Discussion:
Information request - Which was the first Complete Beethoven Symphonies on LP? Toscanini, Walter or Scherchen?
Add Reply
John Fowler
2019-09-05 15:01:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Yes I know Weingartner beat everyone on 78s.
John Fowler
2019-09-05 15:11:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
During the mono LP era:
-- RCA had Arturo Toscanini/NBC
-- Columbia had Bruno Walter/New York (+ Philadelphia)
-- Westminster had Herman Scherchen/Vienna State Opera (+ Royal Philharmonic)
-- EMI had Herbert von Karajan/Philharmonia

Did Decca, DG or Philips issue any complete Beethoven Symphony sets during the mono LP era?
wkasimer
2019-09-05 15:36:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Fowler
Did Decca, DG or Philips issue any complete Beethoven Symphony sets during the mono LP era?
I don't believe so, although part of Jochum's DG set was monaural.

Wasn't Schuricht's set (EMI) also mono?
msw design
2019-09-05 19:50:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by wkasimer
Post by John Fowler
Did Decca, DG or Philips issue any complete Beethoven Symphony sets during the mono LP era?
I don't believe so, although part of Jochum's DG set was monaural.
Wasn't Schuricht's set (EMI) also mono?
All except one of them. 8?
John Fowler
2019-09-05 20:21:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
It looks like Toscanini/NBC Symphony was first. Four months ahead of Bruno Walter/ New York Philharmonic.

They finished their set on November 19, 1952 with Symphony 8.
All nine Symphonies were on LP by early 1953.
I don't know when the boxed set was issued. Anybody?

Bruno Walter/New York Philharmonic finished their set on March 7, 1953 with a remake of the Symphony 9 finale.
All nine Symphonies were on LP by late 1953.
I'm pretty sure it was not issued as a boxed set until much later - late 1960s on the budget label Odyssey.
John Fowler
2019-09-05 20:32:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
If the conductor had not insisted on a re-do of the Symphony 9 finale, Bruno Walter/New York Philharmonic would have finished their set eight months ahead of Toscanini/NBC.
Walter taped Symphony 4 on march 24, 1952.
p***@classicalnotes.net
2019-09-05 20:42:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Fowler
If the conductor had not insisted on a re-do of the Symphony 9 finale, Bruno Walter/New York Philharmonic would have finished their set eight months ahead of Toscanini/NBC.
Walter taped Symphony 4 on march 24, 1952.
Actually, according to the authoritative discography in the Ryding/Pachefsky biography Walter's NYP 9th with the original 4th movement was issued on LP as SL 156, presumably shortly after it was recorded in 1949.
John Fowler
2019-09-05 21:21:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by p***@classicalnotes.net
Actually, according to the authoritative discography in the Ryding/Pachefsky biography Walter's NYP 9th with the original 4th movement was issued on LP as SL 156, presumably shortly after it was recorded in 1949.
YES, YOU ARE CORRECT. The 1949 recording of the entire Ninth Symphony was issued on LP, however briefly.
This means Walter/NYPO finished the first complete set of the nine Beethoven Symphonies on March 24, 1952, eight months ahead of Toscanini/NBC.
Both versions of the Ninth finale will be included in the upcoming 77 CD Sony Bruno Walter box.
John Fowler
2019-09-05 21:38:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Karajan, Philharmonia was recorded by EMI in 1951-1955, released in mono on LP. The stereo Beethoven 8th (1955) was only released much later.

Schuricht, Paris Conservatoire was recorded in 1957-1958, released in mono on LP.
This was AFTER the Krips/LSO and Walter/Columbia Symphony stereo sets.
The Paris branch of EMI was behind every technological innovation in the recording industry. Way behind (sorry).
Beethoven's 9th was only released in stereo fifty years later.
drh8h
2019-09-06 00:20:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Fowler
Karajan, Philharmonia was recorded by EMI in 1951-1955, released in mono on LP. The stereo Beethoven 8th (1955) was only released much later.
Schuricht, Paris Conservatoire was recorded in 1957-1958, released in mono on LP.
This was AFTER the Krips/LSO and Walter/Columbia Symphony stereo sets.
The Paris branch of EMI was behind every technological innovation in the recording industry. Way behind (sorry).
Beethoven's 9th was only released in stereo fifty years later.
And it all started with a sea sick turntable ruining many important recordings and no one seemed to notice. Only in the last decade or so with pitch stabilizing software can we finally hear what they should have sounded like in the first place: recordings by Debussy, Grieg, Saint-Saens, Pugno....

DH
John Fowler
2019-09-06 12:47:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Third place: Westminster Records issued a complete mono Beethoven set with Hermann Scherchen conducting the Vienna State Opera and the "Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra of London" (actually the Royal Philharmonic) recorded 1951-1954.
Symphonies 3 and 6 were re-recorded in stereo in 1958.

Loading...