Discussion:
What are the best recordings of Schubert's String Quartet No. 15?
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Andrew Knippenberg
2014-04-01 03:48:50 UTC
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I have recordings by the Busch Quartet and Quartetto Italiano. While I'm quite fond of both, and enjoy their different styles, are there any other performances I'm missing?
Herman
2014-04-01 05:55:29 UTC
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Post by Andrew Knippenberg
I have recordings by the Busch Quartet and Quartetto Italiano. While I'm quite fond of both, and enjoy their different styles, are there any other performances I'm missing?
Alban Berg Quartett is a must have.
Terry
2014-04-01 05:58:39 UTC
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Post by Andrew Knippenberg
I have recordings by the Busch Quartet and Quartetto Italiano. While I'm
quite fond of both, and enjoy their different styles, are there any other
performances I'm missing?
The Belcea Quartet. They seem to me to have an uncanny empathy for
Schubert. Beautifully recorded. Comes as a 2-CD set, coupled with
excellent performances of the String Quintet and the D810 Quartet. The
only slight disadvantage is that #15 is split over the two CDs. I
thought that this would annoy me, but it hasn't. The playing is so
wonderful, I could forgive anything.
Herman
2014-04-01 09:18:13 UTC
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Post by Terry
The Belcea Quartet. They seem to me to have an uncanny empathy for
Schubert. Beautifully recorded. Comes as a 2-CD set, coupled with
excellent performances of the String Quintet and the D810 Quartet. The
only slight disadvantage is that #15 is split over the two CDs. I
thought that this would annoy me, but it hasn't. The playing is so
wonderful, I could forgive anything.
I like the Belcea's Quintet better than the G major quartet. Somehow the first mvt doesn't quite cohere IMO, it's one of the pitfalls of taking this music as a sort of symphony for string quartet, with huge dynamic contrasts. The gentle bits (the siciliano-like theme) are taken so soft and recessed that they don't seem to belong to the same structure.

Taking the exposition repeat doesn't help either, perhaps.
Christopher Webber
2014-04-01 09:24:31 UTC
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Post by Herman
Taking the exposition repeat doesn't help either, perhaps.
Taking Schubert's repeats rarely does help, in my opinion - he's an
exception (to my rule at least, which is "if they're written, do them"!)
Edward A. Cowan
2014-04-03 14:25:06 UTC
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Re: "the two CDs"

It would seem that silver discs may very soon become double-sided. I have a BD of "Das Boot" (the film), and it's a double-sided disc. --E.A.C.
Post by Terry
only slight disadvantage is that #15 is split over the two CDs.
Terry
2014-04-04 15:31:08 UTC
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Post by Edward A. Cowan
Re: "the two CDs"
It would seem that silver discs may very soon become double-sided. I have a
BD of "Das Boot" (the film), and it's a double-sided disc. --E.A.C.
Post by Terry
only slight disadvantage is that #15 is split over the two CDs.
Well, I guess there's not much difference between turning a CD over,
versus replacing one CD with another in your player.

(I believe I read somewhere that whilst the first movement of this
quartet was played in Schubert's lifetime, the remaining movements
didn't see the light of day until about 30 years later. So one doesn't
have to run to the CD player in all that much of a hurry.)
h***@btinternet.com
2014-04-04 16:07:06 UTC
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Has anyone enjoyed the Schubert from Cuarteto Casals?
jrsnfld
2014-04-04 17:31:27 UTC
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Post by h***@btinternet.com
Has anyone enjoyed the Schubert from Cuarteto Casals?
I'm glad you mentioned it, because I didn't realize they'd recorded this piece.

I've actually been listening to a live performance of Cuarteto Casals playing this piece, from September 2012, while considering the options presented in this thread. I love the performance--they take their time, they take the repeats, they're stylish and varied with phrasing and vibrato; they're rock solid technically and musically. As far as I'm concerned, they could play forever and I wouldn't want it to stop. That's how Schubert ought to be played. I hope the CD is the same.

I'll second the mention of the Amadeus Q, while I'm at it. They are of an earlier school, but the glow of their tonal palette and the incisive, lively rendering of rhythms is the standard by which I judge others in this music. Again, the music should never end.

I also listened recently to the Lindsays, and while inevitably they're a little more square, rhythmically, than the Amadeus, their hearty (somewhat beefy) approach is very effective, too.

