
How can you be so not interested in the music you're performing?
Hahn wouldn't play Bach the way she does if she weren't interested in the music. It's great music and as you say, even those who try to play it the way Bach is supposed to have played it, sound different.
Of course I have no way of knowing her thinking.
You should have stopped there. because after that you go o with a load of .S. that presumes to know what she is thinking.

Interviews, a natural part of the promotion effort to get the Bach cd sold (the concerts are part of the promo, or the other way around, it's hard to tell), don't say a lot either.
Post by Herman
However, I mean she is not evincing any awareness of what Bach and Baroque research has yielded the past half century. She seems primarily focused on getting the job done, scaling that Violinist Everest, i.e. performing the Bach S & P, or as they are called by large parts of the audience "the Chaconne".
Playing "the Chaconne" is the ultimate status symbol for young violinists (never mind that there are pieces even more difficult; they are not as famous) the majority of these young violinists don't give a damn about musically contextualizing this (as is shown by the way the Chaconne is commonly seen as a stand-alone piece).
graham
2018-11-05 19:26:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Frank Forman
I sure wish I could here them!
Review: Hilary Hahn Plays an Unabashedly Romantic Bach
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/24/arts/music/review-hilary-hahn-bach-lincoln-center.html
Hilary Hahn performed on Tuesday at Alice Tully Hall, Lincoln Center.
By Corinna da Fonseca-Wollheim
Encores have never been an afterthought for Hilary Hahn. In recent
years, this brilliant violinist has commissioned 27 short solo
pieces from as many composers to expand her stash of end-of-concert
treats.
She might have been expected to pick one on Tuesday, when she gave
her first-ever violin-alone recital in New York at Alice Tully Hall
as part of Lincoln Center's White Light Festival. But her evening of
Bach culminated in the sprawling, majestic Chaconne from the Partita
No. 2--the Everest of the violin repertory. Which one of her
commissioned encores would she pick to follow that?
None, it turned out. Instead, she scaled the Chaconne a second time.
It was a gutsy choice. But as I listened to Ms. Hahn, 38, embark
once more on that 18-minute workout of runs, arpeggios and triple
stops, I felt some of the magic drain out of the evening. That's
because this time around, my focus shifted from Bach's genius to Ms.
Hahn's skill, and to the audible deliberation that went into every
note.
Sure, the occasional bass tone rang out even more forcefully on her
second go; Ms. Hahn took extra time on one thoughtful pause and
allowed herself a tiny slurp on an expressive slide from one note to
the next. But her interpretation had clearly been hewed in stone,
one meticulous stroke at a time.
What most surprised me about Ms. Hahn's take on Bach--she
performed the first sonata and the first two partitas--was its
throwback glamour. On Tuesday she played on an 1865 Vuillaume (one
of two instruments by that maker that she used for her new Bach
recording), producing a high-gloss sound of enormous power. There is
Across strings, in different registers and bow strokes, it maintains
the same brilliance and focus.
In meditative movements like the Adagio of the G Minor Sonata, Ms.
Hahn takes an unabashedly Romantic approach, with slow tempos that
allow her to spin out the melody in shiny ribbons. Her take on that
sonata's fugue, too, was designed to maximize sound, with short
notes rendered solid--almost broad--and only the difficult
triple stops ringing out harshly, like gunshots.
Ms. Hahn dispatched fast movements like the Gigue of the D Minor
Partita with such fire and panache that the audience erupted in
spontaneous (and graciously acknowledged) applause. With sure
dramatic instinct she zoomed in on moments of pathos, lingering on a
sighing motif, or building up crescendos with muscular impatience.
Her playing evoked the Bach of past generations, like Itzhak
Perlman's recording from 1988. Her contemporaries often now play
this repertory with feathered bow strokes, gestural phrasing and
swift tempos inspired by the historically-informed-performance
movement. Ms. Hahn plays as if that shift never occurred.
The Gramophone review of her CD is so glowing that I'm almost tempted to
buy it.
http://tiny.cc/2k3q0y
dk
2018-11-07 02:10:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by graham
Post by Frank Forman
I sure wish I could here them!
