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Chopin Competition 2021
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Andy Evans
2021-10-04 08:11:56 UTC
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https://chopin2020.pl/en/calendar

The Chopin Competition has begun. Hopefully there will be a more interesting winner than with the Leeds.

I'm always interested in following piano competitions!
HT
2021-10-04 10:32:49 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
https://chopin2020.pl/en/calendar
The Chopin Competition has begun. Hopefully there will be a more interesting winner than with the Leeds.
I'm always interested in following piano competitions!
The number of Polish members of the jury is out of proportion. So is the number of candidates. Some of them even skipped the preliminaries. Without Argerich and Freire the competition may be full of surprises.

Henk
Andy Evans
2021-10-04 11:26:51 UTC
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The number of Polish members of the jury is out of proportion. So is the number of candidates. Some of them even skipped the preliminaries. Without Argerich and Freire the competition may be full of surprises. > > Henk
I'm slogging through the first rounds. At least the music is exceptionally familiar and holds no surprises. Nobody is standing out so far. Some good pianists to my ears e.g. Arseniy Mun, Evren Ozel, Kamil Pakholiz, Jung Min Park (spelling may be quite wrong). Early days. Quite a number will be rightly eliminated. I feel for all the pianists - so many years of hard work, so many ambitions, so hard to break through and not end up as a teacher. I'm sure many are nervous as well - it shows at times.

Fortunately I just rebuilt my SE 300b amp to use Russian 6C4C tubes and it's sounding very nice on piano reproduction.
Ricardo Jimenez
2021-10-04 18:15:46 UTC
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On Mon, 4 Oct 2021 01:11:56 -0700 (PDT), Andy Evans
Post by Andy Evans
https://chopin2020.pl/en/calendar
The Chopin Competition has begun. Hopefully there will be a more interesting winner than with the Leeds.
I'm always interested in following piano competitions!
Youtube star Hayato Sumino aka Canteen is competing. How is he doing?
He can play the first Chopin etude as fast and accurately as anybody.
HT
2021-10-04 19:10:17 UTC
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Post by Ricardo Jimenez
On Mon, 4 Oct 2021 01:11:56 -0700 (PDT), Andy Evans
Post by Andy Evans
https://chopin2020.pl/en/calendar
The Chopin Competition has begun. Hopefully there will be a more interesting winner than with the Leeds.
I'm always interested in following piano competitions!
Youtube star Hayato Sumino aka Canteen is competing. How is he doing?
He can play the first Chopin etude as fast and accurately as anybody.
He played today. This was his program:

12.30 – 13.00
HAYATO SUMINO (Japonia / Japan)
https://chopin2020.pl/en/competitors/...

Nokturn c-moll op. 48 nr 1 / Nocturne in C minor, Op. 48 No. 1 (2:39:31)
Etiuda C-dur op. 10 nr 1 / Etude in C major, Op. 10 No. 1 (2:45:46)
Etiuda h-moll op. 25 nr 10 / Etude in B minor, Op. 25 No. 10 (2:47:48)
Scherzo h-moll op. 20 / Scherzo in B minor, Op 20 (2:52:06)

Henk
Ricardo Jimenez
2021-10-04 19:16:31 UTC
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Post by Ricardo Jimenez
On Mon, 4 Oct 2021 01:11:56 -0700 (PDT), Andy Evans
Post by Andy Evans
https://chopin2020.pl/en/calendar
The Chopin Competition has begun. Hopefully there will be a more interesting winner than with the Leeds.
I'm always interested in following piano competitions!
Youtube star Hayato Sumino aka Canteen is competing. How is he doing?
He can play the first Chopin etude as fast and accurately as anybody.
12.30 – 13.00
HAYATO SUMINO (Japonia / Japan)
https://chopin2020.pl/en/competitors/...
Nokturn c-moll op. 48 nr 1 / Nocturne in C minor, Op. 48 No. 1 (2:39:31)
Etiuda C-dur op. 10 nr 1 / Etude in C major, Op. 10 No. 1 (2:45:46)
Etiuda h-moll op. 25 nr 10 / Etude in B minor, Op. 25 No. 10 (2:47:48)
Scherzo h-moll op. 20 / Scherzo in B minor, Op 20 (2:52:06)
Henk
I couldn't find the performances at that link, but here they are:

Chris from Lafayette
2021-10-04 22:59:54 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
https://chopin2020.pl/en/calendar
The Chopin Competition has begun. Hopefully there will be a more interesting winner than with the Leeds.
I'm always interested in following piano competitions!
As you know, I missed the Leeds Competition completely this year, but Ms. CfL and started to gingerly dip our toes into Chopin XVIII last night with the first five competitors. I rarely get to hear all the competitors from the first round, but here are my impressions of the five we heard:

https://www.audioasylum.com/audio/music/classical/messages/2/29683.html
Ricardo Jimenez
2021-10-04 23:46:02 UTC
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On Mon, 4 Oct 2021 15:59:54 -0700 (PDT), Chris from Lafayette
Post by Chris from Lafayette
Post by Andy Evans
https://chopin2020.pl/en/calendar
The Chopin Competition has begun. Hopefully there will be a more interesting winner than with the Leeds.
I'm always interested in following piano competitions!
https://www.audioasylum.com/audio/music/classical/messages/2/29683.html
I don't have the ability to listen to these short concerts of the same
pieces over and over. I suppose people who can watch spectator
sports, which seem to me to be the same plays over and over, can also
watch and listen to these things without going nuts.
Herman
2021-10-05 07:29:30 UTC
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I haven't yet paid much attention to this competition yet, but I did happen to see pictures of a concert featuring Yulianna Avdeedva and what looked like a string quartet.
Was this in the 2021 proceedings? what was that about?
Herman
2021-10-06 07:02:25 UTC
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I watched part of Tuesday's proceedings, and was struck by the awfulness of the last candidate, an Italian kid with hair hanging down his face. His Etudes weren't too great and his Fantaisie suffered a memory lapse which should have sufficed to put him out of the competition.
Andy Evans
2021-10-06 11:52:37 UTC
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Yasuko Furumi had very nice touch today, morning of 6th. Alberto Ferro was alright too - a good sense of architecture. Alexander Gadjiev held my interest too, though he doesn't really have the pianism. Martin Garcia made the music dance. Not a bad day so far! But like many I was waiting for Eva Gevorgyan, simply because she's seriously good-looking. She looks quite the media personality but in front of the piano she seemed nervous. In fact you can see the fingers of the left hand shaking quite visibly on a number of pianists. More so than the right hand for some reason. Maybe Chris can offer an insight?

Anyway - just listening to her first piece. Eva is mostly behaving herself and has a nice touch, but no fireworks so far. Etude 25/11 was nothing special. With hair as long as she has she could have a go at Melisande if she sings as well. I'm sorry, being a bit fanciful here but good Melisandes don't grow on trees. Her Scherzo #4 is going a lot better. Looks as if her nerves have settled a bit. Yes, she can certainly play, but not sure how far she'll progress.

Quite a funny moment when one of the ushers had to stop her going back on stage for another bow!!! She's certainly media-aware.
HT
2021-10-06 14:43:01 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
Yasuko Furumi had very nice touch today, morning of 6th. Alberto Ferro was alright too - a good sense of architecture. Alexander Gadjiev held my interest too, though he doesn't really have the pianism. Martin Garcia made the music dance. Not a bad day so far! But like many I was waiting for Eva Gevorgyan, simply because she's seriously good-looking. She looks quite the media personality but in front of the piano she seemed nervous. In fact you can see the fingers of the left hand shaking quite visibly on a number of pianists. More so than the right hand for some reason. Maybe Chris can offer an insight?
Anyway - just listening to her first piece. Eva is mostly behaving herself and has a nice touch, but no fireworks so far. Etude 25/11 was nothing special. With hair as long as she has she could have a go at Melisande if she sings as well. I'm sorry, being a bit fanciful here but good Melisandes don't grow on trees. Her Scherzo #4 is going a lot better. Looks as if her nerves have settled a bit. Yes, she can certainly play, but not sure how far she'll progress.
Quite a funny moment when one of the ushers had to stop her going back on stage for another bow!!! She's certainly media-aware.
Agreed, Gadjiev and Georgyan are interesting. I also liked, in no special order: Mun (for playing Op. 48/2 instead of 48/1), Ozel (sympathetic and solid), Sawada (genius, he also studies medicine), Sorita (one of a kind), Tuan (hidden power), Zenin (reminds me of Zak), Z. Wang (remarkable Op. 10/7), and Gonzalez (left hand).
Somehow, I have the feeling that the coming days will be even more interesting. I hope so, at least.

The chat on YT is merciless, and sometimes quite informative and even funny (like the self-appointed wrong note police - who cannot stop finding what he is looking for, even when it isn't there).

Henk
Andy Evans
2021-10-07 08:57:42 UTC
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On Wednesday, 6 October 2021 at 15:43:04 UTC+1, ***@xs4all.nl wrote:
Gadjiev and Georgyan are interesting. I also liked, in no special order: Mun (for playing Op. 48/2 instead of 48/1), Ozel (sympathetic and solid), Sawada (genius, he also studies medicine), Sorita (one of a kind), Tuan (hidden power), Zenin (reminds me of Zak), Z. Wang (remarkable Op. 10/7), and Gonzalez (left hand). > Henk

I can see you've been following this quite closely. Listening to Sorita now - impressive pianism. He certainly has the power as well. I also enjoyed Yifan Hou and Yasuko Furumi. I haven't heard all the pianists on your list yet, though I agree with Mun and Ozel. The piano scene is getting very Asian, and why not?
HT
2021-10-07 12:49:50 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
Gadjiev and Georgyan are interesting. I also liked, in no special order: Mun (for playing Op. 48/2 instead of 48/1), Ozel (sympathetic and solid), Sawada (genius, he also studies medicine), Sorita (one of a kind), Tuan (hidden power), Zenin (reminds me of Zak), Z. Wang (remarkable Op. 10/7), and Gonzalez (left hand). > Henk
I can see you've been following this quite closely. Listening to Sorita now - impressive pianism. He certainly has the power as well. I also enjoyed Yifan Hou and Yasuko Furumi. I haven't heard all the pianists on your list yet, though I agree with Mun and Ozel. The piano scene is getting very Asian, and why not?
Their quality is very high. I am particularly impressed by the ladies. They are very talented, and have, in general, a level of technique that seems unattainable for many westerners - and as a bonus, they all look beautiful (pace Herman).

Henk
Al Eisner
2021-10-07 22:20:28 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
Gadjiev and Georgyan are interesting. I also liked, in no special order: Mun (for playing Op. 48/2 instead of 48/1), Ozel (sympathetic and solid), Sawada (genius, he also studies medicine), Sorita (one of a kind), Tuan (hidden power), Zenin (reminds me of Zak), Z. Wang (remarkable Op. 10/7), and Gonzalez (left hand). > Henk
I can see you've been following this quite closely. Listening to Sorita now - impressive pianism. He certainly has the power as well. I also enjoyed Yifan Hou and Yasuko Furumi. I haven't heard all the pianists on your list yet, though I agree with Mun and Ozel. The piano scene is getting very Asian, and why not?
So how does one listen to any of these? Not at all obvious from the
competition web pages.
--
Al Eisner
Andy Evans
2021-10-07 22:23:27 UTC
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So how does one listen to any of these? Not at all obvious from the competition web pages.
-- > Al Eisner
It's all on YT, together with all the chat police giving a running commentary
Al Eisner
2021-10-07 22:32:39 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
So how does one listen to any of these? Not at all obvious from the competition web pages.
It's all on YT, together with all the chat police giving a running commentary
And I just found it is all under the Multimedia menu, "transmission";
if one clicks on "Stage 1" one can select the date. No commentary.
--
Al Eisner
Al Eisner
2021-10-07 22:44:31 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
Post by Andy Evans
So how does one listen to any of these? Not at all obvious from the
competition web pages.
It's all on YT, together with all the chat police giving a running commentary
And I just found it is all under the Multimedia menu, "transmission";
if one clicks on "Stage 1" one can select the date. No commentary.
And "other" under multimedia has lots of stuff: interview with
contestants; pre-compotition recitals include this by Nelson
Goerner (among other jurorss):
https://chopin2020.pl/en/multimedia/other/25/before-the-grand-competition
(Brahms 3rd sonata somehow snuck into this); videos from previous
Chopin competitions; etc.
--
Al Eisner
HT
2021-10-07 15:15:26 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
Yasuko Furumi had very nice touch today, morning of 6th. Alberto Ferro was alright too - a good sense of architecture. Alexander Gadjiev held my interest too, though he doesn't really have the pianism. Martin Garcia made the music dance. Not a bad day so far! But like many I was waiting for Eva Gevorgyan, simply because she's seriously good-looking. She looks quite the media personality but in front of the piano she seemed nervous. In fact you can see the fingers of the left hand shaking quite visibly on a number of pianists. More so than the right hand for some reason. Maybe Chris can offer an insight?
Anyway - just listening to her first piece. Eva is mostly behaving herself and has a nice touch, but no fireworks so far. Etude 25/11 was nothing special. With hair as long as she has she could have a go at Melisande if she sings as well. I'm sorry, being a bit fanciful here but good Melisandes don't grow on trees. Her Scherzo #4 is going a lot better. Looks as if her nerves have settled a bit. Yes, she can certainly play, but not sure how far she'll progress.
Quite a funny moment when one of the ushers had to stop her going back on stage for another bow!!! She's certainly media-aware.
Agreed, Gadjiev and Georgyan are interesting. I also liked, in no special order: Mun (for playing Op. 48/2 instead of 48/1), Ozel (sympathetic and solid), Sawada (genius, he also studies medicine), Sorita (one of a kind), Tuan (hidden power), Zenin (reminds me of Zak), Z. Wang (remarkable Op. 10/7), and Gonzalez (left hand).
Somehow, I have the feeling that the coming days will be even more interesting. I hope so, at least.
Notable are also Ch. Guo (for her Op. 10/5), Khozaynov (for his obsession with middle voices), S-Y. Kim (great Op. 39) and above all Kobayashi (who took her time before going on stage and once there made a scene about her piano stool). She's an excellent Chopin performer, btw.

