Discussion:
Forgotten Performers
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JohnGavin
2021-12-24 15:00:44 UTC
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Christmas Eve somehow seems like a good time to remember musicians who have been largely forgotten. In many cases their recordings have gone into oblivion with the advent of CDs.

If nobody chooses to contribute, there are so many forgotten performers that I’ll the thread going for a while.

Sylvia Marlowe

Harpsichordist active around 1945 - 1980. She commissioned many 20th century composers and enriched the modern harpsichord repertoire greatly.

My favorites of her discography are a Purcell LP



Also her Couperin LPs are excellent. They’re on YouTube as well.

The playing in the above recordings are inspired, lively and most important - colorful. She played on a modern instrument with 4, 8, 16 foot stops along with nasals and lute stops.
Lawrence Kart
2021-12-24 16:04:03 UTC
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Christmas Eve somehow seems like a good time to remember musicians who have been largely forgotten. In many cases their recordings have gone into oblivion with the advent of CDs.
If nobody chooses to contribute, there are so many forgotten performers that I’ll the thread going for a while.
Sylvia Marlowe
Harpsichordist active around 1945 - 1980. She commissioned many 20th century composers and enriched the modern harpsichord repertoire greatly.
My favorites of her discography are a Purcell LP
http://youtu.be/pjVqIiQN0N8
Also her Couperin LPs are excellent. They’re on YouTube as well.
The playing in the above recordings are inspired, lively and most important - colorful. She played on a modern instrument with 4, 8, 16 foot stops along with nasals and lute stops.
Lawrence Kart
2021-12-24 16:04:26 UTC
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Permalink
Christmas Eve somehow seems like a good time to remember musicians who have been largely forgotten. In many cases their recordings have gone into oblivion with the advent of CDs.
If nobody chooses to contribute, there are so many forgotten performers that I’ll the thread going for a while.
Sylvia Marlowe
Harpsichordist active around 1945 - 1980. She commissioned many 20th century composers and enriched the modern harpsichord repertoire greatly.
My favorites of her discography are a Purcell LP
http://youtu.be/pjVqIiQN0N8
Also her Couperin LPs are excellent. They’re on YouTube as well.
The playing in the above recordings are inspired, lively and most important - colorful. She played on a modern instrument with 4, 8, 16 foot stops along with nasals and lute stops.
Lawrence Kart
2021-12-24 16:04:59 UTC
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Permalink
Christmas Eve somehow seems like a good time to remember musicians who have been largely forgotten. In many cases their recordings have gone into oblivion with the advent of CDs.
If nobody chooses to contribute, there are so many forgotten performers that I’ll the thread going for a while.
Sylvia Marlowe
Harpsichordist active around 1945 - 1980. She commissioned many 20th century composers and enriched the modern harpsichord repertoire greatly.
My favorites of her discography are a Purcell LP
http://youtu.be/pjVqIiQN0N8
Also her Couperin LPs are excellent. They’re on YouTube as well.
The playing in the above recordings are inspired, lively and most important - colorful. She played on a modern instrument with 4, 8, 16 foot stops along with nasals and lute stops.
Lawrence Kart
2021-12-24 16:07:38 UTC
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Permalink
Christmas Eve somehow seems like a good time to remember musicians who have been largely forgotten. In many cases their recordings have gone into oblivion with the advent of CDs.
If nobody chooses to contribute, there are so many forgotten performers that I’ll the thread going for a while.
Sylvia Marlowe
Harpsichordist active around 1945 - 1980. She commissioned many 20th century composers and enriched the modern harpsichord repertoire greatly.
My favorites of her discography are a Purcell LP
http://youtu.be/pjVqIiQN0N8
Also her Couperin LPs are excellent. They’re on YouTube as well.
The playing in the above recordings are inspired, lively and most important - colorful. She played on a modern instrument with 4, 8, 16 foot stops along with nasals and lute stops.
Andy Evans
2021-12-24 16:37:05 UTC
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I'd be thinking of the older Russian School of pianists....

Feinberg, Sofronitsky, Cherkassky, Flier, Ginsburg, Igumnov, Neuhaus, Postnikova, Davidovich, Ervy-Novitskaya, Leonskaya, Pachman, Zak, Virsaladze, Yudina, Nikolayeva......
Frank Berger
2021-12-24 18:18:57 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
I'd be thinking of the older Russian School of pianists....
Feinberg, Sofronitsky, Cherkassky, Flier, Ginsburg, Igumnov, Neuhaus, Postnikova, Davidovich, Ervy-Novitskaya, Leonskaya, Pachman, Zak, Virsaladze, Yudina, Nikolayeva......
Why do you say they are forgotten? By people who never heard of them in the first place?
Andy Evans
2021-12-24 18:44:03 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
I'd be thinking of the older Russian School of pianists....
Feinberg, Sofronitsky, Cherkassky, Flier, Ginsburg, Igumnov, Neuhaus, Postnikova, Davidovich, Ervy-Novitskaya, Leonskaya, Pachman, Zak, Virsaladze, Yudina, Nikolayeva......
Why do you say they are forgotten? By people who never heard of them in the first place?
That's a very good question. Some like Igumnov and Ervy-Novitskaya are more unlikely to have broken through to contemporary listeners. Others might have been listened to years ago and forgotten. I had to look up Virsaladze because although I remember her playing I'd forgotten her name. Whichever way you look at it, these are mostly names out of the usual currency with the probable exceptions of Sofronitsky and Cherkassky. I'm sure many of you would know most of them, and I'd expect Dan to know them all pretty well.
Frank Berger
2021-12-24 18:54:03 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
Post by Andy Evans
I'd be thinking of the older Russian School of pianists....
Feinberg, Sofronitsky, Cherkassky, Flier, Ginsburg, Igumnov, Neuhaus, Postnikova, Davidovich, Ervy-Novitskaya, Leonskaya, Pachman, Zak, Virsaladze, Yudina, Nikolayeva......
Why do you say they are forgotten? By people who never heard of them in the first place?
That's a very good question. Some like Igumnov and Ervy-Novitskaya are more unlikely to have broken through to contemporary listeners. Others might have been listened to years ago and forgotten. I had to look up Virsaladze because although I remember her playing I'd forgotten her name. Whichever way you look at it, these are mostly names out of the usual currency with the probable exceptions of Sofronitsky and Cherkassky. I'm sure many of you would know most of them, and I'd expect Dan to know them all pretty well.
I have recordings by every one of these. In some cases virtually everything they recorded (at least what has made it to CD or someone has transferred to CD-R). I'm not sure I can tell you why, but I particularly seek out recordings by Ervy-Novitskaya and Virsaladze. Maybe not so much Yudina, and Nikoleyeva.
Andy Evans
2021-12-24 19:01:24 UTC
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I have recordings by every one of these. In some cases virtually everything they recorded (at least what has made it to CD or someone has transferred to CD-R). I'm not sure I can tell you why, but I particularly seek out recordings by Ervy-Novitskaya and Virsaladze. Maybe not so much Yudina, and Nikoleyeva.
That's good to know - I agree completely! I don't listen to Yudina or Nikolayeva, just stuck them in for completeness. Big fan of Virsaladze, and I have Ervy-Novitskaya in Prokofiev. Igumnov in Chopin #3, various Flier, Neuhaus, Ginsburg and Zak and plenty of Feinberg and Sofronitzky. Plus the others mentioned either on CD or I listen to them on YouTube.
Mandryka
2021-12-24 19:09:47 UTC
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Oh, another thing. Someone was asking about D664 - and my favourite by far happens to be by a forgotten piano player - Erdmann. So I got it out, played it, and was as predicted bowled over, and was also similarly impressed by his D 884. So I thought I’d explore some of his other stuff. Well, there are nice things but it’s a bit of a mixed bag.