Review: Hilary Hahn Plays an Unabashedly Romantic Bach
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/24/arts/music/review-hilary-hahn-bach-lincoln-center.html
Hilary Hahn performed on Tuesday at Alice Tully Hall, Lincoln Center.
By Corinna da Fonseca-Wollheim
Encores have never been an afterthought for Hilary Hahn. In recent
years, this brilliant violinist has commissioned 27 short solo
pieces from as many composers to expand her stash of end-of-concert
treats.
She might have been expected to pick one on Tuesday, when she gave
her first-ever violin-alone recital in New York at Alice Tully Hall
as part of Lincoln Center's White Light Festival. But her evening of
Bach culminated in the sprawling, majestic Chaconne from the Partita
No. 2--the Everest of the violin repertory. Which one of her
commissioned encores would she pick to follow that?
None, it turned out. Instead, she scaled the Chaconne a second time.
It was a gutsy choice. But as I listened to Ms. Hahn, 38, embark
once more on that 18-minute workout of runs, arpeggios and triple
stops, I felt some of the magic drain out of the evening. That's
because this time around, my focus shifted from Bach's genius to Ms.
Hahn's skill, and to the audible deliberation that went into every
note.
Sure, the occasional bass tone rang out even more forcefully on her
second go; Ms. Hahn took extra time on one thoughtful pause and
allowed herself a tiny slurp on an expressive slide from one note to
the next. But her interpretation had clearly been hewed in stone,
one meticulous stroke at a time.
What most surprised me about Ms. Hahn's take on Bach--she
performed the first sonata and the first two partitas--was its
throwback glamour. On Tuesday she played on an 1865 Vuillaume (one
of two instruments by that maker that she used for her new Bach
recording), producing a high-gloss sound of enormous power. There is
Across strings, in different registers and bow strokes, it maintains
the same brilliance and focus.
In meditative movements like the Adagio of the G Minor Sonata, Ms.
Hahn takes an unabashedly Romantic approach, with slow tempos that
allow her to spin out the melody in shiny ribbons. Her take on that
sonata's fugue, too, was designed to maximize sound, with short
notes rendered solid--almost broad--and only the difficult
triple stops ringing out harshly, like gunshots.
Ms. Hahn dispatched fast movements like the Gigue of the D Minor
Partita with such fire and panache that the audience erupted in
spontaneous (and graciously acknowledged) applause. With sure
dramatic instinct she zoomed in on moments of pathos, lingering on a
sighing motif, or building up crescendos with muscular impatience.
Her playing evoked the Bach of past generations, like Itzhak
Perlman's recording from 1988. Her contemporaries often now play
this repertory with feathered bow strokes, gestural phrasing and
swift tempos inspired by the historically-informed-performance
movement. Ms. Hahn plays as if that shift never occurred.
The Gramophone review of her CD is so glowing that
I'm almost tempted to buy it. http://tiny.cc/2k3q0y
Watch out, it might burn your hands!
I treat the Gramophone with absolute
mistrust! ;-)

dk
S***@aol.com
2018-11-07 02:20:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
Post by graham
Post by Frank Forman
I sure wish I could here them!
Review: Hilary Hahn Plays an Unabashedly Romantic Bach
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/24/arts/music/review-hilary-hahn-bach-lincoln-center.html
Hilary Hahn performed on Tuesday at Alice Tully Hall, Lincoln Center.
By Corinna da Fonseca-Wollheim
Encores have never been an afterthought for Hilary Hahn. In recent
years, this brilliant violinist has commissioned 27 short solo
pieces from as many composers to expand her stash of end-of-concert
treats.
She might have been expected to pick one on Tuesday, when she gave
her first-ever violin-alone recital in New York at Alice Tully Hall
as part of Lincoln Center's White Light Festival. But her evening of
Bach culminated in the sprawling, majestic Chaconne from the Partita
No. 2--the Everest of the violin repertory. Which one of her
commissioned encores would she pick to follow that?
None, it turned out. Instead, she scaled the Chaconne a second time.
It was a gutsy choice. But as I listened to Ms. Hahn, 38, embark
once more on that 18-minute workout of runs, arpeggios and triple
stops, I felt some of the magic drain out of the evening. That's
because this time around, my focus shifted from Bach's genius to Ms.