Henk
HT
2021-10-07 19:31:52 UTC
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Post by HT
Post by Andy Evans
Yasuko Furumi had very nice touch today, morning of 6th. Alberto Ferro was alright too - a good sense of architecture. Alexander Gadjiev held my interest too, though he doesn't really have the pianism. Martin Garcia made the music dance. Not a bad day so far! But like many I was waiting for Eva Gevorgyan, simply because she's seriously good-looking. She looks quite the media personality but in front of the piano she seemed nervous. In fact you can see the fingers of the left hand shaking quite visibly on a number of pianists. More so than the right hand for some reason. Maybe Chris can offer an insight?
Anyway - just listening to her first piece. Eva is mostly behaving herself and has a nice touch, but no fireworks so far. Etude 25/11 was nothing special. With hair as long as she has she could have a go at Melisande if she sings as well. I'm sorry, being a bit fanciful here but good Melisandes don't grow on trees. Her Scherzo #4 is going a lot better. Looks as if her nerves have settled a bit. Yes, she can certainly play, but not sure how far she'll progress.
Quite a funny moment when one of the ushers had to stop her going back on stage for another bow!!! She's certainly media-aware.
Agreed, Gadjiev and Georgyan are interesting. I also liked, in no special order: Mun (for playing Op. 48/2 instead of 48/1), Ozel (sympathetic and solid), Sawada (genius, he also studies medicine), Sorita (one of a kind), Tuan (hidden power), Zenin (reminds me of Zak), Z. Wang (remarkable Op. 10/7), and Gonzalez (left hand).
Somehow, I have the feeling that the coming days will be even more interesting. I hope so, at least.
Notable are also Ch. Guo (for her Op. 10/5), Khozaynov (for his obsession with middle voices), S-Y. Kim (great Op. 39) and above all Kobayashi (who took her time before going on stage and once there made a scene about her piano stool). She's an excellent Chopin performer, btw.
Henk
The 87th candidate just played the last note of Stage 1 of the competition. 40 go to the next round.
Interesting were Bruce Liu (never boring) and Chao Wang (very slow or very loud, but not uninteresting). And there was Peng (who melted away during her recital but didn't budge).

Henk
Andy Evans
2021-10-07 20:13:43 UTC
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Post by HT
The 87th candidate just played the last note of Stage 1 of the competition. 40 go to the next round.
Interesting were Bruce Liu (never boring) and Chao Wang (very slow or very loud, but not uninteresting). And there was Peng (who melted away during her recital but didn't budge). > > Henk
Indeed, Bruce Liu is a possible prize winner. Quite a buzz around him. The online YT police loved him - the chat was full of heart emojis. I rather liked Julia Losowska as well, though she was more predictable. Chao Wang was playing a Yamaha, like a lot of the Asian pianists who played loud. It has a good tone when played loud and keeps more body and warmth than the Steinways. I don't know how much the choice of piano is based on touch. All the Yamahas I played had a stiffer action than the Steinways. I'm not a concert pianist at all - very far from it - but I do play the piano. Chao was a bit on the slow side for me, like quite a few of the pianists this year.

I'm missing Dan here - I hope he comes in on this thread.
HT
2021-10-07 20:53:46 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
Post by HT
The 87th candidate just played the last note of Stage 1 of the competition. 40 go to the next round.
Interesting were Bruce Liu (never boring) and Chao Wang (very slow or very loud, but not uninteresting). And there was Peng (who melted away during her recital but didn't budge). > > Henk
Indeed, Bruce Liu is a possible prize winner. Quite a buzz around him. The online YT police loved him - the chat was full of heart emojis. I rather liked Julia Losowska as well, though she was more predictable. Chao Wang was playing a Yamaha, like a lot of the Asian pianists who played loud. It has a good tone when played loud and keeps more body and warmth than the Steinways. I don't know how much the choice of piano is based on touch. All the Yamahas I played had a stiffer action than the Steinways. I'm not a concert pianist at all - very far from it - but I do play the piano. Chao was a bit on the slow side for me, like quite a few of the pianists this year.
I'm missing Dan here - I hope he comes in on this thread.
Seconded!

Henk
Herman
2021-10-06 14:54:49 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
Yasuko Furumi had very nice touch today, morning of 6th. Alberto Ferro was alright too - a good sense of architecture. Alexander Gadjiev held my interest too, though he doesn't really have the pianism. Martin Garcia made the music dance. Not a bad day so far! But like many I was waiting for Eva Gevorgyan, simply because she's seriously good-looking. She looks quite the media personality but in front of the piano she seemed nervous.
It's a bit iffy to talk about the way female performers look, but frankly I think Gevorgyan looks borderline creepy, and the long ponytail doesn't help either. Teenagers who let their hair grow that long....

To compensate, I thought some of the men looked pretty silly, too. Also in their stage demeanor.
Andy Evans
2021-10-06 15:11:13 UTC
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On Wednesday, 6 October 2021 at 15:54:52 UTC+1, Herman wrote:
.. frankly I think Gevorgyan looks borderline creepy, and the long ponytail doesn't help either. Teenagers who let their hair grow that long....
Post by Herman
To compensate, I thought some of the men looked pretty silly, too. Also in their stage demeanor.
To be frank I've always preferred short hair in women - love that gamine look, especially with a beret on top. So I'm on board with "creepy" long hair. I also find playing with your eyes closed a bit... well, strange....

Quite a few of the men looked like insurance salesmen - dark suit, short hair and glasses. Refreshing. Now, about a good deal on my car......
Al Eisner
2021-10-05 21:22:40 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
https://chopin2020.pl/en/calendar
The Chopin Competition has begun. Hopefully there will be a more interesting winner than with the Leeds.
Perhaps, but the accouncers for the Leeds did say that it was the most
important international piano competition (unqualified by words like
"in England"). :)
Post by Andy Evans
I'm always interested in following piano competitions!
I doubt if I will pay attention until they are down to at least the
semi's.
--
Al Eisner
Graham
2021-10-05 22:18:55 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
Post by Andy Evans
https://chopin2020.pl/en/calendar
The Chopin Competition has begun. Hopefully there will be a more
interesting winner than with the Leeds.
Perhaps, but the accouncers for the Leeds did say that it was the most
important international piano competition (unqualified by words like
"in England").  :)
So how would you rank all the more notable ones?
Al Eisner
2021-10-06 21:45:08 UTC
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Post by Graham
Post by Al Eisner
Post by Andy Evans
https://chopin2020.pl/en/calendar
The Chopin Competition has begun. Hopefully there will be a more
interesting winner than with the Leeds.
Perhaps, but the accouncers for the Leeds did say that it was the most
important international piano competition (unqualified by words like
"in England").  :)
So how would you rank all the more notable ones?
I wouldn't risk it; for that sort of thing I just rely on others at rmcr :)

Actually, I'm not sure what "important" means in this context. Perhaps
important to the performers (especially the winners).
--
Al Eisner
Dan Koren
2021-10-07 10:25:28 UTC
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Sarah Tuan

dk
HT
2021-10-07 12:51:30 UTC
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Post by Dan Koren
Sarah Tuan
dk
Good to hear from you! Tuan is a surprise, yes.

Henk
Herman
2021-10-07 13:12:06 UTC
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Yes Tuan's first round was good, although, again, it was a reminder that stage decorum has gone out the window, with her hair trailing all over.

I couldn't help but notice a competitor with a name right out of a Rushdie novel, Aristo Sham.
Chris from Lafayette
2021-10-07 21:07:28 UTC
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Post by HT
Post by Dan Koren
Sarah Tuan
dk
Good to hear from you! Tuan is a surprise, yes.
Henk
OMG! Are you two KIDDING? YOU CANNOT BE SERIOUS! Tuan was a complete nothing! (Not to say that she still might not make it to the next round though, political considerations between the US and Poland being what they are and Poland trying to be our bestest vassal state in Europe!)
Andy Evans
2021-10-07 22:16:21 UTC
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I miss Yifan Hou here, but results are pretty much as expected.

Stage I results announced!