A Juilliard Q recording of this piece was my favorite for a while. I'm looking forward to trying it again.

--Jeff
wkasimer
2014-04-04 17:01:10 UTC
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Re: "the two CDs" It would seem that silver discs may very soon become double-sided. <
Double-sided DVD's have been around for years.

Bill
Edward A. Cowan
2014-04-06 17:01:02 UTC
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Whatever... This DVD (Das Boot film) is the first double-sided DVD I have ever encountered. Can you name a few others, please? --E.A.C.
Post by wkasimer
Double-sided DVD's have been around for years.
Bill
m***@gmail.com
2014-04-01 10:24:22 UTC
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Post by Andrew Knippenberg
I have recordings by the Busch Quartet and Quartetto Italiano. While I'm quite fond of both, and enjoy their different styles, are there any other performances I'm missing?
Alban Berg Quartet's first recording (sans exp. repeat)
wkasimer
2014-04-01 13:23:02 UTC
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I have recordings by the Busch Quartet and Quartetto Italiano. While I'm quite fond of both, and enjoy their different styles, are there any other performances I'm missing?
If you can find it (it's OOP), the Hagen Quartet on DG.

Bill
Sol L. Siegel
2014-04-02 23:12:02 UTC
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Post by Andrew Knippenberg
I have recordings by the Busch Quartet and Quartetto Italiano. While
I'm quite fond of both, and enjoy their different styles, are there
any other performances I'm missing?
Brandis Quartet: Their first version, on Orfeo. They dig very
deep here. But avoid their distressingly bland Nimbus remake
like the plague. The Orfeo, FWIW, includes the first-movement
repeat; Nimbus doesn't.

Also Budapest, never mind that it's LOC, mono and lacks the
repeat. It just speaks to me every time I hear it. On CD, I've
only seen it in the 2-disc Biddulph set with 13, 14 and Trout.

- Sol L. Siegel, Philadelphia, PA USA
c***@gmail.com
2014-04-03 11:36:28 UTC
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Post by Sol L. Siegel
Post by Andrew Knippenberg
I have recordings by the Busch Quartet and Quartetto Italiano. While
I'm quite fond of both, and enjoy their different styles, are there
any other performances I'm missing?
Brandis Quartet: Their first version, on Orfeo. They dig very
deep here. But avoid their distressingly bland Nimbus remake
like the plague. The Orfeo, FWIW, includes the first-movement
repeat; Nimbus doesn't.
Also Budapest, never mind that it's LOC, mono and lacks the
repeat. It just speaks to me every time I hear it. On CD, I've
only seen it in the 2-disc Biddulph set with 13, 14 and Trout.
- Sol L. Siegel, Philadelphia, PA USA
I agree with Sol's recommendations as well as the Busch and Hagen (the latter is op but available via SymphonyShare). Among historicals I'd also recommend the Kolisch (Symposium CD) and among newer recordings the Neues Leipziger SQ (MD&G). Is it safe to assume that the great 1962 Juilliard recording (Epic LP BC 1260) remains in LP limbo?

AC
Steve Emerson
2014-04-04 18:07:21 UTC
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Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Sol L. Siegel
Post by Andrew Knippenberg
I have recordings by the Busch Quartet and Quartetto Italiano. While
I'm quite fond of both, and enjoy their different styles, are there
any other performances I'm missing?
Brandis Quartet: Their first version, on Orfeo. They dig very
deep here. But avoid their distressingly bland Nimbus remake
like the plague. The Orfeo, FWIW, includes the first-movement
repeat; Nimbus doesn't.
Also Budapest, never mind that it's LOC, mono and lacks the
repeat. It just speaks to me every time I hear it. On CD, I've
only seen it in the 2-disc Biddulph set with 13, 14 and Trout.
- Sol L. Siegel, Philadelphia, PA USA
I agree with Sol's recommendations as well as the Busch and Hagen (the latter
is op but available via SymphonyShare). Among historicals I'd also recommend
the Kolisch (Symposium CD) and among newer recordings the Neues Leipziger SQ
(MD&G). Is it safe to assume that the great 1962 Juilliard recording (Epic LP
BC 1260) remains in LP limbo?
I believe so, presumably along with the Taneyev Quartet's even more
vital recording. Plus one on the rest, with possible exception of
Kolisch; will have to revisit. At this point, frankly, I could get along
on the Leipzig and Taneyev, the Busch, and one of the fierce ones such
as Juilliard or ABQ analog.