Hahn's skill, and to the audible deliberation that went into every
note.
Sure, the occasional bass tone rang out even more forcefully on her
second go; Ms. Hahn took extra time on one thoughtful pause and
allowed herself a tiny slurp on an expressive slide from one note to
the next. But her interpretation had clearly been hewed in stone,
one meticulous stroke at a time.
What most surprised me about Ms. Hahn's take on Bach--she
performed the first sonata and the first two partitas--was its
throwback glamour. On Tuesday she played on an 1865 Vuillaume (one
of two instruments by that maker that she used for her new Bach
recording), producing a high-gloss sound of enormous power. There is
Across strings, in different registers and bow strokes, it maintains
the same brilliance and focus.
In meditative movements like the Adagio of the G Minor Sonata, Ms.
Hahn takes an unabashedly Romantic approach, with slow tempos that
allow her to spin out the melody in shiny ribbons. Her take on that
sonata's fugue, too, was designed to maximize sound, with short
notes rendered solid--almost broad--and only the difficult
triple stops ringing out harshly, like gunshots.
Ms. Hahn dispatched fast movements like the Gigue of the D Minor
Partita with such fire and panache that the audience erupted in
spontaneous (and graciously acknowledged) applause. With sure
dramatic instinct she zoomed in on moments of pathos, lingering on a
sighing motif, or building up crescendos with muscular impatience.
Her playing evoked the Bach of past generations, like Itzhak
Perlman's recording from 1988. Her contemporaries often now play
this repertory with feathered bow strokes, gestural phrasing and
swift tempos inspired by the historically-informed-performance
movement. Ms. Hahn plays as if that shift never occurred.
The Gramophone review of her CD is so glowing that
I'm almost tempted to buy it. http://tiny.cc/2k3q0y
Watch out, it might burn your hands!
I treat the Gramophone with absolute
mistrust! ;-)
dk
was this review the deal breaker for you? https://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/beethoven-complete-piano-sonatas-excl-nos-19-20
dk
2018-11-07 09:45:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by S***@aol.com
Post by dk
Post by graham
Post by Frank Forman
I sure wish I could here them!
Review: Hilary Hahn Plays an Unabashedly Romantic Bach
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/24/arts/music/review-hilary-hahn-bach-lincoln-center.html
Hilary Hahn performed on Tuesday at Alice Tully Hall, Lincoln Center.
By Corinna da Fonseca-Wollheim
Encores have never been an afterthought for Hilary Hahn. In recent
years, this brilliant violinist has commissioned 27 short solo
pieces from as many composers to expand her stash of end-of-concert
treats.
She might have been expected to pick one on Tuesday, when she gave
her first-ever violin-alone recital in New York at Alice Tully Hall
as part of Lincoln Center's White Light Festival. But her evening of
Bach culminated in the sprawling, majestic Chaconne from the Partita
No. 2--the Everest of the violin repertory. Which one of her
commissioned encores would she pick to follow that?
None, it turned out. Instead, she scaled the Chaconne a second time.
It was a gutsy choice. But as I listened to Ms. Hahn, 38, embark
once more on that 18-minute workout of runs, arpeggios and triple
stops, I felt some of the magic drain out of the evening. That's
because this time around, my focus shifted from Bach's genius to Ms.
Hahn's skill, and to the audible deliberation that went into every
note.
Sure, the occasional bass tone rang out even more forcefully on her
second go; Ms. Hahn took extra time on one thoughtful pause and
allowed herself a tiny slurp on an expressive slide from one note to
the next. But her interpretation had clearly been hewed in stone,
one meticulous stroke at a time.
What most surprised me about Ms. Hahn's take on Bach--she
performed the first sonata and the first two partitas--was its
throwback glamour. On Tuesday she played on an 1865 Vuillaume (one
of two instruments by that maker that she used for her new Bach
recording), producing a high-gloss sound of enormous power. There is
Across strings, in different registers and bow strokes, it maintains
the same brilliance and focus.
In meditative movements like the Adagio of the G Minor Sonata, Ms.
