Discussion:
Celibidache/Munich: what's the verdict?
(too old to reply)
Roland van Gaalen
2004-12-28 20:13:54 UTC
Permalink
Some of Celibidache's Munich recordings have been available for several
years now;
what's the verdict?

My own tentative opinions:

* Bruckner 8: pretty good, slowish but otherwise nothing special (keep, but
don't buy)

Furtwangler, Knappertsbusch, Van Beinum are much more exciting, and
I think Haitink and Jochum would be preferable as more or less central
benchmarks im modern sound.
Celibidache's slow tempo adds nothing, as far as I am concerned.
Why could this CD be worth keeping? I'm not sure, but for one thing, it's
pleasant to listen to and I will give it a few more tries.

* Bach B Minor Mass: very good (buy and keep)

This seems to be somewhere between HIP and non-HIP. Celibidache had a
doctorate in musicology, after all.
The interpretation combines subtlety and power. It is quite different from
the powerful recordings by Klemperer and Jochum
(two excellent recordings in the grand old style) as well as from the
presumably more subtle readings by Leonhardt and Herreweghe (Virgin).

* Schubert 9: dull (don't buy; sell if applicable)

I briefly owned this. Performances such as this one might lead one to
believe that Schubert's ninth is not a good symphony.
If you have heard various historical recordings, you may think otherwise (as
I do).
--
Roland van Gaalen
Amsterdam
r.p.vangaalenATchello.nl (AT=@)
b***@phillynews.com
2004-12-28 20:33:04 UTC
Permalink
Of the handfull of Celi/Munich recordings I've heard, the best one is
the Bruckner sixth. In fact, it's probably my single favorite Bruckner
recording.

Another standout is the Tchaikovsky Romeo and Juliet Overture.

I agree that the Schubert ninth is terrible; probably the worst
Schubert ninth I've heard.

Barry
Theresa
2004-12-28 23:18:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@phillynews.com
Of the handfull of Celi/Munich recordings I've heard, the best one is
the Bruckner sixth. In fact, it's probably my single favorite Bruckner
recording.
Another standout is the Tchaikovsky Romeo and Juliet Overture.
I agree that the Schubert ninth is terrible; probably the worst
Schubert ninth I've heard.
Barry
Strange. I quite liked the Schubert Ninth when I heard it (which
was several years ago).
I also thought that the typical late-Celibidache-slowness that
mars the Pictures of an Exhibition or Bartoks Concerto or the
Debussy was less marked in the Schubert.
ESH Tooter
2004-12-29 01:04:52 UTC
Permalink
<< > I agree that the Schubert ninth is terrible; probably the worst
Post by b***@phillynews.com
Schubert ninth I've heard.
Barry
Strange. I quite liked the Schubert Ninth when I heard it (which
was several years ago).
I also thought that the typical late-Celibidache-slowness that
mars the Pictures of an Exhibition or Bartoks Concerto or the
Debussy was less marked in the Schubert. >><BR><BR>

I couldn't agree more. The Schubert 9 along with Beethoven 2 & 4 are among my
favorite late Celi recordings.

t
b***@phillynews.com
2004-12-29 02:09:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by ESH Tooter
<< > I agree that the Schubert ninth is terrible; probably the worst
Post by b***@phillynews.com
Schubert ninth I've heard.
Barry
Strange. I quite liked the Schubert Ninth when I heard it (which
was several years ago).
I also thought that the typical late-Celibidache-slowness that
mars the Pictures of an Exhibition or Bartoks Concerto or the
Debussy was less marked in the Schubert. >><BR><BR>
I couldn't agree more. The Schubert 9 along with Beethoven 2 & 4 are among my
favorite late Celi recordings.
t
There are times when Celi's slow tempos can work magic for me, but
other times when they just seem to grind a piece to a hault, and that
Schubert ninth is one of the latter cases for me. Ironically, as I
mentioned in my earlier post, I like his Tchaikovsky R&J Overture a
lot, while Paul Golstein called it unlistenable on this thread. And I
discovered that Tchaikovsky performance because someone else on another
board raved about the Pictures on the same disc. I got it for that and
wound up hating it, but loved the R&J Overture.
I guess the point being that Celi's extreme approach really polarizes
listeners.

