Discussion:
Honeck Brahms 4
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mswd...@gmail.com
2021-11-17 14:16:00 UTC
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Gifting all of you an on-topic message...

A friend and I have heard it and both think it is sensational. To my mind, it is micromanaged, but positively- all rhythms are clear, but then shaped and pushed around to sculpt dramatic impact. There is nothing staid or particularly patient here, even when things proceed naturally. In fact, the tension, especially in movement 1, is dialed up to 11, to thrilling effect. This is Brahms played as the sharpest Beethoven, while still sounding idiomatic (What does that mean? Reiner brings tension to his recordings, and they always sound strange to me along the lines of "what if this was actually composed by Tchaikovsky?") The orchestral tone the opposite of Karajan: absolutely transparent.

The way Reference manages their releases, it is hard to imagine we'd get a cycle out of him before he goes somewhere else, but if there is something special about this PSO/Honeck relationship - and I'd say there is - that's what I would ask for. At least 1 and 3, please.
Bob Harper
2021-11-17 14:30:36 UTC
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Post by ***@gmail.com
Gifting all of you an on-topic message...
A friend and I have heard it and both think it is sensational. To my mind, it is micromanaged, but positively- all rhythms are clear, but then shaped and pushed around to sculpt dramatic impact. There is nothing staid or particularly patient here, even when things proceed naturally. In fact, the tension, especially in movement 1, is dialed up to 11, to thrilling effect. This is Brahms played as the sharpest Beethoven, while still sounding idiomatic (What does that mean? Reiner brings tension to his recordings, and they always sound strange to me along the lines of "what if this was actually composed by Tchaikovsky?") The orchestral tone the opposite of Karajan: absolutely transparent.
The way Reference manages their releases, it is hard to imagine we'd get a cycle out of him before he goes somewhere else, but if there is something special about this PSO/Honeck relationship - and I'd say there is - that's what I would ask for. At least 1 and 3, please.
I don't buy many CDs these days, but I may have to make an exception for
this one.

Bob Harper
mswd...@gmail.com
2021-11-17 14:58:10 UTC
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Post by Bob Harper
Post by ***@gmail.com
Gifting all of you an on-topic message...
A friend and I have heard it and both think it is sensational. To my mind, it is micromanaged, but positively- all rhythms are clear, but then shaped and pushed around to sculpt dramatic impact. There is nothing staid or particularly patient here, even when things proceed naturally. In fact, the tension, especially in movement 1, is dialed up to 11, to thrilling effect. This is Brahms played as the sharpest Beethoven, while still sounding idiomatic (What does that mean? Reiner brings tension to his recordings, and they always sound strange to me along the lines of "what if this was actually composed by Tchaikovsky?") The orchestral tone the opposite of Karajan: absolutely transparent.
The way Reference manages their releases, it is hard to imagine we'd get a cycle out of him before he goes somewhere else, but if there is something special about this PSO/Honeck relationship - and I'd say there is - that's what I would ask for. At least 1 and 3, please.
I don't buy many CDs these days, but I may have to make an exception for
this one.
Bob Harper
My friend tried it on Spotify (free if you put up with a few ads) and said it was unlike anything he's heard. So you can sample it risk-free.
Andrew Clarke
2021-11-18 03:00:14 UTC
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Post by Bob Harper
I don't buy many CDs these days, but I may have to make an exception for
this one.
If you prefer downloads, it's available from Presto Classical as MP3 and various flavours of FLAC. The physical disc - an SACD - is currently out of stock there, so it must be selling well.