I guess a similar story is true for many forgotten pianists - Ciani, De Brunhoff come to mind.
Lawrence Kart
2021-12-24 19:19:32 UTC
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Post by Mandryka
Oh, another thing. Someone was asking about D664 - and my favourite by far happens to be by a forgotten piano player - Erdmann. So I got it out, played it, and was as predicted bowled over, and was also similarly impressed by his D 884. So I thought I’d explore some of his other stuff. Well, there are nice things but it’s a bit of a mixed bag.
I guess a similar story is true for many forgotten pianists - Ciani, De Brunhoff come to mind.
Eduardo Del Pueyo -- his "Hammerklavier" and his "Nights in the Garden of Spain."
Frank Berger
2021-12-24 20:05:02 UTC
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Post by Mandryka
Oh, another thing. Someone was asking about D664 - and my favourite by far happens to be by a forgotten piano player - Erdmann. So I got it out, played it, and was as predicted bowled over, and was also similarly impressed by his D 884. So I thought I’d explore some of his other stuff. Well, there are nice things but it’s a bit of a mixed bag.
I guess a similar story is true for many forgotten pianists - Ciani, De Brunhoff come to mind.
D664 was never on CD, right?
Mandryka
2021-12-24 20:43:08 UTC
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Post by Frank Berger
Post by Mandryka
Oh, another thing. Someone was asking about D664 - and my favourite by far happens to be by a forgotten piano player - Erdmann. So I got it out, played it, and was as predicted bowled over, and was also similarly impressed by his D 884. So I thought I’d explore some of his other stuff. Well, there are nice things but it’s a bit of a mixed bag.
I guess a similar story is true for many forgotten pianists - Ciani, De Brunhoff come to mind.
D664 was never on CD, right?
Not as far as I know -- you can hear it on youtube


Frank Berger
2021-12-24 20:04:23 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
I have recordings by every one of these. In some cases virtually everything they recorded (at least what has made it to CD or someone has transferred to CD-R). I'm not sure I can tell you why, but I particularly seek out recordings by Ervy-Novitskaya and Virsaladze. Maybe not so much Yudina, and Nikoleyeva.
That's good to know - I agree completely! I don't listen to Yudina or Nikolayeva, just stuck them in for completeness. Big fan of Virsaladze, and I have Ervy-Novitskaya in Prokofiev. Igumnov in Chopin #3, various Flier, Neuhaus, Ginsburg and Zak and plenty of Feinberg and Sofronitzky. Plus the others mentioned either on CD or I listen to them on YouTube.
I have so many duplicates, it ridiculous. I have every single Sofronitsky disk on Vista Vera and Denon. There were a few released on Classound, which I read somewhere had better sound, but I never got around to testing that. There was one Classound Sofronitsky release that I've never seen offered for sale. That is this one:

https://ruslania.com/en/music/223689-vladimir-sofronitsky-chopin-polonaise-valses-mazurkas/

I've been looking for it for years.
Frank Berger
2021-12-24 20:50:19 UTC
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Post by Frank Berger
Post by Andy Evans
I have recordings by every one of these. In some cases virtually everything they recorded (at least what has made it to CD or someone has transferred to CD-R). I'm not sure I can tell you why, but I particularly seek out recordings by Ervy-Novitskaya and Virsaladze. Maybe not so much Yudina, and Nikoleyeva.
That's good to know - I agree completely! I don't listen to Yudina or Nikolayeva, just stuck them in for completeness. Big fan of Virsaladze, and I have Ervy-Novitskaya in Prokofiev. Igumnov in Chopin #3, various Flier, Neuhaus, Ginsburg and Zak and plenty of Feinberg and Sofronitzky. Plus the others mentioned either on CD or I listen to them on YouTube.
https://ruslania.com/en/music/223689-vladimir-sofronitsky-chopin-polonaise-valses-mazurkas/
I've been looking for it for years.
I have that, I can let you have it (are you a member of Symphonyshare?) I think the material is available elsewhere (maybe his Great Pianists), mostly or all late performances I think -- the transfers are good (but maybe not better than others.)
Thanks, but no thanks. I want the CD. Not a big deal, but for completeness, you know. If you want to sell yours......
Chris from Lafayette
2021-12-24 22:52:56 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
Post by Andy Evans
I'd be thinking of the older Russian School of pianists....
Feinberg, Sofronitsky, Cherkassky, Flier, Ginsburg, Igumnov, Neuhaus, Postnikova, Davidovich, Ervy-Novitskaya, Leonskaya, Pachman, Zak, Virsaladze, Yudina, Nikolayeva......
Why do you say they are forgotten? By people who never heard of them in the first place?
That's a very good question. Some like Igumnov and Ervy-Novitskaya are more unlikely to have broken through to contemporary listeners. Others might have been listened to years ago and forgotten. I had to look up Virsaladze because although I remember her playing I'd forgotten her name. Whichever way you look at it, these are mostly names out of the usual currency with the probable exceptions of Sofronitsky and Cherkassky. I'm sure many of you would know most of them, and I'd expect Dan to know them all pretty well.
I have recordings by every one of these. In some cases virtually everything they recorded (at least what has made it to CD or someone has transferred to CD-R). I'm not sure I can tell you why, but I particularly seek out recordings by Ervy-Novitskaya and Virsaladze. Maybe not so much Yudina, and Nikoleyeva.
I remember when Novitskaya's Melodiya-Angel Prokofiev album first came out (right after she won the QEB Competition in 1968) - man, did I have the hots for her! Unfortunately, her babeliousciousness didn't last that long - but I've always enjoyed her rather aggressive performances on that album, and of course I still have the CD remastering. In any case, I've never forgotten her!
Andy Evans
2021-12-25 17:07:24 UTC
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I remember when Novitskaya's Melodiya-Angel Prokofiev album first came out (right after she won the QEB Competition in 1968) - man, did I have the hots for her! Unfortunately, her babeliousciousness didn't last that long - but I've always enjoyed her rather aggressive performances on that album, and of course I still have the CD remastering. In any case, I've never forgotten her!>>
I've been enjoying her playing enormously today on Christmas Day!
Frank, Debussy, Ravel
Beethoven "Tempest"
Beethoven op. 111

A truly fascinating pianist.
Mandryka
2021-12-24 18:57:20 UTC
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I’ll tell you a forgotten pianist who I remembered a few months ago and enjoyed hearing - Harold Bauer.

And another one who I remembered and, when I listened again, I concluded was best forgotten: Nyiregyházi.
HT
2021-12-24 23:37:39 UTC
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Christmas Eve somehow seems like a good time to remember musicians who have been largely forgotten. In many cases their recordings have gone into oblivion with the advent of CDs.
If nobody chooses to contribute, there are so many forgotten performers that I’ll the thread going for a while.
Sylvia Marlowe
Harpsichordist active around 1945 - 1980. She commissioned many 20th century composers and enriched the modern harpsichord repertoire greatly.
My favorites of her discography are a Purcell LP
http://youtu.be/pjVqIiQN0N8
Also her Couperin LPs are excellent. They’re on YouTube as well.
The playing in the above recordings are inspired, lively and most important - colorful. She played on a modern instrument with 4, 8, 16 foot stops along with nasals and lute stops.
Bela Siki,


Tamas Vasary,


Anderzej Czajkowski,


Ingrid Haebler,


Henk
HT
2021-12-25 10:18:50 UTC
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Alexander Uninsky,


Bella Davidovich,


Noel Lee (who recorded an impressive set of Debussy études - thanks again, Steve!),


Gabriel Tacchino (my first encounter with Poulenc's work for piano solo),


Henk
Andy Evans
2021-12-25 16:54:38 UTC
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On Saturday, 25 December 2021 at 16:25:27 UTC, Graham wrote:

Egon Petri is surely a name known to all lovers of fine pianism, but I don't see him mentioned much. I love his Beethoven in particular.