Barry
Paul Goldstein
2004-12-29 16:53:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@phillynews.com
I guess the point being that Celi's extreme approach really polarizes
listeners.
Exactly.

By the way, it is interesting to compare the Celi/Munich R&J with Scherchen's
performance. Scherchen is also daringly slow in the quiet parts - especially
the introductory material up to the first outburst - and yet his performance is
tremendously successful, more dramatic and multifaceted than any other I know.
Celi's tempi, however, never accomplish anything other than to highlight some
orchestral sonorities. They do not generate any drama.
--
Paul Goldstein
ESH Tooter
2005-01-02 01:45:11 UTC
Permalink
<< By the way, it is interesting to compare the Celi/Munich R&J with
Scherchen's
performance. Scherchen is also daringly slow in the quiet parts - especially
the introductory material up to the first outburst - and yet his performance is
tremendously successful, more dramatic and multifaceted than any other I know.
Celi's tempi, however, never accomplish anything other than to highlight some
orchestral sonorities. They do not generate any drama. >><BR><BR>

I wonder if anyone has compared Celi's and Scherchen's Siegfried Idyll?

t

ESH Tooter
2005-01-02 01:41:32 UTC
Permalink
<< There are times when Celi's slow tempos can work magic for me, but
other times when they just seem to grind a piece to a hault, and that
Schubert ninth is one of the latter cases for me. Ironically, as I
mentioned in my earlier post, I like his Tchaikovsky R&J Overture a
lot, while Paul Golstein called it unlistenable on this thread. And I
discovered that Tchaikovsky performance because someone else on another
board raved about the Pictures on the same disc. I got it for that and
wound up hating it, but loved the R&J Overture.
I guess the point being that Celi's extreme approach really polarizes
listeners. >><BR><BR>

It is definitely curious how many of us find great beauty in some of Celi's
slow performances and dislike others, but disagree so completely on which we
like and dislike. I love the Schubert 9th, like the Pictures. "Unlistenable"
is a good word for my reaction to the Tchaikovsky and Bartok performances.
I'll have to revisit the Bach B minor, but my recollection is that I didn't
like it even though I enjoy Klemperer. It's not the tempo, but how the tempo
moves.

t
John Wilson
2004-12-29 02:51:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by ESH Tooter
<< > I agree that the Schubert ninth is terrible; probably the worst
Post by b***@phillynews.com
Schubert ninth I've heard.
Barry
Strange. I quite liked the Schubert Ninth when I heard it (which
was several years ago).
I also thought that the typical late-Celibidache-slowness that
mars the Pictures of an Exhibition or Bartoks Concerto or the
Debussy was less marked in the Schubert. >><BR><BR>
I couldn't agree more. The Schubert 9 along with Beethoven 2 & 4 are among my
favorite late Celi recordings.
I also agree about the Munich Schubert 9th. However, I don't agree
with the original poster's high opinion of the B Minor Mass. I heard
it just this past Sunday evening and thought it was very poor. The
Kyrie alone is so lugubrious that it almost grinds to a halt.

John
Paul Goldstein
2004-12-28 21:08:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roland van Gaalen
Some of Celibidache's Munich recordings have been available for several
years now;
what's the verdict?
* Schubert 9: dull (don't buy; sell if applicable)
I briefly owned this. Performances such as this one might lead one to
believe that Schubert's ninth is not a good symphony.
If you have heard various historical recordings, you may think otherwise (as
I do).
I have exactly the same comments about the Schumann symphonies.