A Petersen Quartet live performance that turned up on Symphonyshare is
one more highly arresting, superbly played take of the fierce variety.

I would urge the OP to pick up the Leipzig, for something in marked
contrast with what he has.

SE.
jrsnfld
2014-04-05 06:34:50 UTC
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Post by Steve Emerson
I would urge the OP to pick up the Leipzig, for something in marked
contrast with what he has.
SE.
What do you think of the Hugo Wolf Quartet's recording? I've only heard the first movement, but it's formidably well played, relatively spacious. Of the recent-ish recordings I've heard, this one and the Cuarteto Casals (assuming that's anything like the live performance I've been listening to) seem capable of superceding anything I've heard since the live ABQ. I admit I'm not so fond of the quicker, fiercer recordings lately, but I suppose my mood could change.

There's also a incisive (and well played) live performance by the Prazak Quartet on YT that is worth hearing.

--Jeff
Steve Emerson
2014-04-06 01:23:04 UTC
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Post by jrsnfld
Post by Steve Emerson
I would urge the OP to pick up the Leipzig, for something in marked
contrast with what he has.
SE.
What do you think of the Hugo Wolf Quartet's recording? I've only heard the
first movement, but it's formidably well played, relatively spacious. Of the
recent-ish recordings I've heard, this one and the Cuarteto Casals (assuming
that's anything like the live performance I've been listening to) seem
capable of superceding anything I've heard since the live ABQ. I admit I'm
not so fond of the quicker, fiercer recordings lately, but I suppose my mood
could change.
There's also a incisive (and well played) live performance by the Prazak
Quartet on YT that is worth hearing.
That sounds promising. I like their D. 804 and D. 810 on Praga. Have not
heard the Hugo Wolf or the Casals. The Casals have tended to rub me the
wrong way but the Schubert might easily be a different story.

SE.
jrsnfld
2014-04-06 19:12:42 UTC
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Post by Steve Emerson
Post by jrsnfld
There's also a incisive (and well played) live performance by the Prazak
Quartet on YT that is worth hearing.
That sounds promising. I like their D. 804 and D. 810 on Praga. Have not
heard the Hugo Wolf or the Casals. The Casals have tended to rub me the
wrong way but the Schubert might easily be a different story.
You might the Casals too fussy for your tastes. (I'm guessing about the CD and about your tastes, but speculations is fun, no?).

--Jeff
h***@btinternet.com
2014-04-05 07:54:41 UTC
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Post by Steve Emerson
I would urge the OP to pick up the Leipzig, for something in marked
contrast with what he has.
SE.
Do the Leipzig Quartet take the first movement repeat?
Steve Emerson
2014-04-05 20:40:24 UTC
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Post by h***@btinternet.com
Post by Steve Emerson
I would urge the OP to pick up the Leipzig, for something in marked
contrast with what he has.
SE.
Do the Leipzig Quartet take the first movement repeat?
Yes, absolutely they do. This was Vol. 1 of their Schubert cycle and
they got off on the right foot. Very likely it was the first of their
many MDG recordings, as well (1995).

21:33 for the first movement. They do the first-movement repeat in the
quintet as well.

SE.
h***@btinternet.com
2014-04-07 07:06:48 UTC
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Post by Steve Emerson
Post by h***@btinternet.com
Do the Leipzig Quartet take the first movement repeat?
Yes, absolutely they do. This was Vol. 1 of their Schubert cycle and
they got off on the right foot. Very likely it was the first of their
many MDG recordings, as well (1995).
21:33 for the first movement. They do the first-movement repeat in the
quintet as well.
SE.
I listened to to Leipzig Quartet. I thought it was the most confidential, refined, intimate interpretation I can remember hearing. The first violinist is totally disarming in his candor. I enjoyed their voicing, especially when the cello becomes prominent. They tell a good story -- I loved the way they express internal turbulence rather than extrovert drama. Beautifully recorded.