On another note, many composers were fine pianists. Hardly forgotten guys but their own piano recordings aren't often listened to. I particularly love Prokofiev.

Prokofiev pieces
Scriabin
Rachmaninov prelude
a portrait
Dan Koren
2021-12-28 01:26:35 UTC
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Are Richter-Haaser and Conrad
Hansen forgotten performers?
Definitely!

dk
Dan Koren
2021-12-25 01:48:06 UTC
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Post by JohnGavin
Christmas Eve somehow seems like a good
time to remember musicians who have been
largely forgotten. In many cases their recordings
have gone into oblivion with the advent of CDs.
At the top of my oblivion list: Ernst Levy, Maryla
Jonas, Esteban Sanchez, Harry Datyner, Julian
von Karolyi, Ervin Nyiregyházi, Monique de la
Bruchollerie, Fabienne Jacquinot, France
Clidat, Rudolf Kehrer, Jean-Rodolphe Kars.

dk
Dan Koren
2021-12-25 01:54:51 UTC
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Post by Dan Koren
Post by JohnGavin
Christmas Eve somehow seems like a good
time to remember musicians who have been
largely forgotten. In many cases their recordings
have gone into oblivion with the advent of CDs.
At the top of my oblivion list: Ernst Levy, Maryla
Jonas, Esteban Sanchez, Harry Datyner, Julian
von Karolyi, Ervin Nyiregyházi, Monique de la
Bruchollerie, Fabienne Jacquinot, France
Clidat, Rudolf Kehrer, Jean-Rodolphe Kars.
I would add Dino Ciano, Sergio Perticaroli
and Richard Farrell. One does not hear much
either about Sergio Fiorentino nowadays.

dk
Frank Lekens
2021-12-28 20:52:08 UTC
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Post by Dan Koren
Post by Dan Koren
Post by JohnGavin
Christmas Eve somehow seems like a good
time to remember musicians who have been
largely forgotten. In many cases their recordings
have gone into oblivion with the advent of CDs.
At the top of my oblivion list: Ernst Levy, Maryla
Jonas, Esteban Sanchez, Harry Datyner, Julian
von Karolyi, Ervin Nyiregyházi, Monique de la
Bruchollerie, Fabienne Jacquinot, France
Clidat, Rudolf Kehrer, Jean-Rodolphe Kars.
I would add Dino Ciano, Sergio Perticaroli
and Richard Farrell. One does not hear much
either about Sergio Fiorentino nowadays.
dk
Or Catherine Collard.
--
Frank Lekens

http://fmlekens.home.xs4all.nl/
https://franklekens.blogspot.nl/
Lawrence Kart
2021-12-25 03:17:58 UTC
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Post by Dan Koren
Post by JohnGavin
Christmas Eve somehow seems like a good
time to remember musicians who have been
largely forgotten. In many cases their recordings
have gone into oblivion with the advent of CDs.
At the top of my oblivion list: Ernst Levy, Maryla
Jonas, Esteban Sanchez, Harry Datyner, Julian
von Karolyi, Ervin Nyiregyházi, Monique de la
Bruchollerie, Fabienne Jacquinot, France
Clidat, Rudolf Kehrer, Jean-Rodolphe Kars.
dk
Thanks to Dan, I know about and agree with him about Levy, Sanchez, and de la
Bruchollerie. When the Nyiregyházi "boom," so to speak, occurred some years ago, I bought
the recordings but remained unconvinced.
Dan Koren
2021-12-25 04:39:23 UTC
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Post by Dan Koren
Post by JohnGavin
Christmas Eve somehow seems like a good
time to remember musicians who have been
largely forgotten. In many cases their recordings
have gone into oblivion with the advent of CDs.
At the top of my oblivion list: Ernst Levy, Maryla
Jonas, Esteban Sanchez, Harry Datyner, Julian
von Karolyi, Ervin Nyiregyházi, Monique de la
Bruchollerie, Fabienne Jacquinot, France
Clidat, Rudolf Kehrer, Jean-Rodolphe Kars.
Thanks to Dan, I know about and agree with him
about Levy, Sanchez, and de la Bruchollerie. When
the Nyiregyházi "boom," so to speak, occurred some
years ago, I bought the recordings but remained
unconvinced.
Try this:



Nyiregyházi's (non)career was the greatest loss in
the history of music.

dk
Mandryka
2021-12-25 21:39:49 UTC
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Post by Dan Koren
Post by Dan Koren
Post by JohnGavin
Christmas Eve somehow seems like a good
time to remember musicians who have been
largely forgotten. In many cases their recordings
have gone into oblivion with the advent of CDs.
At the top of my oblivion list: Ernst Levy, Maryla
Jonas, Esteban Sanchez, Harry Datyner, Julian
von Karolyi, Ervin Nyiregyházi, Monique de la
Bruchollerie, Fabienne Jacquinot, France
Clidat, Rudolf Kehrer, Jean-Rodolphe Kars.
Thanks to Dan, I know about and agree with him
about Levy, Sanchez, and de la Bruchollerie. When
the Nyiregyházi "boom," so to speak, occurred some
years ago, I bought the recordings but remained
unconvinced.
http://youtu.be/O0S1KDOC8is
Nyiregyházi's (non)career was the greatest loss in
the history of music.
dk
Yes I've got a good transfer of the Liszt LP, and maybe he was more in his element in Liszt than in the other composers he recorded. He's good at threnodies.

Fancy some funeral mazurkas?


Dan Koren
2021-12-25 23:11:26 UTC
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Post by Dan Koren
http://youtu.be/O0S1KDOC8is
Nyiregyházi's (non)career was the greatest loss in
the history of music.
Yes I've got a good transfer of the Liszt LP, and maybe
he was more in his element in Liszt than in the other
composers he recorded. He's good at threnodies.
Fancy some funeral mazurkas?
http://youtu.be/Gk9SDuckPRc
Sounds like Backhaus playing Beethoven.

dk
Dan Koren
2021-12-25 05:32:51 UTC
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Post by Dan Koren
Post by JohnGavin
Christmas Eve somehow seems like a good
time to remember musicians who have been
largely forgotten. In many cases their recordings
have gone into oblivion with the advent of CDs.
At the top of my oblivion list: Ernst Levy, Maryla
Jonas, Esteban Sanchez, Harry Datyner, Julian
von Karolyi, Ervin Nyiregyházi, Monique de la
Bruchollerie, Fabienne Jacquinot, France
Clidat, Rudolf Kehrer, Jean-Rodolphe Kars.
Hommage aux Brigades Françaises du Piano:

France Clidat:

Liszt 3 Sonnets de Pétrarque -- France Clidat (1967)


Schubert/Liszt -- Complete Soirées de Vienne (1988)