Mr Piotr Alexewicz, Poland
Ms Leonora Armellini, Italy
Mr J J Jun Li Bui, Canada
Ms Michelle Candotti, Italy
Mr Kai-Min Chang, Chinese Taipei
Mr Xuehong Chen, China
Mr Hyounglok Choi, South Korea
Mr Federico Gad Crema, Italy
Mr Alberto Ferro, Italy
Ms Yasuko Furumi, Japan
Mr Alexander Gadjiev, Italy/Slovenia
Mr Avery Gagliano, U.S.A.
Mr Martin Garcia Garcia, Spain
Ms Eva Gevorgyan, Russia/Armenia
Ms Wei-Ting Hsieh, Chinese Taipei
Mr Adam Kałduński, Poland
Mr Nikolay Khozyainov, Russia
Ms Su Yeon Kim, South Korea
Ms Aimi Kobayashi, Japan
Mr Mateusz Krzyżowski, Poland
Mr Jakub Kuszlik, Poland
Mr Shushi Kyomasu, Japan
Mr Hyuk Lee, South Korea
Mr Bruce (Xiaoyu) Liu, Canada
Mr Arsenii Mun, Russia
Mr Szymon Nehring, Poland
Mr Viet Trung Nguyen, Vietnam/Poland
Mr Georgijs Osokins, Latvia
Mr Evren Ozel, U.S.A.
Mr Kamil Pacholec, Poland
Mr Hao Rao, China
Mr Sohgo Sawada, Japan
Mr Aristo Sham, China, Hong Kong
Ms Miyu Shindo, Japan
Mr Talon Smith, U.S.A.
Mr Kyohei Sorita, Japan
Ms Szuyu Su, Chinese Taipei
Mr Hayato Sumino, Japan
Mr Yutong Sun, China
Mr Tomoharu Ushida, Japan
Mr Marcin Wieczorek, Poland
Mr Andrzej Wierciński, Poland
Mr Yuchong Wu, China
Mr Lingfei (Stephan) Xie, Canada/China
Mr Zi Xu, China
Dan Koren
2021-10-07 23:57:10 UTC
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The competition is as rigged and the jury
as deaf and incompetent as ever, ranking
mechanical competence above musical
intelligence and expression. The only
competitor that made music from the
first to the last note was Sarah Tuan.
This is deja vu -- Tiffany Poon was
also denied promotion to the 2nd
stage in a prior competition.
Post by Andy Evans
I miss Yifan Hou here, but results are pretty much as expected.
Stage I results announced!
Mr Piotr Alexewicz, Poland
Ms Leonora Armellini, Italy
Mr J J Jun Li Bui, Canada
Ms Michelle Candotti, Italy
Mr Kai-Min Chang, Chinese Taipei
Mr Xuehong Chen, China
Mr Hyounglok Choi, South Korea
Mr Federico Gad Crema, Italy
Mr Alberto Ferro, Italy
Ms Yasuko Furumi, Japan
Mr Alexander Gadjiev, Italy/Slovenia
Mr Avery Gagliano, U.S.A.
Mr Martin Garcia Garcia, Spain
Ms Eva Gevorgyan, Russia/Armenia
Ms Wei-Ting Hsieh, Chinese Taipei
Mr Adam Kałduński, Poland
Mr Nikolay Khozyainov, Russia
Ms Su Yeon Kim, South Korea
Ms Aimi Kobayashi, Japan
Mr Mateusz Krzyżowski, Poland
Mr Jakub Kuszlik, Poland
Mr Shushi Kyomasu, Japan
Mr Hyuk Lee, South Korea
Mr Bruce (Xiaoyu) Liu, Canada
Mr Arsenii Mun, Russia
Mr Szymon Nehring, Poland
Mr Viet Trung Nguyen, Vietnam/Poland
Mr Georgijs Osokins, Latvia
Mr Evren Ozel, U.S.A.
Mr Kamil Pacholec, Poland
Mr Hao Rao, China
Mr Sohgo Sawada, Japan
Mr Aristo Sham, China, Hong Kong
Ms Miyu Shindo, Japan
Mr Talon Smith, U.S.A.
Mr Kyohei Sorita, Japan
Ms Szuyu Su, Chinese Taipei
Mr Hayato Sumino, Japan
Mr Yutong Sun, China
Mr Tomoharu Ushida, Japan
Mr Marcin Wieczorek, Poland
Mr Andrzej Wierciński, Poland
Mr Yuchong Wu, China
Mr Lingfei (Stephan) Xie, Canada/China
Mr Zi Xu, China
Dan Koren
2021-10-08 00:06:55 UTC
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The competition is as rigged and the jury
is as deaf and corrupt as ever, ranking
mechanical competence above musical
intelligence and expression. The only
competitor that made music from the
first to the last note was Sarah Tuan.
This is deja vu -- Tiffany Poon was
also denied promotion to the 2nd
stage in a prior competition.
Post by Andy Evans
I miss Yifan Hou here, but results are pretty much as expected.
Stage I results announced!
Mr Piotr Alexewicz, Poland
Ms Leonora Armellini, Italy
Mr J J Jun Li Bui, Canada
Ms Michelle Candotti, Italy
Mr Kai-Min Chang, Chinese Taipei
Mr Xuehong Chen, China
Mr Hyounglok Choi, South Korea
Mr Federico Gad Crema, Italy
Mr Alberto Ferro, Italy
Ms Yasuko Furumi, Japan
Mr Alexander Gadjiev, Italy/Slovenia
Mr Avery Gagliano, U.S.A.
Mr Martin Garcia Garcia, Spain
Ms Eva Gevorgyan, Russia/Armenia
Ms Wei-Ting Hsieh, Chinese Taipei
Mr Adam Kałduński, Poland
Mr Nikolay Khozyainov, Russia
Ms Su Yeon Kim, South Korea
Ms Aimi Kobayashi, Japan
Mr Mateusz Krzyżowski, Poland
Mr Jakub Kuszlik, Poland
Mr Shushi Kyomasu, Japan
Mr Hyuk Lee, South Korea
Mr Bruce (Xiaoyu) Liu, Canada
Mr Arsenii Mun, Russia
Mr Szymon Nehring, Poland
Mr Viet Trung Nguyen, Vietnam/Poland
Mr Georgijs Osokins, Latvia
Mr Evren Ozel, U.S.A.
Mr Kamil Pacholec, Poland
Mr Hao Rao, China
Mr Sohgo Sawada, Japan
Mr Aristo Sham, China, Hong Kong
Ms Miyu Shindo, Japan
Mr Talon Smith, U.S.A.
Mr Kyohei Sorita, Japan
Ms Szuyu Su, Chinese Taipei
Mr Hayato Sumino, Japan
Mr Yutong Sun, China
Mr Tomoharu Ushida, Japan
Mr Marcin Wieczorek, Poland
Mr Andrzej Wierciński, Poland
Mr Yuchong Wu, China
Mr Lingfei (Stephan) Xie, Canada/China
Mr Zi Xu, China
Herman
2021-10-08 00:56:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dan Koren
The competition is as rigged and the jury
is as deaf and corrupt as ever, ranking
mechanical competence above musical
intelligence and expression. The only
competitor that made music from the
first to the last note was Sarah Tuan.
Unlike you, the jury does not give points for long hair.

The phrase "the X was rigged" has fallen into disgrace since Trump.

Bruce Liu is the one who made music from first to last note, and, absent gaffes, will be among the top winners.
Dan Koren
2021-10-08 01:25:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Herman
Bruce Liu is the one who made music
from first to last note, and, absent gaffes,
will be among the top winners.
Perhaps. Very ugly and harsh tone.
Sounds driven, does not make the
music sound natural and improvised.

In my book this adds up to zero.

dk
JohnGavin
2021-10-08 16:19:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Herman
Post by Dan Koren
The competition is as rigged and the jury
is as deaf and corrupt as ever, ranking
mechanical competence above musical
intelligence and expression. The only
competitor that made music from the
first to the last note was Sarah Tuan.
Unlike you, the jury does not give points for long hair.
The phrase "the X was rigged" has fallen into disgrace since Trump.
Bruce Liu is the one who made music from first to last note, and, absent gaffes, will be among the top winners.
I’ve now watched several of the contestants and completely agree that Bruce Liu is a standout. The only thing I can say to Dan is that the Fazioli has always had a somewhat leaner tone than the typical Steinway, but through my speakers his tone was not harsh at all.
HT
2021-10-08 16:43:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Herman
Post by Dan Koren
The competition is as rigged and the jury
is as deaf and corrupt as ever, ranking
mechanical competence above musical
intelligence and expression. The only
competitor that made music from the
first to the last note was Sarah Tuan.
Unlike you, the jury does not give points for long hair.
The phrase "the X was rigged" has fallen into disgrace since Trump.
Bruce Liu is the one who made music from first to last note, and, absent gaffes, will be among the top winners.
I’ve now watched several of the contestants and completely agree that Bruce Liu is a standout. The only thing I can say to Dan is that the Fazioli has always had a somewhat leaner tone than the typical Steinway, but through my speakers his tone was not harsh at all.
I also wanted to say that I like Yuja Wang a great deal more than the general consensus here. She may not be the deepest philosopher-pianist, and she may never give a “reference” performance of anything, but her command and fearlessness, the sheer size of her repertoire at age 30 (which major concerto hasn’t she played), are highly admirable. I like her straightforwardness and complete lack of mannerisms. She is easy to listen too without being shallow (IMO of course). She seems to be very popular, being the soloist in the Carnegie Hall reopening. I don’t think the concert going public is that ignorant. It’s astounding to me that she has sustained a frantic schedule in the last decade without burning out.
Seconded!

Henk
Andy Evans
2021-10-08 16:50:47 UTC
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Permalink
I also wanted to say that I like Yuja Wang a great deal more than the general consensus here.
Seconded! > > Henk
Nothing wrong, for me, in bringing some glamour into piano playing in a visual age.

After all, weren't Franz Liszt, Paganini, Vivaldi and countless singers all about glamour? It's nothing new in performers.

Yuja plays well enough for me and clearly for most people.
Ricardo Jimenez
2021-10-08 16:48:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
If this competition was on Youtube, even I would watch. Only 1
evening and not the same pieces over and over.
https://robertgreenbergmusic.com/mozart-clementi-duel/
HT
2021-10-08 18:38:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
If this competition was on Youtube, even I would watch. Only 1
evening and not the same pieces over and over.
https://robertgreenbergmusic.com/mozart-clementi-duel/
It is on YT:

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=chopin+competition+2021

Henk
Ricardo Jimenez
2021-10-08 18:45:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by HT
If this competition was on Youtube, even I would watch. Only 1
evening and not the same pieces over and over.
https://robertgreenbergmusic.com/mozart-clementi-duel/
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=chopin+competition+2021
Henk
The this referred to the article I linked.
JohnGavin
2021-10-08 18:59:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ricardo Jimenez
Post by HT
If this competition was on Youtube, even I would watch. Only 1
evening and not the same pieces over and over.
https://robertgreenbergmusic.com/mozart-clementi-duel/
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=chopin+competition+2021
Henk
The this referred to the article I linked.
Clementi’s greatest Piano Sonatas can easily stand alongside Mozart’s.
I’d recommend listening to Demidenko’s recording on Hyperion.
HT
2021-10-08 21:01:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ricardo Jimenez
Post by HT
If this competition was on Youtube, even I would watch. Only 1
evening and not the same pieces over and over.
https://robertgreenbergmusic.com/mozart-clementi-duel/
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=chopin+competition+2021
Henk
The this referred to the article I linked.
Sorry, I should have said "The competition is on YT".

Henk
Chris from Lafayette
2021-10-08 23:40:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Herman
Bruce Liu is the one who made music from first to last note, and, absent gaffes, will be among the top winners.
I’ve now watched several of the contestants and completely agree that Bruce Liu is a standout. The only thing I can say to Dan is that the Fazioli has always had a somewhat leaner tone than the typical Steinway, but through my speakers his tone was not harsh at all.
I agree that the Faz here was not harsh, but it was still kind of weird. (Kind of more disembodied, at least on my system.) And one of those Steinways kept going out of tune. (Maybe because it was getting a lot more use?) I liked the Yamaha and the Kawai instruments.
Chris from Lafayette
2021-10-08 23:44:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I also wanted to say that I like Yuja Wang a great deal more than the general consensus here. She may not be the deepest philosopher-pianist, and she may never give a “reference” performance of anything, but her command and fearlessness, the sheer size of her repertoire at age 30 (which major concerto hasn’t she played), are highly admirable. I like her straightforwardness and complete lack of mannerisms. She is easy to listen too without being shallow (IMO of course). She seems to be very popular, being the soloist in the Carnegie Hall reopening. I don’t think the concert going public is that ignorant. It’s astounding to me that she has sustained a frantic schedule in the last decade without burning out.
John - I agree with you about Yuja. If anything, I like her playing even more. (I drove to see her play the Hammerklavier at Cal State Sonoma - definitely worth it IMHO. Also saw her play the Brahms 2 and the Prokofiev 5 on the SAME program in Santa Cruz - unbelievable!)
Dan Koren
2021-10-08 00:29:07 UTC
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Note some of the gender pronouns are wrong.
Post by Andy Evans
I miss Yifan Hou here, but results are pretty much as expected.
Stage I results announced!
Mr Piotr Alexewicz, Poland
Ms Leonora Armellini, Italy
Mr J J Jun Li Bui, Canada
Ms Michelle Candotti, Italy
Mr Kai-Min Chang, Chinese Taipei
Mr Xuehong Chen, China
Mr Hyounglok Choi, South Korea
Mr Federico Gad Crema, Italy
Mr Alberto Ferro, Italy
Ms Yasuko Furumi, Japan
Mr Alexander Gadjiev, Italy/Slovenia
Mr Avery Gagliano, U.S.A.
Mr Martin Garcia Garcia, Spain
Ms Eva Gevorgyan, Russia/Armenia
Ms Wei-Ting Hsieh, Chinese Taipei
Mr Adam Kałduński, Poland
Mr Nikolay Khozyainov, Russia
Ms Su Yeon Kim, South Korea
Ms Aimi Kobayashi, Japan
Mr Mateusz Krzyżowski, Poland
Mr Jakub Kuszlik, Poland
Mr Shushi Kyomasu, Japan
Mr Hyuk Lee, South Korea
Mr Bruce (Xiaoyu) Liu, Canada
Mr Arsenii Mun, Russia
Mr Szymon Nehring, Poland
Mr Viet Trung Nguyen, Vietnam/Poland
Mr Georgijs Osokins, Latvia
Mr Evren Ozel, U.S.A.
Mr Kamil Pacholec, Poland
Mr Hao Rao, China
Mr Sohgo Sawada, Japan
Mr Aristo Sham, China, Hong Kong
Ms Miyu Shindo, Japan
Mr Talon Smith, U.S.A.
Mr Kyohei Sorita, Japan
Ms Szuyu Su, Chinese Taipei
Mr Hayato Sumino, Japan
Mr Yutong Sun, China
Mr Tomoharu Ushida, Japan
Mr Marcin Wieczorek, Poland
Mr Andrzej Wierciński, Poland
Mr Yuchong Wu, China
Mr Lingfei (Stephan) Xie, Canada/China
Mr Zi Xu, China
HT
2021-10-07 22:25:42 UTC
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Post by Chris from Lafayette
Post by HT
Post by Dan Koren
Sarah Tuan
dk
Good to hear from you! Tuan is a surprise, yes.
Henk
OMG! Are you two KIDDING? YOU CANNOT BE SERIOUS! Tuan was a complete nothing! (Not to say that she still might not make it to the next round though, political considerations between the US and Poland being what they are and Poland trying to be our bestest vassal state in Europe!)
=====

<g> The jury is with you, Chris. Tuan isn't going to the next stage.