It felt so strange to enjoy a Schubert quartet again, after spending so long listening pretty well exclusively to baroque keyboard music, where the interest is mainly contrapuntal.
c***@gmail.com
2014-04-05 11:54:44 UTC
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Post by Steve Emerson
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Sol L. Siegel
Post by Andrew Knippenberg
I have recordings by the Busch Quartet and Quartetto Italiano. While
I'm quite fond of both, and enjoy their different styles, are there
any other performances I'm missing?
Brandis Quartet: Their first version, on Orfeo. They dig very
deep here. But avoid their distressingly bland Nimbus remake
like the plague. The Orfeo, FWIW, includes the first-movement
repeat; Nimbus doesn't.
Also Budapest, never mind that it's LOC, mono and lacks the
repeat. It just speaks to me every time I hear it. On CD, I've
only seen it in the 2-disc Biddulph set with 13, 14 and Trout.
- Sol L. Siegel, Philadelphia, PA USA
I agree with Sol's recommendations as well as the Busch and Hagen (the latter
is op but available via SymphonyShare). Among historicals I'd also recommend
the Kolisch (Symposium CD) and among newer recordings the Neues Leipziger SQ
(MD&G). Is it safe to assume that the great 1962 Juilliard recording (Epic LP
BC 1260) remains in LP limbo?
I believe so, presumably along with the Taneyev Quartet's even more
vital recording. Plus one on the rest, with possible exception of
Kolisch; will have to revisit. At this point, frankly, I could get along
on the Leipzig and Taneyev, the Busch, and one of the fierce ones such
as Juilliard or ABQ analog.
A Petersen Quartet live performance that turned up on Symphonyshare is
one more highly arresting, superbly played take of the fierce variety.
I would urge the OP to pick up the Leipzig, for something in marked
contrast with what he has.
SE.
How could I have forgotten to mention the Taneyev! All of their Schubert is marvelous, and I have heard most of it thanks to Steve's generosity. Does anyone know if this site is on the level: http://stlballoonjam.com/cbin/fr/FLAC-Taneyev-Quartet/m16008/ ? Clicking on a download yields an executable, which I am loath to run.

AC
h***@btinternet.com
2014-04-05 13:59:11 UTC
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I just tried to download a Louis Couperin CD from that site, Alan, and it directed me to a screen where you have to pay to sign up to a server, so my guess is it's a scam.

The Taneyev Quartet recordings they list are on spotify and so I suppose they're all easy to find.
MELMOTH
2014-04-03 19:00:41 UTC
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Ce cher mammifère du nom de Andrew Knippenberg nous susurrait, le mardi
01/04/2014, dans nos oreilles grandes ouvertes mais un peu sales tout
de même, et dans le message
Post by Andrew Knippenberg
I have recordings by the Busch Quartet and Quartetto Italiano. While I'm
quite fond of both, and enjoy their different styles, are there any other
performances I'm missing?
*Juilliard* (Sony)...
*WienerKonzertHaus* (Universal)...
*Cherubini* (EMI)...
*Amadeus I* (DG)...
--
Car avec beaucoup de science, il y a beaucoup de chagrin ; et celui qui
accroît sa science accroît sa douleur.
[Ecclésiaste, 1-18]
MELMOTH - souffrant
dk
2014-04-05 06:05:59 UTC
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Post by Andrew Knippenberg
I have recordings by the Busch Quartet and Quartetto Italiano. While I'm quite fond of both, and enjoy their different styles, are there any other performances I'm missing?
The Strub Quartet, mid/late 1930s performance
issued (I believe) by Electrola.

dk
h***@btinternet.com
2014-04-05 07:52:22 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by Andrew Knippenberg
I have recordings by the Busch Quartet and Quartetto Italiano. While I'm quite fond of both, and enjoy their different styles, are there any other performances I'm missing?
The Strub Quartet, mid/late 1930s performance
issued (I believe) by Electrola.
dk
I once started a discussion about this but no-one could trance it. Do you actually have it? It would be great if there was a way you could let us hear it, if you've made a transfer.
dk
2020-11-18 21:42:32 UTC
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Post by h***@btinternet.com
The Strub Quartet, mid/late 1930s performance issued (I believe) by Electrola.
I once started a discussion about this but no-one could trance it. Do you actually
have it? It would be great if there was a way you could let us hear it, if you've made
a transfer.
5 German Electrola 78 rpm HMV EH 1039/43!