Liszt -- Sonata in B minor (1974)


LIszt -- Treifscendental Etudes



Monique de La Bruchollerie:

Saint-Saëns -- Toccata (Étude op. 111 no. 6)


Meowszart Piano Concerto No 23 A Major KV 488 (1961)


Saint-Saëns –Piano Concerto n°5 (1965)


Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No. 3 Ansermet/BSO 1951




Fabienne Jacquinot:

Schumann -- L'Oiseau Prophète, Op. 28 No 7


Schumann -- Carnaval op. 9


Schumann -- Davidsbündlertänze op. 6 (1988)


J. Strauss -- "An der schönen blauen Donau" (1983)


Saint-Saëns -- Piano Concerto No. 5 Op. 103 in F (1953)



Enjoy!

dk
Frank Berger
2021-12-25 23:33:39 UTC
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Post by Dan Koren
Post by JohnGavin
Christmas Eve somehow seems like a good
time to remember musicians who have been
largely forgotten. In many cases their recordings
have gone into oblivion with the advent of CDs.
At the top of my oblivion list: Ernst Levy, Maryla
Jonas, Esteban Sanchez, Harry Datyner, Julian
von Karolyi, Ervin Nyiregyházi, Monique de la
Bruchollerie, Fabienne Jacquinot, France
Clidat, Rudolf Kehrer, Jean-Rodolphe Kars.
dk
All wonderful artists. But they're not forgotten, they're just dead!
Al Eisner
2021-12-26 00:53:28 UTC
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Post by Frank Berger
Post by Dan Koren
Post by JohnGavin
Christmas Eve somehow seems like a good
time to remember musicians who have been
largely forgotten. In many cases their recordings
have gone into oblivion with the advent of CDs.
At the top of my oblivion list: Ernst Levy, Maryla
Jonas, Esteban Sanchez, Harry Datyner, Julian
von Karolyi, Ervin Nyiregyházi, Monique de la
Bruchollerie, Fabienne Jacquinot, France
Clidat, Rudolf Kehrer, Jean-Rodolphe Kars.
dk
All wonderful artists. But they're not forgotten, they're just dead!
In fact, reading this thread makes it clear that the myriad pianists
mentioned are remembered by someone, and often by many. It is the
non-pianists who are actually forgotten in this forum. (Kudos to
John, however, for starting off with a harpsichordist.)

Whether forgotten or not, lots of good names to keep in mind.
--
Al Eisner
Frank Berger
2021-12-26 01:16:01 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
Post by Dan Koren
Post by JohnGavin
Christmas Eve somehow seems like a good
time to remember musicians who have been
largely forgotten. In many cases their recordings
have gone into oblivion with the advent of CDs.
At the top of my oblivion list: Ernst Levy, Maryla
Jonas, Esteban Sanchez, Harry Datyner, Julian
von Karolyi, Ervin Nyiregyházi, Monique de la
Bruchollerie, Fabienne Jacquinot, France
Clidat, Rudolf Kehrer, Jean-Rodolphe Kars.
dk
All wonderful artists.  But they're not forgotten, they're just dead!
In fact, reading this thread makes it clear that the myriad pianists
mentioned are remembered by someone, and often by many.  It is the
non-pianists who are actually forgotten in this forum.  (Kudos to
John, however, for starting off with a harpsichordist.)
Whether forgotten or not, lots of good names to keep in mind.
How about all the great performers from before the recording era. They are all forgotten!
Dan Koren
2021-12-26 01:32:27 UTC
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Post by Frank Berger
How about all the great performers
from before the recording era. They
are all forgotten!
This NG is mainly about RECORDINGS!

dk
Frank Berger
2021-12-26 02:06:25 UTC
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Post by Dan Koren
Post by Frank Berger
How about all the great performers
from before the recording era. They
are all forgotten!
This NG is mainly about RECORDINGS!
dk
All of a sudden you are objecting to being off-topic, Mr. super-vaxxer.
Dan Koren
2021-12-26 02:24:16 UTC
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Post by Frank Berger
Post by Dan Koren
Post by Frank Berger
How about all the great performers
from before the recording era. They
are all forgotten!
This NG is mainly about RECORDINGS!
All of a sudden you are objecting to
being off-topic, Mr. super-vaxxer.
I reserve the right to choose my
objections! ;-)

dk
Frank Berger
2021-12-26 03:13:01 UTC
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Post by Dan Koren
Post by Frank Berger
Post by Dan Koren
Post by Frank Berger
How about all the great performers
from before the recording era. They
are all forgotten!
This NG is mainly about RECORDINGS!
All of a sudden you are objecting to
being off-topic, Mr. super-vaxxer.
I reserve the right to choose my
objections! ;-)
dk
Objection overruled.
Dan Koren
2021-12-26 05:09:58 UTC
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Post by Frank Berger
Post by Dan Koren
Post by Frank Berger
Post by Dan Koren
Post by Frank Berger
How about all the great performers
from before the recording era. They
are all forgotten!
This NG is mainly about RECORDINGS!
All of a sudden you are objecting to
being off-topic, Mr. super-vaxxer.
I reserve the right to choose my
objections! ;-)
Objection overruled.
Will appeal all the way up to SCOTUS! ;-)

dk
Frank Berger
2021-12-26 16:08:47 UTC
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Post by Dan Koren
Post by Frank Berger
Post by Dan Koren
Post by Frank Berger
Post by Dan Koren
Post by Frank Berger
How about all the great performers
from before the recording era. They
are all forgotten!
This NG is mainly about RECORDINGS!
All of a sudden you are objecting to
being off-topic, Mr. super-vaxxer.
I reserve the right to choose my
objections! ;-)
Objection overruled.
Will appeal all the way up to SCOTUS! ;-)
dk
You can appeal to SCROTUM for all the good it will do.
Dan Koren
2021-12-26 02:26:05 UTC
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Post by Frank Berger
How about all the great performers
from before the recording era. They
are all forgotten!
People still mention Liszt sometimes.
Or Paganini or Malibran. One of my
black coloraturas is named after her!

dk
Paul A
2021-12-25 06:09:57 UTC
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Christmas Eve somehow seems like a good time to remember musicians who have been largely forgotten. In many cases their recordings have gone into oblivion with the advent 960'sof CDs.
If nobody chooses to contribute, there are so many forgotten performers that I’ll the thread going for a while.
Sylvia Marlowe
Harpsichordist active around 1945 - 1980. She commissioned many 20th century composers and enriched the modern harpsichord repertoire greatly.
My favorites of her discography are a Purcell LP
http://youtu.be/pjVqIiQN0N8
Also her Couperin LPs are excellent. They’re on YouTube as well.
The playing in the above recordings are inspired, lively and most important - colorful. She played on a modern instrument with 4, 8, 16 foot stops along with nasals and lute stops.
In my early college days at San Diego State University in the 1960's there was a recital performed by the piano duo Luboshutz & Nemenoff...

http://www.soundfountain.org/rem/remlubnem.html

... and as a 19 year-old I was astounded as to just how good they were... she had to assist him in getting to his piano bench since it appeared that he might not make it there by himself... but when they started to play it was just magic... I sat in awe for about 90 minutes that I will never forget... and a year later there was another concert, this time by Alirio Diaz, from Venezuela, on guitar, another fellow who was largely unknown at the time... and I remain today a fan of his mastery of the guitar...
Dan Koren
2021-12-25 06:41:41 UTC
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Post by Paul A
a year later there was another concert, this
time by Alirio Diaz, from Venezuela, on guitar,
another fellow who was largely unknown at the
time... and I remain today a fan of his mastery of
the guitar...
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_l35Xmli-1bnXenrTnT13xtsqEsn58ibcs

dk
Dan Koren
2021-12-25 06:45:33 UTC
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Post by JohnGavin
Sylvia Marlowe
Harpsichordist active around 1945 - 1980.
No need for harpsichord activits!
They are much better forgotten!
Starting with Mme Landowska!