45 to the next stage. 9/45 is Polish (all male). 10/45 is female. 21/45 is Asian. Out of proportion, of course - but probably not according to the the jury (7/17 Polish, 12/17 male, 3/17 Asian).

1. 1. Mr Piotr Alexewicz, Poland 2. 2. Ms Leonora Armellini, Italy 3. 3. Mr J J Jun Li Bui, Canada 4. 4. Ms Michelle Candotti, Italy 5. 5. Mr Kai-Min Chang, Chinese Taipei 6. 6. Mr Xuehong Chen, China 7. 7. Mr Hyounglok Choi, South Korea 8. 8. Mr Federico Gad Crema, Italy 9. 9. Mr Alberto Ferro, Italy 10. 10. Ms Yasuko Furumi, Japan 11. 11. Mr Alexander Gadjiev, Italy/Slovenia 12. 12. Mr Avery Gagliano, U.S.A. 13. 13. Mr Martin Garcia Garcia, Spain 14. 14. Ms Eva Gevorgyan, Russia/Armenia 15. 15. Ms Wei-Ting Hsieh, Chinese Taipei 16. 16. Mr Adam Kałduński, Poland 17. 17. Mr Nikolay Khozyainov, Russia 18. 18. Ms Su Yeon Kim, South Korea 19. 19. Ms Aimi Kobayashi, Japan 20. 20. Mr Mateusz Krzyżowski, Poland 21. 21. Mr Jakub Kuszlik, Poland 22. 22. Mr Shushi Kyomasu, Japan 23. 23. Mr Hyuk Lee, South Korea 24. 24. Mr Bruce (Xiaoyu) Liu, Canada 25. 25. Mr Arsenii Mun, Russia 26. 26. Mr Szymon Nehring, Poland 27. 27. Mr Viet Trung Nguyen, Vietnam/Poland 28. 28. Mr Georgijs Osokins, Latvia 29. 29. Mr Evren Ozel, U.S.A. 30. 30. Mr Kamil Pacholec, Poland 31. 31. Mr Hao Rao, China 32. 32. Mr Sohgo Sawada, Japan 33. 33. Mr Aristo Sham, China, Hong Kong 34. 34. Ms Miyu Shindo, Japan 35. 35. Mr Talon Smith, U.S.A. 36. 36. Mr Kyohei Sorita, Japan 37. 37. Ms Szuyu Su, Chinese Taipei 38. 38. Mr Hayato Sumino, Japan 39. 39. Mr Yutong Sun, China 40. 40. Mr Tomoharu Ushida, Japan 41. 41. Mr Marcin Wieczorek, Poland 42. 42. Mr Andrzej Wierciński, Poland 43. 43. Mr Yuchong Wu, China 44. 44. Mr Lingfei (Stephan) Xie, Canada/China 45. 45. Mr Zi Xu, China

Henk
Chris from Lafayette
2021-10-08 01:40:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by HT
Post by Chris from Lafayette
Post by HT
Post by Dan Koren
Sarah Tuan
dk
Good to hear from you! Tuan is a surprise, yes.
Henk
OMG! Are you two KIDDING? YOU CANNOT BE SERIOUS! Tuan was a complete nothing! (Not to say that she still might not make it to the next round though, political considerations between the US and Poland being what they are and Poland trying to be our bestest vassal state in Europe!)
=====
<g> The jury is with you, Chris. Tuan isn't going to the next stage.
1. 1. Mr Piotr Alexewicz, Poland 2. 2. Ms Leonora Armellini, Italy 3. 3. Mr J J Jun Li Bui, Canada 4. 4. Ms Michelle Candotti, Italy 5. 5. Mr Kai-Min Chang, Chinese Taipei 6. 6. Mr Xuehong Chen, China 7. 7. Mr Hyounglok Choi, South Korea 8. 8. Mr Federico Gad Crema, Italy 9. 9. Mr Alberto Ferro, Italy 10. 10. Ms Yasuko Furumi, Japan 11. 11. Mr Alexander Gadjiev, Italy/Slovenia 12. 12. Mr Avery Gagliano, U.S.A. 13. 13. Mr Martin Garcia Garcia, Spain 14. 14. Ms Eva Gevorgyan, Russia/Armenia 15. 15. Ms Wei-Ting Hsieh, Chinese Taipei 16. 16. Mr Adam Kałduński, Poland 17. 17. Mr Nikolay Khozyainov, Russia 18. 18. Ms Su Yeon Kim, South Korea 19. 19. Ms Aimi Kobayashi, Japan 20. 20. Mr Mateusz Krzyżowski, Poland 21. 21. Mr Jakub Kuszlik, Poland 22. 22. Mr Shushi Kyomasu, Japan 23. 23. Mr Hyuk Lee, South Korea 24. 24. Mr Bruce (Xiaoyu) Liu, Canada 25. 25. Mr Arsenii Mun, Russia 26. 26. Mr Szymon Nehring, Poland 27. 27. Mr Viet Trung Nguyen, Vietnam/Poland 28. 28. Mr Georgijs Osokins, Latvia 29. 29. Mr Evren Ozel, U.S.A. 30. 30. Mr Kamil Pacholec, Poland 31. 31. Mr Hao Rao, China 32. 32. Mr Sohgo Sawada, Japan 33. 33. Mr Aristo Sham, China, Hong Kong 34. 34. Ms Miyu Shindo, Japan 35. 35. Mr Talon Smith, U.S.A. 36. 36. Mr Kyohei Sorita, Japan 37. 37. Ms Szuyu Su, Chinese Taipei 38. 38. Mr Hayato Sumino, Japan 39. 39. Mr Yutong Sun, China 40. 40. Mr Tomoharu Ushida, Japan 41. 41. Mr Marcin Wieczorek, Poland 42. 42. Mr Andrzej Wierciński, Poland 43. 43. Mr Yuchong Wu, China 44. 44. Mr Lingfei (Stephan) Xie, Canada/China 45. 45. Mr Zi Xu, China
Henk
Henk - I was about to lord it over you and Dan, but I'll refrain! ;-)

Ms. CfL and I did our best to listen to whomever we could, but we've not heard most of the pianists now in the second stage. Of the ones we did hear, I did liked JJ June Li Bui, Hyonglok Choi (Mr. gender-fluid), Eva Gevorgyan (extra points for babeliociousness!), Avery Gagliano (simple, direct, elegant understated - a refreshing change from most of the rest we heard), Arsenii Mun (razzle-dazzle). I hope we're able to hear a bigger proportion in the next round.
Herman
2021-10-08 06:55:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris from Lafayette
Post by HT
Post by Chris from Lafayette
Post by HT
Post by Dan Koren
Sarah Tuan
dk
Good to hear from you! Tuan is a surprise, yes.
Henk
OMG! Are you two KIDDING? YOU CANNOT BE SERIOUS! Tuan was a complete nothing! (Not to say that she still might not make it to the next round though, political considerations between the US and Poland being what they are and Poland trying to be our bestest vassal state in Europe!)
=====
<g> The jury is with you, Chris. Tuan isn't going to the next stage.
1. 1. Mr Piotr Alexewicz, Poland 2. 2. Ms Leonora Armellini, Italy 3. 3. Mr J J Jun Li Bui, Canada 4. 4. Ms Michelle Candotti, Italy 5. 5. Mr Kai-Min Chang, Chinese Taipei 6. 6. Mr Xuehong Chen, China 7. 7. Mr Hyounglok Choi, South Korea 8. 8. Mr Federico Gad Crema, Italy 9. 9. Mr Alberto Ferro, Italy 10. 10. Ms Yasuko Furumi, Japan 11. 11. Mr Alexander Gadjiev, Italy/Slovenia 12. 12. Mr Avery Gagliano, U.S.A. 13. 13. Mr Martin Garcia Garcia, Spain 14. 14. Ms Eva Gevorgyan, Russia/Armenia 15. 15. Ms Wei-Ting Hsieh, Chinese Taipei 16. 16. Mr Adam Kałduński, Poland 17. 17. Mr Nikolay Khozyainov, Russia 18. 18. Ms Su Yeon Kim, South Korea 19. 19. Ms Aimi Kobayashi, Japan 20. 20. Mr Mateusz Krzyżowski, Poland 21. 21. Mr Jakub Kuszlik, Poland 22. 22. Mr Shushi Kyomasu, Japan 23. 23. Mr Hyuk Lee, South Korea 24. 24. Mr Bruce (Xiaoyu) Liu, Canada 25. 25. Mr Arsenii Mun, Russia 26. 26. Mr Szymon Nehring, Poland 27. 27. Mr Viet Trung Nguyen, Vietnam/Poland 28. 28. Mr Georgijs Osokins, Latvia 29. 29. Mr Evren Ozel, U.S.A. 30. 30. Mr Kamil Pacholec, Poland 31. 31. Mr Hao Rao, China 32. 32. Mr Sohgo Sawada, Japan 33. 33. Mr Aristo Sham, China, Hong Kong 34. 34. Ms Miyu Shindo, Japan 35. 35. Mr Talon Smith, U.S.A. 36. 36. Mr Kyohei Sorita, Japan 37. 37. Ms Szuyu Su, Chinese Taipei 38. 38. Mr Hayato Sumino, Japan 39. 39. Mr Yutong Sun, China 40. 40. Mr Tomoharu Ushida, Japan 41. 41. Mr Marcin Wieczorek, Poland 42. 42. Mr Andrzej Wierciński, Poland 43. 43. Mr Yuchong Wu, China 44. 44. Mr Lingfei (Stephan) Xie, Canada/China 45. 45. Mr Zi Xu, China
Henk
Henk - I was about to lord it over you and Dan, but I'll refrain! ;-)
Ms. CfL and I did our best to listen to whomever we could, but we've not heard most of the pianists now in the second stage. Of the ones we did hear, I did liked JJ June Li Bui, Hyonglok Choi (Mr. gender-fluid), Eva Gevorgyan (extra points for babeliociousness!), Avery Gagliano (simple, direct, elegant understated - a refreshing change from most of the rest we heard), Arsenii Mun (razzle-dazzle). I hope we're able to hear a bigger proportion in the next round.
wow, the chubby Crema guy made it to the next round?
JohnGavin
2021-10-08 09:59:32 UTC
Reply
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Post by Herman
Post by Chris from Lafayette
Post by HT
Post by Chris from Lafayette
Post by HT
Post by Dan Koren
Sarah Tuan
dk
Good to hear from you! Tuan is a surprise, yes.
Henk
OMG! Are you two KIDDING? YOU CANNOT BE SERIOUS! Tuan was a complete nothing! (Not to say that she still might not make it to the next round though, political considerations between the US and Poland being what they are and Poland trying to be our bestest vassal state in Europe!)
=====
<g> The jury is with you, Chris. Tuan isn't going to the next stage.
1. 1. Mr Piotr Alexewicz, Poland 2. 2. Ms Leonora Armellini, Italy 3. 3. Mr J J Jun Li Bui, Canada 4. 4. Ms Michelle Candotti, Italy 5. 5. Mr Kai-Min Chang, Chinese Taipei 6. 6. Mr Xuehong Chen, China 7. 7. Mr Hyounglok Choi, South Korea 8. 8. Mr Federico Gad Crema, Italy 9. 9. Mr Alberto Ferro, Italy 10. 10. Ms Yasuko Furumi, Japan 11. 11. Mr Alexander Gadjiev, Italy/Slovenia 12. 12. Mr Avery Gagliano, U.S.A. 13. 13. Mr Martin Garcia Garcia, Spain 14. 14. Ms Eva Gevorgyan, Russia/Armenia 15. 15. Ms Wei-Ting Hsieh, Chinese Taipei 16. 16. Mr Adam Kałduński, Poland 17. 17. Mr Nikolay Khozyainov, Russia 18. 18. Ms Su Yeon Kim, South Korea 19. 19. Ms Aimi Kobayashi, Japan 20. 20. Mr Mateusz Krzyżowski, Poland 21. 21. Mr Jakub Kuszlik, Poland 22. 22. Mr Shushi Kyomasu, Japan 23. 23. Mr Hyuk Lee, South Korea 24. 24. Mr Bruce (Xiaoyu) Liu, Canada 25. 25. Mr Arsenii Mun, Russia 26. 26. Mr Szymon Nehring, Poland 27. 27. Mr Viet Trung Nguyen, Vietnam/Poland 28. 28. Mr Georgijs Osokins, Latvia 29. 29. Mr Evren Ozel, U.S.A. 30. 30. Mr Kamil Pacholec, Poland 31. 31. Mr Hao Rao, China 32. 32. Mr Sohgo Sawada, Japan 33. 33. Mr Aristo Sham, China, Hong Kong 34. 34. Ms Miyu Shindo, Japan 35. 35. Mr Talon Smith, U.S.A. 36. 36. Mr Kyohei Sorita, Japan 37. 37. Ms Szuyu Su, Chinese Taipei 38. 38. Mr Hayato Sumino, Japan 39. 39. Mr Yutong Sun, China 40. 40. Mr Tomoharu Ushida, Japan 41. 41. Mr Marcin Wieczorek, Poland 42. 42. Mr Andrzej Wierciński, Poland 43. 43. Mr Yuchong Wu, China 44. 44. Mr Lingfei (Stephan) Xie, Canada/China 45. 45. Mr Zi Xu, China
Henk
Henk - I was about to lord it over you and Dan, but I'll refrain! ;-)
Ms. CfL and I did our best to listen to whomever we could, but we've not heard most of the pianists now in the second stage. Of the ones we did hear, I did liked JJ June Li Bui, Hyonglok Choi (Mr. gender-fluid), Eva Gevorgyan (extra points for babeliociousness!), Avery Gagliano (simple, direct, elegant understated - a refreshing change from most of the rest we heard), Arsenii Mun (razzle-dazzle). I hope we're able to hear a bigger proportion in the next round.
wow, the chubby Crema guy made it to the next round?
Do we really know what the judges go by in total? Are they only judging by what they hear in the moment, or are they gauging their choices with a sense of who can sustain a concert career? I’m fairly sure that each contestant submits a list of their overall repertoire which the judges all see. This is one indicator of how equipped each contestant is.

