Discussion:
My favorite performance of probably my favorite Mozart work
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Lawrence Kart
2020-10-12 00:38:41 UTC
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Sonata in B Flat Major for Violin and Piano, K. 454.

The work itself is sublime -- in particular the formal and emotional relationship among the three movements: Forgive these groping characterizations: The first movement, immensely poised, balanced, and poignant; the second, a solemn immense and wholly Mozartean sadness; the third; a tremendous outburst of bouncing contrapuntal energy and joy that nonetheless is not without reference to the second movement's sadness and the first's poise and balance.

My favorite performance, (from 1974): Szymon Goldberg and Radu Lupu (London). Not perfect because Goldberg, arguably the greatest Mozart fiddler of the 20th Century, is here in his mid-60s, maybe a decade or so past his prime, amid all of his beauty, wisdom, and insights. Lupu is in prime form, and clearly inspired by his partner, but given Goldberg's age there are times when Lupu comes close to rushing him off his feet. Nonetheless, I've yet to find a superior version.
Herman
2020-10-12 14:16:18 UTC
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Are you by any chance familiar with the Szeryng live performance of the K 454 at the Salzburg Festival 1979, available (hopefully) on an Orfeo cd, together with Brahms's A major sonata (op 100) and Beethoven's C minor sonata nr 7?

In support, James Tocco is tickling the ivories.

That would be my favourite performance of the Mozart, and it's a recital with no weak spot.
Mandryka
2020-10-12 16:26:45 UTC
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Post by Herman
Are you by any chance familiar with the Szeryng live performance of the K 454 at the Salzburg Festival 1979, available (hopefully) on an Orfeo cd, together with Brahms's A major sonata (op 100) and Beethoven's C minor sonata nr 7?
In support, James Tocco is tickling the ivories.
That would be my favourite performance of the Mozart, and it's a recital with no weak spot.
The Szeryng is here -- will listen tonight.


Lawrence Kart
2020-10-12 19:05:34 UTC
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Post by Mandryka
Post by Herman
Are you by any chance familiar with the Szeryng live performance of the K 454 at the Salzburg Festival 1979, available (hopefully) on an Orfeo cd, together with Brahms's A major sonata (op 100) and Beethoven's C minor sonata nr 7?
In support, James Tocco is tickling the ivories.
That would be my favourite performance of the Mozart, and it's a recital with no weak spot.
The Szeryng is here -- will listen tonight.
http://youtu.be/v4xnYvQF7bM
Lawrence Kart
2020-10-12 19:07:07 UTC
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Please forgive my near total idiocy. The work I meant was K. 526 as performed by Goldberg and Lupu, not K. 454.
Post by Mandryka
Post by Herman
Are you by any chance familiar with the Szeryng live performance of the K 454 at the Salzburg Festival 1979, available (hopefully) on an Orfeo cd, together with Brahms's A major sonata (op 100) and Beethoven's C minor sonata nr 7?
In support, James Tocco is tickling the ivories.
That would be my favourite performance of the Mozart, and it's a recital with no weak spot.
The Szeryng is here -- will listen tonight.
http://youtu.be/v4xnYvQF7bM
Lawrence Kart
2020-10-12 19:19:11 UTC
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On the other hand, I still stand behind what I said about that that work and that performance of it. Again, apologies for my initial mistake.
c***@gmail.com
2020-10-12 20:05:19 UTC
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Post by Lawrence Kart
On the other hand, I still stand behind what I said about that that work and that performance of it. Again, apologies for my initial mistake.
Well, setting aside the problems of intonation, you're right that Goldberg can't keep up with Lupu (who is wonderful) in K. 526, and the first-movement tempo isn't even that fast. For a real molto allegro with beautiful sound and practically perfect coordination, try Rougier/Teboul. I find their performance exhilarating; others might consider it rushed, however.