Hahn takes an unabashedly Romantic approach, with slow tempos that
allow her to spin out the melody in shiny ribbons. Her take on that
sonata's fugue, too, was designed to maximize sound, with short
notes rendered solid--almost broad--and only the difficult
triple stops ringing out harshly, like gunshots.
Ms. Hahn dispatched fast movements like the Gigue of the D Minor
Partita with such fire and panache that the audience erupted in
spontaneous (and graciously acknowledged) applause. With sure
dramatic instinct she zoomed in on moments of pathos, lingering on a
sighing motif, or building up crescendos with muscular impatience.
Her playing evoked the Bach of past generations, like Itzhak
Perlman's recording from 1988. Her contemporaries often now play
this repertory with feathered bow strokes, gestural phrasing and
swift tempos inspired by the historically-informed-performance
movement. Ms. Hahn plays as if that shift never occurred.
The Gramophone review of her CD is so glowing that
I'm almost tempted to buy it. http://tiny.cc/2k3q0y
Watch out, it might burn your hands!
I treat the Gramophone with absolute
mistrust! ;-)
was this review the deal breaker for you? https://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/beethoven-complete-piano-sonatas-excl-nos-19-20
You gotta be kidding!

I started reading the Gramophone in
1962, and determined very quickly
its reviewers cared less about
music than about British peerage!

dk
S***@aol.com
2018-11-08 00:39:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
Post by S***@aol.com
Post by dk
Post by graham
Post by Frank Forman
I sure wish I could here them!
Review: Hilary Hahn Plays an Unabashedly Romantic Bach
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/24/arts/music/review-hilary-hahn-bach-lincoln-center.html
Hilary Hahn performed on Tuesday at Alice Tully Hall, Lincoln Center.
By Corinna da Fonseca-Wollheim
Encores have never been an afterthought for Hilary Hahn. In recent
years, this brilliant violinist has commissioned 27 short solo
pieces from as many composers to expand her stash of end-of-concert
treats.
She might have been expected to pick one on Tuesday, when she gave
her first-ever violin-alone recital in New York at Alice Tully Hall
as part of Lincoln Center's White Light Festival. But her evening of
Bach culminated in the sprawling, majestic Chaconne from the Partita
No. 2--the Everest of the violin repertory. Which one of her
commissioned encores would she pick to follow that?
None, it turned out. Instead, she scaled the Chaconne a second time.
It was a gutsy choice. But as I listened to Ms. Hahn, 38, embark
once more on that 18-minute workout of runs, arpeggios and triple
stops, I felt some of the magic drain out of the evening. That's
because this time around, my focus shifted from Bach's genius to Ms.
Hahn's skill, and to the audible deliberation that went into every
note.
Sure, the occasional bass tone rang out even more forcefully on her
second go; Ms. Hahn took extra time on one thoughtful pause and
allowed herself a tiny slurp on an expressive slide from one note to
the next. But her interpretation had clearly been hewed in stone,
one meticulous stroke at a time.
What most surprised me about Ms. Hahn's take on Bach--she
performed the first sonata and the first two partitas--was its
throwback glamour. On Tuesday she played on an 1865 Vuillaume (one
of two instruments by that maker that she used for her new Bach
recording), producing a high-gloss sound of enormous power. There is
Across strings, in different registers and bow strokes, it maintains
the same brilliance and focus.
In meditative movements like the Adagio of the G Minor Sonata, Ms.
Hahn takes an unabashedly Romantic approach, with slow tempos that
allow her to spin out the melody in shiny ribbons. Her take on that
sonata's fugue, too, was designed to maximize sound, with short
notes rendered solid--almost broad--and only the difficult
triple stops ringing out harshly, like gunshots.
Ms. Hahn dispatched fast movements like the Gigue of the D Minor
Partita with such fire and panache that the audience erupted in
spontaneous (and graciously acknowledged) applause. With sure
dramatic instinct she zoomed in on moments of pathos, lingering on a
sighing motif, or building up crescendos with muscular impatience.
Her playing evoked the Bach of past generations, like Itzhak
Perlman's recording from 1988. Her contemporaries often now play
this repertory with feathered bow strokes, gestural phrasing and
swift tempos inspired by the historically-informed-performance
movement. Ms. Hahn plays as if that shift never occurred.