I don't have it. I heard it from a tape transfer in the music section of
the national library of a small European country. I would definitely
kill for a copy! None of the other performances I heard come even
close. I recently found however on YT a performance in a similar
vein by the Doric String Quartet. Give it a try:



dk
Herman
2020-11-19 08:40:01 UTC
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Post by dk
I don't have it. I heard it from a tape transfer in the music section of
the national library of a small European country. I would definitely
kill for a copy! None of the other performances I heard come even
close. I recently found however on YT a performance in a similar
http://youtu.be/xW8PI2Xa8eA
dk
There are so many good and exciting recordings of this quartet, it's really hard to go wrong.
The notion that a good performance is a once-in-a-century thing, and you would have to go to "small European countries" to check out a unique recording is a parody of the connoisseur myth (conferring prestige on the connoisseur for knowing about things other people are not familiar with).
The Doric quartet is a fine ensemble (there are literally dozens of excellent string quartets these days) and I guess the reason why this one appeals to DK is there is a woman with long straight hair on the viola here. A blonde Lim.
Gerard
2020-11-19 10:03:10 UTC
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Post by Herman
Post by dk
I don't have it. I heard it from a tape transfer in the music section of
the national library of a small European country. I would definitely
kill for a copy! None of the other performances I heard come even
close. I recently found however on YT a performance in a similar
http://youtu.be/xW8PI2Xa8eA
dk
There are so many good and exciting recordings of this quartet, it's really hard to go wrong.
The notion that a good performance is a once-in-a-century thing, and you would have to go to "small European countries" to check out a unique recording is a parody of the connoisseur myth (conferring prestige on the connoisseur for knowing about things other people are not familiar with).
It is the usual grotesque dk exaggeration.
Post by Herman
The Doric quartet is a fine ensemble (there are literally dozens of excellent string quartets these days) and I guess the reason why this one appeals to DK is there is a woman with long straight hair on the viola here. A blonde Lim.
Wasn't (or isn't) there a Lim lookalike as well?
http://doricstringquartet.com/biography/


It seems that the group has not always the same members.
https://www.amazon.com/Korngold-String-Quartets-Doric-Quartet/dp/B0040JEWOW/
Herman
2020-11-19 10:20:58 UTC
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Post by Gerard
Post by Herman
Post by dk
I don't have it. I heard it from a tape transfer in the music section of
the national library of a small European country. I would definitely
kill for a copy! None of the other performances I heard come even
close. I recently found however on YT a performance in a similar
http://youtu.be/xW8PI2Xa8eA
dk
There are so many good and exciting recordings of this quartet, it's really hard to go wrong.
The notion that a good performance is a once-in-a-century thing, and you would have to go to "small European countries" to check out a unique recording is a parody of the connoisseur myth (conferring prestige on the connoisseur for knowing about things other people are not familiar with).
It is the usual grotesque dk exaggeration.
Post by Herman
The Doric quartet is a fine ensemble (there are literally dozens of excellent string quartets these days) and I guess the reason why this one appeals to DK is there is a woman with long straight hair on the viola here. A blonde Lim.
Wasn't (or isn't) there a Lim lookalike as well?
http://doricstringquartet.com/biography/
It seems that the group has not always the same members.
https://www.amazon.com/Korngold-String-Quartets-Doric-Quartet/dp/B0040JEWOW/
Youngish string quartets tend to have member changes. It's a rather hard life, really, living out of a suit case, compared to being in an orchestra.
dk
2020-11-19 19:39:25 UTC
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Post by Herman
Post by dk
I don't have it. I heard it from a tape transfer in the music section of
the national library of a small European country. I would definitely
kill for a copy! None of the other performances I heard come even
close. I recently found however on YT a performance in a similar
http://youtu.be/xW8PI2Xa8eA
There are so many good and exciting recordings of this quartet, it's
really hard to go wrong.
Matter of opinion.
Post by Herman
The notion that a good performance is a once-in-a-century thing,
I heard plenty of other people say the same about Strub's D.887.
Post by Herman
and you would have to go to "small European countries" to check
out a unique recording
I did not suggest anything like it, and I provided the recording
information so anyone can look them up in their university,
local, regional or national libraries. The fact I mentioned the
circumstances of my first encounter with this spellbinding
performance should not be taken as a suggestion to repeat
my journey. Incidentally, I spent 6 months listening to this
performance EVERY DAY, and this was not too long after
hearing the Julliard (Carlyss/Adam) perform 12-15 live.
As riveting as they were in 12-14, to my ears they fell
flat in D.887.
Post by Herman
is a parody of the connoisseur myth (conferring prestige on
the connoisseur for knowing about things other people are
not familiar with).
Acting out again your paranoid obsessions?
Post by Herman
The Doric quartet is a fine ensemble (there are literally dozens of
excellent string quartets these days) and I guess the reason why
this one appeals to DK is there is a woman with long straight hair
on the viola here. A blonde Lim.
Ridiculous! FWIW I have listened to all D.887 recordings I could
lay my hands on -- LPs, CDs, YT, live performances -- and none
have come as close to Strub's as the Doric. I couldn't care less
about the identities and genders of the rowers.