dk
drh8h
2021-12-25 13:29:29 UTC
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Christmas Eve somehow seems like a good time to remember musicians who have been largely forgotten. In many cases their recordings have gone into oblivion with the advent 960'sof CDs.
If nobody chooses to contribute, there are so many forgotten performers that I’ll the thread going for a while.
Sylvia Marlowe
Harpsichordist active around 1945 - 1980. She commissioned many 20th century composers and enriched the modern harpsichord repertoire greatly.
My favorites of her discography are a Purcell LP
http://youtu.be/pjVqIiQN0N8
Also her Couperin LPs are excellent. They’re on YouTube as well.
The playing in the above recordings are inspired, lively and most important - colorful. She played on a modern instrument with 4, 8, 16 foot stops along with nasals and lute stops.
In my early college days at San Diego State University in the 1960's there was a recital performed by the piano duo Luboshutz & Nemenoff...
http://www.soundfountain.org/rem/remlubnem.html
... and as a 19 year-old I was astounded as to just how good they were... she had to assist him in getting to his piano bench since it appeared that he might not make it there by himself... but when they started to play it was just magic... I sat in awe for about 90 minutes that I will never forget... and a year later there was another concert, this time by Alirio Diaz, from Venezuela, on guitar, another fellow who was largely unknown at the time... and I remain today a fan of his mastery of the guitar...
drh8h
2021-12-25 13:35:18 UTC
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Christmas Eve somehow seems like a good time to remember musicians who have been largely forgotten. In many cases their recordings have gone into oblivion with the advent 960'sof CDs.
If nobody chooses to contribute, there are so many forgotten performers that I’ll the thread going for a while.
Sylvia Marlowe
Harpsichordist active around 1945 - 1980. She commissioned many 20th century composers and enriched the modern harpsichord repertoire greatly.
The playing in the above recordings are inspired, lively and most important - colorful. She played on a modern instrument with 4, 8, 16 foot stops along with nasals and lute stops.
In my early college days at San Diego State University in the 1960's there was a recital performed by the piano duo Luboshutz & Nemenoff...
http://www.soundfountain.org/rem/remlubnem.html
... and as a 19 year-old I was astounded as to just how good they were... she had to assist him in getting to his piano bench since it appeared that he might not make it there by himself... but when they started to play it was just magic... I sat in awe for about 90 minutes that I will never forget... and a year later there was another concert, this time by Alirio Diaz, from Venezuela, on guitar, another fellow who was largely unknown at the time... and I remain today a fan of his mastery of the guitar...
Both Warner and Universal have sufficient material by Marlowe to each create a box devoted to her. I heartily concur. As for Luboshutz & Nemenoff, are you are aware the Marston label has a set in the pipeline devoted to them? It will include many if not all of their early RCA recordings, so one will be able to hear them in their primes with excellent transfers.

DH
John Fowler
2021-12-25 13:48:07 UTC
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Post by drh8h
Christmas Eve somehow seems like a good time to remember musicians who have been largely forgotten. In many cases their recordings have gone into oblivion with the advent 960'sof CDs.
If nobody chooses to contribute, there are so many forgotten performers that I’ll the thread going for a while.
Sylvia Marlowe
Harpsichordist active around 1945 - 1980. She commissioned many 20th century composers and enriched the modern harpsichord repertoire greatly.
The playing in the above recordings are inspired, lively and most important - colorful. She played on a modern instrument with 4, 8, 16 foot stops along with nasals and lute stops.
In my early college days at San Diego State University in the 1960's there was a recital performed by the piano duo Luboshutz & Nemenoff...
http://www.soundfountain.org/rem/remlubnem.html
... and as a 19 year-old I was astounded as to just how good they were... she had to assist him in getting to his piano bench since it appeared that he might not make it there by himself... but when they started to play it was just magic... I sat in awe for about 90 minutes that I will never forget... and a year later there was another concert, this time by Alirio Diaz, from Venezuela, on guitar, another fellow who was largely unknown at the time... and I remain today a fan of his mastery of the guitar...
Both Warner and Universal have sufficient material by Marlowe to each create a box devoted to her. I heartily concur. As for Luboshutz & Nemenoff, are you are aware the Marston label has a set in the pipeline devoted to them? It will include many if not all of their early RCA recordings, so one will be able to hear them in their primes with excellen
John Fowler
2021-12-25 13:51:15 UTC
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Forgotten pianist: Chico Marx
JohnGavin
2021-12-25 15:46:00 UTC
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Another harpsichordist- Rafael Puyana

I saw him in concert back in the 60s - 2 of the most memorable recitals ever!

His recordings for Mercury Living Stereo made it to CDs as well as his Phillips recordings.
He had rhythm in spades - a real flair in his ability to bring Renaissance and Baroque music alive and make it vibrant.

Many of these recordings are loaded on YouTube.
Steven Bornfeld
2021-12-25 17:46:25 UTC
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Post by Paul A
Christmas Eve somehow seems like a good time to remember musicians who have been largely forgotten. In many cases their recordings have gone into oblivion with the advent 960'sof CDs.
If nobody chooses to contribute, there are so many forgotten performers that I’ll the thread going for a while.
Sylvia Marlowe
Harpsichordist active around 1945 - 1980. She commissioned many 20th century composers and enriched the modern harpsichord repertoire greatly.
My favorites of her discography are a Purcell LP
http://youtu.be/pjVqIiQN0N8
Also her Couperin LPs are excellent. They’re on YouTube as well.
The playing in the above recordings are inspired, lively and most important - colorful. She played on a modern instrument with 4, 8, 16 foot stops along with nasals and lute stops.
In my early college days at San Diego State University in the 1960's there was a recital performed by the piano duo Luboshutz & Nemenoff...
http://www.soundfountain.org/rem/remlubnem.html
... and as a 19 year-old I was astounded as to just how good they were... she had to assist him in getting to his piano bench since it appeared that he might not make it there by himself... but when they started to play it was just magic... I sat in awe for about 90 minutes that I will never forget... and a year later there was another concert, this time by Alirio Diaz, from Venezuela, on guitar, another fellow who was largely unknown at the time... and I remain today a fan of his mastery of the guitar...
It's tough to evaluate attention given to guitarists in the larger music
world. Diaz is hardly forgotten within the small guitar world.
Likewise, someone like Ida Presti (thought by many to have been the
finest guitarist of the 20th century, bar none). Her duo with her
husband Alexandre Lagoya was the first (and many say the best) classical
guitar duo. Lagoya himself--well-respected within the guitar community,
but his reputation definitely suffered from comparison to his gifted
wife; her early death only enhanced her legend (and possibly that she
left a relatively few solo recordings).
JohnGavin
2021-12-25 18:32:46 UTC
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Post by Steven Bornfeld
Christmas Eve somehow seems like a good time to remember musicians who have been largely forgotten. In many cases their recordings have gone into oblivion with the advent 960'sof CDs.
If nobody chooses to contribute, there are so many forgotten performers that I’ll the thread going for a while.
Sylvia Marlowe
Harpsichordist active around 1945 - 1980. She commissioned many 20th century composers and enriched the modern harpsichord repertoire greatly.
My favorites of her discography are a Purcell LP
http://youtu.be/pjVqIiQN0N8
Also her Couperin LPs are excellent. They’re on YouTube as well.
The playing in the above recordings are inspired, lively and most important - colorful. She played on a modern instrument with 4, 8, 16 foot stops along with nasals and lute stops.
In my early college days at San Diego State University in the 1960's there was a recital performed by the piano duo Luboshutz & Nemenoff...
http://www.soundfountain.org/rem/remlubnem.html
... and as a 19 year-old I was astounded as to just how good they were... she had to assist him in getting to his piano bench since it appeared that he might not make it there by himself... but when they started to play it was just magic... I sat in awe for about 90 minutes that I will never forget... and a year later there was another concert, this time by Alirio Diaz, from Venezuela, on guitar, another fellow who was largely unknown at the time... and I remain today a fan of his mastery of the guitar...
It's tough to evaluate attention given to guitarists in the larger music
world. Diaz is hardly forgotten within the small guitar world.
Likewise, someone like Ida Presti (thought by many to have been the
finest guitarist of the 20th century, bar none). Her duo with her
husband Alexandre Lagoya was the first (and many say the best) classical
guitar duo. Lagoya himself--well-respected within the guitar community,
but his reputation definitely suffered from comparison to his gifted
wife; her early death only enhanced her legend (and possibly that she
left a relatively few solo recordings).
Pianist Eugene List