The Pictures at an Exhibition and Tchaikovsky R&J are unlistenable - not boring
like the Schumann, just ridiculously slow.
--
Paul Goldstein
Matthew B. Tepper
2004-12-29 03:19:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Goldstein
Post by Roland van Gaalen
Some of Celibidache's Munich recordings have been available for several
years now; what's the verdict?
* Schubert 9: dull (don't buy; sell if applicable)
I briefly owned this. Performances such as this one might lead one to
believe that Schubert's ninth is not a good symphony. If you have heard
various historical recordings, you may think otherwise (as I do).
I have exactly the same comments about the Schumann symphonies.
The Pictures at an Exhibition and Tchaikovsky R&J are unlistenable - not
boring like the Schumann, just ridiculously slow.
That encompasses my opinion of his "Pictures" that I saw him conduct at
UCLA back in 1989.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Take THAT, Daniel Lin, Mark Sadek, James Lin & Christopher Chung!
JRsnfld
2004-12-29 09:53:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Paul Goldstein
The Pictures at an Exhibition and Tchaikovsky R&J are unlistenable - not
boring like the Schumann, just ridiculously slow.
That encompasses my opinion of his "Pictures" that I saw him conduct at
UCLA back in 1989.
That pretty much expresses the exact opposite of my opinion of his Pictures in
D.C. back in 1989. Perversely slow? Yes. Stupendous edifice of sound? Yes. The
colors were magical, the canvases were vivid. I was spellbound, not bored. The
music too, admittedly, seemed immobilized by it all.

I also disagree about the Schubert, the Schumann (especially the Schumann), and
most of the Bruckner in the EMI set. They are very successful performances and
completely wrongheaded too. That's why many of us ultimately prefer the balance
of sound-wizardry and forward momentum that Celi achieved earlier in his
career.

--Jeff
ESH Tooter
2005-01-02 01:33:12 UTC
Permalink
<< That pretty much expresses the exact opposite of my opinion of his Pictures
in
D.C. back in 1989. Perversely slow? Yes. Stupendous edifice of sound? Yes. The
colors were magical, the canvases were vivid. I was spellbound, not bored. The
music too, admittedly, seemed immobilized by it all. >><BR><BR>

That fits my take of Celi's 1989 Carnegie Hall performance of the work.

I'd add that Celi's recording of Kindertotenlieder with Fassbaender is my all
out favorite recording of the work. I wish he'd done more Mahler.

t
Ssg217
2004-12-29 19:11:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Goldstein
The Pictures at an Exhibition and Tchaikovsky R&J are unlistenable - not boring
like the Schumann, just ridiculously slow.
Come on now, Mr. Goldstein. Things change. In Shakespeare's times, mythical
lovers had to be teenagers. Everything in a rush. Fall, love, die. The lack of
experience, you know.

The '90s have witnessed the ingress of the Golden Girls. Perhaps this is the
autumnal love story of the fierce Sicilian mother, Dorothy's if memory serves.

regards,
SG
(who can't stand those two EMI recs. either, but is keeping that all to
himself)
Roger
2005-01-01 22:43:16 UTC
Permalink
On 28 Dec 2004 13:08:07 -0800, Paul Goldstein
Post by Paul Goldstein
The Pictures at an Exhibition and Tchaikovsky R&J are unlistenable - not boring
like the Schumann, just ridiculously slow.
I once briefly listened to a borrowed recording of
Celibidache/Munich's pictures on an osbcure label called Artists, if
memory serves. Can anyone tell me if it's the same performance that's
on the EMI release? It's one where Celi can occasionally be heard
shouting at the orchestra during the course of the performance.

Thanx,
Roger
n***@earthlink.net
2005-01-02 01:14:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roger
On 28 Dec 2004 13:08:07 -0800, Paul Goldstein
Post by Paul Goldstein
The Pictures at an Exhibition and Tchaikovsky R&J are unlistenable - not boring
like the Schumann, just ridiculously slow.
I once briefly listened to a borrowed recording of
Celibidache/Munich's pictures on an osbcure label called Artists, if
memory serves. Can anyone tell me if it's the same performance that's
on the EMI release? It's one where Celi can occasionally be heard
shouting at the orchestra during the course of the performance.
Thanx,
Roger
Roger,
If you borrowed Artists FED 068, this is Celibidache/Munich
Philharmonic in Chicago April 16, 1989.

The EMI was recorded September, 1993 in Munich's Gasteig Arts Center.
Hope this helps.

Best wishes,
Neil Levenson
George Murnu
2004-12-29 02:24:25 UTC
Permalink
There cannot be a verdict about Celi because Celi is the type of conductor
that you either love or hate. Already on this thread there are various
divergent opinions about his work. So should I say that I like his
Tchaikovsky 5th, Pictures of an Exhibition, or Haydn symphonies event though
these are among his most controversial peformances? Likewise, I find his
newly released Scheherezade magnificent, but can I really recommend it to
somebody who has rezervations about Celi's work in general? For what it's
worth, I love his Bruckner 8, and agree with you up to a certain point about
Schubert 9.