I haven’t watch this year‘s competition but I followed the last one and felt that Seong-Jin Cho seemed like the most equipped to sustain a concert career. If extreme sensitivity had been the criteria for winning, the prize would have gone to Kate Liu. Interestingly, Martha Argerich gave her pretty low grades, but she did come in second if my memory is correct.

I’m sure that the sponsors of any music competition would want their first place winners to be huge successes. It would stand to reason that this would increase the prestige of the competition.
Herman
2021-10-08 10:10:31 UTC
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Generally there is no telling how a performer will do in the future.

I'm also wondering whether something like stage presentation is a factor.

Like I said: Tuan's playing was good, but do people want to look at someone who looks pretty unkempt?

of course, some men get a kick out of that waif stuff, but the jury maybe not so much...
HT
2021-10-08 16:05:21 UTC
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Post by Herman
Generally there is no telling how a performer will do in the future.
I'm also wondering whether something like stage presentation is a factor.
Like I said: Tuan's playing was good, but do people want to look at someone who looks pretty unkempt?
of course, some men get a kick out of that waif stuff, but the jury maybe not so much...
If Tuan did not make it to the second round because of her looks, it only confirms my impression that this jury is not (yet) talent-oriented.
Henk
I was just presenting a hypothesis. And it was not about "looks" but about "stage presentation".
I have no inside info.
I would not have been able to predict that Yuja Wang would be a star performer; I would have guessed people would not want to see what she had on offer.
<g> Not even a hypothesis, you just asked a question. I could be wrong, but it seemed to me that it was about "wanting to look at someone who looks ...".
"IF" this question were answered in the affirmative, then etc.

Predicting a solo career is very difficult, if we may believe Israela Margalit.

Did YW make a furore in Verbier because people wanted to "see what she had to offer"?

Acribia, I know and apologise for it.

Henk
Herman
2021-10-10 03:26:11 UTC
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There's only so much time, and listening to too much male-Pole music can get tedious, so I haven't listened to all Saturday's candidates I did however like the Japanese young woman, Miyu Shindo, who concluded with the Barcarolle. Particularly her A flat waltz was sensational.
And there was the guy who looked like a hotel night clerk, man bun and all, Kyohei Sorita, with a splendid F major Ballade.
Herman
2021-10-10 09:41:38 UTC
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I think it's safe to say that in most piano and violin players technical prowess plateaus (verb) and declines after age thirty (generous estimate). I'm not entirely sure that the interpretative level deepens a lot after age forty; that's just something we like to tell ourselves; why grow old otherwise? There are a lot of musicians who keep repeating their stuff, only with declining accuracy.
Graham
2021-10-10 16:13:02 UTC
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Post by Herman
There's only so much time, and listening to too much male-Pole music can get tedious, so I haven't listened to all Saturday's candidates I did however like the Japanese young woman, Miyu Shindo, who concluded with the Barcarolle. Particularly her A flat waltz was sensational.
I have to turn off the screen when she plays. Her mannerisms are just
too much to tolerate.
Herman
2021-10-10 16:47:10 UTC
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Post by Graham
I have to turn off the screen when she plays. Her mannerisms are just
too much to tolerate.
Yeah, she's doing a lot of excess stuff.
Chris from Lafayette
2021-10-08 23:16:32 UTC
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Post by Herman
Post by Chris from Lafayette
Post by HT
Post by Chris from Lafayette
Post by HT
Post by Dan Koren
Sarah Tuan
dk
Good to hear from you! Tuan is a surprise, yes.
Henk
OMG! Are you two KIDDING? YOU CANNOT BE SERIOUS! Tuan was a complete nothing! (Not to say that she still might not make it to the next round though, political considerations between the US and Poland being what they are and Poland trying to be our bestest vassal state in Europe!)
=====
<g> The jury is with you, Chris. Tuan isn't going to the next stage.
1. 1. Mr Piotr Alexewicz, Poland 2. 2. Ms Leonora Armellini, Italy 3. 3. Mr J J Jun Li Bui, Canada 4. 4. Ms Michelle Candotti, Italy 5. 5. Mr Kai-Min Chang, Chinese Taipei 6. 6. Mr Xuehong Chen, China 7. 7. Mr Hyounglok Choi, South Korea 8. 8. Mr Federico Gad Crema, Italy 9. 9. Mr Alberto Ferro, Italy 10. 10. Ms Yasuko Furumi, Japan 11. 11. Mr Alexander Gadjiev, Italy/Slovenia 12. 12. Mr Avery Gagliano, U.S.A. 13. 13. Mr Martin Garcia Garcia, Spain 14. 14. Ms Eva Gevorgyan, Russia/Armenia 15. 15. Ms Wei-Ting Hsieh, Chinese Taipei 16. 16. Mr Adam Kałduński, Poland 17. 17. Mr Nikolay Khozyainov, Russia 18. 18. Ms Su Yeon Kim, South Korea 19. 19. Ms Aimi Kobayashi, Japan 20. 20. Mr Mateusz Krzyżowski, Poland 21. 21. Mr Jakub Kuszlik, Poland 22. 22. Mr Shushi Kyomasu, Japan 23. 23. Mr Hyuk Lee, South Korea 24. 24. Mr Bruce (Xiaoyu) Liu, Canada 25. 25. Mr Arsenii Mun, Russia 26. 26. Mr Szymon Nehring, Poland 27. 27. Mr Viet Trung Nguyen, Vietnam/Poland 28. 28. Mr Georgijs Osokins, Latvia 29. 29. Mr Evren Ozel, U.S.A. 30. 30. Mr Kamil Pacholec, Poland 31. 31. Mr Hao Rao, China 32. 32. Mr Sohgo Sawada, Japan 33. 33. Mr Aristo Sham, China, Hong Kong 34. 34. Ms Miyu Shindo, Japan 35. 35. Mr Talon Smith, U.S.A. 36. 36. Mr Kyohei Sorita, Japan 37. 37. Ms Szuyu Su, Chinese Taipei 38. 38. Mr Hayato Sumino, Japan 39. 39. Mr Yutong Sun, China 40. 40. Mr Tomoharu Ushida, Japan 41. 41. Mr Marcin Wieczorek, Poland 42. 42. Mr Andrzej Wierciński, Poland 43. 43. Mr Yuchong Wu, China 44. 44. Mr Lingfei (Stephan) Xie, Canada/China 45. 45. Mr Zi Xu, China
Henk
Henk - I was about to lord it over you and Dan, but I'll refrain! ;-)
Ms. CfL and I did our best to listen to whomever we could, but we've not heard most of the pianists now in the second stage. Of the ones we did hear, I did liked JJ June Li Bui, Hyonglok Choi (Mr. gender-fluid), Eva Gevorgyan (extra points for babeliociousness!), Avery Gagliano (simple, direct, elegant understated - a refreshing change from most of the rest we heard), Arsenii Mun (razzle-dazzle). I hope we're able to hear a bigger proportion in the next round.
wow, the chubby Crema guy made it to the next round?
Do we really know what the judges go by in total? Are they only judging by what they hear in the moment, or are they gauging their choices with a sense of who can sustain a concert career? I’m fairly sure that each contestant submits a list of their overall repertoire which the judges all see. This is one indicator of how equipped each contestant is.
I haven’t watch this year‘s competition but I followed the last one and felt that Seong-Jin Cho seemed like the most equipped to sustain a concert career. If extreme sensitivity had been the criteria for winning, the prize would have gone to Kate Liu. Interestingly, Martha Argerich gave her pretty low grades, but she did come in second if my memory is correct.
I’m sure that the sponsors of any music competition would want their first place winners to be huge successes. It would stand to reason that this would increase the prestige of the competition.
Interesting questions, John. I suppose it depends on the individual judges. BTW, I'm glad you mentioned Kate Liu - I thought she was fantastic and deserved to win. I'll never forgive Martha (and that Japanese judge who voted in parallel with her) for giving Kate such undeserved low marks! ;-)

Seong-Jin Cho has turned out to be pretty good though IMHO.
barny02
2021-10-08 10:41:30 UTC
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Post by Chris from Lafayette
Post by HT
Post by Chris from Lafayette
Post by HT
Post by Dan Koren
Sarah Tuan
dk
Good to hear from you! Tuan is a surprise, yes.
Henk
OMG! Are you two KIDDING? YOU CANNOT BE SERIOUS! Tuan was a complete nothing! (Not to say that she still might not make it to the next round though, political considerations between the US and Poland being what they are and Poland trying to be our bestest vassal state in Europe!)
=====
<g> The jury is with you, Chris. Tuan isn't going to the next stage.
1. 1. Mr Piotr Alexewicz, Poland 2. 2. Ms Leonora Armellini, Italy 3. 3. Mr J J Jun Li Bui, Canada 4. 4. Ms Michelle Candotti, Italy 5. 5. Mr Kai-Min Chang, Chinese Taipei 6. 6. Mr Xuehong Chen, China 7. 7. Mr Hyounglok Choi, South Korea 8. 8. Mr Federico Gad Crema, Italy 9. 9. Mr Alberto Ferro, Italy 10. 10. Ms Yasuko Furumi, Japan 11. 11. Mr Alexander Gadjiev, Italy/Slovenia 12. 12. Mr Avery Gagliano, U.S.A. 13. 13. Mr Martin Garcia Garcia, Spain 14. 14. Ms Eva Gevorgyan, Russia/Armenia 15. 15. Ms Wei-Ting Hsieh, Chinese Taipei 16. 16. Mr Adam Kałduński, Poland 17. 17. Mr Nikolay Khozyainov, Russia 18. 18. Ms Su Yeon Kim, South Korea 19. 19. Ms Aimi Kobayashi, Japan 20. 20. Mr Mateusz Krzyżowski, Poland 21. 21. Mr Jakub Kuszlik, Poland 22. 22. Mr Shushi Kyomasu, Japan 23. 23. Mr Hyuk Lee, South Korea 24. 24. Mr Bruce (Xiaoyu) Liu, Canada 25. 25. Mr Arsenii Mun, Russia 26. 26. Mr Szymon Nehring, Poland 27. 27. Mr Viet Trung Nguyen, Vietnam/Poland 28. 28. Mr Georgijs Osokins, Latvia 29. 29. Mr Evren Ozel, U.S.A. 30. 30. Mr Kamil Pacholec, Poland 31. 31. Mr Hao Rao, China 32. 32. Mr Sohgo Sawada, Japan 33. 33. Mr Aristo Sham, China, Hong Kong 34. 34. Ms Miyu Shindo, Japan 35. 35. Mr Talon Smith, U.S.A. 36. 36. Mr Kyohei Sorita, Japan 37. 37. Ms Szuyu Su, Chinese Taipei 38. 38. Mr Hayato Sumino, Japan 39. 39. Mr Yutong Sun, China 40. 40. Mr Tomoharu Ushida, Japan 41. 41. Mr Marcin Wieczorek, Poland 42. 42. Mr Andrzej Wierciński, Poland 43. 43. Mr Yuchong Wu, China 44. 44. Mr Lingfei (Stephan) Xie, Canada/China 45. 45. Mr Zi Xu, China
Henk
Henk - I was about to lord it over you and Dan, but I'll refrain! ;-)
Ms. CfL and I did our best to listen to whomever we could, but we've not heard most of the pianists now in the second stage. Of the ones we did hear, I did liked JJ June Li Bui, Hyonglok Choi (Mr. gender-fluid), Eva Gevorgyan (extra points for babeliociousness!), Avery Gagliano (simple, direct, elegant understated - a refreshing change from most of the rest we heard), Arsenii Mun (razzle-dazzle). I hope we're able to hear a bigger proportion in the next round.
Was a bit disappointed that Shunshun Tie didn't make it to round 2. After his technically perfect Ballade op.23 I really did like to hear more of him.
Andy Evans
2021-10-08 11:19:59 UTC
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If it's anything like the Leeds it will go largely on pianism - exceptionally even tone, totally note perfect, fast passages exactly in time. All the technical stuff.