Still the best Gottschalk player IMO and excellent Grainger as well.

Maybe not forgotten by 60 and over, but unknown to the younger crowd.
Steven Bornfeld
2021-12-26 04:18:25 UTC
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Post by JohnGavin
Post by Steven Bornfeld
Christmas Eve somehow seems like a good time to remember musicians who have been largely forgotten. In many cases their recordings have gone into oblivion with the advent 960'sof CDs.
If nobody chooses to contribute, there are so many forgotten performers that I’ll the thread going for a while.
Sylvia Marlowe
Harpsichordist active around 1945 - 1980. She commissioned many 20th century composers and enriched the modern harpsichord repertoire greatly.
My favorites of her discography are a Purcell LP
http://youtu.be/pjVqIiQN0N8
Also her Couperin LPs are excellent. They’re on YouTube as well.
The playing in the above recordings are inspired, lively and most important - colorful. She played on a modern instrument with 4, 8, 16 foot stops along with nasals and lute stops.
In my early college days at San Diego State University in the 1960's there was a recital performed by the piano duo Luboshutz & Nemenoff...
http://www.soundfountain.org/rem/remlubnem.html
... and as a 19 year-old I was astounded as to just how good they were... she had to assist him in getting to his piano bench since it appeared that he might not make it there by himself... but when they started to play it was just magic... I sat in awe for about 90 minutes that I will never forget... and a year later there was another concert, this time by Alirio Diaz, from Venezuela, on guitar, another fellow who was largely unknown at the time... and I remain today a fan of his mastery of the guitar...
It's tough to evaluate attention given to guitarists in the larger music
world. Diaz is hardly forgotten within the small guitar world.
Likewise, someone like Ida Presti (thought by many to have been the
finest guitarist of the 20th century, bar none). Her duo with her
husband Alexandre Lagoya was the first (and many say the best) classical
guitar duo. Lagoya himself--well-respected within the guitar community,
but his reputation definitely suffered from comparison to his gifted
wife; her early death only enhanced her legend (and possibly that she
left a relatively few solo recordings).
Pianist Eugene List
Still the best Gottschalk player IMO and excellent Grainger as well.
Maybe not forgotten by 60 and over, but unknown to the younger crowd.
Yeah, I should have a listen. A friend (one of my high school math
teachers, and a good amateur pianist) gave me a tour around our local
cemetery (Green-Wood) here in Brooklyn, where for reasons I don't
understand Gottschalk is buried (he died in Brazil). His rather grand
monument was apparently damaged--possibly vandalized, and was restored
not long ago.

https://www.green-wood.com/2010/featured-restoration-the-gottschalk-project/

(My friend also showed me Leonard Bernstein's resting place--his
gravesite is the furthest thing from grand)
Dan Koren
2021-12-25 11:50:01 UTC
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Here is one of my favorite pianists who is
very much alive and active, yet she does
seem to attract much attention. Please
meet Zhu Xiao-Mei:



dk
Dan Koren
2021-12-25 12:08:55 UTC
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Here is one of my favorite pianists who is
very much alive and active, yet she does
not seem to attract much attention.
Please meet Zhu Xiao-Mei:

http://youtu.be/aHgd9obN8MM

dk
HT
2021-12-25 19:31:19 UTC
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Post by Dan Koren
Here is one of my favorite pianists who is
very much alive and active, yet she does
not seem to attract much attention.
http://youtu.be/aHgd9obN8MM
dk
Thanks! Never heard of her before. Her Bach and Scarlatti are exceptional.

Henk
Dan Koren
2021-12-25 22:58:14 UTC
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Post by HT
Post by Dan Koren
Here is one of my favorite pianists who is
very much alive and active, yet she does
not seem to attract much attention.
http://youtu.be/aHgd9obN8MM
Thanks! Never heard of her before. Her Bach and Scarlatti are exceptional.
https://www.amazon.com/Secret-Piano-Labor-Goldberg-Variations-ebook/dp/B0076PGFYW

dk
Graham
2021-12-26 16:31:29 UTC
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Post by Dan Koren
Post by HT
Post by Dan Koren
Here is one of my favorite pianists who is
very much alive and active, yet she does
not seem to attract much attention.
http://youtu.be/aHgd9obN8MM
Thanks! Never heard of her before. Her Bach and Scarlatti are exceptional.
https://www.amazon.com/Secret-Piano-Labor-Goldberg-Variations-ebook/dp/B0076PGFYW
dk
Her Goldbergs:


But shoot the videographer!
Owen
2021-12-27 05:34:57 UTC
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Post by HT
Post by Dan Koren
Here is one of my favorite pianists who is
very much alive and active, yet she does
not seem to attract much attention.
http://youtu.be/aHgd9obN8MM
dk
Thanks! Never heard of her before. Her Bach and Scarlatti are exceptional.
Henk
Malcolm Frager

-Owen
HT
2021-12-27 10:00:02 UTC
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Post by Owen
Post by HT
Post by Dan Koren
Here is one of my favorite pianists who is
very much alive and active, yet she does
not seem to attract much attention.
http://youtu.be/aHgd9obN8MM
dk
Thanks! Never heard of her before. Her Bach and Scarlatti are exceptional.
Henk
Malcolm Frager
-Owen
Seconded! Crystal clear playing with a warm touch and a perfect technique.

Henk
Randy Lane
2021-12-27 10:35:15 UTC
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Post by HT
Post by Owen
Post by HT
Post by Dan Koren
Here is one of my favorite pianists who is
very much alive and active, yet she does
not seem to attract much attention.
http://youtu.be/aHgd9obN8MM
dk
Thanks! Never heard of her before. Her Bach and Scarlatti are exceptional.
Henk
Malcolm Frager
-Owen
Seconded! Crystal clear playing with a warm touch and a perfect technique.
Henk
Luciano Sgrizzi.