dk
Frank Berger
2020-11-19 20:56:34 UTC
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Permalink
Post by dk
Post by Herman
Post by dk
I don't have it. I heard it from a tape transfer in the music section of
the national library of a small European country. I would definitely
kill for a copy! None of the other performances I heard come even
close. I recently found however on YT a performance in a similar
http://youtu.be/xW8PI2Xa8eA
There are so many good and exciting recordings of this quartet, it's
really hard to go wrong.
Matter of opinion.
Post by Herman
The notion that a good performance is a once-in-a-century thing,
I heard plenty of other people say the same about Strub's D.887.
Post by Herman
and you would have to go to "small European countries" to check
out a unique recording
I did not suggest anything like it, and I provided the recording
information so anyone can look them up in their university,
local, regional or national libraries. The fact I mentioned the
circumstances of my first encounter with this spellbinding
performance should not be taken as a suggestion to repeat
my journey. Incidentally, I spent 6 months listening to this
performance EVERY DAY, and this was not too long after
hearing the Julliard (Carlyss/Adam) perform 12-15 live.
As riveting as they were in 12-14, to my ears they fell
flat in D.887.
Post by Herman
is a parody of the connoisseur myth (conferring prestige on
the connoisseur for knowing about things other people are
not familiar with).
Acting out again your paranoid obsessions?
Post by Herman
The Doric quartet is a fine ensemble (there are literally dozens of
excellent string quartets these days) and I guess the reason why
this one appeals to DK is there is a woman with long straight hair
on the viola here. A blonde Lim.
Ridiculous! FWIW I have listened to all D.887 recordings I could
lay my hands on -- LPs, CDs, YT, live performances -- and none
have come as close to Strub's as the Doric. I couldn't care less
about the identities and genders of the rowers.
dk
FWIW, Hurwitz gives a review for the Doric's Haydn op. 33
quartets that could not be worse. I think he uses the
expression barf-worthy.
dk
2020-11-19 21:26:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Frank Berger
Post by dk
Post by Herman
Post by dk
I don't have it. I heard it from a tape transfer in the music section of
the national library of a small European country. I would definitely
kill for a copy! None of the other performances I heard come even
close. I recently found however on YT a performance in a similar
http://youtu.be/xW8PI2Xa8eA
There are so many good and exciting recordings of this quartet, it's
really hard to go wrong.
Matter of opinion.
Post by Herman
The notion that a good performance is a once-in-a-century thing,
I heard plenty of other people say the same about Strub's D.887.
Post by Herman
and you would have to go to "small European countries" to check
out a unique recording
I did not suggest anything like it, and I provided the recording
information so anyone can look them up in their university,
local, regional or national libraries. The fact I mentioned the
circumstances of my first encounter with this spellbinding
performance should not be taken as a suggestion to repeat
my journey. Incidentally, I spent 6 months listening to this
performance EVERY DAY, and this was not too long after
hearing the Julliard (Carlyss/Adam) perform 12-15 live.
As riveting as they were in 12-14, to my ears they fell
flat in D.887.
Post by Herman
is a parody of the connoisseur myth (conferring prestige on
the connoisseur for knowing about things other people are
not familiar with).
Acting out again your paranoid obsessions?
Post by Herman
The Doric quartet is a fine ensemble (there are literally dozens of
excellent string quartets these days) and I guess the reason why
this one appeals to DK is there is a woman with long straight hair
on the viola here. A blonde Lim.
Ridiculous! FWIW I have listened to all D.887 recordings I could
lay my hands on -- LPs, CDs, YT, live performances -- and none
have come as close to Strub's as the Doric. I couldn't care less
about the identities and genders of the rowers.
FWIW, Hurwitz gives a review for the Doric's Haydn op. 33
quartets that could not be worse. I think he uses the
expression barf-worthy.
I could not care less what Hurwitz or anyone else thinks about it.
Remember music reviewers and record reviewers are reviewers
because they are prolific, aggressive writers, not because they
have better taste or hearing or musical knowledge.