So the losers may be those with better interpretive skills - more architectural feel, more sensitivity to nuance, just more basic musicality. There were many great pianists with less than perfect techniques - Cortot just for starters. Some declined with age, some were never totally note perfect. But they gave us something a lot more valuable.

I've spoken to a few pianists who did competitions. They all said they were rigged to some extent. For instance, many of the jury are teachers and it's not unheard of to do deals between them in the earlier rounds.
Herman
2021-10-08 11:38:10 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
If it's anything like the Leeds it will go largely on pianism - exceptionally even tone, totally note perfect, fast passages exactly in time. All the technical stuff.
So the losers may be those with better interpretive skills - more architectural feel, more sensitivity to nuance, just more basic musicality. There were many great pianists with less than perfect techniques - Cortot just for starters. Some declined with age, some were never totally note perfect. But they gave us something a lot more valuable.
This is a cliché that keeps turning up, as I couldn't help but notice in the fast-moving comments next to the livestream. First, whenever a woman appeared, guys started commenting on her attractiveness. It's automatic. (I'm no stranger to those thoughts, but expressing them in a public place is perhaps not necessary, especially since our current priority is spotting the spread of Jacinta Lookalikes.) The other irrepressible thing seems to be that technique and interpretation are mutually exclusive. So, as soon as missed notes became too many to be ignored, commenters started talking about artistry and expressiveness, as if it's impossible to be expressive and not skip entire bars in memory lapses.
HT
2021-10-08 12:42:54 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
If it's anything like the Leeds it will go largely on pianism - exceptionally even tone, totally note perfect, fast passages exactly in time. All the technical stuff.
So the losers may be those with better interpretive skills - more architectural feel, more sensitivity to nuance, just more basic musicality. There were many great pianists with less than perfect techniques - Cortot just for starters. Some declined with age, some were never totally note perfect. But they gave us something a lot more valuable.
I've spoken to a few pianists who did competitions. They all said they were rigged to some extent. For instance, many of the jury are teachers and it's not unheard of to do deals between them in the earlier rounds.
Israela Margalit on competitions:

"The first jury I served on, I was determined that only the best would win. I suggested to my fellow jurors that we select somebody who could shine in Carnegie Hall rather than play like a well-schooled student. Everybody agreed. We all ranked each pianist and tabulated the results not once, but twice. The pianist who got the most points won. Nevertheless the outcome was disheartening."

https://medium.com/@m.israela/about-winning-and-losing-competition-rejection-and-heartbreak-1469356a6618

In this Chopin competition, 9/45 candidates who made it to the second round are Polish and 3/45 others studied in Poland or have a Polish teacher. That cannot be just a matter of talent, as it cannot be just a matter of talent that 35/45 are male.

Henk
Andy Evans
2021-10-08 13:14:58 UTC
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Post by HT
In this Chopin competition, 9/45 candidates who made it to the second round are Polish and 3/45 others studied in Poland or have a Polish teacher. That cannot be just a matter of talent, as it cannot be just a matter of talent that 35/45 are male.
Henk
I certainly know of pianists who start taking lessons with jury members before important competitions. It goes under the radar but it's there.
Chris from Lafayette
2021-10-08 23:34:15 UTC
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Post by HT
Post by Andy Evans
If it's anything like the Leeds it will go largely on pianism - exceptionally even tone, totally note perfect, fast passages exactly in time. All the technical stuff.
So the losers may be those with better interpretive skills - more architectural feel, more sensitivity to nuance, just more basic musicality. There were many great pianists with less than perfect techniques - Cortot just for starters. Some declined with age, some were never totally note perfect. But they gave us something a lot more valuable.
I've spoken to a few pianists who did competitions. They all said they were rigged to some extent. For instance, many of the jury are teachers and it's not unheard of to do deals between them in the earlier rounds.
"The first jury I served on, I was determined that only the best would win. I suggested to my fellow jurors that we select somebody who could shine in Carnegie Hall rather than play like a well-schooled student. Everybody agreed. We all ranked each pianist and tabulated the results not once, but twice. The pianist who got the most points won. Nevertheless the outcome was disheartening."
In this Chopin competition, 9/45 candidates who made it to the second round are Polish and 3/45 others studied in Poland or have a Polish teacher. That cannot be just a matter of talent, as it cannot be just a matter of talent that 35/45 are male.
Henk
So Israela Margalit was disappointed with the outcome - all that means is that the other jurors did not share her ideas as to what "would shine in Carnegie Hall". It almost sounds naive of her to think that the other judges are going to agree down the line with her ideas as to what "shines". ;-)

Regarding all the Polish pianists in this second stage, yes, that seems a little suspicious - although they did not pass ALL the Polish pianists in the first round.
HT
2021-10-09 09:01:41 UTC
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Post by Chris from Lafayette
Post by HT
Post by Andy Evans
If it's anything like the Leeds it will go largely on pianism - exceptionally even tone, totally note perfect, fast passages exactly in time. All the technical stuff.
So the losers may be those with better interpretive skills - more architectural feel, more sensitivity to nuance, just more basic musicality. There were many great pianists with less than perfect techniques - Cortot just for starters. Some declined with age, some were never totally note perfect. But they gave us something a lot more valuable.
I've spoken to a few pianists who did competitions. They all said they were rigged to some extent. For instance, many of the jury are teachers and it's not unheard of to do deals between them in the earlier rounds.
"The first jury I served on, I was determined that only the best would win. I suggested to my fellow jurors that we select somebody who could shine in Carnegie Hall rather than play like a well-schooled student. Everybody agreed. We all ranked each pianist and tabulated the results not once, but twice. The pianist who got the most points won. Nevertheless the outcome was disheartening."
In this Chopin competition, 9/45 candidates who made it to the second round are Polish and 3/45 others studied in Poland or have a Polish teacher. That cannot be just a matter of talent, as it cannot be just a matter of talent that 35/45 are male.
Henk
So Israela Margalit was disappointed with the outcome - all that means is that the other jurors did not share her ideas as to what "would shine in Carnegie Hall". It almost sounds naive of her to think that the other judges are going to agree down the line with her ideas as to what "shines". ;-)
Regarding all the Polish pianists in this second stage, yes, that seems a little suspicious - although they did not pass ALL the Polish pianists in the first round.
<g> They forgot to let the Polish ladies pass.

Henk
Al Eisner
2021-10-10 02:44:30 UTC
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Post by HT
In this Chopin competition, 9/45 candidates who made it to the second round are Polish and 3/45 others studied in Poland or have a Polish teacher. That cannot be just a matter of talent, as it cannot be just a matter of talent that 35/45 are male.
Henk
Well, they are exclusively playing music by a male Pole.

Yes, that's facetious. But Polish pianists do consider this "their"
competition, and I think those pianists who auditioned were highly
weighted toward being Polish. If the jury selected randomly, that
would persist into later rounds. Of course they do not select
randomly, but I could see that high initial proportion has some
residual effect. Do you think that the Poles who made it to the
second round were disproportionately less deserving than others?
That, more than the numbers, is the real question for a jury
made up of Henks. (I have no idea myself; as I said earlier, I
am not listening at all until round 3.)
--
Al Eisner
HT
2021-10-10 10:15:27 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
Post by HT
In this Chopin competition, 9/45 candidates who made it to the second round are Polish and 3/45 others studied in Poland or have a Polish teacher. That cannot be just a matter of talent, as it cannot be just a matter of talent that 35/45 are male.
Henk
Well, they are exclusively playing music by a male Pole.
Yes, that's facetious. But Polish pianists do consider this "their"
competition, and I think those pianists who auditioned were highly
weighted toward being Polish. If the jury selected randomly, that
would persist into later rounds. Of course they do not select
randomly, but I could see that high initial proportion has some
residual effect. Do you think that the Poles who made it to the
second round were disproportionately less deserving than others?
That, more than the numbers, is the real question for a jury
made up of Henks. (I have no idea myself; as I said earlier, I
am not listening at all until round 3.)
--
Al Eisner
<g> A jury made up of Henks would be an exact copy of a jury made up of Israela Margalits: wanting "the best" pianists to pass and win - as the only criterion, even if it is a very subjective one. Of course, as Chris said, it's highly naive.
As to your question, I did follow most, not all competitors and only the more interesting completely. At least one Polish lady should have passed, and at least some Polish gentlemen shouldn't have.

Henk
Chris from Lafayette
2021-10-08 23:27:53 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
If it's anything like the Leeds it will go largely on pianism - exceptionally even tone, totally note perfect, fast passages exactly in time. All the technical stuff.
So the losers may be those with better interpretive skills - more architectural feel, more sensitivity to nuance, just more basic musicality. There were many great pianists with less than perfect techniques - Cortot just for starters. Some declined with age, some were never totally note perfect. But they gave us something a lot more valuable.
I've spoken to a few pianists who did competitions. They all said they were rigged to some extent. For instance, many of the jury are teachers and it's not unheard of to do deals between them in the earlier rounds.
But Andy - "better interpretive skills" is a VERY subjective quality, and you're much less likely to get agreement from a group of judges as to what constitutes such skills. Just so you know, I'm not a big admirer of Cortot, so I suspect we might not be in agreement on this point either. And as for interpretive skills being "a lot more valuable" than technical skills, I'm not sure I'm agreement with you - for me, a really great technician is every bit as rare as a great interpreter.
Andy Evans
2021-10-09 09:23:33 UTC
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Post by Chris from Lafayette
Post by Andy Evans
If it's anything like the Leeds it will go largely on pianism - exceptionally even tone, totally note perfect, fast passages exactly in time. All the technical stuff.
But Andy - "better interpretive skills" is a VERY subjective quality, and you're much less likely to get agreement from a group of judges as to what constitutes such skills. Just so you know, I'm not a big admirer of Cortot, so I suspect we might not be in agreement on this point either. And as for interpretive skills being "a lot more valuable" than technical skills, I'm not sure I'm agreement with you - for me, a really great technician is every bit as rare as a great interpreter.
Thanks for that Chris - you're a working classical pianist and your comments have a lot of weight. It's not going to stop me prioritising interpretive skills though! I know it's subjective, but I think many people have a sixth sense almost immediately of when a pianist is special. It permeates everything in the playing. Pure technique isn't enough - for me at least - to give this special frisson of realising that you're in the presence of somebody a little bit special.
Al Eisner
2021-10-10 02:30:04 UTC
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Post by Chris from Lafayette
Post by Andy Evans
If it's anything like the Leeds it will go largely on pianism - exceptionally even tone, totally note perfect, fast passages exactly in time. All the technical stuff.
So the losers may be those with better interpretive skills - more architectural feel, more sensitivity to nuance, just more basic musicality. There were many great pianists with less than perfect techniques - Cortot just for starters. Some declined with age, some were never totally note perfect. But they gave us something a lot more valuable.
I've spoken to a few pianists who did competitions. They all said they were rigged to some extent. For instance, many of the jury are teachers and it's not unheard of to do deals between them in the earlier rounds.
But Andy - "better interpretive skills" is a VERY subjective quality, and you're much less likely to get agreement from a group of judges as to what constitutes such skills. Just so you know, I'm not a big admirer of Cortot, so I suspect we might not be in agreement on this point either. And as for interpretive skills being "a lot more valuable" than technical skills, I'm not sure I'm agreement with you - for me, a really great technician is every bit as rare as a great interpreter.
A tentative hypothesis: it may be that tchnical skills are unlikely to
appreciably improve, looking ahead to the later careers of these
competitors, whereas there is a greater chance that interpretative
aspects will develop as at least some competitors further mature. so
jurors may be trying to predict both aspects, without neessrily
giving one of th3m priority. Not that I'm sure of this....
--
Al Eisner
Andy Evans
2021-10-10 08:16:48 UTC
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A tentative hypothesis: it may be that tchnical skills are unlikely to
appreciably improve, looking ahead to the later careers of these
competitors, whereas there is a greater chance that interpretative
aspects will develop as at least some competitors further mature. so
jurors may be trying to predict both aspects, without neessrily
giving one of th3m priority. Not that I'm sure of this.... > -- > Al Eisner
I saw this in the career of jazz trumpeter Gerard Presencer. At age 12 his technique was phenomenal, but he wasn't very interesting. As an adult he's grown into a very interesting and in-demand player. Against that you have the argument that musicality is in you or it isn't. There's a documentary on Jaqueline du Pre where she plays the piano briefly in the presence of Barenboim and I'd swear she was the more musical pianist.