There's a few in the Paillard box.
But everything else, especially the fabulous Scarlatti boxes, have been dead as far as availability goes for over 4 decades now.
JohnGavin
2021-12-27 12:00:50 UTC
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Post by Randy Lane
Post by HT
Post by Owen
Post by HT
Post by Dan Koren
Here is one of my favorite pianists who is
very much alive and active, yet she does
not seem to attract much attention.
http://youtu.be/aHgd9obN8MM
dk
Thanks! Never heard of her before. Her Bach and Scarlatti are exceptional.
Henk
Malcolm Frager
-Owen
Seconded! Crystal clear playing with a warm touch and a perfect technique.
Henk
Luciano Sgrizzi.
There's a few in the Paillard box.
But everything else, especially the fabulous Scarlatti boxes, have been dead as far as availability goes for over 4 decades now.
Yes! Agree completely on Luciano Sgrizzi! I have seen some CD sets of about 60 Sonatas on Erato on Amazon, mostly used.

Also a great deal of his discography is on YouTube - the 6 Vivaldi-Bach Concertos, an all-Bach recital with the French Overture - a collection of Italian baroque composers and others. He also recorded Clementi Sonatas on a fortepiano.

For me, he was born to play Scarlatti.
number_six
2021-12-27 21:43:30 UTC
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Post by Owen
Malcolm Frager
-Owen
I enjoyed his album of American piano music on New World label.
Dan Koren
2021-12-25 23:01:07 UTC
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Vera Razumovskaya:


Dan Koren
2021-12-26 05:24:09 UTC
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Vladimir Bakk:



Natan Brand:



Tatyana Ryumina:



Rosa Tamarkina:




Joseph Villa:




Enjoy!

dk
Dan Koren
2021-12-26 05:32:49 UTC
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Post by Dan Koren
http://youtu.be/5wA9DUHEtiM
http://youtu.be/50hLgtpbH_M
http://youtu.be/CR11gEV3gHA
http://youtu.be/E_L1JCeHb-k
http://youtu.be/rSHCdfuoTcY
http://youtu.be/4aBSskZrl54
http://youtu.be/gtdBk1Ytr8M
Jacques Klein:



dk
Frank Berger
2021-12-26 16:10:43 UTC
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Post by Dan Koren
Post by Dan Koren
http://youtu.be/5wA9DUHEtiM
http://youtu.be/50hLgtpbH_M
http://youtu.be/CR11gEV3gHA
http://youtu.be/E_L1JCeHb-k
http://youtu.be/rSHCdfuoTcY
http://youtu.be/4aBSskZrl54
http://youtu.be/gtdBk1Ytr8M
http://youtu.be/NRx_YdUQbsk
dk
I have recordings by all these except the last. I once had a nice e-mail exchange with Natan Brand's wife.
Dan Koren
2021-12-28 23:08:31 UTC
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Post by Dan Koren
http://youtu.be/NRx_YdUQbsk
OMG! There's a name from my past! I saw (and heard!)
him play a recital at Garden Grove High School Auditorium
when I was a mere lad of 11. I remember one of the pieces
was Pics at an Exhibition - I don't remember the rest of the
program.
Ayako Uehara, the improbable winner of the 2002 Tchaikovsky
Competition, seems to have vanished from the stage. Each and
every one of her competition performances was phenomenal.



dk
Dan Koren
2021-12-29 03:40:29 UTC
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Post by Dan Koren
Ayako Uehara, the improbable winner of the 2002 Tchaikovsky
Competition, seems to have vanished from the stage. Each and
every one of her competition performances was phenomenal.
http://youtu.be/bthGw96jh7g
She is still very much active, and produced a
Tchaikovsky disc on EMI some years back.
2014 or 2015. A sonata op. 37 on a par with
Richter and Pletnev.
Here is Ayako in 2020.

Thanks!
ps: she has an exact namesake who is a pro golfer.
I am aware. This is an interesting problem that
hurt other pianists too! Google for Rafael Orozco
and for Esteban Sanchez! ;-)

dk
Dan Koren
2021-12-26 12:10:28 UTC
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Bakk! And Syomin! Although have both
been mentioned here from time to time.
Julian von Karolyi:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0ARnKLniI_SkV4pTazpk4Q

You won't be disappointed! As much paprika as Cziffra!

dk
Mr. Mike
2021-12-27 17:58:56 UTC
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Pianist Mindru Katz??
AB
2021-12-27 18:30:11 UTC
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Post by Mr. Mike
Pianist Mindru Katz??
have quite a few live and studio recordings. yes, excellent Died too young. Was going to do all the Beethoven concertos with Szell.......
AB
Paul A
2021-12-28 03:37:46 UTC
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Christmas Eve somehow seems like a good time to remember musicians who have been largely forgotten. In many cases their recordings have gone into oblivion with the advent of CDs.
Is Ruth Slenczynska considered to be a forgotten musician? In about 1957 my dad bought this record...

https://www.discogs.com/release/10700185-Ruth-Slenczynska-Franz-Liszt-Franz-Liszt-Six-Paganini-Etudes-Spanish-Rhapsody-Feux-FolletsPlayed-By-

... and at age 11 I just about played the grooves off that record... although I still have it! I never really read or heard much about her over the year... but was very pleased to find that she is still with us and will be turning 97 on January 15th!

And, she is still performing...


Dan Koren
2021-12-28 04:20:54 UTC
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Post by Paul A
Is Ruth Slenczynska considered
to be a forgotten musician?
Pretty much so.

dk
Dan Koren
2021-12-28 09:41:56 UTC
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George Malcolm - Harpsichordist
Here he is playing one of his own
compositions “Bach Before the Mast”
and Templeton’s “Bach Goes to Town”

Harpsichordists are best forgotten!

dk
JohnGavin
2021-12-28 09:51:13 UTC
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Post by Dan Koren
George Malcolm - Harpsichordist
Here he is playing one of his own
compositions “Bach Before the Mast”
and Templeton’s “Bach Goes to Town”
http://youtu.be/ebfOAKooIRE
Harpsichordists are best forgotten!
dk
Mindless negativity is best left unexpressed!
Dan Koren
2021-12-28 23:05:28 UTC
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Post by JohnGavin
Post by Dan Koren
Harpsichordists are best forgotten!
Mindless negativity is best left unexpressed!
Not mindless at all - and why would somebody
dredge up clangsichord players in a thread about
pianists?
Well. . . I MIGHT make an exception for Puyana,
the greatest clangsichordist of them all!
No exceptions, no excuses !!!
Wear your masks and ear
mufflers! ;-)

dk
Chris from Lafayette
2021-12-29 19:51:33 UTC
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Not mindless at all - and why would somebody dredge up clangsichord players in a thread about pianists?
Well, read the subject line of the thread, and recheck the first
pst of the thread.
Just saying....:)
--
Al Eisner
Oops! That was a deserved comeuppance!

I still agree with Dan about clangsichord players though. ;-)
Paul A
2021-12-29 02:40:23 UTC
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Post by Paul A
Is Ruth Slenczynska considered to be a forgotten musician?
Came out earlier this year: Australian Eloquence reissue (10 CDs)
https://www.eloquenceclassics.com/releases/ruth-slenczynska-the-complete-american-decca-recordings/
(Available from Presto https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/products/8860552--ruth-slenczynska-complete-american-decca-recordings )
Not only there, but also here...


