Discussion:
Talk about stupid...
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Mr. Mike
2021-04-06 04:01:30 UTC
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https://halloffame.classicfm.com/2021/
Dan Koren
2021-04-06 04:06:41 UTC
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Post by Mr. Mike
https://halloffame.classicfm.com/2021/
x 300! Ralph and his lark are doing well!

This would not happen to be written by Brits -- or would it?

dk
Andrew Clarke
2021-04-06 06:28:16 UTC
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Post by Dan Koren
Post by Mr. Mike
https://halloffame.classicfm.com/2021/
x 300! Ralph and his lark are doing well!
This would not happen to be written by Brits -- or would it?
Well, "The Lark" is better than "On The Trail" although arguably not by much.

I believe the latter is #3 on Joe Biden's Top Ten Classical Hits. Just after "Danny Boy" and "Take Me Out To The Ball Game".

Andrew Clarke
Canberra
Andy Evans
2021-04-06 08:24:52 UTC
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I've nothing against easy listening classical music - if listeners get some pleasure out of it then fine. And nothing against popularity polls. That's just data.

But as has been said, it starts to get meaningless if we use the quality of the music as the criterion. And on a personal note what frustrates me about the station is the awful recordings they choose. I've heard some of the worst performances ever in their playlist. I'd switch to CFM in the car and ask myself "what orchestra and conductor could butcher this work in such a fashion?". Sometimes it's big names, sometimes hick orchestras. But whoever chooses the recordings has cloth ears.
mswd...@gmail.com
2021-04-06 12:53:11 UTC
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If you listened to everything on the list, you'd discover some fine music. That's a silly project doing good.
Frank Berger
2021-04-06 05:53:55 UTC
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Post by Mr. Mike
https://halloffame.classicfm.com/2021/
Why is it stupid? Did they conduct the poll incorrectly? Do you mean people are stupid because this is what they like?
weary flake
2021-04-06 20:08:30 UTC
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Post by Mr. Mike
https://halloffame.classicfm.com/2021/
Why is it stupid?  Did they conduct the poll incorrectly?  Do you mean people are stupid because this is what they like?
Are you saying that polls published by marketing firms should
be taken as true? Isn't it stupid not to be skeptical? Are
you calling us stupid?
Neal Grofman
2021-04-06 20:35:56 UTC
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Post by weary flake
Post by Mr. Mike
https://halloffame.classicfm.com/2021/
Why is it stupid? Did they conduct the poll incorrectly? Do you mean people are stupid because this is what they like?
Are you saying that polls published by marketing firms should
be taken as true? Isn't it stupid not to be skeptical? Are
you calling us stupid?
Shouldn't "Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini" say "Includes the 18th Variation?"
Chris from Lafayette
2021-04-06 21:22:14 UTC
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Post by Neal Grofman
Shouldn't "Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini" say "Includes the 18th Variation?"
Good point, Neal! I was certainly reassured when I read that Massenet's "Thais" includes "Meditation".
Andrew Clarke
2021-04-06 06:05:02 UTC
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Post by Mr. Mike
https://halloffame.classicfm.com/2021/
ClassicFM is a commercial radio station in the UK that specialises in single movements and sound bites. Strictly Andr'e Rieu territory. It's targetted at the kind of music lovers who have to be reminded that Beethoven's Ninth Symphony includes the Ode to Joy., which it does So any surveys that it publishes are not to be taken too seriously.

It has also been extremely successful.

Andrew Clarke
Canberra
Owen
2021-04-06 17:49:05 UTC
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Post by Andrew Clarke
Post by Mr. Mike
https://halloffame.classicfm.com/2021/
ClassicFM is a commercial radio station in the UK that specialises in single movements and sound bites. Strictly Andr'e Rieu territory. It's targetted at the kind of music lovers who have to be reminded that Beethoven's Ninth Symphony includes the Ode to Joy., which it does So any surveys that it publishes are not to be taken too seriously.
It has also been extremely successful.
Andrew Clarke
Canberra
I was so happy to see that
#8, "The Planets" includes Jupiter. At first I feared it had gone
missing. And I wasn't sure if it was just the music or the planet itself.