dk
Frank Berger
2020-11-19 21:38:28 UTC
Reply
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Post by dk
Post by Frank Berger
Post by dk
Post by Herman
Post by dk
I don't have it. I heard it from a tape transfer in the music section of
the national library of a small European country. I would definitely
kill for a copy! None of the other performances I heard come even
close. I recently found however on YT a performance in a similar
http://youtu.be/xW8PI2Xa8eA
There are so many good and exciting recordings of this quartet, it's
really hard to go wrong.
Matter of opinion.
Post by Herman
The notion that a good performance is a once-in-a-century thing,
I heard plenty of other people say the same about Strub's D.887.
Post by Herman
and you would have to go to "small European countries" to check
out a unique recording
I did not suggest anything like it, and I provided the recording
information so anyone can look them up in their university,
local, regional or national libraries. The fact I mentioned the
circumstances of my first encounter with this spellbinding
performance should not be taken as a suggestion to repeat
my journey. Incidentally, I spent 6 months listening to this
performance EVERY DAY, and this was not too long after
hearing the Julliard (Carlyss/Adam) perform 12-15 live.
As riveting as they were in 12-14, to my ears they fell
flat in D.887.
Post by Herman
is a parody of the connoisseur myth (conferring prestige on
the connoisseur for knowing about things other people are
not familiar with).
Acting out again your paranoid obsessions?
Post by Herman
The Doric quartet is a fine ensemble (there are literally dozens of
excellent string quartets these days) and I guess the reason why
this one appeals to DK is there is a woman with long straight hair
on the viola here. A blonde Lim.
Ridiculous! FWIW I have listened to all D.887 recordings I could
lay my hands on -- LPs, CDs, YT, live performances -- and none
have come as close to Strub's as the Doric. I couldn't care less
about the identities and genders of the rowers.
FWIW, Hurwitz gives a review for the Doric's Haydn op. 33
quartets that could not be worse. I think he uses the
expression barf-worthy.
I could not care less what Hurwitz or anyone else thinks about it.
Remember music reviewers and record reviewers are reviewers
because they are prolific, aggressive writers, not because they
have better taste or hearing or musical knowledge.
dk
Definitely partly true.

