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Xenakis...
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Todd Michel McComb
2021-02-15 17:52:54 UTC
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If anyone here does have an interest in this music....

A brief critical, or personal, introduction to the late music of
Iannis Xenakis

http://www.medieval.org/music/modern/xen0.html

... in which e.g. I discuss a small selection of highlighted
works.
Néstor Castiglione
2021-02-15 21:03:34 UTC
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Post by Todd Michel McComb
If anyone here does have an interest in this music....
A brief critical, or personal, introduction to the late music of
Iannis Xenakis
http://www.medieval.org/music/modern/xen0.html
... in which e.g. I discuss a small selection of highlighted
works.
Thanks a lot! Will read this through later today. Love Xenakis; he's one of my favorites.
raymond....@gmail.com
2021-03-08 03:09:38 UTC
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Post by Néstor Castiglione
Post by Todd Michel McComb
If anyone here does have an interest in this music....
A brief critical, or personal, introduction to the late music of
Iannis Xenakis
http://www.medieval.org/music/modern/xen0.html
... in which e.g. I discuss a small selection of highlighted
works.
Thanks a lot! Will read this through later today. Love Xenakis; he's one of my favorites.
I like his percussion music very much.

Ray Hall, Taree
Todd Michel McComb
2021-03-07 17:44:40 UTC
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And now...

Scelsi: A new survey, continuities & reflections
http://www.medieval.org/music/modern/scelsi/survey2020.html

... in which I update another 30 year-old discussion, 15k words.
Néstor Castiglione
2021-03-07 23:39:57 UTC
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Post by Todd Michel McComb
And now...
Scelsi: A new survey, continuities & reflections
http://www.medieval.org/music/modern/scelsi/survey2020.html
... in which I update another 30 year-old discussion, 15k words.
Todd, I'm looking forward to reading this. Your mini-site on Scelsi, too, is a fantastic resource. Grateful to have found it!
Todd Michel McComb
2021-03-07 23:43:41 UTC
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Post by Néstor Castiglione
Todd, I'm looking forward to reading this. Your mini-site on Scelsi,
too, is a fantastic resource. Grateful to have found it!
These Scelsi conversations actually started over in rec.music.classical
(before this group split off).... So it's a project that began in
this general space.
cdc
2021-03-25 15:24:21 UTC
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Post by Todd Michel McComb
Xenakis
listen to the first seconds of the cluster:


Xenakis, Metastaseis (1955):





Mahler, Symphony n.10 (*1910*):


cdc
2021-03-27 19:36:08 UTC
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Post by Todd Michel McComb
Xenakis
I did not understand what the difference is between "Lichens" and
"Lichens I". Why first?
I recently heard him present on the radio as "Lichens I".

In any case it is a wonderful composition.
Todd Michel McComb
2021-03-28 01:01:25 UTC
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Post by cdc
I did not understand what the difference is between "Lichens" and
"Lichens I". Why first?
I recently heard him present on the radio as "Lichens I".
There is only the one piece listed at the Xenakis Association....
Probably a mistake by the radio.
Todd Michel McComb
2021-04-08 00:26:03 UTC
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Finally, Milton Babbitt:

http://www.medieval.org/music/modern/babbitt.html

... less available to hear in this case.
cdc
2021-04-19 15:41:26 UTC
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Post by Todd Michel McComb
Xenakis
This site:

https://tinyurl.com/4xmwm3ub

contains a passage from a book where it says:
"For Boulez, Xenakis's music was crude, betraying his lack of musical
training and experience."

Does anyone know in which period and in what context Boulez said these
words?
MiNe109
2021-04-19 17:10:43 UTC
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Post by cdc
Post by Todd Michel McComb
Xenakis
https://tinyurl.com/4xmwm3ub
"For Boulez, Xenakis's music was crude, betraying his lack of musical
training and experience."
Does anyone know in which period and in what context Boulez said these
words?
The quote is from Griffiths, A Concise History of Western Music:

In his first important work, Metastasis for orchestra, he wrote for
all the string instruments independently in great storms of glissandos
(pitch slides), vastly amplifying a kind of sound production, the slide
through a large interval, that had been almost eradicated from
orchestral practice as a symptom of nineteenth-century sentimentality.
Xenakis made it boldly new, in music of an unabashed sound drama
recalling only Varese among the early modernists, and the work's first
performance at Donaueschingen in 1955, coupled with its author's
criticism of serialism in an article, caused consternation. For Boulez,
Xenakis's music was crude, betraying his lack of musical training and
experience. Rough as it was, though, it could not be ignored.
Todd Michel McComb
2021-04-19 17:14:54 UTC
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Post by cdc
For Boulez, Xenakis's music was crude, betraying his lack of musical
training and experience. Rough as it was, though, it could not be
ignored.
Crude is a fair assessment.
Todd Michel McComb
2021-04-19 18:17:27 UTC
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Post by Todd Michel McComb
Crude is a fair assessment.
Translate to "raw power" and you can say it in complimentary program
notes! ;-)
cdc
2021-04-19 17:25:02 UTC
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Post by MiNe109
Post by cdc
Does anyone know in which period and in what context Boulez said these
words?
The quote is from Griffiths, A Concise History of Western Music
Ok, I had already read this passage. I wondered if Boulez's phrase was
limited to the first performance of Metastaseis in 1955, or if it was a
lasting belief over time.
In the first case it would be understandable, given the demolition of
serialism carried out by Xenakis, in a period in which Boulez's
compositional world was structured with a rigorous serialism.
MiNe109
2021-04-19 18:18:04 UTC
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Post by cdc
Post by MiNe109
Post by cdc
Does anyone know in which period and in what context Boulez said these
words?
The quote is from Griffiths, A Concise History of Western Music
Ok, I had already read this passage. I wondered if Boulez's phrase was
limited to the first performance of Metastaseis in 1955, or if it was a
lasting belief over time.
In the first case it would be understandable, given the demolition of
serialism carried out by Xenakis, in a period in which Boulez's
compositional world was structured with a rigorous serialism.
I can't say but Xenakis did dedicate Jalons (1986) to
Pierre Boulez and Ensemble intercontemporain who performed the premiere,
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