-Owen
Frank Berger
2021-04-06 19:18:26 UTC
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Post by Owen
Post by Andrew Clarke
Post by Mr. Mike
https://halloffame.classicfm.com/2021/
ClassicFM is a commercial radio station in the UK that specialises in single movements and sound bites. Strictly Andr'e Rieu territory. It's targetted at the kind of music lovers who have to be reminded that Beethoven's Ninth Symphony includes the Ode to Joy., which it does So any surveys that it publishes are not to be taken too seriously.
It has also been extremely successful.
Andrew Clarke
Canberra
I was so happy to see that
#8, "The Planets" includes Jupiter.  At first I feared it had gone missing.  And I wasn't sure if it was just the music or the planet itself.
-Owen
Seen today in my Facebook feed:

"There are X-rays erupting from Uranus"

I hate when that happens.
Andrew Clarke
2021-04-06 22:42:08 UTC
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Post by Owen
I was so happy to see that
#8, "The Planets" includes Jupiter. At first I feared it had gone
missing. And I wasn't sure if it was just the music or the planet itself.
-Owen
Owen, the situation at ClassicFM is that much of its audience has never, and possibly will never, go to a concert hall although they may well watch the Last Night at the Proms. It's the equivalent audience to the one targeted by the Nashville Symphony at events like this one:

<https://www.nashvillesymphony.org/media/press-room/press-releases/nashville-symphony-announces-symphony-fashion-show-2021/>

The ClassicFM audience may remember that they like a piece of music called "Jupiter", with that big tune in the middle - and let's be fair, it is a fine tune. They'll probably remember that it's from 'The Planets'. They may not remember that it's by Gustav Holst. Similarly, there may be quite a few people listening to the Nashville Symphony's Fashion Show who know that they like a big, slow tune for violins called "Agnus Dei" without remembering Samuel Barber.

Let's not be too hard on them,

Andrew Clarke
Canberra
Bob Harper
2021-04-06 23:47:01 UTC
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Post by Andrew Clarke
Post by Owen
I was so happy to see that
#8, "The Planets" includes Jupiter. At first I feared it had gone
missing. And I wasn't sure if it was just the music or the planet itself.
-Owen
<https://www.nashvillesymphony.org/media/press-room/press-releases/nashville-symphony-announces-symphony-fashion-show-2021/>
The ClassicFM audience may remember that they like a piece of music called "Jupiter", with that big tune in the middle - and let's be fair, it is a fine tune. They'll probably remember that it's from 'The Planets'. They may not remember that it's by Gustav Holst. Similarly, there may be quite a few people listening to the Nashville Symphony's Fashion Show who know that they like a big, slow tune for violins called "Agnus Dei" without remembering Samuel Barber.
Let's not be too hard on them,
Andrew Clarke
Canberra
Our local classical station (KQAC--AllClassical) in Portland does
something like this at New Year's--the Classical Countdown. Anyone can
vote for their 5 favorite works, and many of the pieces on the list are
also on ClassicFM's list. That's no surprise, for the reasons given in
this thread. Needless to say, #1 is either the Beethoven 9 or the New
World Symphony, at least for the last several years.

I think we need to remember that those on this newsgroup are, let's face
it, classical music nerds. Given the state of the culture today, I'm
just glad we HAVE a classical station to listen to, even if its playlist
is long on the over-familiar and short on anything challenging. I've
badgered the station manager to play more late Strauss, for example, and
have had some success, but I doubt we'll get any Feldman or Lachenmann
any time soon, After all, they do have to raise enough money to keep
going :).
Bob Harper
Néstor Castiglione
2021-04-07 01:55:01 UTC
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Post by Bob Harper
Post by Andrew Clarke
Post by Owen
I was so happy to see that
#8, "The Planets" includes Jupiter. At first I feared it had gone
missing. And I wasn't sure if it was just the music or the planet itself.
-Owen
<https://www.nashvillesymphony.org/media/press-room/press-releases/nashville-symphony-announces-symphony-fashion-show-2021/>
The ClassicFM audience may remember that they like a piece of music called "Jupiter", with that big tune in the middle - and let's be fair, it is a fine tune. They'll probably remember that it's from 'The Planets'. They may not remember that it's by Gustav Holst. Similarly, there may be quite a few people listening to the Nashville Symphony's Fashion Show who know that they like a big, slow tune for violins called "Agnus Dei" without remembering Samuel Barber.
Let's not be too hard on them,
Andrew Clarke
Canberra
Our local classical station (KQAC--AllClassical) in Portland does
something like this at New Year's--the Classical Countdown. Anyone can
vote for their 5 favorite works, and many of the pieces on the list are
also on ClassicFM's list. That's no surprise, for the reasons given in
this thread. Needless to say, #1 is either the Beethoven 9 or the New
World Symphony, at least for the last several years.
I think we need to remember that those on this newsgroup are, let's face
it, classical music nerds. Given the state of the culture today, I'm
just glad we HAVE a classical station to listen to, even if its playlist
is long on the over-familiar and short on anything challenging. I've
badgered the station manager to play more late Strauss, for example, and
have had some success, but I doubt we'll get any Feldman or Lachenmann
any time soon, After all, they do have to raise enough money to keep
going :).
Bob Harper
I agree. These things aren't aimed at listeners like myself. Which is fine, although reading this poll does make me nostalgic for the time when classical radio was serious. By the time I started listening to the good stuff in junior high (goodness, more than a quarter century ago), the halcyon days of classical radio were long over.