The Gramophone review of her CD is so glowing that
I'm almost tempted to buy it. http://tiny.cc/2k3q0y
Watch out, it might burn your hands!
I treat the Gramophone with absolute
mistrust! ;-)
was this review the deal breaker for you? https://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/beethoven-complete-piano-sonatas-excl-nos-19-20
You gotta be kidding!
I started reading the Gramophone in
1962, and determined very quickly
its reviewers cared less about
music than about British peerage!
dk
I'm guessing there has een some turnover since 1962 in the writing staff
S***@aol.com
2018-11-08 00:44:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
Post by S***@aol.com
Post by dk
Post by graham
Post by Frank Forman
I sure wish I could here them!
Review: Hilary Hahn Plays an Unabashedly Romantic Bach
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/24/arts/music/review-hilary-hahn-bach-lincoln-center.html
Hilary Hahn performed on Tuesday at Alice Tully Hall, Lincoln Center.
By Corinna da Fonseca-Wollheim
Encores have never been an afterthought for Hilary Hahn. In recent
years, this brilliant violinist has commissioned 27 short solo
pieces from as many composers to expand her stash of end-of-concert
treats.
She might have been expected to pick one on Tuesday, when she gave
her first-ever violin-alone recital in New York at Alice Tully Hall
as part of Lincoln Center's White Light Festival. But her evening of
Bach culminated in the sprawling, majestic Chaconne from the Partita
No. 2--the Everest of the violin repertory. Which one of her
commissioned encores would she pick to follow that?
None, it turned out. Instead, she scaled the Chaconne a second time.
It was a gutsy choice. But as I listened to Ms. Hahn, 38, embark
once more on that 18-minute workout of runs, arpeggios and triple
stops, I felt some of the magic drain out of the evening. That's
because this time around, my focus shifted from Bach's genius to Ms.
Hahn's skill, and to the audible deliberation that went into every
note.
Sure, the occasional bass tone rang out even more forcefully on her
second go; Ms. Hahn took extra time on one thoughtful pause and
allowed herself a tiny slurp on an expressive slide from one note to
the next. But her interpretation had clearly been hewed in stone,
one meticulous stroke at a time.
What most surprised me about Ms. Hahn's take on Bach--she
performed the first sonata and the first two partitas--was its
throwback glamour. On Tuesday she played on an 1865 Vuillaume (one
of two instruments by that maker that she used for her new Bach
recording), producing a high-gloss sound of enormous power. There is
Across strings, in different registers and bow strokes, it maintains
the same brilliance and focus.
In meditative movements like the Adagio of the G Minor Sonata, Ms.
Hahn takes an unabashedly Romantic approach, with slow tempos that
allow her to spin out the melody in shiny ribbons. Her take on that
sonata's fugue, too, was designed to maximize sound, with short
notes rendered solid--almost broad--and only the difficult
triple stops ringing out harshly, like gunshots.
Ms. Hahn dispatched fast movements like the Gigue of the D Minor
Partita with such fire and panache that the audience erupted in
spontaneous (and graciously acknowledged) applause. With sure
dramatic instinct she zoomed in on moments of pathos, lingering on a
sighing motif, or building up crescendos with muscular impatience.
Her playing evoked the Bach of past generations, like Itzhak
Perlman's recording from 1988. Her contemporaries often now play
this repertory with feathered bow strokes, gestural phrasing and
swift tempos inspired by the historically-informed-performance
movement. Ms. Hahn plays as if that shift never occurred.
The Gramophone review of her CD is so glowing that
I'm almost tempted to buy it. http://tiny.cc/2k3q0y
Watch out, it might burn your hands!
I treat the Gramophone with absolute
mistrust! ;-)
was this review the deal breaker for you? https://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/beethoven-complete-piano-sonatas-excl-nos-19-20
You gotta be kidding!
I started reading the Gramophone in
1962, and determined very quickly
its reviewers cared less about
music than about British peerage!
dk
I had no idea Hilary Hahn was so British! Quite an accomplishment for a Virginia gal.
Loading...