Mandryka
2020-11-19 21:05:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dk
Post by Herman
Post by dk
I don't have it. I heard it from a tape transfer in the music section of
the national library of a small European country. I would definitely
kill for a copy! None of the other performances I heard come even
close. I recently found however on YT a performance in a similar
http://youtu.be/xW8PI2Xa8eA
There are so many good and exciting recordings of this quartet, it's
really hard to go wrong.
Matter of opinion.
Post by Herman
The notion that a good performance is a once-in-a-century thing,
I heard plenty of other people say the same about Strub's D.887.
Post by Herman
and you would have to go to "small European countries" to check
out a unique recording
I did not suggest anything like it, and I provided the recording
information so anyone can look them up in their university,
local, regional or national libraries. The fact I mentioned the
circumstances of my first encounter with this spellbinding
performance should not be taken as a suggestion to repeat
my journey. Incidentally, I spent 6 months listening to this
performance EVERY DAY, and this was not too long after
hearing the Julliard (Carlyss/Adam) perform 12-15 live.
As riveting as they were in 12-14, to my ears they fell
flat in D.887.
Post by Herman
is a parody of the connoisseur myth (conferring prestige on
the connoisseur for knowing about things other people are
not familiar with).
Acting out again your paranoid obsessions?
Post by Herman
The Doric quartet is a fine ensemble (there are literally dozens of
excellent string quartets these days) and I guess the reason why
this one appeals to DK is there is a woman with long straight hair
on the viola here. A blonde Lim.
Ridiculous! FWIW I have listened to all D.887 recordings I could
lay my hands on -- LPs, CDs, YT, live performances -- and none
have come as close to Strub's as the Doric. I couldn't care less
about the identities and genders of the rowers.
dk
Well I for one am pleased you posted the link. I often have trouble enjoying the first movement of this quartet, especially when the repeats are taken. But this was a pleasure to hear. The balance, the textures, are clear enough to let me hear dialogue, drama coming from within the voices. And that makes it animated. . .
dk
2020-11-19 21:29:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mandryka
Post by dk
Post by Herman
Post by dk
I don't have it. I heard it from a tape transfer in the music section of
the national library of a small European country. I would definitely
kill for a copy! None of the other performances I heard come even
close. I recently found however on YT a performance in a similar
http://youtu.be/xW8PI2Xa8eA
There are so many good and exciting recordings of this quartet, it's
really hard to go wrong.
Matter of opinion.
Post by Herman
The notion that a good performance is a once-in-a-century thing,
I heard plenty of other people say the same about Strub's D.887.
Post by Herman
and you would have to go to "small European countries" to check
out a unique recording
I did not suggest anything like it, and I provided the recording
information so anyone can look them up in their university,
local, regional or national libraries. The fact I mentioned the
circumstances of my first encounter with this spellbinding
performance should not be taken as a suggestion to repeat
my journey. Incidentally, I spent 6 months listening to this
performance EVERY DAY, and this was not too long after
hearing the Julliard (Carlyss/Adam) perform 12-15 live.
As riveting as they were in 12-14, to my ears they fell
flat in D.887.
Post by Herman
is a parody of the connoisseur myth (conferring prestige on
the connoisseur for knowing about things other people are
not familiar with).
Acting out again your paranoid obsessions?
Post by Herman
The Doric quartet is a fine ensemble (there are literally dozens of
excellent string quartets these days) and I guess the reason why
this one appeals to DK is there is a woman with long straight hair
on the viola here. A blonde Lim.
Ridiculous! FWIW I have listened to all D.887 recordings I could
lay my hands on -- LPs, CDs, YT, live performances -- and none
have come as close to Strub's as the Doric. I couldn't care less
about the identities and genders of the rowers.
Well I for one am pleased you posted the link. I often have trouble
enjoying the first movement of this quartet, especially when the
? repeats are taken. But this was a pleasure to hear. The balance,
the textures, are clear enough to let me hear dialogue, drama
coming from within the voices. And that makes it animated. . .
Glad you enjoyed it. If you liked the Doric you would probably like
the Strub. I hope someone finds a way to reissue the recording,
or to digitize its and upload it to YT. it should be out of copyright
by now.

dk
Andrej Kluge
2014-04-06 13:04:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Hi,
Post by Andrew Knippenberg
I have recordings by the Busch Quartet and Quartetto Italiano. While
I'm quite fond of both, and enjoy their different styles, are there
any other performances I'm missing?
For me: Panocha Quartet (1991), hand down. No other recording comes close.
YMMD.

Ciao
AK
d***@nytimes.com
2014-04-07 02:53:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Andrew Knippenberg
I have recordings by the Busch Quartet and Quartetto Italiano. While I'm quite fond of both, and enjoy their different styles, are there any other performances I'm missing?
Thanks for asking this question --- the various responses have made me realize how many recordings I haven't heard (yet). My personal favorites fall into two categories: 1) the super-tight, proto-Stravinskyesque modernist approach: the Hagen, the (analog EMI) Alban Berg Quartet, the marvelous 60s Julliard/Epic LP --- and 2) the relaxed and wayward gemultich approach i.e. the second (stereo 60s) Amadeus recording, the Tanayev and the Kolisch. I'll be searching out the Strub and Leipziger and relistening to the first Brandis recording based on the suggestions in this thread. And the Casals!

I've always found the Busch Quartet Schubert recordings suffer from the constricted sound in a way that their Beethoven recordings don't, but I'm sure that's just me ...
Johannes Roehl
2014-04-09 09:11:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Andrew Knippenberg
I have recordings by the Busch Quartet and Quartetto Italiano. While I'm quite fond of both, and enjoy their different styles, are there any other performances I'm missing?
Many good ones have been mentioned.
I wonder if anyone compared the two recordings by the Auryn Quartet. The
one on TACET was their Debut (or at least one of their first recordings)
and is regarded very highly, but I only know their later recording in
the cpo Schubert complete quartets which is very good, but not so
extraordinary. Still, I am not sure I want to shell out for the Tacet disc.

An interesting recording with a very bleak and slow first movement is
the one from the 80ties by Kremer/Philips/Kashkashian/Ma on CBS/Sony.
For some reason this does not seem very well known.

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