With that in mind, if you would like to try more of Celi's work, you may
wish to give a try to his Tchaikovsky 6, or perhaps Bruckner 6 and 7. And,
for something completely different, do try the Celibidache set from the EMI
Great Conductors series - the Celi set for non-believers as I call it. It
showcases Celi's work before 1970 or so and it's totally different than his
Munich work. Not all the performances are equal but some are excellent and
none are less than good, plus there's enough rare repertoire to make it
worth a try. Besides that would give a better overall picture of Celi's
work; if you decide to try it, I am curious to hear your impressions.

Regards,

George
Post by Roland van Gaalen
Some of Celibidache's Munich recordings have been available for several
years now;
what's the verdict?
* Bruckner 8: pretty good, slowish but otherwise nothing special (keep, but
don't buy)
Furtwangler, Knappertsbusch, Van Beinum are much more exciting, and
I think Haitink and Jochum would be preferable as more or less central
benchmarks im modern sound.
Celibidache's slow tempo adds nothing, as far as I am concerned.
Why could this CD be worth keeping? I'm not sure, but for one thing, it's
pleasant to listen to and I will give it a few more tries.
* Bach B Minor Mass: very good (buy and keep)
This seems to be somewhere between HIP and non-HIP. Celibidache had a
doctorate in musicology, after all.
The interpretation combines subtlety and power. It is quite different from
the powerful recordings by Klemperer and Jochum
(two excellent recordings in the grand old style) as well as from the
presumably more subtle readings by Leonhardt and Herreweghe (Virgin).
* Schubert 9: dull (don't buy; sell if applicable)
I briefly owned this. Performances such as this one might lead one to
believe that Schubert's ninth is not a good symphony.
If you have heard various historical recordings, you may think otherwise (as
I do).
--
Roland van Gaalen
Amsterdam
Raymond Hall
2004-12-29 02:56:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by George Murnu
With that in mind, if you would like to try more of Celi's work, you may
wish to give a try to his Tchaikovsky 6, or perhaps Bruckner 6 and 7.
And,
for something completely different, do try the Celibidache set from the EMI
Great Conductors series - the Celi set for non-believers as I call it.
I love Celi's Bruckner 5th with the Munich gang, and as shown on Ovation a
few times recently. Indeed, as a result I am seriously thinking about Celi's
EMI Bruckner set. Does anybody know what is included in the Celi Bruckner
set? All the symphonies, or does he skip a few?

People who don't like music to breathe, should be locked up, and fed videos
of Solti for 6 months. That'll cure 'em. They will never ever complain about
Celi ever again.
<g>

Ray H
Taree
Dan Koren
2004-12-29 03:07:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Raymond Hall
People who don't like music to breathe,
should be locked up, and fed videos of
Solti for 6 months. That'll cure 'em.
Or CK recordings.



dk
Marc Perman
2004-12-29 03:32:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Raymond Hall
I love Celi's Bruckner 5th with the Munich gang, and as shown on Ovation a
few times recently. Indeed, as a result I am seriously thinking about
Celi's EMI Bruckner set. Does anybody know what is included in the Celi
Bruckner set? All the symphonies, or does he skip a few?
Nos. 3 through 9. I own 3, 4, and 6, these being the most conventional as
regards tempi and possibly the most rewarding over many listenings, though
in honesty I couldn't bear the 8th, was indifferent about 9, haven't heard 5
or 7. FWIW, I quite like the DG 3, 4 (check out the fast scherzo!), 5, and
8.

Marc Perman
Simon Roberts
2004-12-29 14:14:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by George Murnu
There cannot be a verdict about Celi because Celi is the type of conductor
that you either love or hate.
Perhaps that's the verdict....

Already on this thread there are various
Post by George Murnu
divergent opinions about his work. So should I say that I like his
Tchaikovsky 5th, Pictures of an Exhibition, or Haydn symphonies event though
these are among his most controversial peformances?
Yes, of course you should. What you probably shouldn't do is recommend them to
unsuspecting buyers without a word or fifty or warning.