AC
Lawrence Kart
2020-10-12 21:50:54 UTC
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I've now listened to some (I think enough, because so many versions seemed to me to be quickly ruled out) of every recording of this work that's on YouTube, and while my fondness for Goldberg/Lupu remains, I was very impressed by Anne-Sophie Mutter and Lambert Orkis. Among the other things that to my mind they get just right is that the opening phrase of Movement I needs to (pardon the metaphor) roll right downhill at you like a ball made of gold. For sure, violin and piano will be differentiated many times over in K. 526, but here IMO they must be close to one. It's like that opening phrase has begun on a half intake of breath just before it actually begins.
Post by Lawrence Kart
On the other hand, I still stand behind what I said about that that work and that performance of it. Again, apologies for my initial mistake.
Well, setting aside the problems of intonation, you're right that Goldberg can't keep up with Lupu (who is wonderful) in K. 526, and the first-movement tempo isn't even that fast. For a real molto allegro with beautiful sound and practically perfect coordination, try Rougier/Teboul. I find their performance exhilarating; others might consider it rushed, however.
AC
Mandryka
2020-10-13 02:45:45 UTC
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Thanks - enjoying Rougier/Teboul very much.
Post by Lawrence Kart
On the other hand, I still stand behind what I said about that that work and that performance of it. Again, apologies for my initial mistake.
Well, setting aside the problems of intonation, you're right that Goldberg can't keep up with Lupu (who is wonderful) in K. 526, and the first-movement tempo isn't even that fast. For a real molto allegro with beautiful sound and practically perfect coordination, try Rougier/Teboul. I find their performance exhilarating; others might consider it rushed, however.
AC
Mandryka
2020-10-12 19:45:08 UTC
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Post by Lawrence Kart
Please forgive my near total idiocy. The work I meant was K. 526 as performed by Goldberg and Lupu, not K. 454.
Post by Mandryka
Post by Herman
Are you by any chance familiar with the Szeryng live performance of the K 454 at the Salzburg Festival 1979, available (hopefully) on an Orfeo cd, together with Brahms's A major sonata (op 100) and Beethoven's C minor sonata nr 7?
In support, James Tocco is tickling the ivories.
That would be my favourite performance of the Mozart, and it's a recital with no weak spot.
The Szeryng is here -- will listen tonight.
http://youtu.be/v4xnYvQF7bM
Ah, that's a sonata I've never much enjoyed, though your description sells it well. I will try Lupu and Goldberg.
c***@gmail.com
2020-10-12 15:58:48 UTC
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Post by Lawrence Kart
Sonata in B Flat Major for Violin and Piano, K. 454.
The work itself is sublime -- in particular the formal and emotional relationship among the three movements: Forgive these groping characterizations: The first movement, immensely poised, balanced, and poignant; the second, a solemn immense and wholly Mozartean sadness; the third; a tremendous outburst of bouncing contrapuntal energy and joy that nonetheless is not without reference to the second movement's sadness and the first's poise and balance.
My favorite performance, (from 1974): Szymon Goldberg and Radu Lupu (London). Not perfect because Goldberg, arguably the greatest Mozart fiddler of the 20th Century, is here in his mid-60s, maybe a decade or so past his prime, amid all of his beauty, wisdom, and insights. Lupu is in prime form, and clearly inspired by his partner, but given Goldberg's age there are times when Lupu comes close to rushing him off his feet. Nonetheless, I've yet to find a superior version.
No argument from me when it comes to the sublimity of the work! I know too many fine performances to single out a favorite, although I guess the ones I play most often are Ughi/Tipo, Snítil/Panenka, and Müllejans/Bezuidenhout. I'm a big Goldberg fan (of his Mozart with Kraus in particular) but find his later recordings hard to take.

AC
Mandryka
2020-10-12 16:21:34 UTC
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Post by Lawrence Kart
Sonata in B Flat Major for Violin and Piano, K. 454.
The work itself is sublime -- in particular the formal and emotional relationship among the three movements: Forgive these groping characterizations: The first movement, immensely poised, balanced, and poignant; the second, a solemn immense and wholly Mozartean sadness; the third; a tremendous outburst of bouncing contrapuntal energy and joy that nonetheless is not without reference to the second movement's sadness and the first's poise and balance.
My favorite performance, (from 1974): Szymon Goldberg and Radu Lupu (London). Not perfect because Goldberg, arguably the greatest Mozart fiddler of the 20th Century, is here in his mid-60s, maybe a decade or so past his prime, amid all of his beauty, wisdom, and insights. Lupu is in prime form, and clearly inspired by his partner, but given Goldberg's age there are times when Lupu comes close to rushing him off his feet. Nonetheless, I've yet to find a superior version.
No argument from me when it comes to the sublimity of the work! I know too many fine performances to single out a favorite, although I guess the ones I play most often are Ughi/Tipo, Snítil/Panenka, and Müllejans/Bezuidenhout. I'm a big Goldberg fan (of his Mozart with Kraus in particular) but find his later recordings hard to take.
AC
Yes but ljk is right to say that Lupu is on top form -- thanks to him for mentioning it.
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