I've always attached some weight to Dante G. Rossetti's words "Conception, my boy, fundamental brain work, is what makes all the difference in art."
JohnGavin
2021-10-10 09:45:24 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
A tentative hypothesis: it may be that tchnical skills are unlikely to
appreciably improve, looking ahead to the later careers of these
competitors, whereas there is a greater chance that interpretative
aspects will develop as at least some competitors further mature. so
jurors may be trying to predict both aspects, without neessrily
giving one of th3m priority. Not that I'm sure of this.... > -- > Al Eisner
I saw this in the career of jazz trumpeter Gerard Presencer. At age 12 his technique was phenomenal, but he wasn't very interesting. As an adult he's grown into a very interesting and in-demand player. Against that you have the argument that musicality is in you or it isn't. There's a documentary on Jaqueline du Pre where she plays the piano briefly in the presence of Barenboim and I'd swear she was the more musical pianist.
I've always attached some weight to Dante G. Rossetti's words "Conception, my boy, fundamental brain work, is what makes all the difference in art."
It also has much to do with what the late NY Times music critic called “the X factor”, which is charisma. It’s an undefinable, innate quality that is unmistakable.

I would say that Mr. Rossetti’s observation is wrong in the sense that overly brainy musicians quite often lack charisma. Take for example two Chopin Competition winners: Martha Argerich and Garrick Ohlsson.

They strike me as having completely different sets of virtues. Argerich exudes an obvious charisma on stage and in her playing. If an upcoming recital or appearance were announced anywhere in the world, she would sell out the house, even at age 80. Her talent is of the innate type - It never seems calculated, overly thought out or brainy. Yet the naturalness of it never fails to make it’s powerful effect.

While I never listened much to Ohlsson, I surveyed his many recordings yesterday. My suspicions were confirmed. He plays the piano very well. His special gifts are that he is an extraordinary sight reader who can learn large chunks of repertoire quickly and efficiently. In a certain sense he could be called a “studio pianist“, a pianist who can be called in at the last moment to play a concerto when the soloist calls in sick. He can make large numbers of recordings, but the playing will never knock you out of your seat (if you know what I mean). He possesses the fundamental brain work in spades that Mr. Rosetti is talking about, but I’m pretty sure on stage he doesn’t approach Martha Argerich’s magic. Another observation is that his very best playing came right after his win in Warsaw.

I’m not sure that the judges can sense what type of pianist the top contestants will turn out to be. Will they be in the rank of pianists who are invited to play with the greatest conductors in orchestras or will they excel more in the recording studio. Will they peek early in their careers? (as I believe Pollini did). Will they burn out early in their performing careers as Van Cliburn did?

Being a concert pianist these days strikes me is an almost impossible career. Until you establish yourself solidly you don’t even have a certainty that there will be a decent piano to practice on when you land at your destination. You have to be constantly learning new repertoire at that stage while you’re on the road. There’s so many things that many of us are not aware of that they go through.

Since the genre is pretty much set in writing, up-and-coming pianist these days have 100 years of recorded archives of most of what they play to contend with and in a sense to compete with. Those archives have never been as available with easy access as they are these days. Also they have to contend with the illusion of perfection that latter-day recordings project to the public.
Herman
2021-10-10 10:11:49 UTC
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I would say that Mr. Rossetti’s observation is wrong in the sense that overly brainy musicians quite often lack charisma. Take for example two Chopin Competition winners: Martha Argerich and Garrick Ohlsson.
My feeling is most people who go to concerts of soloists over, say, sixty years old, just go because they want to be able to say they have been at a concert of this famous, very much over the hill, guy or woman.

So these soloists are pretty much banking on the reputation the earned between age twenty and thirty the rest of their life. You seriously don't think Argerich is playing Prok 3 and what's her other piece? better now than fifty years ago?

As a performer Ohlsson is pretty much meaningless, IMHO.
Herman
2021-10-10 10:17:31 UTC
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Same btw with these ancient conductors who are performing ever-shrinking rep at ever-slowing tempi.

There's something morbid about audiences who want to see these decrepit men (no women conductors at that stage yet!) slowly ascending the podium...
JohnGavin
2021-10-10 10:30:20 UTC
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Post by Herman
Same btw with these ancient conductors who are performing ever-shrinking rep at ever-slowing tempi.
There's something morbid about audiences who want to see these decrepit men (no women conductors at that stage yet!) slowly ascending the podium...
This might be an example of what you’re talking about:


Herman
2021-10-10 10:47:05 UTC
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OMG that super cautious Heroic Polonaise!!!
HT
2021-10-10 10:40:15 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
A tentative hypothesis: it may be that tchnical skills are unlikely to
appreciably improve, looking ahead to the later careers of these
competitors, whereas there is a greater chance that interpretative
aspects will develop as at least some competitors further mature. so
jurors may be trying to predict both aspects, without neessrily
giving one of th3m priority. Not that I'm sure of this.... > -- > Al Eisner
I saw this in the career of jazz trumpeter Gerard Presencer. At age 12 his technique was phenomenal, but he wasn't very interesting. As an adult he's grown into a very interesting and in-demand player. Against that you have the argument that musicality is in you or it isn't. There's a documentary on Jaqueline du Pre where she plays the piano briefly in the presence of Barenboim and I'd swear she was the more musical pianist.
I've always attached some weight to Dante G. Rossetti's words "Conception, my boy, fundamental brain work, is what makes all the difference in art."
It also has much to do with what the late NY Times music critic called “the X factor”, which is charisma. It’s an undefinable, innate quality that is unmistakable.
I would say that Mr. Rossetti’s observation is wrong in the sense that overly brainy musicians quite often lack charisma. Take for example two Chopin Competition winners: Martha Argerich and Garrick Ohlsson.
They strike me as having completely different sets of virtues. Argerich exudes an obvious charisma on stage and in her playing. If an upcoming recital or appearance were announced anywhere in the world, she would sell out the house, even at age 80. Her talent is of the innate type - It never seems calculated, overly thought out or brainy. Yet the naturalness of it never fails to make it’s powerful effect.
While I never listened much to Ohlsson, I surveyed his many recordings yesterday. My suspicions were confirmed. He plays the piano very well. His special gifts are that he is an extraordinary sight reader who can learn large chunks of repertoire quickly and efficiently. In a certain sense he could be called a “studio pianist“, a pianist who can be called in at the last moment to play a concerto when the soloist calls in sick. He can make large numbers of recordings, but the playing will never knock you out of your seat (if you know what I mean). He possesses the fundamental brain work in spades that Mr. Rosetti is talking about, but I’m pretty sure on stage he doesn’t approach Martha Argerich’s magic. Another observation is that his very best playing came right after his win in Warsaw.
I’m not sure that the judges can sense what type of pianist the top contestants will turn out to be. Will they be in the rank of pianists who are invited to play with the greatest conductors in orchestras or will they excel more in the recording studio. Will they peek early in their careers? (as I believe Pollini did). Will they burn out early in their performing careers as Van Cliburn did?
Being a concert pianist these days strikes me is an almost impossible career. Until you establish yourself solidly you don’t even have a certainty that there will be a decent piano to practice on when you land at your destination. You have to be constantly learning new repertoire at that stage while you’re on the road. There’s so many things that many of us are not aware of that they go through.
Since the genre is pretty much set in writing, up-and-coming pianist these days have 100 years of recorded archives of most of what they play to contend with and in a sense to compete with. Those archives have never been as available with easy access as they are these days. Also they have to contend with the illusion of perfection that latter-day recordings project to the public.
Ohlsson's Goyescas, Debussy and Scriabin etudes are easy to listen to. I'm not a great fan of his Chopin.

In my humble opinion, charisma isn't a trait or property, it's how someone behaves in a specific situation. Not Horowitz, but Horowitz in Carnegie Hall was charismatic. Charisma is 'knowing' how to catch the audience's attention. That may be a matter of talent, but that's only the beginning.

Henk
Herman
2021-10-10 10:43:28 UTC
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Post by HT
In my humble opinion, charisma isn't a trait or property, it's how someone behaves in a specific situation. Not Horowitz, but Horowitz in Carnegie Hall was charismatic. Charisma is 'knowing' how to catch the audience's attention. That may be a matter of talent, but that's only the beginning.
Henk
It's also the expectation of the audience.
Andy Evans
2021-10-10 10:54:40 UTC
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Talking of ageing pianists, quite a few became conductors. One reason I was informed confidentially was a growing fear of memory lapses. Once memory lapses start to occur, pianists or other soloists just don't want to risk going on the concert platform. Richter used to take the score on to the platform as he aged - very refreshing attitude. He probably didn't need it, but it was there. For new music there isn't such a taboo of taking the score on with you, but in the classic works, one pianist said in private "It would be like dropping your pants in public". Maybe attitudes are still very set on this subject.
JohnGavin
2021-10-10 11:02:51 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
Talking of ageing pianists, quite a few became conductors. One reason I was informed confidentially was a growing fear of memory lapses. Once memory lapses start to occur, pianists or other soloists just don't want to risk going on the concert platform. Richter used to take the score on to the platform as he aged - very refreshing attitude. He probably didn't need it, but it was there.
I remember Richter’s explanation for that. He admitted that his absolute pitch sense had gone off kilter. The same thing happened in late-career to Alicia DeLarrocha. Hamelin also stated that his absolute pitch aided tremendously in memorizing scores.
Herman
2021-10-10 12:11:10 UTC
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I remember Richter’s explanation for that. He admitted that his absolute pitch sense had gone off kilter. The same thing happened in late-career to Alicia DeLarrocha. Hamelin also stated that his absolute pitch aided tremendously in memorizing scores.
Yes, Hamelin 'states' it. But he doesn't explain what perfect pitch would mean for a pianist in memorizing scores.
I can't believe the interviewer does not ask, 'can you elaborate'?
So, I'm sceptical.
HT
2021-10-10 10:56:52 UTC
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Post by Herman
Post by HT
In my humble opinion, charisma isn't a trait or property, it's how someone behaves in a specific situation. Not Horowitz, but Horowitz in Carnegie Hall was charismatic. Charisma is 'knowing' how to catch the audience's attention. That may be a matter of talent, but that's only the beginning.
Henk
It's also the expectation of the audience.
True! Perhaps even the most important part.

Henk
JohnGavin
2021-10-10 11:36:25 UTC
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Post by HT
Post by Herman
Post by HT
In my humble opinion, charisma isn't a trait or property, it's how someone behaves in a specific situation. Not Horowitz, but Horowitz in Carnegie Hall was charismatic. Charisma is 'knowing' how to catch the audience's attention. That may be a matter of talent, but that's only the beginning.
Henk
It's also the expectation of the audience.
True! Perhaps even the most important part.
Henk
It’s one of those “what came first, the chicken or the egg”, observations. Does the audience expect it because the performer has a reputation of having it, or does the performer have it because the audience expects it?
JohnGavin
2021-10-10 12:13:58 UTC
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Post by HT
Post by Herman
Post by HT
In my humble opinion, charisma isn't a trait or property, it's how someone behaves in a specific situation. Not Horowitz, but Horowitz in Carnegie Hall was charismatic. Charisma is 'knowing' how to catch the audience's attention. That may be a matter of talent, but that's only the beginning.
Henk
It's also the expectation of the audience.
True! Perhaps even the most important part.
Henk
It’s one of those “what came first, the chicken or the egg”, observations. Does the audience expect it because the performer has a reputation of having it, or does the performer have it because the audience expects it?
One reason why I believe the former is true - this Chopin Competetion - I know none of the contestants, yet Bruce Liu clearly had an elevated presence compared to those who came before. I’d guess that had to do with energy level, intensity of concentration - maybe perhaps taking the music seriously, but not too much.
Andy Evans
2021-10-10 12:54:03 UTC
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If you look at research around charisma a lot has to do with a person's uncompromising determination to be themselves. I was surprised in Norway when I asked several people what their definition of "a strong man" was, and the answer was exactly that - a person who could stand up for their own convictions against others.

Charisma is also about physical appeal and very much about the ability to flirt or challenge others. Being secure in challenging others once again partly goes back to security in one's self, though it's really a parameter on its own.