What I wonder about, though, is do these gimmicks really work as an introduction to classical music? That is, can a durable audience which is curious to explore more (and, therefore, spend more) really be cultivated when you're selling them the notion that any single recording or piece of music is the "greatest?" Why listen to anything else if you've already listened to the "greatest," right? It seems to me that these marketing tactics are effective enough in the short term, but may be inadvertently ruinous in the long. But what do I know? I'm just some guy.
gggg gggg
2021-04-07 02:47:27 UTC
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Post by Néstor Castiglione
Post by Bob Harper
Post by Andrew Clarke
Post by Owen
I was so happy to see that
#8, "The Planets" includes Jupiter. At first I feared it had gone
missing. And I wasn't sure if it was just the music or the planet itself.
-Owen
<https://www.nashvillesymphony.org/media/press-room/press-releases/nashville-symphony-announces-symphony-fashion-show-2021/>
The ClassicFM audience may remember that they like a piece of music called "Jupiter", with that big tune in the middle - and let's be fair, it is a fine tune. They'll probably remember that it's from 'The Planets'. They may not remember that it's by Gustav Holst. Similarly, there may be quite a few people listening to the Nashville Symphony's Fashion Show who know that they like a big, slow tune for violins called "Agnus Dei" without remembering Samuel Barber.
Let's not be too hard on them,
Andrew Clarke
Canberra
Our local classical station (KQAC--AllClassical) in Portland does
something like this at New Year's--the Classical Countdown. Anyone can
vote for their 5 favorite works, and many of the pieces on the list are
also on ClassicFM's list. That's no surprise, for the reasons given in
this thread. Needless to say, #1 is either the Beethoven 9 or the New
World Symphony, at least for the last several years.
I think we need to remember that those on this newsgroup are, let's face
it, classical music nerds. Given the state of the culture today, I'm
just glad we HAVE a classical station to listen to, even if its playlist
is long on the over-familiar and short on anything challenging. I've
badgered the station manager to play more late Strauss, for example, and
have had some success, but I doubt we'll get any Feldman or Lachenmann
any time soon, After all, they do have to raise enough money to keep
going :).
Bob Harper
I agree. These things aren't aimed at listeners like myself. Which is fine, although reading this poll does make me nostalgic for the time when classical radio was serious. By the time I started listening to the good stuff in junior high (goodness, more than a quarter century ago), the halcyon days of classical radio were long over.
What I wonder about, though, is do these gimmicks really work as an introduction to classical music? That is, can a durable audience which is curious to explore more (and, therefore, spend more) really be cultivated when you're selling them the notion that any single recording or piece of music is the "greatest?" Why listen to anything else if you've already listened to the "greatest," right? It seems to me that these marketing tactics are effective enough in the short term, but may be inadvertently ruinous in the long. But what do I know? I'm just some guy.
- Planning in business and government is short-range; the long-term threats are someone else’s concern. This is to be expected in a competitive society where those who do not devote themselves to short-term advantage are unlikely to be in the competition in the long run.

Chomsky
Alan P Dawes
2021-04-07 10:05:48 UTC
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Post by Andrew Clarke
I was so happy to see that #8, "The Planets" includes Jupiter. At
first I feared it had gone missing. And I wasn't sure if it was just
the music or the planet itself.
-Owen
Owen, the situation at ClassicFM is that much of its audience has never,
and possibly will never, go to a concert hall although they may well
watch the Last Night at the Proms. It's the equivalent audience to the
<https://www.nashvillesymphony.org/media/press-room/press-releases/nashville-symphony-announces-symphony-fashion-show-2021/>
The ClassicFM audience may remember that they like a piece of music
called "Jupiter", with that big tune in the middle - and let's be fair,
it is a fine tune. They'll probably remember that it's from 'The
Planets'. They may not remember that it's by Gustav Holst. Similarly,
there may be quite a few people listening to the Nashville Symphony's
Fashion Show who know that they like a big, slow tune for violins called
"Agnus Dei" without remembering Samuel Barber.
Let's not be too hard on them,
Andrew Clarke
Canberra
Whilst I would agree that a lot of the daytime broadcasting on CLassic FM
is mainly excerpte from pieces for people doin g other jobs at the same
time. Rather like "Music While You Work" that I can remember in the
factories that I had holiday jobs in in the 1960s

But does your description tally with last night's 2 hour concert (8-10pm)
of full length works on ClassicFM?
VW Fantasia on a Theme of Thomas Tallis
Pachelbel Canon
Tchaikovsky 4th Sym
Rossini String sonata No1 in G
Britten A Simple Symphony
The only "bleeding chunck" was Bernstein conducting the Serenade from
Harold in Italy

I see that tonight they are including Haydn's sym 31.