Likewise, I find his
Post by George Murnu
newly released Scheherezade magnificent, but can I really recommend it to
somebody who has rezervations about Celi's work in general? For what it's
worth, I love his Bruckner 8, and agree with you up to a certain point about
Schubert 9.
I love some of his slow, late performances, especially Bruckner 7 and the adagio
of 8 (not that I wanted to; I'm not favorably predisposed to conductors who
attract a cultish following, who like slow tempi, and who spout philosophical
nonsense), hate some, and am indifferent to others (e.g. the Schubert 9, which I
thought merely boring the last time I tried it).
Post by George Murnu
With that in mind, if you would like to try more of Celi's work, you may
wish to give a try to his Tchaikovsky 6, or perhaps Bruckner 6 and 7. And,
for something completely different, do try the Celibidache set from the EMI
Great Conductors series - the Celi set for non-believers as I call it. It
showcases Celi's work before 1970 or so and it's totally different than his
Munich work. Not all the performances are equal but some are excellent and
none are less than good, plus there's enough rare repertoire to make it
worth a try. Besides that would give a better overall picture of Celi's
work; if you decide to try it, I am curious to hear your impressions.
I tend to like either very early or very late Celibidache. Among the earlier
recordings, I'm especially fond of the Brahms 4, which sounds a bit like
Furtwaengler on speed.

Simon
George Murnu
2004-12-29 16:34:20 UTC
Permalink
[snip]
Post by Simon Roberts
I tend to like either very early or very late Celibidache. Among the earlier
recordings, I'm especially fond of the Brahms 4, which sounds a bit like
Furtwaengler on speed.
Simon
I am just curious: did you listen to the Swedish Radio recordings on DG? If
yes, what are your impressions? Personally I consider that set the finest
of the DG Celibidache series.

Regards,

George
Simon Roberts
2004-12-29 16:56:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by George Murnu
[snip]
Post by Simon Roberts
I tend to like either very early or very late Celibidache. Among the
earlier
Post by Simon Roberts
recordings, I'm especially fond of the Brahms 4, which sounds a bit like
Furtwaengler on speed.
Simon
I am just curious: did you listen to the Swedish Radio recordings on DG? If
yes, what are your impressions? Personally I consider that set the finest
of the DG Celibidache series.
Some of them; also the other DG boxes. My reactions to the Munich recordings,
where they overlap, is more extreme in both directions; but where I like them, I
much prefer the Munich recordings. (My memory being what it is, and not having
kept any of the DG releases, I can't remember which he recorded with the Swedish
Radio Orch.)

Simon
Roland van Gaalen
2004-12-29 21:35:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Simon Roberts
Post by George Murnu
There cannot be a verdict about Celi because Celi is the type of conductor
that you either love or hate.
Perhaps that's the verdict....
No I don't think so.

His output is a mixed bag, but it is remarkable that there is so much
disagreement about what is the good stuff and what is only so-so.