Andrew Clarke
Canberra
Frank Berger
2021-11-18 06:13:04 UTC
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Post by Andrew Clarke
Post by Bob Harper
I don't buy many CDs these days, but I may have to make an exception for
this one.
If you prefer downloads, it's available from Presto Classical as MP3 and various flavours of FLAC. The physical disc - an SACD - is currently out of stock there, so it must be selling well.
Andrew Clarke
Canberra
I ordered 5 of the Honeck Reference recordings today at their web site ($20 each) and they are available and shipping tomorrow. The high Ebay and Amazon prices don't seem to make a lot of sense.
mswd...@gmail.com
2021-11-19 04:01:41 UTC
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I ordered 5 of the Honeck Reference recordings today at their web site ($20 each) and they are available and shipping tomorrow. The high Ebay and Amazon prices don't seem to make a lot of sense.
The Exton Tchaikovsky 5 is marvelous if you can get your hands on it, but if you can't, the YouTube Frankfurt performance is also electric.
Flowsouth8
2021-11-19 19:47:37 UTC
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I guess I'm the only one who notices the grunting on these Honeck/Pittsburgh recordings? Is it unreasonable to expect the conductor to be quiet during a performance, especially one that is being recorded?
Colin Davis should help you better calibrate.
Okay, I laughed. Yes, Davis was a hummer. But the engineers weren't able to pick it up so clearly in his older recordings.
Frank Berger
2021-11-17 15:52:06 UTC
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Post by ***@gmail.com
Gifting all of you an on-topic message...
A friend and I have heard it and both think it is sensational. To my mind, it is micromanaged, but positively- all rhythms are clear, but then shaped and pushed around to sculpt dramatic impact. There is nothing staid or particularly patient here, even when things proceed naturally. In fact, the tension, especially in movement 1, is dialed up to 11, to thrilling effect. This is Brahms played as the sharpest Beethoven, while still sounding idiomatic (What does that mean? Reiner brings tension to his recordings, and they always sound strange to me along the lines of "what if this was actually composed by Tchaikovsky?") The orchestral tone the opposite of Karajan: absolutely transparent.
The way Reference manages their releases, it is hard to imagine we'd get a cycle out of him before he goes somewhere else, but if there is something special about this PSO/Honeck relationship - and I'd say there is - that's what I would ask for. At least 1 and 3, please.
This post reminds me that I has ordered this (or thought I had, according to my apparently imperfect records) on Nov. 4. A search of my e-mail, Amazon and E-bay orders reveals no such order. Turns out many of the Honeck/Pittsburgh releases on Reference Recordings (there are 12 of them) are going for surprising prices on Amazon and Ebay, but you can order the CDs directly from Reference Recordings for $20 each with reasonable shipping.
Alex Brown
2021-11-17 17:12:14 UTC
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Post by ***@gmail.com
Gifting all of you an on-topic message...
A friend and I have heard it and both think it is sensational. To my mind, it is micromanaged, but positively- all rhythms are clear, but then shaped and pushed around to sculpt dramatic impact. There is nothing staid or particularly patient here, even when things proceed naturally. In fact, the tension, especially in movement 1, is dialed up to 11, to thrilling effect. This is Brahms played as the sharpest Beethoven, while still sounding idiomatic (What does that mean? Reiner brings tension to his recordings, and they always sound strange to me along the lines of "what if this was actually composed by Tchaikovsky?") The orchestral tone the opposite of Karajan: absolutely transparent.
The way Reference manages their releases, it is hard to imagine we'd get a cycle out of him before he goes somewhere else, but if there is something special about this PSO/Honeck relationship - and I'd say there is - that's what I would ask for. At least 1 and 3, please.
Yeah, it's great with some genuinely magical moments (the balancing in
the scherzo!)

Definitely top-drawer stuff and a recording all Brahms aficionados
should hear. Whether it's at the top of the top-drawer? ... time will
tell. My sense is it'll be seen as an exceptionally charismatic
supplement (like C. Kleiber) to more "core" recordings.
Paul A
2021-11-18 02:29:04 UTC
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Post by ***@gmail.com
Gifting all of you an on-topic message...
A friend and I have heard it and both think it is sensational. To my mind, it is micromanaged, but positively- all rhythms are clear, but then shaped and pushed around to sculpt dramatic impact. There is nothing staid or particularly patient here, even when things proceed naturally. In fact, the tension, especially in movement 1, is dialed up to 11, to thrilling effect. This is Brahms played as the sharpest Beethoven, while still sounding idiomatic (What does that mean? Reiner brings tension to his recordings, and they always sound strange to me along the lines of "what if this was actually composed by Tchaikovsky?") The orchestral tone the opposite of Karajan: absolutely transparent.
The way Reference manages their releases, it is hard to imagine we'd get a cycle out of him before he goes somewhere else, but if there is something special about this PSO/Honeck relationship - and I'd say there is - that's what I would ask for. At least 1 and 3, please.
... and then there is this, too...


Matthew Silverstein
2021-11-18 05:27:50 UTC
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Post by ***@gmail.com
A friend and I have heard it and both think it is sensational. To my mind, it is micromanaged, but positively- all rhythms are clear,
but then shaped and pushed around to sculpt dramatic impact. There is nothing staid or particularly patient here, even when things
proceed naturally. In fact, the tension, especially in movement 1, is dialed up to 11, to thrilling effect. This is Brahms played as the
sharpest Beethoven, while still sounding idiomatic.
I agree completely. This is an outstanding performance.

Matty
Herman
2021-11-19 08:59:22 UTC
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Post by ***@gmail.com
A friend and I have heard it and both think it is sensational.
I thought the "sculpting" & such you mention were good, but I didn't
think much of the sound of the orchestra. I figured I'd add this
just for the on topic post, not wanting to pick on anyone.... But
the tone is rather "meh" much of the time... I just don't think
these are the top musicians. But hey, a good recording that let me
hear that factor clearly. :-)
I listened to the first mvt and had the same feeling.
Too loud, too unyielding.
MiNe109
2021-11-19 13:14:10 UTC
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Post by Herman
Post by ***@gmail.com
A friend and I have heard it and both think it is sensational.
I thought the "sculpting" & such you mention were good, but I didn't
think much of the sound of the orchestra. I figured I'd add this
just for the on topic post, not wanting to pick on anyone.... But
the tone is rather "meh" much of the time... I just don't think
these are the top musicians. But hey, a good recording that let me
hear that factor clearly. :-)
I listened to the first mvt and had the same feeling.
Too loud, too unyielding.
I found myself missing tension in the first, which I blame on imprinting
on Kleiber. I did appreciate the phrasing and dynamics.

The winds are quite present in the recording.
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