So the research suggests that it's an interaction between performer and audience where both are involved.
HT
2021-10-10 13:22:27 UTC
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Post by HT
Post by Herman
Post by HT
In my humble opinion, charisma isn't a trait or property, it's how someone behaves in a specific situation. Not Horowitz, but Horowitz in Carnegie Hall was charismatic. Charisma is 'knowing' how to catch the audience's attention. That may be a matter of talent, but that's only the beginning.
Henk
It's also the expectation of the audience.
True! Perhaps even the most important part.
Henk
It’s one of those “what came first, the chicken or the egg”, observations. Does the audience expect it because the performer has a reputation of having it, or does the performer have it because the audience expects it?
In my opinion, causality does not play a role. What matters is how the performer and the audience, each in his own way, are attuned to this specific situation.

Henk
Herman
2021-10-10 13:39:51 UTC
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In cultural situations, such as a concert, many people feel insecure. Am I going to understand the music? will I be able to tell when it's over? how am I supposed to feel about it? they would like to be sold on it, and a performer who enters the stage with an aura of confidence and happiness with what he's going to do (and who he is) has charisma in the eyes of the audience. (he may well be totally different in his hotel room.) It helps if you love being in front of an audience; if you need them as badly as they need you.

That's why many people consider Bernstein as the nec plus ultra of charisma: he explained and demonstrated to audiences what they were going to hear and how they should experience it.
Andy Evans
2021-10-10 14:17:14 UTC
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On Sunday, 10 October 2021 at 14:39:53 UTC+1, Herman wrote:
... a performer who enters the stage with an aura of confidence and happiness with what he's going to do (and who he is) has charisma in the eyes of the audience. That's why many people consider Bernstein as the nec plus ultra of charisma: he explained and demonstrated to audiences what they were going to hear and how they should experience it."

A record company exec whose job was to sign bands put it this way:
"Out of talented, hardworking and likeable, by far the most important is likeable if I'm going to sign somebody. And artists are divided into those that project 'look at me' and those that project 'come with me'. The artists that make you want to go with them into their lives and work are the ones that are most interesting". One well-known singer I know said "I bet there are 500 people in the world who know the name of my cat". I think of Elvis as a person everyone wanted as a friend.

These days it's even possible to quantify "likes" on Instagram, Facebook etc. What a strange media world we inhabit.
JohnGavin
2021-10-10 14:17:40 UTC
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Post by Herman
In cultural situations, such as a concert, many people feel insecure. Am I going to understand the music? will I be able to tell when it's over? how am I supposed to feel about it? they would like to be sold on it, and a performer who enters the stage with an aura of confidence and happiness with what he's going to do (and who he is) has charisma in the eyes of the audience. (he may well be totally different in his hotel room.) It helps if you love being in front of an audience; if you need them as badly as they need you.
That's why many people consider Bernstein as the nec plus ultra of charisma: he explained and demonstrated to audiences what they were going to hear and how they should experience it.
Three of the most charismatic performers for me were Horowitz, Heifetz and Michelangeli. These three had something in common which is that when they played their movements were very economical, they were very still most of the time and from that came a sort of visceral energy that you could feel. You also had a sense, particularly with Michelangeli, that he knew the music he was playing from every angle possible. It was this confidence that allowed him to give transcendental performances that could only be fully perceived in a live situation.
Andy Evans
2021-10-10 14:21:17 UTC
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Three of the most charismatic performers for me were Horowitz, Heifetz and Michelangeli. These three had something in common which is that when they played their movements were very economical, they were very still most of the time and from that came a sort of visceral energy that you could feel. >
Another thing they had in common was that they were very opinionated. Same with Richter and Argerich. Very much their own person and not afraid to disagree with anyone. Very interesting as jury members.......
Dan Koren
2021-10-10 13:21:36 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
There's a documentary on Jaqueline du
Pre where she plays the piano briefly in
the presence of Barenboim and I'd swear s
he was the more musical pianist.
That isn't difficult at all.

dk
Dan Koren
2021-10-09 06:54:23 UTC
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HT
2021-10-09 09:29:10 UTC
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Post by Dan Koren
http://youtu.be/PTYz9c24Wqo
Ohlsson on Chopin and the competition (as a participant and as a member of the jury). According to him, the rating of performers at this high level is strictly subjective.

Henk
JohnGavin
2021-10-09 10:27:13 UTC
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It’s interesting at this point to look at this list of Chopin competition winners since it’s inception in 1921.
It allows the luxury of hindsight as to the long term wisdom of the choices. It’s a pretty good outcome IMO. A glaring exception is 1955. Interesting factoid, one of the judges that year, Michelangeli, refused to sign onto the decision to give 1st prize to Harasiewicz over Ashkenazy. He then went to Harasiewicz and kindly offered to teach him free of charge and the offer was accepted. Interesting too is the 2010 outcome.


Top 3 prize winners since 1927
Edition 1st 2nd 3rd
I (1927) Lev Oborin
Soviet Union Stanisław Szpinalski
Poland Róża Etkin
Poland
II (1932) Alexander Uninsky (c)
Soviet Union Imre Ungár (c)
Hungary Bolesław Kon
Poland
III (1937) Yakov Zak
Soviet Union Rosa Tamarkina
Soviet Union Witold Małcużyński
Poland
IV (1949) Bella Davidovich
Soviet Union Barbara Hesse-Bukowska
Poland Waldemar Maciszewski
Poland
Halina Czerny-Stefańska
Poland (tie)
V (1955) Adam Harasiewicz
Poland Vladimir Ashkenazy
Soviet Union Fou Ts'ong
China
VI (1960) Maurizio Pollini
Italy Irina Zaritskaya
Soviet Union Tania Achot-Haroutounian
Iran
VII (1965) Martha Argerich
Argentina Arthur Moreira Lima
Brazil Marta Sosińska
Poland
VIII (1970) Garrick Ohlsson
United States Mitsuko Uchida
Japan Piotr Paleczny
Poland
IX (1975) Krystian Zimerman
Poland Dina Joffe
Soviet Union Tatyana Fedkina
Soviet Union
X (1980) Dang Thai Son
Vietnam Tatyana Shebanova
Soviet Union Arutyun Papazyan
Soviet Union
XI (1985) Stanislav Bunin
Soviet Union Marc Laforet
France Krzysztof Jabłoński
Poland
XII (1990) Not awarded Kevin Kenner
United States Yukio Yokoyama
Japan
XIII (1995) Not awarded Philippe Giusiano
France Gabriela Montero
United States
Alexei Sultanov
Uzbekistan (tie)
XIV (2000) Yundi Li
China Ingrid Fliter
Argentina Alexander Kobrin
Russia
XV (2005) Rafał Blechacz
Poland Not awarded Dong-Hyek Lim
South Korea
Dong-Min Lim
South Korea (tie)
XVI (2010) Yulianna Avdeeva
Russia Lukas Geniušas
Russia Lithuania Daniil Trifonov
Russia
Ingolf Wunder
Austria (tie)
XVII (2015) Seong-Jin Cho
South Korea Charles Richard-Hamelin
Canada Kate Liu
United States
HT
2021-10-09 11:15:47 UTC
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Post by JohnGavin
It’s interesting at this point to look at this list of Chopin competition winners since it’s inception in 1921.
It allows the luxury of hindsight as to the long term wisdom of the choices. It’s a pretty good outcome IMO.
I (1927) Róża Etkin Poland
II (1932) Imre Ungár Hungary Bolesław Kon Poland
III (1937)
IV (1949) Barbara Hesse-Bukowska Poland Waldemar Maciszewski Poland
V (1955)
VI (1960) Irina Zaritskaya Soviet Union Tania Achot-Haroutounian Iran
VII (1965) Marta Sosińska Poland
VIII (1970) Piotr Paleczny Poland
IX (1975) Tatyana Fedkina Soviet Union
X (1980) Arutyun Papazyan Soviet Union
XI (1985) Marc Laforet France
XII (1990) Yukio Yokoyama Japan
XIII (1995)
XIV (2000)
XV (2005) Dong-Min Lim South Korea
XVI (2010)
XVII (2015)
As a promotor of its laureates, Warsaw does very well.

Henk
Andy Evans
2021-10-09 11:17:31 UTC
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I'm very puzzled by Giorgijs Osokins and I wonder if you guys can help me. He seems to be reproducing the Golden Age of piano playing with all its mannerisms. He's also doing it pretty darned well. It's very close and sounds very familiar if you've listened a lot to the Golden Age pianists.

So is he playing from the heart? Or has he done intensive study of "how to play Chopin" and is doing it in a very subtle way.
I just can't make this out. I love this style and it's very recognisable. But is it genuine or a clever pastiche?
JohnGavin
2021-10-09 13:44:59 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
I'm very puzzled by Giorgijs Osokins and I wonder if you guys can help me. He seems to be reproducing the Golden Age of piano playing with all its mannerisms. He's also doing it pretty darned well. It's very close and sounds very familiar if you've listened a lot to the Golden Age pianists.
So is he playing from the heart? Or has he done intensive study of "how to play Chopin" and is doing it in a very subtle way.
I just can't make this out. I love this style and it's very recognisable. But is it genuine or a clever pastiche?
I’d say that the ultimate answer comes from your own heart. I completely agree with the idea that interpretation is very highly subjective.

There is a saying saying - never enter into an argument regarding politics or religion. I think musical interpretation should be added to that!
HT
2021-10-09 13:50:58 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
I'm very puzzled by Giorgijs Osokins and I wonder if you guys can help me. He seems to be reproducing the Golden Age of piano playing with all its mannerisms. He's also doing it pretty darned well. It's very close and sounds very familiar if you've listened a lot to the Golden Age pianists.
So is he playing from the heart? Or has he done intensive study of "how to play Chopin" and is doing it in a very subtle way.
I just can't make this out. I love this style and it's very recognisable. But is it genuine or a clever pastiche?
Since 2015 he has calmed down a bit. Still a bit strange, but not as bad as Trifonov and certainly as genuine (or "integer" as we used to say here in the Netherlands). Otherwise, Gidon Kremer would never have wanted to work with him.

Henk
Andy Evans
2021-10-09 15:57:52 UTC
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Post by HT
Post by Andy Evans
I'm very puzzled by Giorgijs Osokins and I wonder if you guys can help me. He seems to be reproducing the Golden Age of piano playing with all its mannerisms. He's also doing it pretty darned well. It's very close and sounds very familiar if you've listened a lot to the Golden Age pianists.
So is he playing from the heart? Or has he done intensive study of "how to play Chopin" and is doing it in a very subtle way.
I just can't make this out. I love this style and it's very recognisable. But is it genuine or a clever pastiche?
Since 2015 he has calmed down a bit. Still a bit strange, but not as bad as Trifonov and certainly as genuine (or "integer" as we used to say here in the Netherlands). Otherwise, Gidon Kremer would never have wanted to work with him.
Post by Andy Evans
Henk
I must say that I found him quite refreshing when I started listening to him, but I got dissatisfied more and more and even ended up a little irritated by his discursive interpretations. I experienced the same with some of the Golden Age performances - interesting at first listen but don't last. Same with Horowitz at times, especially in Chopin, though I remain a fan.

Chris' comments on pianism have been on my mind and out of curiosity I listened to a lot of the last winner, Seong-Jin Cho, on YT. I must say I enjoyed his pianism. I don't think his playing stands out for its originality but it kept my attention pretty well.
Chris from Lafayette
2021-10-10 19:54:55 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
https://chopin2020.pl/en/calendar
The Chopin Competition has begun. Hopefully there will be a more interesting winner than with the Leeds.
Andy (or anyone else here): are you getting any unnatural "adjustments" of the dynamic level on the YouTube videos, similar to the old technique of gain riding, i.e., where the recording engineer boosts the low-level sounds and cuts back the level of the higher dynamics? I've suspected that this was going on just a tiny bit all through the competition, but it was painfully obvious in the audio of the prodigiously gifted last pianist to play on the first day of the second round, Kyohei Sorita (Japan) - especially in his final piece, the Andante Spianato and Grande Polonaise Brillante in G major / E flat major, Op. 22. The quiet beginning (pianissimo) started at a level that was clearly and artificially too loud (something more like mezzo forte, or even forte), while the actual louder parts (the beginning of the polonaise proper, etc.) were artificially reduced in level - this had nothing to do with Sorita's actual playing, since you could hear the level being changed on held notes! Outrageous! If this continues, it will unfortunately not be worthwhile to continue watching the progress of the competition, since some dweeb in the Polish Radio control room will be in charge of the dynamics - not the pianist! As I say, outrageous! I suppose that it's possible that Comcast could be doing this kind of manipulation (a narrower dynamic range saves on bandwidth?), but, as evil a company as Comcast is, I'd consider that possibility far less likely.
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