Another example: the Faure Requiem -- excellent ("to die for") according to
Dan Koren, but I hear nothing special: again slow without being dramatic,
rather dull in constrast to the recording by Nadia Boulanger; the organ
sounds thin and artificial as if was afterwords dubbed in. No comparison
actually, the Boulanger version is much much better (and not excessively
sweet).
--
Roland van Gaalen
Amsterdam
r.p.vangaalenATchello.nl (AT=@)
Matthew B. Tepper
2004-12-30 05:49:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roland van Gaalen
Post by Simon Roberts
Post by George Murnu
There cannot be a verdict about Celi because Celi is the type of
conductor that you either love or hate.
Perhaps that's the verdict....
No I don't think so.
His output is a mixed bag, but it is remarkable that there is so much
disagreement about what is the good stuff and what is only so-so.
Another example: the Faure Requiem -- excellent ("to die for") according
to Dan Koren, but I hear nothing special: again slow without being
dramatic, rather dull in constrast to the recording by Nadia Boulanger;
the organ sounds thin and artificial as if was afterwords dubbed in. No
comparison actually, the Boulanger version is much much better (and not
excessively sweet).
There are three Boulangers -- an unnamed French ensemble from 1948 (I have
the EMI transfer), live New York Philharmonic from 1962 in their "Historic
Broadcasts" box, and live 1968 BBC on BBC Legends. Unless, of course, you
know of another one that I don't....
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Take THAT, Daniel Lin, Mark Sadek, James Lin & Christopher Chung!
Roland van Gaalen
2004-12-30 11:25:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Roland van Gaalen
Post by Simon Roberts
Post by George Murnu
There cannot be a verdict about Celi because Celi is the type of
conductor that you either love or hate.
Perhaps that's the verdict....
No I don't think so.
His output is a mixed bag, but it is remarkable that there is so much
disagreement about what is the good stuff and what is only so-so.
Another example: the Faure Requiem -- excellent ("to die for") according
to Dan Koren, but I hear nothing special: again slow without being
dramatic, rather dull in constrast to the recording by Nadia Boulanger;
the organ sounds thin and artificial as if was afterwords dubbed in. No
comparison actually, the Boulanger version is much much better (and not
excessively sweet).
There are three Boulangers -- an unnamed French ensemble from 1948 (I have
the EMI transfer), live New York Philharmonic from 1962 in their "Historic
Broadcasts" box, and live 1968 BBC on BBC Legends. Unless, of course, you
know of another one that I don't....
I meant the first one.
--
Roland van Gaalen
Amsterdam
r.p.vangaalenATchello.nl (AT=@)
l***@yahoo.com
2004-12-30 18:43:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by George Murnu
With that in mind, if you would like to try more of Celi's work, you
may
Post by George Murnu
wish to give a try to his Tchaikovsky 6, or perhaps Bruckner 6 and 7.
And,
Post by George Murnu
for something completely different, do try the Celibidache set from
the EMI
Post by George Murnu
Great Conductors series - the Celi set for non-believers as I call
it. It
Post by George Murnu
showcases Celi's work before 1970 or so and it's totally different
than his
Post by George Murnu
Munich work. Not all the performances are equal but some are
excellent and
Post by George Murnu
none are less than good, plus there's enough rare repertoire to make
it
Post by George Murnu
worth a try. Besides that would give a better overall picture of
Celi's
Post by George Murnu
work; if you decide to try it, I am curious to hear your impressions.
Regards,
George
I have just listened to your Celi set for non-believers. I am familiar
with very little of Celi's work and I don't have any general opinion
about it.
It looks like this set has indeed turned me into a non-believer.
What is it that you like therein?

EG
Josep Vilanova
2004-12-30 20:41:54 UTC
Permalink
On 30/12/04 6:43 pm, in article
Post by l***@yahoo.com
It looks like this set has indeed turned me into a non-believer.
What is it that you like therein?
Why don¹t you try a set of Celi for true believers? Get some of his Bruckner
EMI (any of his CDs there are exceptional), or any of the new EMI CDs, like
his Bach mass or his Faure requiem.


josep
George Murnu
2005-01-01 19:57:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by George Murnu
Post by George Murnu
With that in mind, if you would like to try more of Celi's work, you
may
Post by George Murnu
wish to give a try to his Tchaikovsky 6, or perhaps Bruckner 6 and 7.
And,
Post by George Murnu
for something completely different, do try the Celibidache set from
the EMI
Post by George Murnu
Great Conductors series - the Celi set for non-believers as I call
it. It
Post by George Murnu
showcases Celi's work before 1970 or so and it's totally different
than his
Post by George Murnu
Munich work. Not all the performances are equal but some are
excellent and
Post by George Murnu
none are less than good, plus there's enough rare repertoire to make
it
Post by George Murnu
worth a try. Besides that would give a better overall picture of
Celi's
Post by George Murnu
work; if you decide to try it, I am curious to hear your impressions.
Regards,
George
I have just listened to your Celi set for non-believers. I am familiar
with very little of Celi's work and I don't have any general opinion
about it.
It looks like this set has indeed turned me into a non-believer.
What is it that you like therein?
I like most of the set except for the Mendelssohn and the Fledermaus
overture. Each one with his own taste I suppose, but my point being was
that Celi's approach was radically different than in Munich.

Regards,

George
Post by George Murnu
EG
Ivailo Partchev
2004-12-29 16:26:23 UTC
Permalink
Roland van Gaalen wrote:

The Bruckner is generally fine. Of the non-Bruckners, my own favourite
is Schumann 3 & 4
Continue reading on narkive:
Loading...