Alan
--
***@argonet.co.uk
***@riscos.org
Using an ARMX6
Andrew Clarke
2021-04-07 21:07:27 UTC
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Post by Alan P Dawes
Post by Andrew Clarke
I was so happy to see that #8, "The Planets" includes Jupiter. At
first I feared it had gone missing. And I wasn't sure if it was just
the music or the planet itself.
-Owen
Owen, the situation at ClassicFM is that much of its audience has never,
and possibly will never, go to a concert hall although they may well
watch the Last Night at the Proms. It's the equivalent audience to the
<https://www.nashvillesymphony.org/media/press-room/press-releases/nashville-symphony-announces-symphony-fashion-show-2021/>
The ClassicFM audience may remember that they like a piece of music
called "Jupiter", with that big tune in the middle - and let's be fair,
it is a fine tune. They'll probably remember that it's from 'The
Planets'. They may not remember that it's by Gustav Holst. Similarly,
there may be quite a few people listening to the Nashville Symphony's
Fashion Show who know that they like a big, slow tune for violins called
"Agnus Dei" without remembering Samuel Barber.
Let's not be too hard on them,
Andrew Clarke
Canberra
Whilst I would agree that a lot of the daytime broadcasting on CLassic FM
is mainly excerpte from pieces for people doin g other jobs at the same
time. Rather like "Music While You Work" that I can remember in the
factories that I had holiday jobs in in the 1960s
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music_While_You_Work>
Post by Alan P Dawes
But does your description tally with last night's 2 hour concert (8-10pm)
of full length works on ClassicFM?
VW Fantasia on a Theme of Thomas Tallis
Pachelbel Canon
Tchaikovsky 4th Sym
Rossini String sonata No1 in G
Britten A Simple Symphony
The only "bleeding chunck" was Bernstein conducting the Serenade from
Harold in Italy
I see that tonight they are including Haydn's sym 31.
Alan
If that programme were advertised for a live concert, it would look odd. Two "heavy" works balanced by three "light" ones. But yes, they are playing the entire works, not just single movements.

Andrew Clarke
Canberra
number_six
2021-04-07 18:18:34 UTC
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Post by Owen
Post by Andrew Clarke
Post by Mr. Mike
https://halloffame.classicfm.com/2021/
ClassicFM is a commercial radio station in the UK that specialises in single movements and sound bites. Strictly Andr'e Rieu territory. It's targetted at the kind of music lovers who have to be reminded that Beethoven's Ninth Symphony includes the Ode to Joy., which it does So any surveys that it publishes are not to be taken too seriously.
It has also been extremely successful.
Andrew Clarke
Canberra
I was so happy to see that
#8, "The Planets" includes Jupiter. At first I feared it had gone
missing. And I wasn't sure if it was just the music or the planet itself.
-Owen
The gas giants are all accounted for -- some may even be posting here...
Andrew Clarke
2021-04-07 21:45:23 UTC
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Post by number_six
Post by Owen
Post by Andrew Clarke
Post by Mr. Mike
https://halloffame.classicfm.com/2021/
ClassicFM is a commercial radio station in the UK that specialises in single movements and sound bites. Strictly Andr'e Rieu territory. It's targetted at the kind of music lovers who have to be reminded that Beethoven's Ninth Symphony includes the Ode to Joy., which it does So any surveys that it publishes are not to be taken too seriously.
It has also been extremely successful.
Andrew Clarke
Canberra
I was so happy to see that
#8, "The Planets" includes Jupiter. At first I feared it had gone
missing. And I wasn't sure if it was just the music or the planet itself.
-Owen
The gas giants are all accounted for -- some may even be posting here...
We have a few gas giants here as well:

<https://www.abc.net.au/classic/>

We're lucky to have this station, although I listen to it less and less. It increasingly sounds like The Retirement Village of the Air.

Andrew Clarke
Canberra

weary flake
2021-04-06 20:32:04 UTC
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Post by Andrew Clarke
Post by Mr. Mike
https://halloffame.classicfm.com/2021/
ClassicFM is a commercial radio station in the UK that specialises in single movements and sound bites. Strictly Andr'e Rieu territory. It's targetted at the kind of music lovers who have to be reminded that Beethoven's Ninth Symphony includes the Ode to Joy., which it does So any surveys that it publishes are not to be taken too seriously.
It has also been extremely successful.
Does it use brick wall compression like American stations do?
Romantic music as a genre has the most harm done to it by
dynamic compression, giving me a hunch that compression is
done to discourage that hated Romantic Era music from the
airwaves!

Dynamic compression gives the effect of a quiet PP violin solo
louder than a following passage from a FFF orchestra, discouraging
program directors from including such music, since radio stations
take extreme compression as an engineering axiom.

This follows with popular oldie classics too, as old late 1960s
rock songs sound anemic, lifeless, on the radio compared to
their relatively uncompressed original CDs.
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