Discussion:
Gould's Goldbergs
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g***@gmail.com
2020-07-24 04:52:11 UTC
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Which recording by Glenn Gould of Bach's "Goldberg Variations" is
worse than the others?
-Skip
According to this:

- A really intriguing question is the degree to which Glenn Gould's obsession with Soseki's ideas affected his playing of Bach. Listen to Gould's iconic 1955 playing of the Goldberg Variations, then read a few chapters of "The Three-Cornered World," then listen to Gould's transformed, slower, more ethereal reworking of the Goldberg Variations in 1981 and consider whether there is a sense in which Bach has been partly transformed by Turney's translation of Soseki.

https://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20200203/p2a/00m/0et/023000c
t***@gmail.com
2020-07-28 18:01:23 UTC
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Which recording by Glenn Gould of Bach's "Goldberg Variations" is
worse than the others?
Both of them.

That is, if you're talking just about the studio recordings. Interesting that nobody here has mentioned the three live recordings, all of which barely resemble the studio recordings and are wonderfully imaginative, impulsive, and colorful, unlike the flawless chrome-plated machine of his studio recordings.
John Hood
2020-07-29 00:00:06 UTC
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Post by t***@gmail.com
Which recording by Glenn Gould of Bach's "Goldberg Variations" is
worse than the others?
Both of them.
That is, if you're talking just about the studio recordings. Interesting that nobody here has mentioned the three live recordings, all of which barely resemble the studio recordings and are wonderfully imaginative, impulsive, and colorful, unlike the flawless chrome-plated machine of his studio recordings.
The 1954 ? version for CBC is a joyous romp, filled with ideas and
youthful enthusiasm. I don't listen to the Goldbergs very often,
preferring other Bach solo piano but the CBC are wonderful.

JH

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