Discussion:
"Monteux doesn't sell"
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g***@gmail.com
2018-08-23 06:58:52 UTC
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https://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/beethoven-symphonies-6
g***@gmail.com
2018-10-08 20:55:46 UTC
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https://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/beethoven-symphonies-6
(Recent Youtube upload):

Liszt - Les Préludes - Boston / Monteux studio
Jerry
2018-10-08 21:22:37 UTC
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I could be mistaken, but the “Monteux doesn’t sell” line, may have been attributed to
an un-named RCA executive in John Culshaw’s book, who likewise did not
name another executive, perhaps from EMI, who claimed a stereo Ring Cycle
would not sell.

Jerry
Russ (not Martha)
2018-10-09 17:20:03 UTC
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Post by Jerry
I could be mistaken, but the “Monteux doesn’t sell” line, may have been attributed to
an un-named RCA executive in John Culshaw’s book, who likewise did not
name another executive, perhaps from EMI, who claimed a stereo Ring Cycle
would not sell.
Jerry
Erich Leinsdorf, in his book 'Cadenza,' describes how the then manager of the RCA Red Seal Division, cancelled at the last minute a session to record Schumann's 2nd Symphony ('It won't sell') - and in fact the same individual wanted to scrap Leinsdorf's sessions to record the Bartók and Stravinsky Violin Concertos with Joseph Silverstein, but happily in this case Leinsdorf prevailed.

In Leinsdorf's book, the executive is indeed named.

Russ (not Martha)
Bob Harper
2018-10-10 20:17:06 UTC
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Post by Jerry
I could be mistaken, but the “Monteux doesn’t sell” line, may have been attributed to
an un-named RCA executive in John Culshaw’s book, who likewise did not
name another executive, perhaps from EMI, who claimed a stereo Ring Cycle
would not sell.
Jerry
Erich Leinsdorf, in his book 'Cadenza,' describes how the then manager of the RCA Red Seal Division, cancelled at the last minute a session to record Schumann's 2nd Symphony ('It won't sell') - and in fact the same individual wanted to scrap Leinsdorf's sessions to record the Bartók and Stravinsky Violin Concertos with Joseph Silverstein, but happily in this case Leinsdorf prevailed.
In Leinsdorf's book, the executive is indeed named.
Russ (not Martha)
Well, don't keep us in suspense! :)

Bob Harper
Russ (not Martha)
2018-10-11 17:13:33 UTC
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Post by Russ (not Martha)
Post by Jerry
I could be mistaken, but the “Monteux doesn’t sell” line, may have been attributed to
an un-named RCA executive in John Culshaw’s book, who likewise did not
name another executive, perhaps from EMI, who claimed a stereo Ring Cycle
would not sell.
Jerry
Erich Leinsdorf, in his book 'Cadenza,' describes how the then manager of the RCA Red Seal Division, cancelled at the last minute a session to record Schumann's 2nd Symphony ('It won't sell') - and in fact the same individual wanted to scrap Leinsdorf's sessions to record the Bartók and Stravinsky Violin Concertos with Joseph Silverstein, but happily in this case Leinsdorf prevailed.
In Leinsdorf's book, the executive is indeed named.
Russ (not Martha)
Well, don't keep us in suspense! :)
Bob Harper
Roger Hall. There was an obit in the NYT for June 12, 2005 which listed some of the artists he signed up, but not the ones whose projects he attempted to squelch.

Russ (not Martha)
l***@gmail.com
2018-10-11 20:16:09 UTC
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https://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/beethoven-symphonies-6
What about the RCA executive, (O'Connor?) who refused to allow Rachmaninov to record many of his own works? That was beyond a disaster.

Mort Linder
D***@aol.com
2018-10-11 21:27:52 UTC
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https://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/beethoven-symphonies-6
What about the RCA executive, (O'Connor?) who refused to allow Rachmaninov to record many of his own works? That was beyond a disaster.
Mort Linder
It was Charles O'Connell. Agreed that O'Connell's treatment of Rachmaninoff -- his refusal to let Rachmaninoff record a lot of what he wanted to record -- is one of the most outrageous, disastrous things in the history of recording. I have read that Rachmaninoff wanted RCA Victor to record at least some of his recitals live, but O'Connell refused; that Rachmaninoff wanted to record Beethoven's First Concerto with Toscanini, and O'Connell refused; likewise Schumann's A Minor Concerto (with another conductor I can't recall); and Rachmaninoff wanted to record some of his music conducting the Chicago Symphony. In every case, O'Connell refused.

Don Tait
g***@gmail.com
2018-10-11 23:23:34 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
https://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/beethoven-symphonies-6
What about the RCA executive, (O'Connor?) who refused to allow Rachmaninov to record many of his own works? That was beyond a disaster.
Mort Linder
It was Charles O'Connell. Agreed that O'Connell's treatment of Rachmaninoff -- his refusal to let Rachmaninoff record a lot of what he wanted to record -- is one of the most outrageous, disastrous things in the history of recording. I have read that Rachmaninoff wanted RCA Victor to record at least some of his recitals live, but O'Connell refused; that Rachmaninoff wanted to record Beethoven's First Concerto with Toscanini, and O'Connell refused; likewise Schumann's A Minor Concerto (with another conductor I can't recall); and Rachmaninoff wanted to record some of his music conducting the Chicago Symphony. In every case, O'Connell refused.
Don Tait
According to this recent item:

- O’Connell admired Sergei Rachmaninoff – yet only recorded Rachmaninoff in two extended solo piano works: Schumann’s Carnaval and Chopin’s B-flat minor Sonata, both classics of the discography for piano. That is: O’Connell failed to record Rachmaninoff’s esteemed readings of Liszt’s Sonata or Beethoven’s Op. 111. Or of the piece Rachmaninoff considered his supreme compositional achievement: the existential Symphonic Dances. Rachmaninoff was known to play the Symphonic Dances, privately, with his friend Vladimir Horowitz in the two-piano version. We know that he wished to record the Symphonic Dances as a conductor. O’Connell had thrice recorded Rachmaninoff memorably conducting the Philadelphia Orchestra in his own music. But O’Connell lacked enthusiasm for the Symphonic Dances and nothing was done.

http://www.artsjournal.com/uq/2018/09/rachmaninoff-uncorked-take-two-rca-ormandy-and-the-cork.html
Russ (not Martha)
2018-10-13 03:42:59 UTC
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https://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/beethoven-symphonies-6
What about the RCA executive, (O'Connor?) who refused to allow Rachmaninov to record many of his own works? That was beyond a disaster.
Mort Linder
It was Charles O'Connell. Agreed that O'Connell's treatment of Rachmaninoff -- his refusal to let Rachmaninoff record a lot of what he wanted to record -- is one of the most outrageous, disastrous things in the history of recording. I have read that Rachmaninoff wanted RCA Victor to record at least some of his recitals live, but O'Connell refused; that Rachmaninoff wanted to record Beethoven's First Concerto with Toscanini, and O'Connell refused; likewise Schumann's A Minor Concerto (with another conductor I can't recall); and Rachmaninoff wanted to record some of his music conducting the Chicago Symphony. In every case, O'Connell refused.
Don Tait
O'Connell may now be roasting in the Lake of Fire for his treatment of Rachmaninoff, but he did orchestrate a couple of César Franck's organ pieces; I would love to see modern recordings of these.

Russ (not Martha)

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