Dan Koren
2021-12-29 11:18:26 UTC
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Véronique Lautard -- aka Vera Lotar Shevchenko:





dk
Dan Koren
2021-12-29 11:21:19 UTC
Reply
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Rudolf Kehrer:



dk
Dan Koren
2021-12-29 11:23:03 UTC
Reply
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Harold Samuel:



dk
Dan Koren
2021-12-29 11:24:59 UTC
Reply
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Eileen Joyce:



dk
Dan Koren
2021-12-29 11:26:08 UTC
Reply
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Yakov Zak:



dk
Dan Koren
2021-12-29 11:31:21 UTC
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Nikolai Petrov:



dk
Dan Koren
2021-12-29 11:35:26 UTC
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Anne Schein:

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1gAgJIplj-ku_uRX_srPM02qZm5UPq0i

dk
Frank Berger
2021-12-29 20:10:17 UTC
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Post by Dan Koren
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1gAgJIplj-ku_uRX_srPM02qZm5UPq0i
dk
Ann Schein - ANOTHER pianist I had the hots for in the 60's! I had her Chopin Scherzos album on the Kapp label. "Miss Ann Schein: A Truly Brilliant Pianist", as the cover on that album proclaimed - and then I'd see these ratty reviews of her concerts in NYC in Musical America. Strange, I don't remember the critic's name at all, but there are plenty of us who still remember and appreciate Ann Schein.
Her recording of the two Prokofiev sonatas for violin and piano with Wanda Wilkomirska is perhaps my single favorite CD. Even though I imprinted on the Perlman/Ashkenazy recording.

https://www.discogs.com/release/6637020-Prokofiev-Wanda-Wilkomirska-Ann-Schein-Two-Sonatas-For-Violin-And-Piano
Frank Berger
2021-12-29 21:17:31 UTC
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Post by Dan Koren
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1gAgJIplj-ku_uRX_srPM02qZm5UPq0i
dk
Ann Schein - ANOTHER pianist I had the hots for in the 60's! I had her Chopin Scherzos album on the Kapp label. "Miss Ann Schein: A Truly Brilliant Pianist", as the cover on that album proclaimed - and then I'd see these ratty reviews of her concerts in NYC in Musical America. Strange, I don't remember the critic's name at all, but there are plenty of us who still remember and appreciate Ann Schein.
Her recording of the two Prokofiev sonatas for violin and piano with Wanda Wilkomirska is perhaps my single favorite CD. Even though I imprinted on the Perlman/Ashkenazy recording.
https://www.discogs.com/release/6637020-Prokofiev-Wanda-Wilkomirska-Ann-Schein-Two-Sonatas-For-Violin-And-Piano
Yes - I have and love that Wilkomirska/Schein recording. (I have the Connoisseur Society CD incarnation from Japan.) There have been quite a few excellent recordings of those works made in the meantime too (Ibragimova/Osborne, Jansen/Golan - No. 1 anyway, Gluzman/Yoffe - love that surround sound BTW!, and others - we're really spoiled for choice these days!)
I don't know the Gluzman/Yoffe. As you say, many great recordings. I enjoy watching Kremer and Argerich on Youtube.
Randy Lane
2021-12-29 21:59:56 UTC
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Post by Dan Koren
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1gAgJIplj-ku_uRX_srPM02qZm5UPq0i
dk
Ann Schein - ANOTHER pianist I had the hots for in the 60's! I had her Chopin Scherzos album on the Kapp label. "Miss Ann Schein: A Truly Brilliant Pianist", as the cover on that album proclaimed - and then I'd see these ratty reviews of her concerts in NYC in Musical America. Strange, I don't remember the critic's name at all, but there are plenty of us who still remember and appreciate Ann Schein.
Her recording of the two Prokofiev sonatas for violin and piano with Wanda Wilkomirska is perhaps my single favorite CD. Even though I imprinted on the Perlman/Ashkenazy recording.
https://www.discogs.com/release/6637020-Prokofiev-Wanda-Wilkomirska-Ann-Schein-Two-Sonatas-For-Violin-And-Piano
Yes - I have and love that Wilkomirska/Schein recording. (I have the Connoisseur Society CD incarnation from Japan.) There have been quite a few excellent recordings of those works made in the meantime too (Ibragimova/Osborne, Jansen/Golan - No. 1 anyway, Gluzman/Yoffe - love that surround sound BTW!, and others - we're really spoiled for choice these days!)
I don't know the Gluzman/Yoffe. As you say, many great recordings. I enjoy watching Kremer and Argerich on Youtube.
Joyce Hatto
Frank Berger
2021-12-29 22:16:13 UTC
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Post by Randy Lane
Post by Dan Koren
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1gAgJIplj-ku_uRX_srPM02qZm5UPq0i
dk
Ann Schein - ANOTHER pianist I had the hots for in the 60's! I had her Chopin Scherzos album on the Kapp label. "Miss Ann Schein: A Truly Brilliant Pianist", as the cover on that album proclaimed - and then I'd see these ratty reviews of her concerts in NYC in Musical America. Strange, I don't remember the critic's name at all, but there are plenty of us who still remember and appreciate Ann Schein.
Her recording of the two Prokofiev sonatas for violin and piano with Wanda Wilkomirska is perhaps my single favorite CD. Even though I imprinted on the Perlman/Ashkenazy recording.
https://www.discogs.com/release/6637020-Prokofiev-Wanda-Wilkomirska-Ann-Schein-Two-Sonatas-For-Violin-And-Piano
Yes - I have and love that Wilkomirska/Schein recording. (I have the Connoisseur Society CD incarnation from Japan.) There have been quite a few excellent recordings of those works made in the meantime too (Ibragimova/Osborne, Jansen/Golan - No. 1 anyway, Gluzman/Yoffe - love that surround sound BTW!, and others - we're really spoiled for choice these days!)
I don't know the Gluzman/Yoffe. As you say, many great recordings. I enjoy watching Kremer and Argerich on Youtube.
Joyce Hatto
?

Dan Koren
2021-12-29 11:39:37 UTC
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Grete Scherzer:



Dan Koren
2021-12-29 11:42:19 UTC
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Olga Samaroff:



dk
Dan Koren
2021-12-29 11:44:05 UTC
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Yakov Flier:



dk
Dan Koren
2021-12-29 11:45:50 UTC
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Stanislav Neuhaus:



dk
Dan Koren
2021-12-29 11:49:12 UTC
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Rudolf Firkušný:



dk
Dan Koren
2021-12-29 11:51:10 UTC
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Stefan Askenase:



dk
Dan Koren
2021-12-29 11:53:07 UTC
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Wladyslaw Szpilman:



dk
Dan Koren
2021-12-29 11:56:10 UTC
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Conrad Hansen:



dk
Frank Berger
2021-12-29 14:49:45 UTC
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Post by Dan Koren
http://youtu.be/0XNFR0uaMDc
dk
It appears that you, and the creators of these Youtube videos, have not forgotten these historic artists.
JohnGavin
2021-12-29 16:06:33 UTC
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Post by Frank Berger
Post by Dan Koren
http://youtu.be/0XNFR0uaMDc
dk
It appears that you, and the creators of these Youtube videos, have not forgotten these historic artists.
James Tocco
Seemed to concentrate on American composers.



His recording of the 4 MacDowell Sonatas would be the best, were it not for the awful sound engineering.
Dan Koren
2021-12-29 22:13:03 UTC
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Post by Frank Berger
Post by Dan Koren
http://youtu.be/0XNFR0uaMDc
It appears that you, and the creators of
these Youtube videos, have not forgotten
these historic artists.
I actually heard Hansen live. And
I have pornographic memory.

dk
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